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Organization DBA CfJJ
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Citizens for Juvenile Justice (CfJJ) is the only independent, non-profit, statewide organization working exclusively to improve the juvenile justice system in Massachusetts. We advocate, conduct research, and educate the public on important juvenile justice issues. We believe that both children in the system and public safety are best served by a fair and effective system that recognizes the ways children are different than adults and focuses primarily on their rehabilitation.

Mission Statement

Citizens for Juvenile Justice (CfJJ) is the only independent, non-profit, statewide organization working exclusively to improve the juvenile justice system in Massachusetts. We advocate, conduct research, and educate the public on important juvenile justice issues. We believe that both children in the system and public safety are best served by a fair and effective system that recognizes the ways children are different than adults and focuses primarily on their rehabilitation.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $599,300.00
Projected Expense $599,245.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Advocacy for a Fair and Effective Juvenile Justice System

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Citizens for Juvenile Justice (CfJJ) is the only independent, non-profit, statewide organization working exclusively to improve the juvenile justice system in Massachusetts. We advocate, conduct research, and educate the public on important juvenile justice issues. We believe that both children in the system and public safety are best served by a fair and effective system that recognizes the ways children are different than adults and focuses primarily on their rehabilitation.


Background Statement

In the 1990s, every state in the country adopted draconian policies that increasingly treated children in trouble with the law as adults. In the midst of this “moral panic”, CfJJ was founded to provide an independent, rational voice for a fair and effective juvenile justice system in Massachusetts. Since 1994, we have participated in, and often led, all the major juvenile justice policy debates in the Commonwealth, advocating for smart policies that prevent crime, help youth develop into healthy and productive citizens, and use scarce resources wisely. We have fought measures that automatically treat children as adults and focused more on punishment than rehabilitation. We have led multiple major campaigns to raise awareness of issues and to implement reform.

CfJJ accepts no government funding and is thus uniquely positioned as an independent organization, able to challenge policies and practices that others often cannot. Moreover, we are uniquely positioned at the hub of the system, working with all branches of government, multiple private agencies, as well as impacted youth and families. We are well-connected to experts and advocates across the country.

We ground all of our work in solid data and constantly advocate for the collection of comprehensive statistical (non-identifying) data by the Commonwealth. We produce reports and fact sheets; organize conferences, forums and events; communicate via traditional and social media; serve on multiple coalitions and advisory committees; and meet and seek input regularly with a wide variety of system stakeholders, including families, community groups, law enforcement, Probation, prosecutors, defense attorneys, mental health clinicians, and Department of Youth Services administrators and providers.

 


Impact Statement

In the past few years, we successfully advocated to raise the age of juvenile court jurisdiction to bring seventeen year olds into our juvenile system; worked to end life without parole sentences for children in Massachusetts; and published multiple reports on systemic reform issues. Other recent accomplishments include:

(1) Leading a statewide Juvenile Justice Reform coalition to promote a package of legislation to prevent the unnecessary involvement of children in the juvenile justice system; and ensure effective and developmentally appropriate treatment of youth in the system. Our legislation passed the Senate, but was not taken up by the House prior to the end of the legislative session.

(2) CfJJ is conducting a project to assist youth in Massachusetts who are involved in the juvenile justice system and at least one other state care system, particularly child welfare and mental health. CfJJ recently released a data-driven report, “Missed Opportunities: Preventing Child Welfare Involved Youth from Entering the Juvenile Justice System”

(3) CfJJ is promoting transparent, evidence-based, and community-responsive diversion, or alternatives to formal court processing. Strategies include legislative advocacy and work with police and DAs to support their development of fair, research-informed pre-arraignment diversion programs.

(4) CfJJ helped co-found and staff the Child Welfare & Juvenile Justice Leadership Forum, a “collective impact” group of Massachusetts juvenile justice and child welfare system leaders serving as its “backbone organization”

CfJJ has a four-year strategic plan focused on four key issues: reducing the flow of children into the juvenile justice system; ensuring that policies and practices within the system are developmentally appropriate and promote effective rehabilitation; working to end the treatment of youth as “adults,” particularly in the context of sentencing in murder cases; and working to reduce racial and ethnic disparities across the system.


