Share |

Adolescent Consultation Services, Inc.

 189 Cambridge Street
 Cambridge, MA 02141
[P] (617) 494-0135
[F] (617) 494-0136
www.acskids.org
[email protected]
Robyn Eastwood
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1973
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3263996

LAST UPDATED: 11/21/2017
Organization DBA ACS
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

Adolescent Consultation Services (ACS) supports and empowers court-involved children and families by providing mental health prevention and intervention services to help them envision and work toward a better future. 

Mission Statement

Adolescent Consultation Services (ACS) supports and empowers court-involved children and families by providing mental health prevention and intervention services to help them envision and work toward a better future. 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,614,500.00
Projected Expense $1,614,500.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Direct Services to Court-involved Kids and their Families

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Adolescent Consultation Services (ACS) supports and empowers court-involved children and families by providing mental health prevention and intervention services to help them envision and work toward a better future. 


Background Statement

Adolescent Consultation Services (ACS) supports and empowers court-involved children and families by providing mental health prevention and intervention services to help them envision and work toward a better future.

ACS was founded in 1973 in response to the specialized needs of court-involved children, focusing on their undiagnosed learning needs. Throughout its first two decades, ACS served court-involved teens and families from Cambridge and Greater Boston. The program developed expertise in diagnostic and therapeutic services and built community linkages. In 1998, ACS was awarded the contract to provide Juvenile Court Clinic services throughout Middlesex County. The contract, administered by the Department of Mental Health (DMH), covers approximately 60% of ACS’s overall operating budget.

Today, ACS provides highly specialized psychological evaluations, counseling, and advocacy for at-risk, court-involved kids and their families. ACS clinicians work to understand each court-involved child, identify their individual needs and strengths, and actively advocate for the child and their family to ensure access to appropriate services and educational opportunities. We believe support for children and families should not end with the submission of the evaluation report to the court. Clinicians have found that many families are confused, intimidated, and overwhelmed by the court process. Others lacked adequate health insurance or struggled with access to other resources. In response to this concern, ACS developed both a Treatment program and an Education & Advocacy program. We connect families with the resources they need to overcome obstacles due to trauma, family difficulties, educational challenges, mental health issues, and substance use concerns. Private support allows ACS to offer critical Education & Advocacy (E&A) and Treatment services to families served by the Juvenile Court Clinics in Cambridge, Lowell, Framingham, and Waltham.


Impact Statement

The children served by Adolescent Consultation Services (ACS) are highly vulnerable and bring with them a unique set of challenges. In FY17, ACS provided crucial diagnostic and therapeutic services to 438 at-risk children and their families. These children and their families received a total of 1,536 mental health services to help them move forward in a positive direction. Of the children referred to ACS, 64% were male and 36% were female; the average age was 15; 74% were diagnosed with a mood disorder and 63% with ADHD; 45% had previously been psychiatrically hospitalized; 28% had a substance use disorder; and 37% had exhibited suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

During FY17, ACS provided E&A services to 213 children and their families exceeding our goal of 200. Our goal was that 80% of the children receiving E&A services would reach our three outcome measures: client attendance at school, client compliance with treatment, and parent or family member involvement in treatment.

The children receiving E&A services surpassed our goals with:

85% of children regularly attending school or an alternative educational setting;

86% engaging in therapeutic services; and,

87% demonstrating increased involvement of parents/family in treatment.


Needs Statement

 ACS Treatment and Education & Advocacy programs are funded entirely by our private donors and are critical resources for court-involved children. Our diverse, interdisciplinary team of social workers, mental health counselors, and psychologists provide these services at no cost to the family, removing one of the most significant barriers to care. Our primary need is to raise funds to enable us to provide these critical services. 


CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement



Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

ACS serves the Middlesex Juvenile Court. Through the Middlesex County Juvenile Court sites in Cambridge, Lowell, Framingham, and Waltham, we serve 54 urban, MetroWest, and Greater Boston cities and towns. Middlesex County is the most populous in Massachusetts and has the largest population under the age of 18 with over 320,000 youth. With support from private sources, ACS services respond to the diverse needs of these urban, rural, and suburban communities.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Treatment
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Direct Services to Court-involved Kids and their Families

ACS clinicians work to understand each child, identify their individual needs and strengths, and actively advocate for the child and their family to facilitate access to critical services. ACS services include:

Diagnostic Evaluations—same-day emergency mental health and substance use assessments and full biopsychosocial evaluations.
Treatment—individual and family therapy and treatment groups for children and families.
Education & Advocacy for children and families— education of children and families about issues identified in the evaluation process; advocacy for clients and assistance linking them with appropriate community services; and follow-up with clients and providers to help ensure that clients are actually receiving the recommended services.
Education & Advocacy for the court and community—consultations to court personnel and members of the community; education for providers about the needs of high-risk, court-involved children; and advocacy for enhanced services and support for families.
Budget  555,000
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Families
Program Short-Term Success 

At a Young Women’s Group session in the fall, Janice Chen, the ACS group leader, was guiding the girls through a conversation about their own self-worth. One of the girls, Alexis, introduced herself with her name, grade, and three or four things she’s good at. The girl next to her, Lauren, simply said her name and her grade, and then stopped, saying she didn’t know what else to say. Alexis immediately turned to Lauren and asked, “What are you good at?”

Lauren looked around, shook her head, and said: “Nothing.” But Alexis quickly said: “Come on, you must be good at something. What do you like to do?” After some discussion about different activities, they decided that Lauren was good at drawing. That exchange was very valuable for Lauren, who has extremely low self-esteem. Janice noted how that experience of peer support and validation transformed her: Lauren lit up and contributed more in that group session than she ever had before.
Program Long-Term Success 

ACS clinicians evaluate children and their families to understand their needs and to bring together the resources necessary to find real solutions to their underlying problems. ACS intervenes at the critical point when positive outcomes are still possible. ACS services increase the resiliency of families by educating youth and their families about how to use community resources when problems arise. 

