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Grassroots International

 179 Boylston Street, 4th Floor
 Boston, MA 02130
[P] (617) 524-1400
[F] (617) 5245525
http://www.grassrootsonline.org
development@grassrootsonline.org
Jonathan Leaning
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INCORPORATED: 1983
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2791159

LAST UPDATED: 08/20/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Grassroots International works in partnership with social movements to create a just and sustainable world by advancing the human rights to land, water, and food through global grantmaking, building solidarity across organizations and movements, and advocacy in the US.

Mission Statement

Grassroots International works in partnership with social movements to create a just and sustainable world by advancing the human rights to land, water, and food through global grantmaking, building solidarity across organizations and movements, and advocacy in the US.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Nov 01, 2014 to Oct 31, 2015
Projected Income $2,461,076.00
Projected Expense $2,366,062.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Brazil: Innovative Approaches to Ecological Farming and Social Equality
  • Haiti Program: Haitian-led Solutions and Reconstruction
  • Mesoamerica: Vibrant Social Movements Paving the Way to Justice

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Grassroots International works in partnership with social movements to create a just and sustainable world by advancing the human rights to land, water, and food through global grantmaking, building solidarity across organizations and movements, and advocacy in the US.


Background Statement

For over 30 years, Grassroots International has promoted global justice by partnering with social change organizations, providing over $23 million in cash support and distributing much more through in-kind donations. Currently, Grassroots works with 25 partner organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, and North America, as well as globally through the international Via Campesina network. Our partners are primarily rural organizations that focus on the human rights to land, water and food within a framework known as ‘Resource Rights’ and ‘Food Sovereignty’. By providing long-term funding to key movement organizations, we have helped build the local capacity needed to tackle entrenched problems of poverty, injustice and hunger.

 

 

Grassroots International supports the growing international resource rights and food sovereignty movements by collaborating with social movements grounded in the communities most directly affected by the industrial food system, and bolsters their efforts to implement an alternative model of agricultural development in the face of daunting challenges.

 

We support community-based groups in their efforts to implement innovative local strategies to combat hunger and promote sustainable livelihoods as well as advocacy and organizing efforts at the national and international levels.Our grantmaking philosophy emphasizes the building of local leadership and strengthening social justice movements. For example, we sponsor representatives from our partner organizations to attend international convenings like the climate conference in Copenhagen, build international solidarity and raise a voice for policies that truly support their communities and families. We deepen these cross-border connections with U.S. groups by sharing the stories and insights of our partners on issues of shared concern—hunger, environmental degradation, and the human rights to land, food and water.

 

Grassroots’ ongoing public education and advocacy work with donors and activists in the U.S. is informed by our overseas partnerships and our collaborations with other U.S.-based social and economic justice organizations. We develop tailored educational curricula that encourage varied U.S. audiences to reflect on our country’s policies from the perspective of marginalized communities overseas.  Working with key allies, Grassroots encourages activism and advocacy around global justice issues.

Impact Statement

Here are some accomplishments made possible in part by Grassroots’ support:

- As a result of the Campaign to Stop Violence against Rural Women, Nicaragua's government passed a landmark bill to stop violence against women and protect their human rights.

- Mexican tribunal suspends GMO corn plantations: Mexican peasant farmers and environmentalists won a victory when a federal tribunal suspended the planting of genetically modified corn by transnational powerhouses such as Monsanto and Pioneer. Grassroots’ partners are part of the coalition whose work over the past decade laid the groundwork for this victory.

- Spreading land reform, food sovereignty across Central America: More than 600 peasant and indigenous farm leaders from across Central America received training in strategies for winning land rights and agrarian reform, thanks to Grassroots’ support.

- We amplified the voices of our partners through activities such as circulating calls-to-action, writing blogs and articles, arranging presentations and panels, and increasing the size of our e-list and frequency of electronic communications. We alerted and mobilized roughly 27,000 subscribers through our robust e-advocacy and education campaign such as supporting Mexican peasants and indigenous peoples protesting GMO corn; opposing the proposed Transpacific Partnership; supporting an unjustly arrested Honduran indigenous leader; and calling for free and fair elections in Honduras.

