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Organization DBA Spirit of Adventure Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America
Spirit of Adventure Council
Boy Scouts of America Spirit of Adventure Council
Former Names Boston Minuteman Council, Boy Scouts of America (2015)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

 The Mission of the Spirit of Adventure Council, BSA is to serve others by helping to instill values in young people and in other ways prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full potential. The values we strive to instill are based upon the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
 
Scout Oath: On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.
 
Scout Law: A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent.

Mission Statement

 The Mission of the Spirit of Adventure Council, BSA is to serve others by helping to instill values in young people and in other ways prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full potential. The values we strive to instill are based upon the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
 
Scout Oath: On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.
 
Scout Law: A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $4,500,000.00
Projected Expense $4,400,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Boy Scouts
  • Cub Scouts
  • ScoutReach
  • Venturing

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

 The Mission of the Spirit of Adventure Council, BSA is to serve others by helping to instill values in young people and in other ways prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full potential. The values we strive to instill are based upon the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
 
Scout Oath: On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.
 
Scout Law: A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent.

Background Statement

The Boy Scouts of America is one of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth-development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship,and develops personal fitness. For more than a century, the BSA has helped build the future leaders of this country by combining educational activities and lifelong values with fun.
 
The Boy Scouts of America believes — and, through over a century of experience, knows — that helping youth is a key to building a more conscientious, responsible and productive society.
 
Since its founding in 1910 as part of the international Scout Movement, more than 110 million Americans have been members of the BSA.

The Scouting program consists of three major subsets: Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts and Venturing.

 


Impact Statement

Accomplishment: Grew urban Scouting to 650 boys aged 7-11 in low income and at-risk neighborhoods.  Began to expand our Scout Strong model to other areas of Massachusetts.
 
Goal: To grow urban Scouting to 850 youth in 2013 and establish ScoutReach/ScoutStrong Packs across Eastern Massachusetts.  We also aim to increase the number of urban Scouts attending day camp. 
 
Accomplishment: Organized and executed SOAR2012 (Scouting's Outdoor Adventure on the River) on the banks of the Charles River in October.  More than 3,500 youth and their families attended.  The event, which featured the World's Longest Pinewood Derby Track, was featured on most local news stations. The event was helped by a coordinated marketing campaign that included radio ads, print, billboards throughout Greater Boston and social media.  Planning for SOAR2014 is underway.
Goal:  Collaborate with surrounding Councils to create a Scouting for Food day in November.  Coordinate 25,000 Scouts to collect non-perishable items for local food banks and successfully market the event. 
 
Accomplishment: Six straight months of membership increases greather than 6%.  Total youth membership is approximately 6,700.    
Continue to increase membership throughout 2013.  End the 2013 year with 7,200 youth served.
 
Goal: 
 
Accomplishment: Partnered with Harvard and MIT Lincoln Labs to run a Merit Badge University over two weekends in Spring.  The program filled to capacity and more than 200 boys interacted with faculty and students at Harvard on subjects such as computers, oceanography and engineering.
 
 Goal: Expand the MBU idea to a week long STEM Camp in April 2013.  The camp will allow Cub and Boy Scouts to interact with real world STEM professionals and earn merit badges in subjects such as Robotics, Engineering and Space Exploration.  The week will culminate in an awards ceremony where astronaut Bernard Harris will address the campers. 

Needs Statement

ScoutReach:The urban Scouting program (ScoutReach) does tremendous good but is in need of more support than traditional Scouting. Volunteers run traditional Scouting units. In low-income areas the higher percentage of caregivers working multiple jobs means we must hire program specialists, bi-lingual if possible, to run units. ScoutReach costs the Council $200,000/yr.

Camp Renovations: At Camp Sayre in Milton, MA, we are working to improve the archery range, as well as connecting Hayden Lodge to water and sewers. We also plan to run water to all campsites and to renovate aging cabins. At Storer Scout Reservation in New Hampshire, we plan building renovations and to complete our chapel.

