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Organization DBA --
Former Names Arch Foundation (2009)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

 The Gavin Foundation is dedicated to improving the quality of life for individuals in recovery by providing addiction prevention, treatment and support through the Gavin charities. These programs include AAWOL Rehabilitation Program, Center for Recovery Services, Cushing House Boys, Cushing House Girls, Devine Recovery Center, the Gavin House, Graduate Center Diversion Program, Phoenix House Quincy, Speakers for Hope, Total Immersion Program,  and the Walsh Community Center.  

Mission Statement

 The Gavin Foundation is dedicated to improving the quality of life for individuals in recovery by providing addiction prevention, treatment and support through the Gavin charities. These programs include AAWOL Rehabilitation Program, Center for Recovery Services, Cushing House Boys, Cushing House Girls, Devine Recovery Center, the Gavin House, Graduate Center Diversion Program, Phoenix House Quincy, Speakers for Hope, Total Immersion Program,  and the Walsh Community Center.  


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $5,087,000.00
Projected Expense $5,075,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community programs for All
  • Treatment Programs for Adults
  • Treatment Programs for Youth

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

 The Gavin Foundation is dedicated to improving the quality of life for individuals in recovery by providing addiction prevention, treatment and support through the Gavin charities. These programs include AAWOL Rehabilitation Program, Center for Recovery Services, Cushing House Boys, Cushing House Girls, Devine Recovery Center, the Gavin House, Graduate Center Diversion Program, Phoenix House Quincy, Speakers for Hope, Total Immersion Program,  and the Walsh Community Center.  


Background Statement

Gavin has a complex fast-paced history. It was founded in 1994 to provide substance abuse treatment to court-involved adult violent offenders through the Total Immersion Program (TIP) and AAWOL, as an alternative to incarceration, as part of an effort to effect the decriminalization of addiction and substance abuse.   

In 1997, our home community of South Boston looked to Gavin Foundation to take on a health crisis among its youth, an epidemic of teen suicides and substance abuse and addiction. In 1999 Gavin Foundation opened the first of two residential addiction treatment programs for adolescents, Cushing House for Boys, with enough space for 16 boys. In 2005 Gavin Foundation opened the second program, Cushing House for Girls, with space for 12. Both programs provide up to six months of residential treatment, although the usual length of stay is 90 days.

In 2006, Gavin took on decriminalization for court-involved youth with The Diversion Program, which provides court-involved youth with treatment as an alternative to incarceration.

In 2007, Gavin was selected to provide substance abuse counseling services for Massachusetts’ first “recovery” high school, the William J. Ostiguy High School, an alternative high school diploma program for young people whose capacity to succeed in a conventional public high school environment is limited by a history of substance abuse.

In 2008, Gavin merged with Arch Foundation, an older South Boston non-profit organization, which shared Board members and mission with Gavin Foundation. Arch Foundation, founded in 1963, operated a residential recovery home, Gavin House, a 33-bed program for men, and a Graduate (or Sober) House. The objective in merging Gavin and Arch Foundation was to economize administrative costs, so that program services could be better funded.

Beginning in 2009 Gavin worked to open the Center for Recovery Services, the first clinical outpatient addiction program developed especially for Boston school-age youth. Opened in early 2011, CRS fills a critical health care gap for school age youth and makes it easier for youth with addictions to receive treatment covered by health insurance while they stay at home and in school while they’re receiving treatment.


Impact Statement

Collaboration for more economic and effective delivery of services is essential to our work. Because of our long track record in the field of decriminalization of addiction, the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office selected the Gavin Foundation to implement Access to Recovery, which provides supports to enable persons released from incarceration to access addiction treatment and other services.

We established the Devine Recovery Center, a peer to peer recovery center.  The DRC is a place of support for those 18+ in recovery from various types of addiction. All members utilize the support provided at the center or offer their time and talents through volunteering and taking on leadership roles. 

With the advent of universal health care, the landscape for prevention and treatment for substance abuse and addiction is changing. Because more people are insured, more people are seeking and receiving treatment. Community based substance abuse treatment, education, and prevention programs are on the frontline in connecting the uninsured to their health care insurance and creating greater access to treatment. The Gavin Foundation’s top goal is to continue to expand the role we play in filling the many gaps in health care coverage that still exist for low-income youth and adults.