ACS helps kids stay in school and have a more successful educational career by coordinating with schools to meet the needs of each child. Research shows that students compelled to take an extra year of schooling experienced an average increase of 14 % in wages; graduating from high school means an average of $10,000 more per year when that child becomes an adult. Therefore, as ACS helps young people to stay in school, there is an overall benefit not just for the individual child, but also a long-term benefit for all of the communities in Middlesex County.

Program Success Monitored By 

The outcomes for the children served throughout the ACS court clinics in Middlesex County demonstrate the success of the ACS model. In FY17, the following three outcome measures were tracked:

85% of children regularly attending school or an alternative educational setting;

86% engaging in therapeutic services; and,

87% demonstrating increased involvement of parents/family in treatment.

Our clients' needs vary and so do the measures of their success. Children most frequently demonstrate success by changes in their behavior—evidence for all to see that they have made a significant turnaround. There is no single, easy remedy for complex problems that have usually developed over an extended period of time. Individually tailored responses, which take into account the urgent and comprehensive needs of the child and family, are what lead to success.

Examples of Program Success 

Sisters Cindy, 16, and Ellie, 14, were referred for ACS evaluations. Cindy was an honors student who generally avoided getting into trouble, with the exception of when she was violently attacking her younger sister. Ellie was running away and cutting herself. The girls’ mother, Susan, was highly traumatized after being raised in a Cambodian refugee camp. Cindy and Ellie’s father left and Susan became involved with an abusive boyfriend. When their father petitioned for custody the Department of Children and Families learned that Ellie was raped by her mother’s boyfriend.

ACS connected Ellie with services to ensure that she stays safe enough to remain at home with her family. Cindy will begin a trauma-informed group at our ACS Court Clinic, comprised of young women who need help finding alternatives to violence when dealing with conflict. We’ll also support Dave and his mother, linking them with parenting classes for families dealing with a history of trauma.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Leah Kelly
CEO Term Start June 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Leah Kelly, Psy.D., has served as the Executive Director of ACS since June 2016. Leah’s 20-year career in mental health has spanned a broad range of clinical settings. In Colorado and Massachusetts, she has worked in community-based mental health clinics, public school systems, psychiatric hospitals, academic research labs, and most recently, correctional facilities.


After earning her M.A. at Boston College in Adolescent and Adult Counseling Psychology, Leah later earned her Psy.D. at Williams James College (formerly, the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology) in Clinical Psychology, and a Certificate of Specialized Training in Forensic Psychology. She began her doctoral training at ACS and developed a keen interest in the challenges facing court-involved individuals and families. Over the past several years, Leah has practiced at Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center, a maximum-security men’s prison in Shirley, MA, most recently serving as the Clinical Director of Mental Health Services and the Director of Training. Her work with incarcerated adults has deepened Leah’s commitment to providing critical intervention and advocacy to court-involved youth and families.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Daniel Sanford Clinical Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Citizenship Award Middlesex District Attorney 2009

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

ACS maintains longstanding collaborative relationships with a broad range of public and private service providers and agencies in the community. ACS clinicians serve as liaisons between the Court and key state agencies, including schools and the Department of Children and Families (DCF). In addition, ACS refers children to numerous community-based agencies and providers throughout Middlesex County.

ACS is an active member of the Massachusetts Alliance of Juvenile Court Clinics (MAJCC). MAJCC works to strengthen and expand services to court-referred children throughout the state. This group educates legislators about the special needs and challenges of court-involved children and families and advocates for increased funding to better serve them. MAJCC also advocates for improved laws impacting children such as the Raise the Age law that brought 17-year-olds into the jurisdiction of the Juvenile Court in 2013.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 11
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 15
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 14
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Frances H. Miller
Board Chair Company Affiliation Boston University
Board Chair Term July 2012 -
Board Co-Chair William H. Paine
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Terrie Graham Raytheon Global Headquarters Voting
Daniel H. Jacobs psychiatrist Voting
Jacquie L. Kay WPI, Inc. Voting
Elizabeth Keating Harvard University Voting
Leah Kelly ACS Executive Director Voting
Michael Lafleur Suffolk County Voting
Frances H. Miller Boston University Voting
William H. Paine Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr Voting
Lia G. Poorvu No Affiliation Voting
Laura M. Prager Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School Voting
Mary M. Shahian Daintree Advisors Voting
Jane R. Siegel Retired Voting
Charles "Chip" K. Storey Northeastern University Voting
David Wilcox Psychologist Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,614,500.00
Projected Expense $1,614,500.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,821,432 $1,578,892 $1,608,526
Total Expenses $1,634,788 $1,546,602 $1,426,740

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$524,533 $274,061 $327,588
Government Contributions $1,033,745 $1,026,586 $881,554
    Federal -- -- --
    State $1,033,745 $1,026,586 $881,554
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $126,474 $142,152 $118,306
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $9,741 $30,172 $170,350
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $94,000 $94,000 $94,000
Other $32,939 $11,921 $16,728

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,352,114 $1,285,063 $1,163,904
Administration Expense $217,880 $192,732 $173,648
Fundraising Expense $64,794 $68,807 $89,188
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.11 1.02 1.13
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 83% 82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 5% 7%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $2,201,894 $1,989,395 $1,950,004
Current Assets $847,316 $754,269 $762,679
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- $0
Current Liabilities $63,410 $37,555 $30,454
Total Net Assets $2,138,484 $1,951,840 $1,919,550

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 13.36 20.08 25.04

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.  

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--