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SquashBusters Inc.

 795 Columbus Avenue
 Roxbury Crossing, MA 02120
[P] (617) 373-7782
[F] (617) 373-7370
http://www.squashbusters.org
[email protected]
Greg Zaff
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INCORPORATED: 1996
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3330698

LAST UPDATED: 06/21/2017
Organization DBA SquashBusters
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

SquashBusters’ mission is to challenge and nurture urban youth – as students, athletes and citizens – so that they recognize and fulfill their fullest potential in life.

Mission Statement

SquashBusters’ mission is to challenge and nurture urban youth – as students, athletes and citizens – so that they recognize and fulfill their fullest potential in life.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,200,000.00
Projected Expense $1,950,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • College and Alumni Success Program
  • Middle School & High School Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

SquashBusters’ mission is to challenge and nurture urban youth – as students, athletes and citizens – so that they recognize and fulfill their fullest potential in life.


Background Statement

SquashBusters was founded in 1996 by Greg Zaff, a former squash professional, with the aim of supporting disadvantaged kids in the Boston Public Schools through the most crucial years of their development and helping them grow to lead healthy lives. SquashBusters launched with 24 students from two public middle schools in Boston and Cambridge, a leased van, and free facility access at the Boston YMCA, Harvard Club and Harvard University. In 2003, SquashBusters took a giant step forward by constructing its own youth center on the campus of Northeastern University. In return for fundraising the building costs of the facility, SquashBusters received a 50-year free lease which allowed the program to triple in size and serve young people continuously from the start of middle school until high school graduation. This long-term continuity consequently positioned SquashBusters to have enormous impact on students' long-term health, educational opportunity and college success. In 2012, SquashBusters expanded its program to Lawrence, where we are currently serving more than 70 middle and high school students. This program operates on borrowed courts and classrooms at Brooks School and Phillips Academy, but our long-term plan is to build a permanent home for the program in the city of Lawrence.


Twenty years since inception, SquashBusters is proud to have served more than 500 youth. We are currently supporting nearly 60 graduates who are enrolled in colleges such as Barnard, UMass, Northeastern, Mount Holyoke, BU, and Smith. Additionally, 17 of 18 of our graduating seniors now have affordable college plans for the fall, and five alumni of the program are employed with us as full-time teachers, coaches, college counselors and administrators. Big picture, SquashBusters is growing in Lawrence and expanding to Providence with board-approved plans to build a facility in partnership with the Moses Brown School. This project will allow our program to expand its impact on urban youth and add a third New England city to its growing reach.


Impact Statement

2015-2016

  • In the 2015-2016 year, SquashBusters served a record 274 students.
  • 100% of the SQB class of 2016 was accepted to college.
  • Average program attendance was 92%, which means that the average student attended more than 100 practices and events.
  • SquashBusters students spent a total of 2,122 hours giving back to the community in 2015-2016, at places like the Greater Boston Food Bank, the Boston AIDS Walk, Mt. Pleasant Home,  and Pine Street Inn.
  • 100% of students participated in physical activity at least three times a week. 86% increased or sustained their fitness level as measured by individual fitness profiles.

We hope to maintain or exceed these measures in the 2016-2017 program year.

 

Historical Impact

 

Since we began tracking our program graduates, 99% have enrolled in college, 86% of the time to a four-year school; 78% completed their higher education within six years.

 

SquashBusters has served as the model for what has now become an international movement that promises to improve the health, character and educational success of thousands of urban youth. Today, there are urban squash and education programs in twenty cities including New York, Chicago, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Detroit, Denver, San Diego, Pittsburgh and Toronto. Together, these programs serve more than 2000 students worldwide.

 


Needs Statement



CEO Statement

Our uniqueness stems from two characteristics of our program. First, we are strong believers in depth. Our kids can stay in the SquashBusters program for up to seven years, and the relationships formed during these years are transforming. Second, the variety of activities, from squash to academics to community service, ensures that students are challenged to go beyond their comfort zones, and encourages them to strive for success in many areas of their lives. They are constantly learning and building character. No other program in Boston or Lawrence works with kids so intensely over such a long period of time.


Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Boston, MA
Lawrence, MA

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Education - Student Services
  3. Recreation & Sports - Racquet Sports

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

College and Alumni Success Program

College and Alumni Success: Once our students graduate the program and enroll in college, SQB staff provides support for each individual in the form of regular communication to ensure they are on track to graduate, and provides individual advising on issues like financial aid and college persistence. SquashBusters also offers two scholarship opportunities, the Engaged Scholar Award and the Last Dollar Fund. Professional alumni remain closely connected to SquashBusters as well, by serving as members of the SquashBusters Alumni Association, playing in the alumni league, and/or attending professional development and fundraising events throughout the year.
Budget  $92,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Guidance & Counseling
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  • 100% of alumni in college will have social, emotional, and academic progress and challenges tracked in a red/yellow/green matrix in Salesforce.
• 80% of SquashBusters alumni will graduate from college within six years.
Program Long-Term Success  SquashBusters students will be more likely to graduate from college, and to do so on time, than their peers.
Program Success Monitored By 
SquashBusters connects with each college-enrolled alum regularly to check in on their academic, financial and social well-being. Each of these measures is tracked in a Red/Yellow/Green matrix in Salesforce.
 
If a student is identified as at-risk of non-completion, SquashBusters staff meets with the student to develop a plan to address whatever obstacles are standing in the way of their on-time graduation.
Examples of Program Success  80% of SquashBusters who enrolled in college graduated within six years years (from the high school graduation classes of 2003-2015)

Middle School & High School Program

SquashBusters serves students from the start of middle school until they graduate from high school through a long-term, intensive program that helps them to develop in each of the areas of college, character and health. Once they graduate, SquashBusters provides support for each alum’s college perseverance and serves as a network of positive relationships that they can rely on for years beyond the program’s formal end.

Middle School and High School: Our middle school SquashBusters students attend practice 3 times per week, each day consisting of 90 minutes of homework help and 90 minutes of squash and fitness, and receive guidance with the high school choice process to ensure they receive a quality secondary education.

Like our middle school students, our high school students are with us for squash and homework 3-5 days per week, but are also provided with enrichment workshops that focus on topics like academic skill-building and career exploration. Juniors receive SAT prep, and seniors are paired with mentors who, along with SQB staff, provide intensive support through the college and financial aid application process.

To help them build a deep sense of character, all students complete required community service projects during the school year, and each summer, SquashBusters connects its youth with academic, athletic and employment opportunities both internally and outside of SQB.

Budget  $1,483,962.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Families
Program Short-Term Success 
COLLEGE
• 100% of SquashBusters students will gain exposure to and spend time on a college campus.
• 24 of 24 juniors will follow the SquashBusters SAT prep curriculum and improve test scores.
• 100% of SQB seniors will have a college mentor and submit 12 or more college applications.
• 100% of seniors will be accepted to and matriculate to college.
 
HEALTH
• 75% of students will show improvement in fitness levels as measured by fitness profiles.
• 75% of students will show squash skill level increases as measured by students’ US Squash ratings and SQB’s skill progression scale.
• 80% of students will compete in 4 or more competitive squash events per year, including school matches or US sanctioned tournaments.
• All students will participate in at least one team trip, to help them grow emotionally and build strong connections with their teammates and coaches.
• 100% of students will participate in Boys & Girls group discussions where they learn how to make healthy decisions.
 
CHARACTER
• 20-25 Student Ambassadors will play leadership roles in the SquashBusters Derby, donor visits, family and culture nights, and special events.
• 50 students will be placed in summer opportunities that expose them to new people, places, and experiences during summer 2017.
• SQB programs will achieve a 90% attendance rate over the course of the program year.
• 90% of high school and middle school students will serve the community through at least two service projects during the program year.
Program Long-Term Success 
SquashBusters aims to continue to see the same high success rates the program has historically produced.
 
