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Silver Lining Mentoring Inc. (formerly Adoption and Foster Care Mentoring, Inc.)

 727 Atlantic Avenue, 3rd Floor
 Boston, MA 02111
[P] (617) 224-1300
[F] (617) 451-1025
www.silverliningmentoring.org
[email protected]
Colby Swettberg
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INCORPORATED: 2002
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3575764

LAST UPDATED: 03/23/2018
Organization DBA Silver Lining Mentoring
Former Names Adoption & Foster Care Mentoring (2015)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Silver Lining Mentoring empowers youth in foster care to thrive through committed mentoring relationships and the development of essential life skills.

Mission Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring empowers youth in foster care to thrive through committed mentoring relationships and the development of essential life skills.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $1,851,878.00
Projected Expense $1,851,787.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Based Mentoring
  • Learn & Earn
  • Young Adult Services
  • Youth Outreach

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring empowers youth in foster care to thrive through committed mentoring relationships and the development of essential life skills.

Background Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring (SLM) was founded in 2002 by Justin Pasquariello. Justin was adopted out of the foster care system himself, and understands firsthand the need for youth in foster care to have a consistent adult mentor during frequent transitions to new homes, schools, and communities. Justin is actively involved in Silver Lining Mentoring as both a member of the Board of Directors and as a mentor.

SLM was built on its Community Based Mentoring program, creating one-to-one matches between volunteer adult mentors and youth impacted by foster care. In 2012, SLM launched Learn & Earn, an intensive life skills curriculum for young adults ages 16 and older with mentoring and asset-building components. In 2017, SLM formalized its Young Adult Services program, providing specific supports and resource brokering to young adults who are facing aging out of foster care at 18. Youth are not passive recipients of SLM’s services; they utilize SLM staff and programs to navigate a healthy transition to adulthood in which they have the tools and resources they need to thrive.

In 2014, SLM was chosen as a three-year investee by Social Venture Partners (SVP). SVP consultants worked closely with the organization’s leadership team to crystallize the organization’s service model, evaluation plan, and business plan. Thanks to the in-depth capacity building services provided by SVP, SLM is positioned to serve more youth in foster care and increase the impact of its programs through 2020. In 2017, SLM’s CEO, Colby Swettberg, was chosen as a Barr Foundation Fellow, a prestigious honor recognizing her, and SLM’s, impact in the community. Through this Fellowship, Colby will participate in a two-year program with the ultimate goal of supporting more youth in foster care through vital mentoring services.


Impact Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring (SLM) is the only mentoring organization in Massachusetts that focuses exclusively on the unique needs of youth impacted by foster care.

 

In 2017 Silver Lining Mentoring:

 

-Provided 118 youth in foster care with high-quality, long-term mentors who are often the only adults not paid to spend time with them through its Community Based Mentoring program. The average length of a mentoring relationship supported by Silver Lining Mentoring is 4.6 years, over six times the national average.

 
-Provided 58 young adults impacted by the foster care system with the opportunity to learn critical financial literacy, job, and life skills with the support of a mentor through its Learn & Earn program. 
 

-Conducted essential life skills workshops for 185 youth in foster care in Greater Boston who were preparing to "age out" of the foster care system at 18 through its outreach efforts.

 
In 2018 Silver Lining Mentoring’s goals are:
 

 -To serve 415 youth impacted by foster care in Greater Boston, a 15% increase over 2017.

 

-To analyze its marketing strategy to better articulate its innovative approach and the need for mentors for youth in foster care.

 

-To continue its role as a thought leader in the fields of mentoring and child welfare.


Needs Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring (SLM) is looking for the following forms of support:

 

-Volunteers: SLM has a particular need for volunteer mentors to support young people in its Community Based Mentoring and Learn & Earn programs. SLM always needs mentors of all backgrounds and identities. SLM is youth-focused - youth make requests about what is important to them in a mentor. The three areas where SLM has more requests than it has mentors are mentors of color, male mentors, and mentors with foster care experience. 

 

-Corporate & Foundation Funding: SLM must continue to diversify its funding portfolio to include more corporate and foundation funders to support its organizational growth goals.

 
-Individual Investors: Individuals who are looking for an innovative organization that is growing and in need of your support to reach our goals.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Silver Lining Mentoring serves youth in the Greater Boston area (as defined by Rt. 128). The organization continues to support youth if they are moved to a placement outside of its service area due to the transient nature of the foster care system.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Adult, Child Matching Programs
  2. Human Services - Foster Care
  3. Human Services -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Community Based Mentoring

SLM's Community Based Mentoring program serves youth 7 and older in foster care. It matches youth in 1-to-1 mentoring relationships with adult volunteers for at least a year, often the only adults not paid to spend time with them. The program addresses the fact that frequent transitions in homes and communities leave these youth without consistent positive relationships. 
 
