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Organization DBA Silver Lining Mentoring
Former Names Adoption & Foster Care Mentoring (2015)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Silver Lining Mentoring empowers youth in foster care to flourish through committed mentoring relationships and the development of essential life skills.

Mission Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring empowers youth in foster care to flourish through committed mentoring relationships and the development of essential life skills.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $1,319,700.00
Projected Expense $1,307,684.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Leaders/Youth Outreach
  • Learn & Earn
  • Mentors

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring empowers youth in foster care to flourish through committed mentoring relationships and the development of essential life skills.

Background Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring was founded in 2001 by Justin Pasquariello who, adopted out of the foster care system himself, understood the need for youth in foster care to have a consistent adult presence during frequent transitions to new homes, guardians, and schools. Justin served as SLM’s Executive Director until 2007, and remains actively involved as a long-time mentor and Board Member. 

 
SLM was built on our flagship Mentors program, creating one-to-one matches between volunteer mentors and youth impacted by foster care ages 7 and older. In 2009 SLM launched Leaders, a skill-building program for teens in foster care designed to provide a support network and opportunities to learn job, health and life skills in preparation for adulthood. Leaders was expanded in 2012 with Learn and Earn, an intensive life skills curriculum for young adults ages 16 and older with mentoring and matched-savings components. 
 
 
Our current Chief Executive Officer, Colby Swettberg, has been recognized on several occasions. Secretary of State John Kerry and the Congressional Institute on Adoption honored Colby as an “Angel in Adoption” in 2012. In 2013 Colby received a “Woman of Excellence” Award from Youth Villages and the United Way recognized Colby’s commitment to the community as a nominee for the “Women Who Live United” Award. 
 

In 2014 Silver Lining Mentoring was chosen as a three-year investee by Social Venture Partners (SVP). SVP consultants have been working closely with Silver Lining Mentoring’s leadership team to crystallize our organization’s service model, evaluation plan, and business plan. This effort has helped us identify key conditions for success and chart the path to achieving our goals. Thanks to the in-depth capacity building services provided by SVP, Silver Lining Mentoring is positioned to serve more youth in foster care and significantly increase the impact of our programs through 2018.


Impact Statement

Silver Lining Mentoring (SLM) is the only mentoring organization in Massachusetts that focuses exclusively on the unique needs of youth impacted by foster care.

 

In 2015 Silver Lining Mentoring:

 

-Provided 75 youth in foster care with high-quality, long term mentors who are often the only adults not paid to spend time with them through our Mentors program.

 
-Provided 35 young adults impacted by the foster care system with the opportunity to learn critical financial literacy, job, and life skills and the support of a mentor through our Learn & Earn program. 
 

-Conducted essential life skills workshops for over 160 youth in foster care in Greater Boston who are preparing to "age out" of the foster care system at 18.

 
In 2016 Silver Lining Mentoring’s goals are:
 

 -To serve 315 youth impacted by foster care in Greater Boston (as defined by Rt. 128).

 

-To analyze our marketing strategy to better articulate our innovative approach and the need for mentors for youth in foster care.

 

-To continue to our role as a thought leader in the fields of mentoring and child welfare.


Needs Statement

SLM is looking for the following forms of support:

 

-Volunteers: SLM has a particular need for Life Skills Mentors to support young people in our Learn & Earn program. We are always in need of mentors of all backgrounds and identities. SLM is youth focused - our youth make requests about what is important to them in a mentor. The three areas where we have more requests than we have mentors are mentors of color, male mentors, and mentors with foster care experience. 

 

-Corporate & Foundation Funding: SLM must continue to diversify its funding portfolio to include more corporate and foundation funders to support our organizational growth goals.

