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South Shore Community Action Council Inc.

 71 Obery Street
 Plymouth, MA 02360
[P] (508) 747-7575
[F] (508) 747-1250
www.sscac.org
jcocio@sscac.org
Jack Cocio
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INCORPORATED: 1965
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-6125732

LAST UPDATED: 11/26/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of South Shore Community Action Council is to eliminate poverty along the south shore by affording everyone in need the opportunities for education, training and work; to live with dignity; to contribute to the full extent of their capabilities; and to participate in the workings of our society. 

Mission Statement

The mission of South Shore Community Action Council is to eliminate poverty along the south shore by affording everyone in need the opportunities for education, training and work; to live with dignity; to contribute to the full extent of their capabilities; and to participate in the workings of our society. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $20,486,705.00
Projected Expense $20,308,102.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Food Resources Program
  • Fuel Assistance
  • South Shore Early Education
  • Transportation

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of South Shore Community Action Council is to eliminate poverty along the south shore by affording everyone in need the opportunities for education, training and work; to live with dignity; to contribute to the full extent of their capabilities; and to participate in the workings of our society. 

Background Statement

South Shore Community Action Council, Inc. (SSCAC), a private, non-profit community action agency, works to increase opportunities and improve the quality of life for low-income individuals and families throughout the South Shore. Founded under the auspices of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 and the War on Poverty, SSCAC remains true to its mission of helping low-income individuals and families attain the skills and access opportunities to live up to their fullest potential and achieve greater economic self-sufficiency. SSCAC provides a wide range of programs and services in the areas of Early Childhood Education and Development, Energy Assistance and Conservation, Transportation, Nutrition and Food Assistance, and Financial Self-sufficiency.

Impact Statement

Since its founding in 1965, SSCAC has grown to serve over 21,000 low income people of all ages each year. Our top accomplishments of the past year include: * Our Fuel Assistance Program worked with over 55 non-profit community partners to provide home heating assistance for nearly 8,900 low income people, 40% of whom are over the age of 70 and living on fixed income. * Our South Shore Early Education program provided high quality early education and care for 427 preschoolers and 132 infants/toddlers. We began expansion of the school day and school year for Head Start and Early Head Start in Marshfield and Plymouth to low income parents with much-needed, full day/full year child care so they can participate in post-secondary education, job training, or full-time employment. * Our Food Resources Program collected, stored, and distributed 489,231 emergency food to fight hunger and food insecurity on the South Shore. Of the nearly half million pounds of food collected, nearly 306,000 pounds of food were locally donated, far surpassing the program’s goal of 205,000 pounds. Our Food Resources Program supplies this locally donated food to over 50 soup kitchens, food pantries, shelters, Boys & Girls Clubs, Councils on Aging, and other food assistance providers working to end hunger on the South Shore. * Our Transportation Program provided 1,157 elderly and/or disabled passengers with 167,723 trips for medical, rehabilitation, and other critical appointments, including a pilot collaboration with the Randolph Council on Aging to centralize and coordinate handicap-accessible transportation for their elderly clients. Centralization of scheduling at SSCAC alleviated logistical strain on the Randolph COA and resulted in more reliable and efficient transportation services provided by SSCAC for Randolph's elderly residents. * With the retirement of SSCAC's long-standing Executive Director, SSCAC's Board of Directors skillfully oversaw the executive succession, hiring, and smooth transition to a new Chief Executive Officer. In FY17, SSCAC completed a comprehensive Community Assessment and Strategic Planning process. Our Community and Internal Assessments revealed the need for continued or expanded services provided by SSCAC, combined with linkages with external community partners providing services that do not comport with SSCAC’s mission or current capacity. The top community and internal agency needs and SSCAC’s strategic goals align with the 3 National Goals for Community Action: * Individuals and families with low incomes are stable and achieve economic security. * Communities where people with low incomes live are healthy and offer economic opportunity. * People with low incomes are engaged and active in building opportunities in communities. For the current year, SSCAC's top goals include: * Our Fuel Assistance Program will work with over 55 non-profit community partners to provide home heating assistance for nearly 8,800 low income people. * Our South Shore Early Education program will provide high quality early education and care for 365 low income preschoolers and 85 infants/toddlers. * Our Food Resources Program aims to collect, store, and distribute 465,000 pounds of emergency food to fight hunger and food insecurity on the South Shore, including 285,000 pounds of local food donations. * Our Transportation Program will provide 1,300 elderly and/or disabled passengers with 190,000 trips for medical, rehabilitation, and other critical needs.