Mentors undergo a lengthy screening process, and receive 9 hours of training, facilitated by SLM's social workers. Mentor/mentee “matches” meet for at least 8 hours a month. 
 
SLM staff provides personal support to each match. SLM's Masters level clinicians understand youth behaviors and needs with their histories of abuse, trauma, and neglect, and implement evidence-based intervention methods for youth in care. SLM's average match length is 55 months, over six times the national average.
Budget  $680,738.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
The short-term success of the program is determined by annual evaluations completed by all mentors and mentees. The following are SLM's benchmarks for success:
 
• At least 75% of youth will report having a mentor they can depend on.
• At least 80% of youth will show improvements in self-esteem.
• At least 70% of youth will improve their ability to set and achieve goals.
• At least 85% of youth will acquire a stronger sense of belonging within a healthy community.
Program Long-Term Success  SLM fills a critical niche in the youth development field by giving young people the support and individual attention that they need throughout the turbulent transitions of life in the foster care system. Frequent transitions put youth in foster care at an increased risk of negative outcomes including poverty, homelessness, incarceration, and other high-risk behaviors. Rhodes et al. (1999) found that after 12 months of participation in a mentoring program, youth in foster care exhibited improved social skills, improved ability to trust adults, improvements in pro-social support, and self-esteem enhancement. A long-term mentor often serves as a lifeline for at-risk youth in foster care.
Program Success Monitored By 
Silver Lining Mentoring uses a Salesforce platform to measure the impact of its services, track and respond to client needs, and prioritize the delivery of services that prove to be most effective. SLM also gathers data and measures the effectiveness of its programs through monthly online mentor surveys, youth feedback, and annual evaluations completed by all mentees and mentors. Salesforce and all other evaluation efforts are managed by SLM's Data Strategy Manager. He compiles quantitative and qualitative data on individual youth development in order to measure and quantify program impact.
Examples of Program Success 

In its sixteenth year, Silver Lining Mentoring sees the long-term effects of its services. 76% of young people engaged with SLM over age 18 are employed, compared to 43% of foster care alumni nation-wide. In addition, 74% of Silver Lining Mentoring participants have graduated high school and 23% have enrolled in college, compared to 54% and 3% respectively of all young adults who have left foster care. These statistics prove that Silver Lining Mentoring has a positive impact on the youth it serves.


Learn & Earn

Learn & Earn (L&E) is an intensive 12-week life skills curriculum with a matched savings component for youth impacted by foster care ages 16+. Youth learn life skills including financial literacy, employment, transportation, and housing. 

 

Youth are paired with a volunteer adult mentor. Mentors are screened and supported by SLM's social workers who are trained to understand the unique needs of youth in care.  Mentors help youth master the skills covered in L&E and provide social and emotional support. Mentor/mentee "matches" can choose to continue the mentoring relationship after the 12-week program ends.

 
Youth earn a stipend for mastering the skills in the L&E curriculum. SLM matches every dollar youth save of their stipend at the end of L&E. Through their earnings youth have paid rent and college tuition, and purchased laptops and professional clothing, meeting critical needs for adulthood.
Budget  $424,424.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
SLM measures the short-term success of Learn & Earn through the following metrics:
-At least 70% of youth will report they are good at setting/achieving goals
-At least 70% of youth will earn and save toward an identified independent living goal
-At least 80% of youth will report improved personal/professional communication skills
-At least 80% of youth will report improved self-esteem
-At least 85% of youth will report that they learned a new skill that will help them in the future
-At least 85% of youth will report a strong sense of belonging within a healthy community
Program Long-Term Success 
 The workshops and support network of Learn & Earn empower young people to avoid negative outcomes associated with time in foster care. A 2008 report from The Boston Foundation highlights the risk factors for youth “aging out” of foster care. Of the young adults that were interviewed:
• 25% had been arrested
• 37% experienced homelessness
• 43% had been pregnant or gotten someone pregnant
• 54% were unemployed
• 59% exhibited signs of depression
 
The support and workshops provided by Learn & Earn help youth combat these risk factors. The long-term goal of Learn & Earn is to prepare participants for a successful adulthood by connecting them to a supportive community and helping them build critical life, employment, and financial literacy skills. 
 