Since 1996, 99% of SquashBusters’ alumni who graduated from our program have gone to colleges, including Barnard College, Bates College, Boston University, Brown University, Harvard University, Northeastern University, Simmons College, University of Massachusetts, University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, Trinity College, Wesleyan University, Smith College, Hamilton College, Boston College, Oberlin College, Tufts University and Bryn Mawr.
o 86% matriculated to a 4-year college
o 14% matriculated to a 2-year college
 
80% of SquashBusters who enrolled in college graduated within six years years from (the high school graduation classes of 2001-2015)
Program Success Monitored By 
SQB long-term education metrics include high school graduation rate, college matriculation and graduation rates. We also measure attendance, fitness and squash improvements, and completion of community service projects as factors of short-term success.
Examples of Program Success 
2015-2016
 
Academics
  • 100% of our high school and middle school students were promoted to the next grade.
  • 23 out of 25 rising Boston ninth graders matriculated to the highest performing high schools in the city after receiving the high school placement curriculum in 2015-2016.
Community Service and Leadership
  • SquashBusters students spent a total of 2,122 hours giving back to the community in 2015-2016; 89% of our Boston students and 94% of our Lawrence students satisfied the two service project per year requirement.
  Squash and Fitness
  • 86% of students either increased or sustained fitness levels as measured by assessments throughout the year.
  • 77% of students improved on the SQB squash skill progression scale (includes the levels novice, intermediate, development and advanced, respectively).
  • 97% of our students attended one or more squash events (private school matches or US sanctioned tournaments) – 89% competed in three or more.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Greg H. Zaff
CEO Term Start June 2011
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience As a highly ranked amateur squash player at Williams College and a professional on the World Pro Squash Association’s tour, Greg Zaff learned much about persistence, discipline, and sportsmanship. But it wasn't until he retired from professional athletics and entered the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University that his dream of an after-school squash program for urban youth took shape.
 
Zaff knew that in order to be successful, his program would have to be intense, demanding, fun, and frequent. Using his Cambridge bedroom as an office, he launched SquashBusters in the spring of 1995. In the beginning, he relied on the facilities of the Cambridge Racquet and Fitness Club, the Harvard Club, and Harvard University. Each after-school session ran for three hours: two hours of academics and one hour of squash, three days a week. The kids participated in monthly community service projects. They traveled to squash tournaments and were offered other outings such as sailing trips and visits to Broadway shows. In 2003, SquashBusters moved into a new facility, on the campus of Northeastern University in Boston. In 2012, SquashBusters Lawrence was launched, serving Lawrence Public School students who practice at Phillips Andover and Brooks School.
 
Zaff believes in high standards; he also believes in second chances. Kids who struggle to stick with the program are given a lot of assistance; those who drop out are given multiple opportunities to earn their way back in. SquashBusters introduces urban youth to a variety of life-broadening experiences through a structured, fun, and physically challenging program.  The urban squash model that Zaff pioneered through SquashBusters has since been replicated in Harlem, the Bronx, Philadelphia, Chicago, New Haven, Baltimore, Denver, San Diego, Detroit, Santa Barbara, Minneapolis, Oakland and other cities throughout the world. In 2007 Zaff helped to found the National Urban Squash and Education Association (NUSEA), an organization created to oversee the development and growth of urban squash around the country. The success of SquashBusters and the NUSEA has demonstrated that perseverance, discipline, and sportsmanship can be more than just a recipe for squash success. They can be a vehicle for remarkable change in kids' lives.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Teresa Soares-Pena Aug 2007 Aug 2011
Greg Zaff Aug 1996 Aug 2007

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Dora Lubin Executive Director, Lawrence Dora spent three years working at CitySquash, the Bronx-based urban squash program, where she ran academic programming and managed the college support program. Before discovering urban squash, Dora held positions at Learning through an Expanded Arts Program (LEAP), an arts-education nonprofit that provides programming to NYC public schools, and Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Dora earned a Bachelors Degree in communications and fine art from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Master's degree in education from Harvard University. Dora joined SquashBusters in 2012. As the Executive Director for the Lawrence site, Dora oversees all aspects of the site's operations and programs.
Chris Lynch Chief Operation Officer
Chris returned to SquashBusters in 2011, after having spent 10 years away from the program working with other sports-based youth development programs. Chris graduated from Bates College in 1985 and went on to earn a Masters degree in Education from Lesley University in 1992. Most recently, he directed the Boston Youth Sports Initiative (BYSI), a network-building effort that increased the quality, scale, and sustainability of all urban youth sports programs in Boston. Chris previously worked in direct youth service both at MetroLacrosse (2001-2003) and SquashBusters (1996-2001).
 