Needs Statement

During 2016 - 2017, SSCAC completed a comprehensive Community Needs Assessment and Strategic Planning process. From all primary and secondary data sources, a clear and consistent picture of community needs emerges. Low income individuals and families in SSCAC’s service area continue to struggle to earn livable wages and have basic needs for affordable housing, affordable and nutritious food, high quality, affordable childcare, heat and utilities, transportation, and help with substance abuse (specifically opioids). In response to the Great Recession, the number of people in need of assistance grew considerably and, though declining, has yet to return to pre-Recession levels even after 8 years since the Recession officially ended. The top 3 needs identified through our Community Needs Assessment were:1) affordable housing, including home heating and utilities; 2) affordable and healthy food; and 3) accessible transportation. SSCAC receives local, state, and federal support for its services that help make housing more affordable and for transportation for elderly and disabled south shore residents. Our Food Resources Program is nearly entirely supported by local food donations and private fundraising.  

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
SSCAC employs more than 180 people across 5 locations on the South Shore, Cape Cod, and the Islands. SSCAC’s administrative office and its main program offices are located at 71 Obery Street in Plymouth. SSCAC also operates two South Shore Early Education centers in Plymouth and Marshfield. In addition to its main intake office at our Obery Street facility in Plymouth, our Fuel Assistance program maintains an intake office in Hyannis and partners with Dukes County Services in Edgartown on Martha’s Vineyard. SSCAC’s 11 incorporating towns are Carver, Duxbury, Hanover, Hull, Kingston, Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Plymouth, Plympton, and Scituate. Through our Fuel Assistance and Transportation Programs, our service area extends to an additional 70 towns in the Southeast, Cape Cod, and the Islands.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Human Services
  2. Education - Preschools
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community Coalitions

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Food Resources Program

Our Food Resources Program aims to get more nutrient-dense food to greater numbers of hungry Plymouth County residents in the most cost-effective way. The Program implements a range of services to collect, store, and distribute a half million pounds of emergency food throughout Plymouth County each year FREE-OF-CHARGE, with targeted distribution to vulnerable elders and children. Food Distribution Center: Founded in 2004, our Center has over 60 members, including pantries, soup kitchens, Councils on Aging, homeless shelters, Boys & Girls Clubs, and more. Twice per week, members come to our Center to “shop” for non- perishable food, frozen foods, fresh produce, proteins, and other perishable foods. Members then bring the food back to their home communities to distribute to hungry people of all ages. Community Food Collection: We collect locally donated food through a network of partners that host collection bins, run food drives, and participate in our Food Recovery Initiative, including businesses, schools, religious institutions, restaurants, grocery stores, food manufacturers, and more. Shared Storage: We provide secure storage at our Center for food from the Greater Boston Food Bank purchased by 6 members whose own facilities cannot store all of the food needed to fight hunger in their towns. Healthy Harvest: During the summer, we transport produce from 5 local farms and to 30 Plymouth County non-profit partners for their low income clients, including 2 Head Starts, 2 Boys & Girls Clubs, 3 senior housing, 2 homeless shelters, and 15 COAs. Children’s Access and Senior Access: Each month, Center staff and volunteers pack grocery bags with food and distribute them free of charge to low income people at 2 Head Starts, a low income housing development, and 9 COAs. Through our Backpack Food for Kids project, PTA volunteers from 12 elementary schools come to our Center each week to collect food that is sent home with low income school children in inconspicuous backpacks to ensure they have enough food to eat during weekends and school vacations.
Budget  $650,647.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success  In FY17, the Food Resources Program achieved the following outcomes: * 305,797 pounds of locally donated food collected (annual goal = 205,000 pounds) * 180,682 pounds of food from the Greater Boston Food Bank stored at SSCAC's Food Distribution Center for center members to distribute in their home communities (annual goal = 245,000 pounds) * 12,649 pounds of farm-fresh fruits and vegetables collected through Healthy Harvest (annual goal = 10,000 pounds) * 68 Food Distribution Center members (annual goal = 45 members) * 4,764 hours of volunteer service donated to the Program (annual goal = 3,952) 
Program Long-Term Success  Started in 2004, the Food Resources Program collected approximately 40,000 pounds in the first year of operating its Food Distribution Center. Through the coordination of community partners in the region, the Program has dramatically increased the regional capacity to respond to hunger and food insecurity on the south shore. Prior to our Food Distribution Center, individual food pantries, soup kitchens, churches, and others struggled to collect and distribute food donations. These food assistance providers were often supported by part-time volunteers and simply did not have the capacity to raise the food and funding needed to meet the needs in their communities. With the centralization and coordination of food collection, storage, and distribution through our Food Resources Program and its Food Distribution Center, SSCAC has greatly strengthened the regional emergency food assistance system and take a leadership role in sustaining this service delivery model.
Program Success Monitored By  SSCAC utilizes a range of tools to evaluate program performance and client satisfaction, including but not limited to the Results Oriented Management and Accounting (ROMA) system through which we engage in a continuous cycle of assessing community and internal needs and resources, plan programs and services, collect data to evaluate our effectiveness, and report on agency-wide programs and services for CSBG. Each year, SSCAC develops an annual community action plan. For each annual community action plan, SSCAC’s Director of Planning and Development works with Program Directors and Managers to review performance trends, establish annual targets, and identify tracking mechanisms. The annual community action plan is reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. At mid-year and as needed, SSCAC evaluates ongoing progress toward meeting annual targets for program outcomes and outputs. These mid-year evaluations and final annual outcomes are reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors.
Examples of Program Success  Our Food Resources Program partners with preschools and elementary schools to ensure children have nutritious snacks and enough food to eat during weekends and vacations. The mother of a child who receives food through our Backpack Food for Kids service recently wrote to us: "I have been receiving snacks for a few weeks now. As my son eats a lot of snacks during snack break this service has helped me tremendously. The snacks provided are healthy and my child, who is a picky eater, has not complained about any of the snacks. With the help of snacks, I am able to afford more food for my child at home while also provider healthier meals. I love that the snacks are shelf sustainable." Her son has a medical condition that requires he eat a large quantity of snacks during his school day, so the snacks he receives are an important component of his health regimen.