Marketing: Seeking $60,000 to help implement an awareness campaign to highlight the good works Scouting does in its communities. Included will be a multi-Council community good turn - Scouting for Food -to collect food for local food banks.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

The Spirit of Adventure Council (SOAC) of the Boy Scouts of America is headquartered in  Woburn, MA and serves the 76 surrounding communities from Boston to the New Hampshire boarder. Founded in 2015, by the merger of Boston Minuteman and Yankee Clipper Councils, the SOAC follows the guidelines of Scouting as established over 100 years ago by the BSA. SOAC is the largest Boy Scout Council in Massachusetts (7 Councils) serving 12,877 young men and women, providing families with a unique program of character development, leadership training and preparation for adult citizenship. We instill values and ethical decision-making skills in youth through our varied age-appropriate programs, our leaders, our training programs, and many resources such as our Council Service Centers and Camp facilities in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

 

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Boy Scouts Of America
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Boy Scouts

Scouting’s flagship program, Boy Scouts, focuses on helping young men ages 11-18 reach new levels of confidence and capability through positive experiences, achievement, values and a sense of belonging. The program achieves the BSA's objectives of developing character, citizenship and personal fitness.

Budget  $0.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Males Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Males
Program Short-Term Success 
Short term success can be demonstrated by the merit badges earned by a Scout as well as his movements through the ranks of Scouting.  Scouts gradually become patrol leaders and senior patrol leaders within their units, which teach leadership skills and earn merit badgges which teach them both about the specific subject as well as how to work with others.
Program Long-Term Success 
The ultimate goal for every Boy Scout is to achieve the rank of Eagle Scout.  It is the highest rank offered in the Scouting program.  In order to achieve this a Scout must earn 21 specific merit badges and complete a service project that benefits his community.  These achievements are tracked through the council office and files are kept for review. 
Program Success Monitored By 
Program success is determined by monitering how many merit badges a Scout earns and how he progresses through the ranks of Scouting.
Examples of Program Success 
A recent example of an Eagle service project is from a Scout in Concord/Carlisle.  This Scout chose to build benches for the Cotting School Field.  This project required 150 community service hours and he was helped by his fellow Scouts, which contributed their time and effort to the project as well. 

Cub Scouts

Cub Scouting is a year-round program uniquely designed to meet the needs of boys in first through fifth grade and their parents. The program offers fun and challenging activities that promote character development, citizenship and physical fitness. Service projects, ceremonies, games, and other activities guide boys through the core values and give them a sense of personal achievement. Through positive peer group interaction and parental guidance, boys also learn honesty, responsibility, and respect.

Budget  $0.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years) Males
Program Short-Term Success 

There are as many short-term successes as there are Cubs in Scouting. Every time a boy earns a badge, learns a skill, solves a problem or gains confidence, it is a victory.

Program Long-Term Success 

Family involvement is an essential part of Cub Scouting, and parents are encouraged to play an active role in the program. Through interaction with parents, leaders, and friends, boys learn cooperation, compassion, and courage. This family and community-centered approach to learning means that Cub Scouting is truly time well spent.

 

Apart from the fun and excitement, the aim of Cub Scouting is to help boys grow into good citizens who are strong in character and personally fit. This is why we say that Cub Scouting is fun with a purpose.

Program Success Monitored By 
Retention statistics, camp attendance, badges earned (thus skills mastered) and the number of Cubs who complete the program and matriculate into Boy Scouts define the fundamental measurment of success.
Examples of Program Success 
We enjoyed a 20-percent increase of Cubs who attended Day camp in 2012 v. 2011, in response to both a successful marketing campaign and a strengthened day camp program.