Chris oversees all programming and related operations for SquashBusters, overseeing program growth and development in Boston and Lawrence.  Chris manages the Boston and Lawrence Program Directors.
Myra Sack Program Director, Boston Myra earned her Bachelor's Degree in Government with a concentration in Latin American Politics from Dartmouth College. Myra was the Captain of the Women's Soccer Team her senior year, and co-founded Athletes United, a student-led initiative to unite children of the Upper Valley with Dartmouth student-athletes through a cost free sports league. Myra earned a post-graduate fellowship from Dartmouth's Dickey Center for International Understanding to work with Soccer Without Borders in a capacity-building role after her stint as a program volunteer with Soccer Without Border in Granada, Nicaragua. Myra focused her efforts on program structure and curriculum development. Myra also worked in the private sector for a technology company in San Francisco, California. Myra joined SquashBusters in March 2013.
Christine Stellar Director of Institutional Advancement Christine earned her bachelor's degree in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University, where she discovered her passion for education and educational policy. After Cornell, Christine earned her master's degree in Education from the University of Pennsylvania and spent three years teaching high school before attending New York University, where she earned a Master in Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy. Combining her passion and her educational background, she spent five years working in development and external relations for City on a Hill and KIPP charter schools in the Boston area before joining SquashBusters in January 2015.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association National Urban Squash and Education Association

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Our partners include Northeastern University, Phillips Academy, Brooks School, Boston and Lawrence Public Schools, National Urban Squash & Education Association (NUSEA), Massachusetts Squash Association (MA Squash), uAspire, Summer Search, and more.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 20
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 81%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 15
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 14
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 6
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. John M. Blasberg
Board Chair Company Affiliation Bain & Company, Partner
Board Chair Term Sept 2013 - Sept
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
David Antonelli MFS Investment Management Voting
George Bell General Catalyst Partners Voting
John M. Blasberg Bain & Company Voting
Meg Campbell Codman Academy Voting
Juma Crawford Lewis Family Foundation Voting
David Drubner The Baupost Group Voting
Matthew Haldeman McGraw-Hill Education Voting
Jonathan Hyett Morgan Stanley Voting
Jon Karlen Astral Capital Voting
Teresa Koster Gallagher Koster Voting
Diana Lam Lowell Community Charter School Voting
Nancy Loucks Yale University Voting
Henry Manice Mighty Squirrell Voting
Philomena Mantella Northeastern University Voting
Will Muggia Westfield Capital Voting
Don Mykrantz The Jeffrey Company Voting
Bill Paine WilmerHale Voting
Jose Rivera Wayfair Voting
Greg H. Zaff Founder and CEO SquashBusters, Inc. Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 16
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 13
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 88%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 94%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $3,746,301 $1,627,340 $3,446,387
Total Expenses $2,098,846 $1,921,489 $1,635,568

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $315,756
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,931,179 $884,603 $811,945
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $9,588 $6,238 $7,859
Investment Income, Net of Losses $436,060 $-546,437 $1,006,305
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $1,369,474 $1,282,936 $1,304,522
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,528,878 $1,244,707 $1,151,649
Administration Expense $311,116 $278,682 $259,132
Fundraising Expense $258,852 $398,100 $224,787
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.78 0.85 2.11
Program Expense/Total Expenses 73% 65% 70%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 8% 18% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $16,629,487 $14,914,968 $15,123,045
Current Assets $1,082,956 $690,110 $608,498
Long-Term Liabilities $118,096 $59,048 $0
Current Liabilities $47,040 $39,024 $12,000
Total Net Assets $16,464,351 $14,816,896 $15,111,045

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose Facility building for expanded site in Providence, RI
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 23.02 17.68 50.71

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 1% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. For fiscal year 2013 the breakout of contributions from foundations and corporations is per the 990's Schedule B and is per data in the Annual Report (on the Document's tab) for fiscal year 2014.