Fuel Assistance

SSCAC’s Fuel Assistance Program helps pay for home heating fuel and utilities for families with incomes up to 60% of the State Median Income. The largest funding source for the Fuel Assistance program is the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). LIHEAP fuel assistance benefit levels are based upon household poverty level and are established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’s fuel assistance plan each year. For client intake and application processing, SSCAC operates two offices in Plymouth and Hyannis, partners with Dukes County Services in Edgartown on Martha’s Vineyard, and coordinates a network of 56 local volunteer intake sites to accept applications throughout the South Shore, Cape Cod, and the Islands. SSCAC makes payments on behalf of Fuel Assistance clients directly to over 140 energy vendors. SSCAC’s Fuel Assistance program also administers funds for supplemental energy assistance programs that help pay for home heating fuel and utilities. Each of these programs provides additional fuel assistance benefits to fuel assistance clients who meet eligibility requirements set forth by each funding source. In FY17, the Fuel Assistance Program served 8,879 households in over 100 cities, towns, and villages on the South Shore, Cape Cod, and the Islands.
Budget  $6,961,077.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing Expense Assistance
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Elderly and/or Disabled Families
Program Short-Term Success  In FY17, the Fuel Assistance Program achieved the following outcomes: * 10,430 applications processed (Annual projection @ 11,100 household applications) * 8,879 households received Fuel Assistance (Annual projection @ 9,150 households) * 749 high-consumption households received additional fuel assistance benefit and priority points for Weatherization (Annual projection @ 850 high-consumption households) * $5,919,070 in Fuel Assistance vendor payments
Program Long-Term Success  Fuel Assistance staff work with all Fuel Assistance applicants to determine eligibility LIHEAP and/or other services, and to make referrals to other agency programs thereby offering more coordinated and comprehensive services. In FY18, we expect to conduct eligibility determinations for 100% of the 10,500 anticipated Fuel Assistance applicant households and will make internal referrals for 420 households for additional services provided by SSCAC, including supplemental fuel assistance provided by other private and public sources or emergency food assistance provided by our Food Resources Program. To make applying for Fuel Assistance accessible, SSCAC partners with public and private organizations throughout the South Shore, Cape Cod, and the Islands as volunteer outreach/intake sites. Fuel Assistance makes direct payments for home heating fuel and utilities on behalf of clients to over 140 energy vendors each year. Community Level Outcomes To Be Achieved: Annual projection @ 55 ongoing partnerships with volunteer outreach sites Annual projection @ 144 ongoing partnerships with fuel vendors Annual projection @ a minimum of 112 volunteers who will participate in annual Fuel Assistance training Annual projection @ a minimum of 280 volunteer hours donated during training
Program Success Monitored By  SSCAC utilizes a range of tools to evaluate program performance and client satisfaction, including but not limited to the Results Oriented Management and Accounting (ROMA) system through which we engage in a continuous cycle of assessing community and internal needs and resources, plan programs and services, collect data to evaluate our effectiveness, and report on agency-wide programs and services Each year, SSCAC develops an annual community action plan. Over the next 3 years, our community action plans will be informed by the agency’s 2018 – 2020 Community Assessment Report and Strategic Plan (CARSP). For each annual community action plan, SSCAC’s Director of Planning and Development works with Program Directors and Managers to review performance trends, establish annual targets, and identify tracking mechanisms. In developing SSCAC’s annual community action plan, the Directors and Managers also review the annual objectives and