Needs Statement

CfJJ hopes to create a statewide network of youth, parents, and community groups interested in advocating for and developing community-responsive alternatives to court processing. CfJJ needs dedicated staff to organize youth, families and other stakeholders to develop a statewide diversion plan. The network would inform and strengthen CfJJ’s advocacy and broaden the political base for other reform. $70,000.

Expand the Story Bank we began as part of our Justice for Kids campaign to include stories of youth in the juvenile system and their families. These stories could then be used to produce videos, blog postings, and other materials to educate the public about the juvenile justice system, illustrate particular issues and amplify the voices of court-involved youth and their families. $40,000.

Revamping our website and online media to increase the accessibility of our research, public education events and other resources including the creation of interactive features, and including flow charts and graphics to map the juvenile system. $10,000.

 


CEO Statement

CfJJ is the only independent, statewide organization working exclusively to improve the juvenile justice system in Massachusetts. We believe that both children and public safety are best served by a system that recognizes the ways in which children are different than adults and focuses primarily on their rehabilitation. Our goals are to include kids in the juvenile system who are now consigned to the adult system, keep kids out of the juvenile system who don’t belong there, and ensure that when kids do enter the juvenile system, they are treated fairly and effectively.


CfJJ is governed by an active Board that includes distinguished leaders from across the juvenile justice community. CfJJ works to ensure that every issue we focus on will have a direct, positive impact on the lives of the young people and families who are directly impacted by the system. We consult with youth and families as we develop our advocacy agenda and in our campaigns. For every campaign, we work carefully to identify the best strategies to accomplish our goals, from coalition building and maintaining a motivated network of allies and supporters, to formal and informal lobbying, to grassroots and stakeholder trainings, to convening system leaders, not to mention data analysis, public education, and media outreach. Some 23 agencies across the Commonwealth that work with at-risk youth support, inform, and participate in CfJJ’s advocacy as organizational members.

CfJJ is in the midst of carrying out a multi-year effort to promote systemic reform through four strategic goals: keeping young people out of the adult criminal justice system; promoting efforts to keep children out of the juvenile justice system whenever possible, and at home if they enter the system; making the system itself more developmentally appropriate; and reducing the toxic racial and ethnic disparities that plague our system.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
STATEWIDE
Massachusetts

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Children's Rights
  2. Youth Development - Alliances & Advocacy
  3. Crime & Legal - Related - Youth Violence Prevention

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Advocacy for a Fair and Effective Juvenile Justice System

CfJJ is the leading voice for systemic juvenile justice reform in Massachusetts.  Our current advocacy focuses on reducing the flow of children into the juvenile justice system; ensuring that policies and practices within the system are developmentally appropriate and promote effective rehabilitation; working to end the treatment of youth as “adults,” particularly in the context of sentencing in murder cases; and working to reduce racial and ethnic disparities across the system.  Three current projects that arise out of these goals are (1) the Massachusetts Child Welfare & Juvenile Justice Leadership Forum, which brings together system leaders to develop a shared vision for systemic improvement and to focus on reducing racial and ethnic disparities; (2) the Multi-system Youth Project, which examines the causes of youth in other systems of care (child welfare, behavioral health) entering the juvenile justice system and seeks reforms aimed at preventing their entry; and (3) the Community Responsive Diversion Network, which seeks to engage youth and families in designing community-based alternatives to court processing and confinement.


CfJJ also speaks out on new issues as they arise and often serve as a source for media contacts. We lead or participate in multiple coalitions and advisory committees to help shape policy. Finally, we work to increase public understanding of the juvenile system through educational events, reports, fact sheets, and multiple forms of electronic communication.

Budget  $599,300.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Children's Rights
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  Passage of legislation or enactment of policies that reflect organizational advocacy goals. Greater numbers of organizations or individuals engaged in our advocacy campaigns. Completion of research reports or other public materials documenting system failures.
Program Long-Term Success 

It is our vision that the work of CfJJ will improve the life outcomes for young people who come in contact with the justice system by creating a juvenile justice system that (1) ensures that every child is treated in a developmentally appropriate fashion, including being kept out of the adult system and treated humanely and appropriately while they are in the juvenile system; (2) keeps children who can be better served in the community out of the juvenile justice system altogether; and (3) treats every young person in our system fairly so that no group of youth will bear a larger burden because of their race, gender, sexual orientation, disability status, where they live, or involvement in other state systems of care. We believe that, by treating children fairly and supporting their healthy development, they will grow up to be happy, responsible and productive adults in our communities.