Program Success Monitored By 

 Silver Lining Mentoring uses a Salesforce platform to measure the impact of its services, track and respond to client needs, and prioritize the delivery of services that prove to be most effective. SLM also gathers data and measures the effectiveness of Learn & Earn through pre- and post-evaluations, as well as weekly surveys. Salesforce and all other evaluation efforts are managed by SLM's Data Strategy Manager. He compiles quantitative and qualitative data on individual youth development in order to measure and quantify program impact.

Examples of Program Success 

In its sixteenth year, Silver Lining Mentoring sees the long-term effects of its services. 76% of young people engaged with SLM over age 18 are employed, compared to 43% of foster care alumni nation-wide. In addition, 74% of Silver Lining Mentoring participants have graduated high school and 23% have enrolled in college, compared to 54% and 3% respectively of all young adults who have left foster care. These statistics prove that Silver Lining Mentoring has a positive impact on the youth it serves.


Young Adult Services

SLM is seeing an upward shift in the age of its participants, meaning their needs are shifting as well. The Young Adult Services (YAS) program addresses these needs with the support of a dedicated, clinically trained program staff member and key services:

  • Resource Brokering: Referrals to meet needs that cannot be met solely by SLM, including legal assistance, professional development, mental health assistance, and housing.
  • Youth Grants: Financial grants for rent assistance, rental deposits, utilities, MBTA passes, and other items to maintain employment and keep young people housed.
  • Leadership Development: Workshops to develop their story for the purposes of advocacy, and paid public speaking opportunities.
  • Youth Advisory Board: YAS participants will meet with SLM’s leadership team to ensure SLM meets participant needs in a culturally responsive manner.
  • Graduated Match Support: Support for the mentors of young people whose needs and face to face meeting frequency have changed.
Budget  $262,289.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Silver Lining Mentoring will offer the Young Adult Services program to all eligible young people. SLM's goal will be to engage at least 75% of these young people in Young Adult Services, including:

· Professional development opportunities

· Opportunities for educational attainment

· Critical resource brokering (such as food and transportation assistance)

· Housing support services

In addition, the Youth Advisory Board, comprised of 5 – 10 Young Adult Services Participants, will:

· Meet 2-4 times annually with SLM's management team to discuss program developments and concerns.

· Participate in an annual retreat to develop their leadership and public speaking skills.

· Engage in 4 community events to share their stories and advocate for youth in care.

· Have the opportunity to attend at least one SLM Board Meeting.

SLM will dedicate more than 1,500 staff hours to the Young Adult Services program in 2018.

Program Long-Term Success 

Silver Lining Mentoring will monitor the success of the Young Adult Services program through the following benchmarks:

  • At least 70% of participants will report improvement in setting and achieving goals.
  • At least 80% of participants will report improved communication skills.
  • At least 80% of participants will show improvements in self-esteem.
  • At least 85% of participants will report that they learned new life skills.
  • At least 85% of participants will report a strong sense of belonging within a healthy community.
Program Success Monitored By 

Silver Lining Mentoring uses a Salesforce platform to analyze data, measure the impact of its services, track and respond to client needs, and prioritize the delivery of services that prove to be most effective. Silver Lining Mentoring uses a custom evaluation tool to assess youth annually along seven dimensions of development, including:

· Sense of belonging and connections

· Soft/interpersonal skills

· Self-esteem and Resiliency

· Basic Life Skills

· Educational Progression

· -Employment Readiness

· Financial Literacy

Assessments over time enable the tracking of individual and aggregate progress and, ultimately, program efficacy. In 2017 Silver Lining Mentoring began working with Dr. Ting Zhang, a researcher from Columbia University, to ensure that its evaluation questions accurately measure and document the impact of its programs.

SLM puts youths’ needs front and center in its service delivery. Annually, youth and mentors complete a self-assessment with SLM social workers. This allows youth to set social, emotional, educational, employment, and life skill goals for the year, and determine the timeline and steps necessary to achieve these goals. Youth also give feedback on their relationship with their mentor and with SLM. Additionally, SLM social workers are in touch with mentors on a monthly basis (at minimum) to ensure they are receiving the support they need.

Examples of Program Success 

SLM regularly sees the impact of its Young Adult Services program. One participant who received housing support shared, “Now that I have stable housing I’m able to focus on other important aspects of my life like school, getting a better job, and saving money more efficiently.”

Beyond the individual examples, SLM has quantitative data to show the impact of its programs. Seventy-six percent of young people engaged with SLM over age 18 are employed, compared to 43% of foster care alumni nation-wide. In addition, 74% of Silver Lining Mentoring participants have graduated high school and 23% have enrolled in college, compared to 54% and 3% respectively of all young adults who have left foster care.