targets established in this CARSP. The annual community action plan is reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. At mid-year and as needed, Directors and Managers evaluate ongoing progress toward meeting annual targets for program outcomes and outputs. These mid-year evaluations and final annual outcomes are reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. Annual program evaluation incorporates review of and reporting on progress toward yearly outcomes as identified in our CARSP. In addition to this ROMA system, Program Directors and Managers implement similar program development and evaluation systems that are unique and specific to their individual programs. All of SSCAC’s programs develop annual targets, track performance, and report to their respective funding sources, often using proprietary software and databases as mandated by their funders. To the extent possible, SSCAC works to coordinate and streamline these various program development, evaluation, and reporting systems. Further, all Program Directors and Managers prepare monthly program updates and progress reports for SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. Finally, individual programs conduct client satisfaction surveys for activities, services, and overall program operations to provide our clients with opportunities for providing feedback and input about our service provision. In so doing, SSCAC engages in an ongoing cycle of data collection and customer feedback that ensures the highest quality of service and engages our clients and communities in the ROMA cycle of planning, implementation, and evaluation. In sum, the ROMA cycle builds off and sustains our community in action.
Examples of Program Success  According to the MA Department of Housing and Community Development’s Fiscal Year 2012 LIHEAP Annual Report (the most recent date of reporting), it is estimated that Fuel Assistance helped reduce low-income households’ energy burden from 13% to 9% of household income paid toward home heating costs. Customer satisfaction surveys show positive feedback on our Fuel Assistance program: “They have helped us with oil the past 2 years. It has been greatly appreciated.” "Fuel oil kept us warm. Otherwise, went cold."

South Shore Early Education

SSCAC’s South Shore Early Education program (SSEE) operates two child care centers in Plymouth and Marshfield. SSEE provides early education and care for low income infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Services include Early Head Start infant/toddler care and Head Start preschool. We contract with the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) and accept EEC child care vouchers to provide subsidized preschool services on a sliding scale for low income families. SSEE also serves children who attend as private pay. SSEE offers bus transportation to/from school, nutritious meals and snacks, health and dental screenings, social services, parenting support and education, and extended day care for working parents.
Budget  $6,451,610.00
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Families
Program Short-Term Success  In FY17, SSCAC's South Shore Early Education Program served 427 preschool children served including: * Head Start: 221 children, 45 of whom were referred by DCF, 20 attending with a voucher, and 25 homeless children * Income Eligible: 153 children served * Private Pay: 20 children served We also served 132 infants/toddlers. Individual/Family Level Outcomes To Be Achieved in FY18 90% of children will demonstrate improved emergent literacy skills (268 of 298 preschool children and 65 of 72 infants/toddlers) 90% of children will demonstrate skills for school readiness (268 of 298 preschool children and 65 of 72 infants/toddlers) 90% of children will demonstrate achievement at basic grade level (268 of 298 preschool children and 65 of 72 infants/toddlers)
Program Long-Term Success 
In FY18 and going forward, we aim to achieve the following long-term outcomes:
* 100% of children will demonstrate improved physical health and well-being (195 of 195 preschool children and 72 of 72 infants/toddlers)
* 100% of children will demonstrate improved mental health and well-being (195 of 195 preschool children and 72 of 72 infants/toddlers)
 