Documents


Other Documents

Testimonial (2013)

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

SquashBusters aims to ensure that all of its graduates:
  1. Enroll in and successfully complete college
  2. Understand and embrace life-long habits of health and wellness
  3. Develop a deep sense of character and personal integrity
 

Population Served 

 

Our Boston students primarily live in the neighborhood of Dorchester, with others living in the communities of Roxbury, Hyde Park, Mattapan, Roslindale, Jamaica Plain, Brighton, East Boston, and South Boston. Our students in Lawrence come from North Lawrence and South Lawrence. Additionally, our student population is 46% male and 54% female, with about 80% of students qualifying for free or reduced price lunch. The racial make-up of our students differs substantially between programs: in Boston, 47% are African American, 34% are Hispanic, 10% are Asian/Pacific Islander, 4% are white and 5% identify as multiracial or "other." In Lawrence, 87% of our students are Hispanic, 3% are Asian/Pacific Islander, 4% are white and 5% identify as multiracial or "other."

 
Upcoming Plans 
 
SquashBusters looks toward the future confident in our ability to grow to reach more students each year. With this in mind, one of our major goals for the last three years has been to enroll more students into the program. We achieved growth in enrollment, in both Lawrence and Boston, by a margin of 13% in 2014-2015. During 2015-2016, we reached 274 students – 75 in Lawrence, 139 in Boston and 60 in college - which is an additional 9.5% increase.
 
Long-term, SquashBusters has identified a strategic plan that includes serving over 500 urban young people across three cities each year.
 A major priority to allow us to do this is finding a permanent home for SquashBusters Lawrence. SQB leadership is currently exploring options for a facility, which will allow the Lawrence program to continue to expand to full enrollment and build deeper ties to the local community.
 

In addition to setting roots down in Lawrence, SquashBusters leadership is partnering with Moses Brown School in Providence to fundraise the building of a 12-court facility which will be shared by students from the school and a new urban squash program serving students from the city of Providence.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

The structure of the SquashBusters program is designed to be long-term, intensive and supportive in each of the areas of college, character and health. SquashBusters serves students from the start of middle school until they graduate from high school, and provides support for every student's college perseverance. Students are with us at least three days per week for 33 weeks of the school year, with each day consisting of squash practice and academic support and enrichment. Throughout the year, students complete community service projects, compete in squash matches and tournaments, visit college campuses, and are connected with internal and external summer programs; all of which allows them to travel, expand their personal networks and access all kinds of experiences they might otherwise be unable to.
 
By expanding this successful model to Lawrence, we have been able to reach that city's youth and begin to prepare them for college and help them develop healthy lifestyles and a sense of personal character. When we expand to Providence, the program's growth will model our expansion in Lawrence.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Organizational Structure 

The SquashBusters program is anchored by a strong and experienced staff who implement the curriculum and form trusting and impactful relationships with students. We are especially proud to have seven alumni on our staff. Founder Greg Zaff serves as CEO. Each site has academic and squash staff who plan and carry out the academic, health and character-building aspects of the program.

SquashBusters fulfills its mission with guidance and oversight from a dedicated Board of Directors composed of 20 members and led by Chair, John Blasberg. Additionally, the SquashBusters program simply wouldn’t be possible without the 100+ volunteers who generously give time and support to our students both on the court and in the classroom.

 

Sustainability 

For twenty years, SquashBusters has been committed to maintaining strong, sustainable programs. In 2015, we welcomed two new staff members to our development team. SquashBusters has also significantly improved its program data collection and analysis by moving all student, alumni, volunteer, and donor data to Salesforce. The presence of all SquashBusters constituent data in one place allows us to better track donations, trends in funding, and relationships with supporters.

 

Key Partners

 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

In 2003, Northeastern University agreed to donate land for SquashBusters' permanent facility and grant us a 50-year free lease. In return, SquashBusters raised the funds necessary to support construction of the building. The placement of the facility on an urban campus grants SQB students exposure to college life on a daily basis.