 
-Individual Investors: Individuals who are looking for an innovative organization that is growing and in need of your support to reach our goals.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

SLM serves youth in the Greater Boston area (as defined by Rt. 128). We continue to support youth if they are moved to a placement outside of our service area.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Adult, Child Matching Programs
  2. Human Services - Foster Care
  3. Human Services -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Leaders/Youth Outreach

Leaders provides teens and young adults impacted by foster care the opportunity to learn life skills in preparation for adulthood. Through Leaders we work with other local organizations supporting teens in care to facilitate workshops on essential life skills. Participants can also engage in leadership and public speaking opportunities. This program is often the gateway for young people to enter Silver Lining Mentoring and go on to participate in our more intensive Mentors and Learn & Earn programs.

Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
The short-term success of Leaders will be determined by evaluations completed by all program participants. The following are SLM's benchmarks for success:
 
• At least 70% of youth will improve ability to set and achieve goals.
• At least 80% of youth will improve ability to communicate feelings and ideas.
• At least 85% of youth will acquire a stronger sense of belonging within a healthy community.
• At least 85% of youth will report learning skills that will help them in the future.
• At least 80% of youth will improve their personal and professional communication skills.
Program Long-Term Success 
The workshops and support of Leaders empowers young people to avoid negative outcomes associated with time in foster care. A 2008 report from The Boston Foundation highlights the risk factors for youth “aging out” of foster care. Of the young adults that were interviewed:
 
• 25% had been arrested
• 37% experienced homelessness
• 43% had been pregnant or gotten someone pregnant
• 54% were unemployed
• 59% exhibited signs of depression
 
The support and workshops provided by Leaders help youth combat these risk factors. Long-term, the goal is for youth to break cycles of homelessness, poverty, and violence, often the same forces that put them in foster care in the first place.
Program Success Monitored By 
Silver Lining Mentoring uses an evaluation platform to measure the impact of our services, track and respond to client needs, and prioritize the delivery of services that prove to be most effective. SLM also gathers data and measures the effectiveness of Leaders through post-workshop surveys. Results of surveys are examined and analyzed by program staff. 
Examples of Program Success 
SLM youth have spoken to the success of the program. One young woman shared an experience she had at a job interview after a career-focused workshop. She excitedly called her Program Coordinator to tell her that she got great feedback about her interview and was subsequently offered the position. This young woman stated she was far better prepared to anticipate interview questions and demonstrate her skills, knowledge, and professionalism because of SLM's workshop.

Learn & Earn

Learn & Earn (L&E) is an intensive 12-week life skills curriculum with a matched savings component for youth impacted by foster care ages 16+. Youth learn life skills including financial literacy, employment, transportation, and housing. 

 

Youth are paired with a volunteer adult Life Skills Mentor. Mentors are screened, trained, and supported by SLM's social workers. Our social workers are trained to understand the unique needs of youth in care.  Mentors help youth master the skills covered in L&E and provide social and emotional support. Mentor/mentee "matches" can chose to continue the mentoring relationship after the 12-week program ends.

 
Youth earn a stipend for mastering the skills in the L&E curriculum. SLM matches every dollar youth save of their stipend at the end of L&E. Through their earnings youth have paid rent and college tuition, and purchased laptops and professional clothing, meeting critical needs for adulthood.
Budget  $501,652.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
SLM measures the short-term success of Learn & Earn through the following metrics:
-At least 70% of youth will report they are good at setting/achieving goals
-At least 70% of youth will earn and save toward an identified independent living goal
-At least 80% of youth will report improved personal/professional communication skills
-At least 80% of youth will report improved self-esteem
-At least 85% of youth will report that they learned a new skill that will help them in the future
-At least 85% of youth will report a strong sense of belonging within a healthy community
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term goal of Learn & Earn is to prepare participants for adulthood by connecting them to a supportive community and helping them build critical life, employment, and financial literacy skills. 
Program Success Monitored By 

SLM has invested in the development of an “Efforts to Outcomes” (ETO) evaluation platform. The platform allows us to analyze data to better measure the impact of our services, track and respond to client needs, and prioritize the delivery of services that prove to be most effective.

SLM gathers data for Learn & Earn through pre- and post-program evaluations completed by all participants. Results of evaluations are examined and analyzed by program staff.