Understanding that children's success is intertwined with that of their parents and families, our South Shore Early Education program creates opportunities for low income parents to participate in post-secondary education, job training, and to develop leadership skills through participation in our Head Start Policy Council. In the coming year, we will work to ensure that: 
* 100% (7 of 7 parents) who participate in Child Growth and Development course will earn a CDA, EEC license, or Associate’s Degree
* 100% (7 of 7 parents) who receive vocational training will obtain a recognized credential
* 100% (7 of 7 unemployed parents) who participate in job training will obtain employment up to a living wage
* 100% (18 of 18) low income parents who serve on HS Policy Council will increase skills, knowledge, and abilities to work with community action to improve their communities
* 10,000 volunteer hours to be donated by low income parents 
 
Program Success Monitored By  SSCAC utilizes a range of tools to evaluate program performance and client satisfaction, including but not limited to the Results Oriented Management and Accounting (ROMA) system through which we engage in a continuous cycle of assessing community and internal needs and resources, plan programs and services, collect data to evaluate our effectiveness, and report on agency-wide programs and services. Each year, SSCAC develops an annual community action plan. Over the next 3 years, our community action plans will be informed by the agency’s 2018 – 2020 Community Assessment Report and Strategic Plan (CARSP). For each annual community action plan, SSCAC’s Director of Planning and Development works with Program Directors and Managers to review performance trends, establish annual targets, and identify tracking mechanisms. In developing SSCAC’s annual community action plan, the Directors and Managers also review the annual objectives and targets established in this CARSP. The annual community action plan is reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. At mid-year and as needed, Directors and Managers evaluate ongoing progress toward meeting annual targets for program outcomes and outputs. These mid-year evaluations and final annual outcomes are reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. Annual program evaluation incorporates review of and reporting on progress toward yearly outcomes as identified in our CARSP. In addition to this ROMA system, Program Directors and Managers implement similar program development and evaluation systems that are unique and specific to their individual programs. All of SSCAC’s programs develop annual targets, track performance, and report to their respective funding sources, often using proprietary software and databases as mandated by their funders. To the extent possible, SSCAC works to coordinate and streamline these various program development, evaluation, and reporting systems. Further, all Program Directors and Managers prepare monthly program updates and progress reports for SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. Finally, individual programs conduct client satisfaction surveys for activities, services, and overall program operations to provide our clients with opportunities for providing feedback and input about our service provision. In so doing, SSCAC engages in an ongoing cycle of data collection and customer feedback that ensures the highest quality of service and engages our clients and communities in the ROMA cycle of planning, implementation, and evaluation. In sum, the ROMA cycle builds off and sustains our community in action.
Examples of Program Success  95% of Head Start and Early Head Start respondents to a customer satisfaction survey reported they feel their child is receiving a high quality education. Beginning in FY17, our South Shore Early Education program lengthened the school day and school year for its Head Start and Early Head Start classrooms. As one parent stated, “School being longer so parents can get more done is HUGE.”