Youth Outreach

SLM's outreach efforts include one-time workshops that provide teens and young adults impacted by foster care the opportunity to learn life skills in preparation for adulthood. SLM works with other local organizations supporting teens in care, such as More Than Words, Bridge Over Troubled Waters, and The Home for Little Wanderers, to facilitate workshops on essential life skills. This program is often the gateway for young people to enter Silver Lining Mentoring and go on to participate in its more intensive Community Based Mentoring and Learn & Earn programs.

Budget  $20,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
The short-term success of outreach efforts will be determined by evaluations completed by all program participants. The following are SLM's benchmarks for success:
 
• At least 70% of youth will improve their ability to set and achieve goals.
• At least 80% of youth will improve their personal and professional communication skills.
• At least 85% of youth will acquire a stronger sense of belonging within a healthy community.
• At least 85% of youth will report learning skills that will help them in the future.
Program Long-Term Success 
The workshops and support of SLM's youth outreach efforts empower young people to avoid negative outcomes associated with time in foster care. A 2008 report from The Boston Foundation highlights the risk factors for youth “aging out” of foster care. Of the young adults that were interviewed:
 
• 25% had been arrested
• 37% experienced homelessness
• 43% had been pregnant or gotten someone pregnant
• 54% were unemployed
• 59% exhibited signs of depression
 
The support and workshops provided by SLM's outreach efforts help youth combat these risk factors. Long-term, the goal is for youth to break cycles of homelessness, poverty, and violence, often the same forces that put them in foster care in the first place.
Program Success Monitored By 
Silver Lining Mentoring uses a Salesforce platform to measure the impact of its services, track and respond to client needs, and prioritize the delivery of services that prove to be most effective. Salesforce and all other evaluation efforts are managed by SLM's Data Strategy Manager. He compiles quantitative and qualitative data on individual youth development in order to measure and quantify program impact.
Examples of Program Success 
SLM youth have spoken to the success of the program. One young woman shared an experience she had at a job interview after a career-focused workshop. She excitedly called her Program Coordinator to tell her that she got great feedback about her interview and was subsequently offered the position. This young woman stated she was far better prepared to anticipate interview questions and demonstrate her skills, knowledge, and professionalism because of SLM's workshop.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Colby Swettberg
CEO Term Start July 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Colby Swettberg holds Master's degrees in both Education and Social Work. Colby worked for The Home for Little Wanderers for seven years where she opened and oversaw the nation's first group home for LGBT teenagers, facilitated support groups for LGBT foster and adoptive families, and provided training nationwide on working with LGBT youth. Colby came to SLM as CEO in July 2009.
 
Colby has been recognized on several occasions. Secretary of State John Kerry and the Congressional Institute on Adoption honored Colby as an “Angel in Adoption” in 2012. This year, Colby was chosen as a Barr Foundation Fellow, a prestigious honor recognizing her, and Silver Lining Mentoring’s, impact in the community. Through this Fellowship, Colby will participate in a two-year program that includes a group learning journey, a summer sabbatical, and facilitated retreats for leadership and organizational development to increase program capacity, with the ultimate goal of supporting more youth in foster care through vital mentoring services.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Julie Asher Deputy Director

Julie joined Silver Lining Mentoring in May 2017. Having learned about the child welfare system from her work in the public and philanthropic sectors, she is thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to Silver Lining Mentoring’s important mission. Julie has dedicated her career to promoting positive impact and equity for children and families. Most recently, Julie worked at the Center on the Developing Child, where she facilitated partnerships across sectors with the goal of developing new solutions to support young children’s development. Prior to this, she worked as a senior program officer at the Robin Hood Foundation, overseeing early childhood and youth grants to nonprofits in New York City. Previously, she worked for the City of New York’s Administration for Children’s Services as a policy analyst for child care and child welfare. Julie earned her bachelor’s degree in human development and family studies from Cornell University and her master’s degree in public policy from the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley.