   


Needs Statement

 Our two top needs are interrelated; technology and managing growth.  We are in need of updated in-house technology resources for operational reasons. With universal health care we are beginning to capture more revenue due to increased reimbursable treatment for our clients. This, in turn, increases insurance billing reporting and medical record keeping requirements.  Additional staff and time is needed to perform related tasks efficiently. We are also in need of an integrated and uniform technology system across all our different programs and their sites. We now have an inherited amalgam of computers, software, and procedures. Ideally, all programs, sites, and staff would work on a common system.           


 


CEO Statement

From my view, Gavin Foundation’s greatest strength is that it is a community-based organization, rooted in the experience and commitment of people such as staff, Board members, volunteers, and former “clients,” (that is, people recovering from addiction), and their friends and families, who have experienced personally the consequences of addiction as well as the path to recovery.


The experience of addiction teaches that education, prevention, decriminalization, and treatment are all equally important components of the continuum of services Gavin provides. As we are rooted in a community of people in recovery, we know operating recovery homes is not the solution to substance abuse. Recovery homes are required because earlier other interventions and deterrents have failed. Decriminalization and our other programs work to reduce the need for recovery homes. Nor does our mission end when our residential clients have progressed enough in recovery for discharge. Full recovery (“late recovery” or “maintenance,”) requires fully reconnecting with family, friends and the community to achieve the restoration of responsibility and self-respect. Full recovery seldom takes less than 3 years.

So while we have many programs, all the programs are just faces of the same job, which is finding people where they are in addiction—in school, in court, on the streets, or in the hospital—and helping them recover from addiction with services no one else can supply. This is how the journey to self-help starts. Addiction is both a medically treatable illness and a disease.

That’s why people shouldn’t get the idea that universal health care is going to do away with addiction, or become the sole way of treating it. What is good is that, because more people are insured, more poor people are seeking and receiving treatment. This is changing old stereotypes about the nature of substance abuse, in which substance abuse and addiction was viewed as a “sin” or a kind of personal moral deficit. Universal health care is reframing this issue as an illness in need of prevention, treatment, and care. But this view can overlook the psychosocial dimension, which is where we come in. Delivering on the promise of universal health care for preventing and treating substance abuse and addiction is still a long way off.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
We are based in South Boston, with additional offices and treatment facilities in Charlestown, Quincy and Somerville. These facilities and our youth and adult decriminalization programs serve adjacent Boston neighborhoods, as well as cities around Boston.  Our diversion programs are associated with the criminal court systems in Dorchester, Quincy, Hingham, Somerville, Brighton and Charlestown, as well the Juvenile Courts associated with multiple neighborhoods of Boston.  

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Substance Abuse Dependency, Prevention & Treatment
  2. Human Services - Family Services
  3. Youth Development - Youth Centers and Clubs (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community programs for All

Gavin is community based substance abuse treatment,
education, and prevention program and we stress that the path to recovery replaces addiction with self-care, self-reliance and community responsibility.We need the friendship and resources of the community to keep our clients on the path to recovery. We need to help them with jobs, get them back in school, and keep them healthy.

Because we get so much from the community, we give back to the community when we can. For example, when a local community gym, the Walsh Center, was threatened with closure we stepped in to keep it open and operating. We work to secure and keep jobs, especially jobs for youth, in the neighborhood. We work with and support all the peer organizations in the community that strive to make this a better place for young people to grow up in. We have also opened an adult community center; a peer-to-peer center for individuals in recovery to connect with others in their community. Showing how to be a good citizen of the community starts with us.             
Budget  $45,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Helping people enroll in health care insurance is one short--term measure of success. As Michael Botticelli, Director of the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, has said “those with active addiction are not known for self-care behavior and enrolling in a health insurance program is not a top priority. Seeking care and treatment for addiction is often the first encounter clients have with any health care provider and provides us with a unique opportunity to help clients enroll in coverage.”

We would add to that, while enrolling in coverage is but a

first step, it does play an important role in helping addicts think about their addiction in a new way. It starts them on the course to self-care.