Transportation

SSCAC’s Transportation Program provides handicap accessible transportation services for the elderly, disabled, and eligible school children paid for by third-party reimbursement for municipalities and other human service agencies. Transportation in SSCAC’s lift-equipped, multi-passenger vehicles is by appointment only for: * Adult Day Health Programs * Doctor and Dental Visits * Non-Emergency Hospital Visits * Shopping Trips * Employment/Work Programs * Educational Facilities * Metro Boston Hospitals and Other Medical Facilities SSCAC’s Transportation program maintains an extensive network of over 40 partnerships through its contracts with area Adult Day Health Programs, GATRA, MART, South Shore Elder Services, Old Colony Elderly Service as well as several towns in its service area. SSCAC is also an authorized vendor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Division of Medical Assistance (DMA). Eligible trips may be billed to one of the agencies mentioned above, or privately to the client using the program. Transportation services are offered Monday to Friday from 6:00 AM to 6:00 PM.
Budget  $3,534,360.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Transportation Assistance
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Elderly and/or Disabled Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  In FY17, our Transportation Program transported 1,157 elderly and/or disabled passengers transported, providing a total of 167,723 rides. This total includes a pilot project with the Randolph Council on Aging, which resulted in 707 rides for clients of the Randolph COA being scheduled by SSCAC through a centralized, coordinated dispatch model.
Program Long-Term Success  Given the lack of public transportation infrastructure on the South Shore and throughout Plymouth County, private-public partnerships among transit and human service providers are critical. SSCAC's Transportation Program maintains an extensive network of collaborative relationships with 44 community partners to bolster the region's capacity to provide transportation to our most vulnerable and isolated residents.
Program Success Monitored By  SSCAC utilizes a range of tools to evaluate program performance and client satisfaction, including but not limited to the Results Oriented Management and Accounting (ROMA) system through which we engage in a continuous cycle of assessing community and internal needs and resources, plan programs and services, collect data to evaluate our effectiveness, and report on agency-wide programs and services Each year, SSCAC develops an annual community action plan. Over the next 3 years, our community action plans will be informed by the agency’s 2018 – 2020 Community Assessment Report and Strategic Plan (CARSP). For each annual community action plan, SSCAC’s Director of Planning and Development works with Program Directors and Managers to review performance trends, establish annual targets, and identify tracking mechanisms. In developing SSCAC’s annual community action plan, the Directors and Managers also review the annual objectives and targets established in this CARSP. The annual community action plan is reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. At mid-year and as needed, Directors and Managers evaluate ongoing progress toward meeting annual targets for program outcomes and outputs. These mid-year evaluations and final annual outcomes are reviewed and approved by SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. Annual program evaluation incorporates review of and reporting on progress toward yearly outcomes as identified in our CARSP. In addition to this ROMA system, Program Directors and Managers implement similar program development and evaluation systems that are unique and specific to their individual programs. All of SSCAC’s programs develop annual targets, track performance, and report to their respective funding sources, often using proprietary software and databases as mandated by their funders. To the extent possible, SSCAC works to coordinate and streamline these various program development, evaluation, and reporting systems. Further, all Program Directors and Managers prepare monthly program updates and progress reports for SSCAC’s Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors. Finally, individual programs conduct client satisfaction surveys for activities, services, and overall program operations to provide our clients with opportunities for providing feedback and input about our service provision. In so doing, SSCAC engages in an ongoing cycle of data collection and customer feedback that ensures the highest quality of service and engages our clients and communities in the ROMA cycle of planning, implementation, and evaluation. In sum, the ROMA cycle builds off and sustains our community in action.
Examples of Program Success  In the past year, SSCAC pilot tested a coordinated service delivery model in partnership with the Randolph Council on Aging. This pilot project centralized scheduling and dispatching of vehicles at SSCAC's Transportation department. In so doing, the Randolph Council on Aging was relieved of the logistical strain of coordinating transportation scheduling for its clients. Still further, the clients of the Randolph COA received more efficient and reliable transportation service. Given the success of this pilot project, SSCAC and the Randolph COA will continue using this centralized dispatch model into the future.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 While many of SSCAC's programs leverage a combination of federal, state, and private funding, its Food Resources Program is supported almost in its entirety by private funding for operations and food, as well as locally donated food and a dedicated volunteer corps.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jack Cocio
CEO Term Start July 2017
CEO Email jcocio@sscac.org
CEO Experience Mr. Jack Cocio has worked as SSCAC’s Fiscal Director since 2001. Prior to joining SSCAC, he held positions as the Controller and Director of Auxiliary Services at Eastern Nazarene College, Chief Financial Officer at Old Colony Hospice, and a Partner at Stavisky, Shapiro & Whyte, CPAs of Boston. Mr. Cocio received his Bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Northeastern University and served as the Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Open Door, another South Shore-based non-profit organization.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Patricia A. Daly Apr 1974 June 2017

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Nikki Galibois PhD Director, Planning and Development --
Mr. Steve Salwak Director, Transportation --
Ms. Lisa Spencer Deputy Director --
Ms. Jennifer Swinhart Director, South Shore Early Education --
Ms. Cheryl White Fiscal Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Head Start Quality Program US Administration for Children and Families 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Institute of CPA's (AICPA) 2017
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) 2017
National Head Start Association 2017
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Association of Community Action Agencies

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Massachusetts Department of Education 2017
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 5 Year Accreditation 2013
Northeast Institute for Quality Community Action (NIQCA), 2013