Program Success Monitored By  Regular review of data on youth in the juvenile justice system by CfJJ staff, ideally that reflects on positive long-term life outcomes for youth (educational achievement, housing, employment, etc.). Interviews with systems stakeholders regarding issues and implementation of reforms. Conferences and other convenings to solicit input and feedback on programs. Regular one-on-one meetings with Coalition members and other partners.
Examples of Program Success 

See Impact statement.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Naoka Carey Esq.
CEO Term Start July 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Naoka Carey joined CfJJ in September 2011 as its Senior Policy Associate, and became its Executive Director in July 2013. Prior to her work at CfJJ, Naoka worked as the coordinator of the Massachusetts Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth at the Youth Advocacy Department at CPCS. She has worked in private practice as a civil litigator and at a number of organizations serving youth in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems, including the Children's Law Center of Washington, D.C. and the Juvenile Rights Division of the Legal Aid Society in New York. She has also worked as a youth organizer and trainer in Seattle and Boston. Naoka is a graduate of Harvard College and New York University School of Law, where she represented youth in the juvenile justice system as part of the Juvenile Rights Clinic. Prior to attending law school, she received a Master's Degree in Education from Harvard, focusing on adolescent risk and prevention.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Lael E. H. Chester Esq. Feb 2001 June 2013
Jack Gately Sept 1998 Dec 2000

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Sana Fadel Deputy Director Sana Fadel joined CfJJ in December 2014. Prior to joining CfJJ, Sana was the Director of Public Policy at Rosie’s Place, a sanctuary for poor and homeless women in Boston. She was the lead organizer of the statewide advocacy campaigns on access to substance abuse treatment, strengthening families involved with the child welfare system, and most recently, improving service for customers applying for and receiving public benefits. She was responsible for advocating at the state-level on issues affecting Rosie’s Place guests as well as empowering them through voter mobilization and advocacy trainings. Sana holds a Masters in Public Administration from Columbia University, New York and a Bachelors of Fine Arts from Augusta State University, Georgia.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Nonprofit Excellence Award: Finalist in the Category of Advocacy Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2015
Embracing the Legacy Robert F. Kennedy Children's Action Corps 2011
Women of Justice Massachusetts Women's Bar Association and Lawyers Weekly 2009
Jay D. Blitzman Youth Advocacy Award Committee for Public Counsel Services 2004

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 3
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Arab
Gender Female: 4
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Virginia Benzan
Board Chair Company Affiliation U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Board Chair Term Oct 2015 - Oct 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term - 2011

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Richard Barnum Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist in private practice Voting
Virginia Benzan Visiting Clinical Professor, Suffolk University Law School Voting
Penelope Billington Hunt Eastern Bank Voting
Josh Dohan Youth Advocacy Department, Committee for Public Counsel Services Voting
Kalila Jackson-Spieker Root Cause Voting
William Lyttle The Key Program Voting
Daniel Nakamoto Mental Health Association of Greater Lowell Voting
Christopher Perry Morse, Barnes-Brown & Pendleton PC Voting
Rebecca Pries Adolescent Consultation Services Voting
Jeanne Schuster Ernst & Young Voting
Scott Taberner Massachusetts Behavioral Health Partnership Voting
Soledad Valenciano Revocation Panel Attorney, Youth Advocacy Department, Committee for Public Counsel Services Voting
Susan Wayne Doc Wayne Athletic League Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $599,300.00
Projected Expense $599,245.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2015 Review

2014 Review

2013 Review

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Review

2009 Review

2008 Review

2007 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $451,560 $387,605 $318,632
Total Expenses $348,433 $328,602 $298,137

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $382,776 $353,391 $300,005
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $37,659 $17,160 $12,021
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $31,125 $17,054 $6,606
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $249,550 $216,550 $200,051
Administration Expense $41,889 $83,292 $65,077
Fundraising Expense $56,994 $28,760 $33,009
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.30 1.18 1.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses 72% 66% 67%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 14% 8% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,299,631 $1,015,616 $956,613
Current Assets $225,627 $166,848 $224,729
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,303 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $1,298,328 $1,015,616 $956,613

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 173.16 -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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