We can confirm that seeking care for their addiction is often the first encounter clients have with any health care provider.Over 16% of CRS’s 50 intakes are completed on individuals who have no health insurance when they applied for admission.
Program Long-Term Success 

By being a good citizen in the community, Gavin can help
transform social stereotypes about the nature of substance abuse and addiction that have hindered treatment for too long. This stereotype is that addiction is a personal “sin” or evidence of a character flaw. To a degree this stereotype is understandable, as the social and personal consequences of addiction are so severe and traumatic. In fact, none are more prone to accept the stereotype than addicts themselves. 

By working hand in hand with universal health care, Gavin Foundation can help reframe this stereotype of addiction, and recast addiction as an illness in need of prevention, treatment, and care. In the end, if our mission is truly “dedicated to the restoration of dignity to persons who are addicted to or abuse alcohol and drugs,” then sharing what addiction truly is with the community is just as important as helping individuals overcome addiction.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
That Gavin Foundation has acquired a positive reputation in the South Boston community and beyond is evidenced by the fact that many peer community organizations have partnered with us to provide addiction counseling services in cases where they lack that capacity. In 2006, Gavin was selected to provide the counseling services for the Ostiguy Recovery High School. In 2009 we began working with Young Adult Recovery Destination. In 2010 we partnered with St. Mary’s Women & Children Center to serve Phoenix House. In 2011 we were selected by the Suffolk County District Attorney to operate the Access to Recovery Program, which provide support to persons being released from prisons who have addictions.

Treatment Programs for Adults

Gavin’s treatment programs for young adults and adults include
residential addiction treatment (at Gavin House and Charlestown House)), two “half-way” houses (or sober houses), decriminalization programs, outpatient addiction treatment at the Center for Recovery Services, and Intensive Treatment Services (Detox and Stabilization Services) at Phoenix House Quincy.

Young adults and mature adults who abuse substances or
become addicted invariably have acquired a variety of other issues and problems, such as criminal involvement, long-term physical and mental health consequences, employment and job issues, and housing problems. For them recovery is a long road. Residential addiction treatment and sober houses offer an environment more conducive to recovery than the homeless shelters where so many
long-term alcoholics live without treatment. Our decriminalization programs for adults, supported with outpatient treatment at CRS, intervene at an earlier stage in the course of adult addiction.              

Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other
Population Served Adults College Aged (18-26 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
In general all our programs measure short-term success in
three ways,retention (that is,completing the course of treatment, be it at CRS or TIP),sobriety (remaining sober or addiction free as proved with drug testing), and evidences of improved psycho-social function. Evidences of improved psychosocial function can include a. no new criminal involvement, b. stable employment, and c. evidences of improved self-esteem, of improved conflict resolution and coping skills, of increased achievement motivation. All treatment programs aim to remodel addiction behaviors, to help the person suffering from addiction to see their dependency upon substances in a new light. That’s why retention is a baseline to successful addiction treatment, for it imposes the commitment to self-discipline that is the first step toward recovery.
Program Long-Term Success 

When residential addiction treatment and/or recovery
supportive housing is indicated for adults, it signals an addiction or alcoholism that has lasted many years, and hence has resulted in a variety of other issues and problems, such as impoverishment
and homelessness. Residential addiction treatment and/or recovery supportive housing provides these adults with the best possible course of treatment, as well as help with health care and economic issues. Residents at Gavin and our sober houses abide by house rules which require they be sober or addiction free, holding a job and self-supporting, and attending to their health needs.Residents typically attend and participate in AA.       

Treatment triggered by decriminalization programs or
provided at CRS is “short–term” by nature. A long-term measure of the success of decriminalization is recidivism. Generally about 50% admitted to TIP complete the program, and of the 50% who complete, only about 10-20% recidivate in 12 months.

Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  Examples of Program Success

Treatment Programs for Youth

For adolescents, Gavin provides residential addiction treatment, at Cushing House for Boys and Cushing House for Girls, and outpatient addiction treatment, at the Center for Recovery Services. We decriminalize adolescent substance abuse with The Diversion Program, providing court-involved youth with treatment as an alternative to incarceration, working with the Juvenile Courts associated with multiple neighborhoods of Boston. We provide the substance abuse counseling for Massachusetts’ first “recovery” high school, the William J. Ostiguy High School.