ScoutReach

In all categories, but with an emphasis on Cubs,the Council focuses on ScoutReach, a program dedicated to providing the Scouting opportunity to young men from at-risk communities, regardless of their circumstances. This has allowed Scouting to make an impact in even most difficult-to-serve communities. ScoutReach collaborates with area religious groups, schools and community-based organizations to establish new Scouting units (such as a Cub Scout Pack or Boy Scout Troop) in disadvantaged neighborhoods.
Budget  $200,000
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Males Children Only (5 - 14 years) Other Economic Level
Program Short-Term Success 
Since its inception in 2011 the ScoutReach program has grown to 650 youth.  The retention rate for ScoutReach Scouts is 76% from year one to year two and there are currently around 20 ScoutReach Packs.
Program Long-Term Success 

Ina Scouting environment, youth interact with a positive peer group that offersencouragement and guidance. Evaluations have shown that quality programs ofthis nature not only decrease the likelihood that youth will participate in risky behaviors but also increase self-confidence, social skills and academicachievement.

Program Success Monitored By 

ScoutReach boys earn Reward points that encourage positive behavior choice both at home and at school. These points are tracked and allow us to monitor how the ScoutReach program helps character development among our Scouts. 

Examples of Program Success 

R. Brown is an 11 year old who entered the ScoutReach program in 2011. In the time he has been a Scout he has participated in several camporees, and gained the confidence to run for School President. He recently spoke about his ScoutReach experience in front of over 200 Boston Business leaders.


Venturing

Venturing is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America foryoung men and women who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age. Venturing’s purpose is to provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults.

Budget  $50,000
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) US Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
 Venturing is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth, adult leaders, and organizations in their communities. Local community organizations establish a Venturing crew by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of exciting and meaningful activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, grow, develop leadership skills, and become good citizens.

Venturing crews can specialize in a variety of avocation or hobby interests. Sea Scouting is a subset of Venturing.

Program Long-Term Success 

Young adults involved in Venturing will:

·        Learn to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling the values in the Venturing Oath and Code

·        Experience a program that is fun and full of challenge and adventure

·        Become a skilled training and program resource for Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and other groups

·        Acquire skills in the areas of high adventure, sports, arts and hobbies, religious life, or Sea Scouting

·        Experience positive leadership from adult and youth leaders and be given opportunities to take on leadership roles

·        Have a chance to learn and grow in a supportive, caring, and fun environment

Program Success Monitored By 
The number of youth who earn the Silver Award, Venturing's highest honor, is a fundamental measure of success. As well, the number of youth who gain life-time and perhaps professional direction are indicators of success.
Examples of Program Success 
Silver Award winner Vickie Nicoletta Hocter served on camp staff for two years as a Venture Counselor then rose to the position of Camp Director at Storer -- a competitive and crucial job.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Chuck Eaton
CEO Term Start June 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. James R. Corcoran Jr. Director of Development 25 years

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 19
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 5,000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 88%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 12
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 88
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jack Klinck
Board Chair Company Affiliation CEO, OUISA
Board Chair Term May 2014 - May 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term May 2013 - May 2014