Collaborations

Collaboration and partnerships lie at the heart of SSCAC’s mission and the community action model. In conducting its 2017 Community Assessment, community stakeholders interviewed by SSCAC reported they feel SSCAC is responsive to community needs and resourceful in helping clients connect with an array of services inside the agency and out in the community. Assessment findings also spoke to the continued importance of developing and leveraging new partnerships in order to maximize resources and make collateral referrals. More specifically, Board members, community stakeholders, and SSCAC Directors and Managers all identified opportunities for partnerships and collaborations with regard to our future efforts in the area of adult education and workforce development. Board members feel the agency might consider partnering with community colleges, high schools, Councils on Aging, behavioral health providers, Salvation Army, and others. SSCAC is known throughout the region as a strong and responsive community partner. The agency collaborates with over 500 businesses, institutions, and organizations to maximize and coordinate services and regional resources.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 155
Number of Part Time Staff 32
Number of Volunteers 833
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 83%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): SSCAC does not collect ethnicity data on its staff
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Blanket Personal Property
Day Care Center/Nursery School
Computer Equipment and Software
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Life Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Dan Shannon
Board Chair Company Affiliation Mass Disabilities Council
Board Chair Term Feb 2000 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Elinor Black Wingate Healthcare; Town of Marshfield Selectmen's Representative Voting
Ms. Pam Blades Retired; Low Income Representative Voting
Mr. George Boerger Esq. Law Office of George Boerger, Esq.; Low Income Representative Voting
Mr. Jack Cocio SSCAC Exofficio
Rev. Catherine Cullen First Parish Duxbury Unitarian Universalist; Towns of Hanover and Duxbury Selectmen's Representative Voting
Ms. Martha Dennison Community Volunteer; Low Income Representative Voting
Ms. Sandie Grauds Town of Hull Social Services Dept.; Town of Hull Selectmen's Representative Voting
Mr. Lincoln Heineman Community Volunteer; Low Income Representative Voting
Ms. Bernadette Hemingway Retired Voting
Ms. Sarah Hewins Town of Carver Selectwoman Voting
Ms. Linda Mahonen RN, MS, CCM Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Lydia Mitchell Head Start Policy Council Voting
Ms. Janis Morrison Cotiviti Healthcare; Low Income Representative Voting
Ms. Linda Osborne Town of Pembroke Selectmen's Representative Voting
Mr. George Prebola Duxbury Rotary Club Voting
Mr. Anthony Provenzano Jr. Town of Plymouth Selectman Voting
Mr. Charlie Schena Retired; Low Income Representative Voting
Mr. Dan Shannon MA Disabilities Council Voting
Mr. Scott Snider Proven Behavior Solutions Voting
Ms. Lisa Spencer SSCAC Exofficio
Mr. Jim Stewart Plymouth Rocket Voting
Ms. Carrie Sylvester Info Trends; Low Income Representative Voting
Ms. Kristina Whiton-O'Brien Town of Kingston Selectmen's Representative Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 21
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 13
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 71%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 67%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2017 to Sept 30, 2018
Projected Income $20,486,705.00
Projected Expense $20,308,102.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 SSCAC Auditor's Report

2015 SSCAC Auditor's Report

2014 SSCAC Auditor's Report

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $18,717,657 $19,934,575 $19,701,769
Total Expenses $18,579,229 $19,787,272 $19,389,054

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $0 $0 $0
Individual Contributions $784,599 $761,453 $550,893
Indirect Public Support $0 $0 $0
Earned Revenue $17,865,340 $19,092,517 $19,079,121
Investment Income, Net of Losses $24,056 $34,623 $43,591
Membership Dues $0 $0 $0
Special Events $0 $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $43,662 $45,982 $28,164

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $17,267,241 $18,543,517 $18,258,055
Administration Expense $1,226,724 $1,184,733 $1,085,951
Fundraising Expense $85,264 $59,022 $45,048
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 1.01 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 93% 94% 94%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 8% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $10,725,415 $10,352,700 $9,816,429
Current Assets $2,235,551 $2,035,175 $1,954,646
Long-Term Liabilities $5,079,328 $5,073,382 $4,039,515
Current Liabilities $1,584,842 $1,377,415 $1,987,282
Total Net Assets $4,061,245 $3,901,903 $3,789,632

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.41 1.48 0.98

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 47% 49% 41%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The proportion of funding from federal, state, and private sources supporting SSCAC and its many programs has shifted slightly over the past 3 years. Federal funding comprised 67% of agency revenue in 2013 and 65% in 2016. State funding remained level at 5% from 2013 to 2016. Private funding (including corporations, foundations, utility and transportation contracts, local funding, and individuals) increased from 28% in 2013 to 30% in 2016. These funds were coordinated with federal Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) funding. In 2016, the CSBG grant award was leveraged $59 to $1 with other funding. According to our 2016 independent auditor’s report, for every dollar in revenue, 93 cents went to programs and services, while only 7 cents was used for administrative purposes.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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