Budget  $1,829,684.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Substance Abuse
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program Short-Term Success 
All our youth programs--residential treatment, outpatient
treatment, and the Diversion Program, and the Recovery High School--have somewhat different markers for short-term success. Often our youth “pass” from one program to another, for example, from residential treatment at Cushing to the Recovery High School, or from the Diversion Program to residential treatment at Cushing. Residential treatment is an expensive and less than optimal outcome. Successful diversion, prevention, and outpatient treatment are preferable as they’re all more economic and more likely to keep abuse from becoming addiction.
The nature of addiction recovery is such that no short-term
success is acceptable unless it leads to long-term success. Full recovery (“late recovery” or “maintenance,”) requires fully reconnecting with family, friends and the community to achieve the restoration of responsibility and self-respect. Full recovery seldom takes less than 3 years.
Program Long-Term Success 

For the young people we serve, the path to recovery invariably leads back to school: to getting back in, if they’ve dropped out; to
trying harder, if they’re failing; to a new or different kind of school, if necessary. Young people who abuse or are addicted to drugs, whatever the reason or circumstances, cannot aspire to self-respect and self-reliance, or to a job or a valued place in the community, without the benefits of a good education.

Our role is to provide the intensive care and community of
recovery that would not otherwise be present in their schools, neighborhoods, or families. That is how we are partners with schools when, in helping young people overcome their addictions, we contribute to their better understanding of themselves and their life experiences. 

Program Success Monitored By 

All our programs use common tools to measure two factors
that indicate successful treatment, the two factors being sobriety and evidences of improved psychosocial function.Sobriety can be measured objectively with drug testing. Specific evidences of improved psychosocial function vary, depending upon whether the adolescent is in residential treatment (at Cushing House), inpatient treatment (at CRS), addiction counseling  (at the Recovery High School), or court involved (the Diversion Program). Retention, that is, completing the required course of treatment for each specific program, is a composite measure of both factors.

Examples of Program Success 

Gavin's expansion from residential treatment programs to working in schools and with the courts has made a difference in young lives saved and young lives turned around, herein South Boston and beyond. From 1999 to 2003, the substance abuse mortality rate among Boston adolescents increased by 50.6%. In the late 90s, South Boston had one of the highest rates of teen mortality due to substance abuse and suicide in the city. Then in 2003 teen mortality due to substance abuse in South Boston (as we all as in Boston overall) reversed course and began to decline; down by 18.1% from 2003 to 2004. According to Health of Boston 2007,by 2007 South Boston's teen mortality rate due to substance abuse was back to the average for all Boston's neighborhoods.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr John McGahan
CEO Term Start Dec 1994
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

John has led Gavin Foundation since it was founded in 1994 to work with the criminal justice system to decriminalize addiction. Under his leadership, Gavin has grown at a fast pace and become one of the most respected, trusted, and comprehensive community-based addiction education, prevention, and treatment programs in greater Boston. John is a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC I), Certified Addiction Specialist (CAS), and a Certified Domestic Violence Counselor. He is the Vice President of the MA Recovery Homes Collaborative, sits on the Board of Directors of the Action for Boston Community Development and South Boston Association of Non Profits and is a member of the South Boston Hope & Recovery Coalition. John has received several awards from faith based, local civic and labor organizations for his dedication to improve access and quality of substance abuse treatment.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Joseph Kelleher Business Manager While a newcomer to Gavin Foundation, Joeis not a stranger to our work, having served atHope House for 14 years as the Business Manager and then as Clinical Supervisor. In addition to attending to our finances, Joe brings his experience and qualifications in the frontline of addiction counseling and nonprofit management to Gavin Foundation.Joseph is a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC I) and has completed Substance Abuse Training Course at UMass Boston. Joseph earned a degree in Sociology from Holy Cross and is currently the Practicum Supervisor at UMass Boston for the Substance Abuse Counseling Program. Joseph was also the Director of the Sullivan House for three years. In addition to his work experience, Joseph is the Treasurer of the Massachusetts Organization for Addiction Recovery (MOAR), he sits on the Board of Directors of Improbable Players, and sits on the Board of Directors for the Massachusetts Association of Alcohol and Drug Counselors.
Ms. Barbara Samek Clinical Director Barbara brings 23 years of experience in clinical and counseling services in the substance abuse treatment field to her job here at Gavin providing clinical supervision and support to all direct care staff and Program Managers. Barbara oversees the Center for Recovery Services. Barbara is a graduate of Westfield State College (majoring in Criminal Justice) and then went on to earn a Masters of Social Work from Simmons College. She also is a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC I) and is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker (LICSW).Before joining Gavin, Barbara served as a Clinical Social Worker for Dimock Behavioral Health in Roxbury, a Clinical Coordinator at Mental Clinical Care in Boston, and as a Social Worker at Boston Veteran’s Administration Medical Center and Brighton-Dimock Early Intervention Program.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Behavioral Health - 1 Year Accreditation 2011