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mark Alaimo Community Volunteer --
Domenic Amara (Ret) Boston Public Schools --
Peter Brennan Partner, PWC --
Sue Ellen Briggs Volunteer --
William Bruce Underwriter, Borislow Insurance --
Helen Chin Schlichte (Ret) Chair, Kwong Kow Chinese School --
Elizabeth Christiansen Community Volunteer --
Jerry Cross Community Volunteer --
Stephen Curry Partner, Deloitte --
Anthony DeProspo Kenney Sams, PC --
Jim Dina COO, Pyramid Hotel Group --
Chuck Eaton CEO/Sons of Liberty Council, Inc. BSA --
Eric Evans Director, MIT Lincoln Labs --
Tom Ford Community Volunteer --
Paul Gilbert Community Volunteer --
John Halsey (Ret) COO, Colony Group --
Lawrence Healey Community Volunteer --
James T Higgs Woodward & Higgs --
Seth Holbrook Holbrook & Murphy --
Michelle Holmes Harvard University --
Steve Horlitz Raytheon --
Bernard Horn CEO, Polaris Capital Management --
Neal Hunter Community Volunteer --
Michael Jeans (Ret) President, New Directions Voting
Denise Jillson Exec. Director, Harvard Business Assoc. --
Thomas Kehoe Selectman, Town of Manchester --
Rick Kiernan Convergent Nonprofit Solutions --
Jack Klinck Exec V.P. State Street --
Sarath Krishnaswamy Community Volunteer --
Neil Lupton President, Talking Lights --
Arthur Mabbett President, Mabbett Engineering --
Greg Miller Senior Principal, Parthenon --
Paul Naehle Community Volunteer --
Nancy Nager President ‐ SBSC Inc. --
Lance Nicolaysen Community Volunteer --
Jamie O’Brien Community Volunteer --
George Regan Founder, Regan Communications --
Jeffrey Reynolds Community Volunteer --
Rich Rudduck Community Volunteer --
Craig Saline Community Volunteer --
Scott Sanborn Senior President, HarborOne Bank --
Bruce Showstack VP, Radford Trans. Inc. --
Daniel Smith Community Volunteer --
Bob Snider Community Volunteer --
Justin St. Louis Community Volunteer --
Dan Strasshofer Partner, KPMG --
Brian Sullivan Community Volunteer --
Jay Sullivan Sullivan Associates --
Mark Svendsen Community Volunteer --
Douglas Tenney Community Volunteer --
Jack Terrill Community Volunteer --
Mike Terry Manager, MultiPlan --
Paul Trubiano Community Volunteer --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Bill Bacic Managing Partner, Deloitte Voting
Mr. Joe Campanelli President, Flagstar Bank Voting
Mr. Larry DiCara Partner, Nixon Peabody Voting
Mr. Chuck Eaton CEO, Boston Minuteman Council Voting
Mr. Ted Kelly Chairman, Liberty Mutual Voting
Mr. Tom Kershaw Owner, Cheers & Hampshire House Voting
Mr. Marshall Sloane Chairman, Century Bank Voting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 39
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 27
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 75%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Facilities
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Membership
  • Nominating
  • Operations

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $3,596,695 $3,705,578 $3,807,602
Total Expenses $2,975,581 $2,960,264 $2,938,195

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $358,973 $355,168
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,503,651 $158,897 $14,859
Indirect Public Support -- $128,190 $174,043
Earned Revenue $1,072,199 $998,266 $1,091,060
Investment Income, Net of Losses $284,742 $146,488 $344,695
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $701,041 $415,424 $451,325
Revenue In-Kind -- $216,665 $221,876
Other $35,062 $1,282,675 $1,154,576

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $2,536,198 $2,491,019 $2,481,964
Administration Expense $184,369 $164,582 $185,102
Fundraising Expense $255,014 $278,806 $250,475
Payments to Affiliates -- $25,857 $20,654
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.21 1.25 1.30
Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 84% 84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 26% 25%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $13,080,589 $5,994,153 $5,866,775
Current Assets $2,049,124 $595,184 $525,355
Long-Term Liabilities $532,646 $18,724 $658,669
Current Liabilities $908,567 $836,220 $814,691
Total Net Assets $11,639,376 $5,139,209 $4,393,415

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $2,423,277.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose Silent phase. Funds to be used for capital projects at our camping facilities.
Campaign Goal $5,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $1,500,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.26 0.71 0.64

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 4% 0% 11%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Please note, on July 1, 2015 the Boston Minuteman Council merged with the Yankee Clipper Council to become the Spirit of Adventure Council. The Spirit of Adventure Council is covered under the Boy Scouts of America's group exemption. The Boy Scouts of America IRS Letter of Determination is posted above along with a subordinate organization letter for your reference.
 
The Form 990s and audits posted above are that of the Spirit of Adventure Council (formerly Boston Minuteman Council). Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990 for FY15 and per the audited financials for FY14 and FY13. For FY14 and FY13 Other above includes capital campaign revenue. For FY14 & FY13 Other also includes gain on sale of land and conservation easement. Also, foundations and corporations above includes contributions from Friends of Scouting, for FY14 and FY13.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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