Examples of Program Success 

Recent evaluations show that 67% of the young people we work with over age 18 are employed, compared to 43% nationally of youth who have left foster care. In addition, 63% of SLM participants have graduated high school, and 31% have gone to college, compared to 54% and 3% respectively, nationwide. These statistics show that SLM's programs have a positive, long-term effect on the youth we serve.


Mentors

Mentors is our flagship program that serves youth 7 and older in foster care. It matches youth in 1-to-1 mentoring relationships with adult volunteers for at least a year, often the only adults not paid to spend time with them. Mentors addresses the fact that frequent transitions in homes and communities leave these youth without consistent positive relationships. 
 
Mentors undergo a lengthy screening process, and receive 9 hours of training, facilitated by SLM's social workers. Mentor/mentee “matches” meet for at least 8 hours a month. 
 
SLM staff provides personal support to each match. Our Masters level clinicians understand youth behaviors and needs with their histories of abuse, trauma, and neglect, and implement evidence-based intervention methods for youth in care. Our average match length is 55 months, over six times the national average.
Budget  $502,926.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
The short-term success of Mentors will be determined by annual evaluations completed by all mentors and mentees. The following are SLM's benchmarks for success:
 
• At least 75% of youth will report having a mentor they can trust.
• At least 80% of youth will show improvements in self-esteem.
• At least 70% of youth will improve ability to set and achieve goals.
• At least 85% of youth will acquire a stronger sense of belonging within a healthy community.
Program Long-Term Success  SLM fills a critical niche in the youth development field by giving young people the support and individual attention that they need throughout the turbulent transitions of life in the foster care system. Frequent transitions put youth in foster care at an increased risk of negative outcomes including poverty, homelessness, incarceration, and other high-risk behaviors. Rhodes et al. (1999) found that after 12 months of participation in a mentoring program, youth in foster care exhibited improved social skills, improved ability to trust adults, improvements in pro-social support, and self-esteem enhancement compared with mentored youth who were not in foster care. A long-term mentor often serves as a lifeline for at-risk youth in foster care.
Program Success Monitored By 
Silver Lining Mentoring uses an evaluation platform that allows us to measure the impact of our services, track and respond to client needs, and prioritize the delivery of services that prove to be most effective. SLM also gathers data and measures the effectiveness of our programs through monthly online mentor surveys, youth feedback, and annual evaluations completed by all mentees and mentors. Results of surveys and evaluations are examined and analyzed by program staff. 
Examples of Program Success 
SLM's success is founded on the quality of our programs and our impact on youth. The following paragraph is an anecdote from one of our program staff members, highlighting the positive impact mentors have on the youth we serve. 
 
"I attended a meeting with the social worker, caseworker, and clinician for Jacob, one of our mentees. Jacob moved several times between foster homes and is now at a residential school. As is the case for most of SLM's youth, Jacob’s mentor is the only adult in his life that is not paid to spend time with him. Even though Jacob is now an hour’s drive from his mentor Mike, Mike still visits him regularly, gladly, and without hesitation. I got unanimous agreement (along with praise and appreciation) from every person at the meeting that Jacob’s mentor has been, hands down, the most consistent and trusted support for Jacob since he’s been matched. Jacob’s clinician said Jacob is ready and waiting eagerly for Mike for each visit they have together."

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Colby Swettberg
CEO Term Start July 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Colby Swettberg holds Master's degrees in both Education and Social Work. Colby worked for The Home for Little Wanderers for seven years where she opened and oversaw the nation's first group home for LGBT teenagers, facilitated support groups for LGBT foster and adoptive families, and provided training nationwide on working with LGBT youth. Colby came to SLM as Executive Director in July 2009. Her title was changed to CEO in 2015.
 
Colby has been recognized on several occasions. Secretary of State John Kerry and the Congressional Institute on Adoption honored Colby as an “Angel in Adoption” in 2012. In 2013, Colby received a “Woman of Excellence” Award from Youth Villages for her impact on the lives of girls and was recognized by the United Way for her commitment to the community as a nominee for the “Women Who Live United” Award. 