Collaborations

William J. Ostiguy High School: Gavin Foundation’s and Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD) collaborated to open the William J. Ostiguy High School in September 2006, specifically to provide a safe, sober and supportive school environment in which youth in recovery can develop skills and strengths needed for personal, academic, vocational and community success. Youth affected by substance misuse often experience substantial educational losses – losing time and opportunities for achievement while using drugs and alcohol, and facing considerable obstacles to school re-entry when sober. The Ostiguy High School addresses these challenges directly
 
Young Adult Recovery Destinations: The YARD Project is a collaboration with the Institute for Health and Recovery, and  Massachusetts Organization for Addiction and Recovery. It is funded by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration/Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, to serve young adults, ages 18–24, in recovery from substance use. Located in Boston.  
Phoenix House of New England:   Gavin provides sunstance abuse assessments and treatment to women in the family treatment facility in Dorchester.  Our clinical supervisor provides on-site training and supervison to their clinical staff. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 36
Number of Part Time Staff 48
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 92%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 77
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 27
Male: 57
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Lt William Ostiguy
Board Chair Company Affiliation Boston Fire Department
Board Chair Term July 2012 - June 2016
Board Co-Chair Mrs Donna Bohan
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Verizon
Board Co-Chair Term July 2012 - June 2016

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Peter Barbuto Treatment Solutions Voting
Ms. Donna Bohan Verizon Voting
Ms. Ann Casey Social Worker Voting
Ms. Dorothy Dunford Suffolk County Voting
Ms. Andrea Flaherty Tufts University Voting
Mr. William J. Halpin Jr. South Boston Community Health Center Voting
Mr. Tommy Howard Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Katy Kenneally Kelly Chief Counsel, Dept. of Transportation Voting
Ms. Margaret Lynch South Boston Community Health Center Voting
Mr. Brian Nee Boston Fire Department Voting
Mr. Willy Ostiguy Boston Fire Department-Retired Voting
Mr. Stephen Passacantilli City of Boston Voting
Ms. Michelle Patrick Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department Voting
Mr. Dennis Rorie Boston Police Department Voting
Mr. Kevin Smith Boston Public Schools Voting
Mr. James Travers CBRE New England Voting
Mr. Paul Tryder Caritas Voting
Fr. Joseph White St. Vincent De Paul Parish Voting
Mr. Charles Yetman Wise Street Transitional Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 17
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 10
Board Term Limits 10
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $5,087,000.00
Projected Expense $5,075,000.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $5,680,186 $4,672,979 $3,779,223
Total Expenses $5,313,893 $4,635,644 $3,606,356

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $55,066
Government Contributions $4,840,893 $4,082,195 $3,104,497
    Federal -- $81,902 --
    State -- $3,534,475 --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $4,840,893 $465,818 $3,104,497
Individual Contributions $233,354 $218,165 $173,760
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $450,593 $340,522 $323,691
Investment Income, Net of Losses $13,190 $18,842 $1,950
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $127,385 $3,404 $6,896
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $14,771 $9,851 $113,363

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $4,696,278 $4,150,590 $3,504,718
Administration Expense $617,615 $485,054 $101,638
Fundraising Expense $0 -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.07 1.01 1.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses 88% 90% 97%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $1,799,472 $1,298,679 $1,213,797
Current Assets $1,075,828 $581,135 $533,509
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $262,292 $165,899 $137,507
Total Net Assets $1,537,180 $1,132,780 $1,076,290

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.10 3.50 3.88

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data, charts, and graphs are per the 990. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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