Cori Mykoff Director of Development Cori has always been fortunate to work with organizations whose missions seek to improve lives in a community-driven way. As a beneficiary of strong role models, Cori feels that access to great mentorship can change lives, and is honored that this passion has led her to Silver Lining Mentoring—a proven leader in providing this critical service to young people who need it most. Before Silver Lining, Cori was the senior development officer at The Posse Foundation in Boston, where she directed local fundraising efforts through collaboration with volunteer leaders, corporate sponsorships, grants, and events. Previously, she was the development officer at TERC, where she worked on federal research grants and national educator trade shows. Cori began her career at The Boston Bar Association and Foundation, where she helped to administer over $1 million in legal aid grants annually, and coordinated several volunteer committees and efforts. Outside of Silver Lining, Cori is a Board Member of The Philanthropy Connection, and volunteers with Emerson College, her alma mater.
Alaina Rosenberry Director of Programs

Alaina first joined Silver Lining Mentoring in September 2010 as an intern from Simmons School of Social Work. Alaina comes to SLM with experience in issues of homelessness and youth education from her work at St. Mary’s Women and Children’s Center and Crittenton Women’s Union. Alaina completed her second clinical internship at Children’s Charter Trauma Clinic where she provided individual and family therapy to children, adolescents and adults who have experienced trauma. Alaina completed her Masters in Social Work in 2012 and joined the SLM staff as a full-time Program Coordinator. She now serves as Director of Programs, overseeing SLM’s mentoring and life skills programs.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
2014 Social Innovator Root Cause, Social Innovation Forum 2013
Innovation Award Small Business Association of New England 2013
Quality-Based Initiative Member Mass Mentoring Partnership 2008
Local Hero award to SLM founder Justin Pasquariello for AFC's impact in Massachusetts Bank of America 2007
A. Keith Brodkin Award for exceptional programming for adopted and foster youth and families The Home for Little Wanderers 2004

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
United Way Member Agency 2010
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

Silver Lining Mentoring’s most prominent partner is the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families (DCF). DCF refers youth to SLM's Community Based Mentoring and Learn & Earn programs. Using the site-based cohort model for Learn & Earn, SLM also partners with local organizations serving youth in foster care, including Youth Villages, The Home for Little Wanderers, and others, to bring the program to residential facilities where youth live. Partner agencies recruit interested youth. SLM provides the curriculum, trained volunteer mentors, and social workers to facilitate the program. Silver Lining Mentoring also finances the program’s critical matched-savings component. Moving the Learn & Earn program out of SLM’s office, and into the community, has more than doubled program graduation rates. These partnerships allow SLM to provide the Learn & Earn program to more youth. Beyond Learn & Earn hosting, SLM works with other partners continue youths’ access to other critical resources. Specific partner agencies include Caritas Communities, More Than Words, Bridge Over Troubled Waters, Bottom Line, and the Wiley Network. These partnerships, in conjunction with SLM’s wraparound services and clinical support, help mitigate risk factors and promote youths’ increased success.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 165
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 2
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 12
Male: 2
Not Specified 3

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. M. Scott Knox
Board Chair Company Affiliation Brooke Charter Schools
Board Chair Term Jan 2017 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Roy Bates Cambridge Savings Bank Voting
Robert Beal The Beal Companies, LLP Exofficio
Anne Bowie Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Voting
Maurice Bradshaw UBS Financial Services Voting
Danielle Halderman Camp Harbor View Foundation Voting
Edward Hale Community Volunteer Voting
Julie Hall Comcast Exofficio
M. Scott Knox Edward W. Brooke Charter Schools Voting
Bryan Nelson Castle Hill Financial Group, LLC Voting
Justin Pasquariello East Boston Social Centers, SLM Founder Voting
Alfonso Perillo GMA Foundations Voting
Tom Shirk White Porch Group Voting
Anna Vouros Massachusetts General Hospital Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 36%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,763,042 $976,155 $1,086,944
Total Expenses $1,052,607 $893,691 $781,463

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$656,542 $441,202 $653,277
Government Contributions $83,040 $82,669 $138,604
    Federal -- -- --
    State $83,040 $82,669 $138,604
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $726,583 $233,157 $121,428
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $72 $77 $131
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $296,360 $218,575 $173,343
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $445 $475 $161

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $784,289 $638,904 $545,705
Administration Expense $85,889 $76,933 $84,403
Fundraising Expense $182,429 $177,854 $151,355
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.67 1.09 1.39
Program Expense/Total Expenses 75% 71% 70%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 10% 18% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $1,891,488 $1,197,123 $1,109,058
Current Assets $1,873,576 $1,163,721 $1,088,925
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $32,187 $48,257 $42,656
Total Net Assets $1,859,301 $1,148,866 $1,066,402

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 58.21 24.12 25.53

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Additional revenue breakout detail was provided by the organization for FY15 & FY14.
 
Please note, this organization changed its name with the IRS in June 2015, as reflected in the above posted IRS Letter of Determination, from Adoption and Foster Care Mentoring, Inc. to Silver Lining Mentoring Inc.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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