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Melissa Birke Chu Director of Evaluation & Strategy

 Melissa served as a volunteer mentor in our Mentors program for two years before joining our staff in 2006. She holds a Bachelor’s of Science in neuroscience and a Master’s degree from Simmons School of Social Work. Melissa was promoted to the newly created Director of Evaluation & Strategy position in 2015.  She uses individual youth development data to to measure and quantify program impact.

 

Alyson Hussey Director of Development

Alyson has spent her entire career as an advocate for youth. In law school, she worked as a Law Clerk for the San Diego County Public Defender’s Juvenile Division. After law school, she worked as the Case Manager for Allegheny Country Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Program in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. After moving to Boston, Alyson was introduced to the Hattie B. Cooper Community Center which provides early education and youth services to families. She served on the Cooper Board of Directors and was later invited to be the Director of Development. Alyson is also teaches a course on Resource Development for Non-Profits for the Organizational Leadership Graduate Program at Wheelock College. Alyson came to Silver Lining Mentoring in 2013.

Alaina Rosenberry Director of Programs

Alaina first joined Silver Lining Mentoring in September 2010 as an intern from Simmons School of Social Work. Alaina comes to SLM with experience in issues of homelessness and youth education from her work at St. Mary’s Women and Children’s Center and Crittenton Women’s Union. Alaina completed her second clinical internship at Children’s Charter Trauma Clinic where she provided individual and family therapy to children, adolescents and adults who have experienced trauma. Alaina completed her Masters in Social Work in 2012 and joined the SLM staff as a full-time Program Coordinator. She now serves as Director of Programs, overseeing SLM’s mentoring and life skills programs.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
2014 Social Innovator Root Cause, Social Innovation Forum 2013
Innovation Award Small Business Association of New England 2013
Quality-Based Initiative Member Mass Mentoring Partnership 2008
Local Hero award to SLM founder Justin Pasquariello for AFC's impact in Massachusetts Bank of America 2007
A. Keith Brodkin Award for exceptional programming for adopted and foster youth and families The Home for Little Wanderers 2004

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
United Way Member Agency 2010
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 11
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 175
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Lisa Rowan-Gillis
Board Chair Company Affiliation United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley
Board Chair Term Jan 2015 - Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Roy Bates Cambridge Savings Bank Voting
Robert Beal The Beal Companies, LLP Exofficio
Anne Bowie Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Voting
Melanie Damsker Camp Combined Jewish Philanthropies Voting
Julie Galeota Comcast Voting
Jennifer Gugliotti John Hancock Financial Services Voting
Danielle Halderman The Partnership, Inc Voting
M. Scott Knox Edward W. Brooke Charter Schools Voting
Bryan Nelson Castle Hill Financial Group, LLC Voting
Justin Pasquariello Children's HealthWatch, AFC Founder Voting
Alfonso Perillo Edelstein & Company Voting
Anna Vouros Massachusetts General Hospital Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 33%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $1,319,700.00
Projected Expense $1,307,684.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Reviewed Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $976,155 $1,086,944 $765,982
Total Expenses $893,691 $781,463 $639,621

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$441,202 $653,277 $400,765
Government Contributions $82,669 $138,604 $151,761
    Federal -- -- --
    State $82,669 $138,604 $151,761
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $233,157 $121,428 $88,931
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $77 $131 $977
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $218,575 $173,343 $123,398
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $475 $161 $150

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $638,904 $545,705 $464,343
Administration Expense $76,933 $84,403 $68,128
Fundraising Expense $177,854 $151,355 $107,150
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.09 1.39 1.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses 71% 70% 73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 18% 14% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,197,123 $1,109,058 $808,100
Current Assets $1,163,721 $1,088,925 $783,434
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $48,257 $42,656 $47,179
Total Net Assets $1,148,866 $1,066,402 $760,921

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 24.12 25.53 16.61

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Additional revenue breakout detail was provided by the organization for FY15, FY14 and FY13.
 
Please note, this organization changed its name with the IRS in June 2015, as reflected in the above posted IRS Letter of Determination, from Adoption and Foster Care Mentoring, Inc. to Silver Lining Mentoring Inc.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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