BOSTON AND LAWRENCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Boston Public Schools – In 2015-2016, we expanded our formal BPS school partnerships to include our long-term partners Timilty Middle School and the John D. O'Bryant School of Math and Science, as well as new partners at the Joseph Lee Elementary School, the Rafael Hernandez School, and Codman Academy.

Lawrence Public Schools – Our Lawrence program is supported through our partnerships with Arlington School and Emily G. Wetherbee School, from which we recruit our middle school students. Our high school students in Lawrence primarily attend Lawrence High School.

COLLEGES AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS

• Phillips Academy and Brooks School, both just outside of Lawrence, have been generous partners, allowing SquashBusters to utilize their courts, libraries and classrooms to implement our program for Lawrence youth.

OTHER YOUTH SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS

Summer Search – We work closely with Summer Search to offer our students life-changing summer trips that broaden their worldviews and open their eyes to new experiences.

uAspire – We partner with uAspire to provide financial aid workshops and support for our high school juniors and seniors.

Tutors for All – In 2015-2016, SquashBusters began a new partnership with Tutors for All to bring individualized tutoring to SquashBusters eighth-graders, in an effort to build their academic skills and close the achievement gap.

Grand Circle Next Generation Leaders – Through a partnership with the Grand Circle Foundation, several of our students have had the opportunity to complete internships and experience international travel to places like Kenya and Tanzania through the Next Generations Leaders program.

OTHER PARTNERS

NUSEA – We are an active member of the National Urban Squash and Education Association (NUSEA), which develops and improves the 22 urban squash programs across the world.

Massachusetts Squash Association (MA Squash) – MA Squash governs the junior level squash competitions in the state, and waives registration fees for SquashBusters students. MA Squash also sponsors our students to participate in high-quality summer squash camps.

Summer experiences – We partner with a number of summer camp organizations, academic programs and internship sites, all of which provide unique experiences for our students during the summer months.

 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

SquashBusters identified the the following metrics for its 2016-2017 program year:

 

COLLEGE

100% of SquashBusters students will gain exposure to and spend time on a college campus.

24 of 24 juniors will follow the SquashBusters SAT prep curriculum and improve test scores.

All 17 SQB seniors will have a college mentor and submit 12 or more college applications.

17 of 17 seniors will be accepted to and matriculate to college.

100% of alumni in college will have social, emotional, and academic progress and challenges tracked in a red/yellow/green matrix in Salesforce.

85% of SQB program graduates will graduate from college within six years.

 

HEALTH

75% of students will show improvement in fitness levels as measured by fitness profiles.

75% of students will show squash skill level increases as measured by students’ US Squash ratings and SQB’s skill progression scale.

80% of students will compete in 4 or more competitive squash events per year, including school matches or US sanctioned tournaments.

All students will participate in at least one team trip, to help them grow emotionally and build strong connections with their teammates and coaches.

100% of students will participate in Boys & Girls group discussions where they learn how to make healthy decisions.

 

CHARACTER

20-25 Student Ambassadors will play leadership roles in the SquashBusters Derby, donor visits, family and culture nights, and special events.

50 students will be placed in summer opportunities that expose them to new people, places, and experiences during summer 2017.

• SQB programs will achieve a 90% attendance rate over the course of the program year.

90% of high school and middle school students will serve the community through at least two service projects during the program year.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Since the program’s inception, SquashBusters has served over 700 students, and our programs have a history of successful results: 99% of SquashBusters graduates enroll in college, and 80% graduate within six years. In 2016, 100% of our eighteen high school seniors were accepted to college. Today, more than 70 SquashBusters students are enrolled in college, and we expect to send 15-20 students each year as our program continues to grow. SquashBusters students have graduated from and are attending colleges such as Barnard College, Bates College, Boston University, Boston College, Connecticut College, Hamilton College, Harvard University, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and Trinity College.
 

Beyond college, we currently have alumni succeeding in careers at places such as State Street Corporation, Wayfair, BNY Mellon, Belmont Hill School, and the Cambridge Police Department. Additionally, five of the full-time SquashBusters staff are alumni of the program, as is one of our Board members, Jose Rivera.