To support the human right to land, water and food through grantmaking and advocacy, in the next year we will:

- Augment our Global South partners’ efforts to develop sustainable, ecologically sound solutions which advance women’s and indigenous people’s livelihoods.

- Provide significant support for campaigns for leadership development, learning exchanges and technical cooperation.

- Help farmers’ movement organizations defend their human rights and monitor human rights abuses.


Needs Statement

According to an influential study by the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development, the world’s industrialized food system—from production to consumption—is now the leading cause of climate change and the ensuing environmental destruction. Industrial agriculture is also pushing millions of small farmers worldwide into debt and hunger. Yet there is increasing evidence and recognition that small farmers using ecologically sound, sustainable methods can produce more food per acre than industrial agriculture, restore the environment and biodiversity,and reduce global warming. These small farmers, indigenous groups and rural movements need support in their efforts to create and replicate exemplary models of sustainable agriculture.

To support these efforts, Grassroots seeks to:

1. Increase our financial support to those on the front line of struggles for land and water rights.

2. Advance advocacy efforts for U.S. farming policies that help rather than hurt family farmers, indigenous peoples and women farmers (e-advocacy, coalition-building, etc.).

Your donations can help us reach these goals!


CEO Statement

“I probably would not have survived had it not been for the support and solidarity of groups like Grassroots International. And I do know that I probably would not be an activist and educator now, helping to build a movement for land rights.” 

When Janaina Stronzake shared those words with us during her visit with us, my perspective shifted. Instead of seeing her as the strong, 27-year-old representative of the Landless Workers Movement I know her to be, I visualized her as a five-year-old girl, camped with her parents and siblings along the side of a road in Brazil, waiting to gain title to land. Hungry. Unsure. Yet hopeful.

Her story is very much a part of the Grassroots International story. And so is the story of our donors and funders, who envision a world where Janaina, her family, and other small farmers, indigenous peoples, women, and human rights activists can not only survive but thrive.

Grassroots is brimming with stories of connection and partnerships— between people in Haiti, Mexico, Palestine, Africa, and around the world with people here in the US.

As a movement-based funder and advocate, connection is what Grassroots has been about for nearly 30 years. Because with connection we experience transformation—be it transforming formerly underutilized land into abundant, life-giving fields, or transforming a visionary gift into a meaningful difference, creating a more just, sustainable world.

From our beginning, Grassroots International placed partnership at the center of all we do—with our donors and with our grantee partners in the Global South. And we learn a lot from our partners.

In recent years, during a time of economic crisis and looming climate change, our partners have introduced us to the concept of ‘el buen vivir’,or living well.

All who work for a just and sustainable world know that over-consumption and “living better” in the U.S. and other affluent countries comes at a huge cost to the ordinary people of the Global South and, ultimately, to the earth itself.

El buen vivir suggests another way: living well in harmony with the earth and in community with one another, moving toward sustainability–of substance and of spirit. Instead of focusing on getting more or getting ahead, “living well” means dignity, equity, sustainability and solidarity.

We learn much from our partners—but we learn important lessons from our supporters, too, like their passion for social justice and the importance of persistence. Our donors are diverse, loyal, enthusiastic and thoughtful.

I hope you will consider joining with us—your partnership means the world.

Board Chair Statement

July, 2012

Dear Colleagues,

It is with pleasure that I write this letter of support for Grassroots International (GRI), an organization that embodies values that I hold dear. During my tenure as Director of the Boston Women’s Fund, one of the most important lessons I learned from our grantees is that the grassroots initiatives planned and led by women and girls themselves are, by far, the most relevant solutions to the problems they face. Grassroots also trusts the solutions proposed by our international partners on the ground and, in turn, Grassroots is trusted by them in what I consider a true partnership.

 

I worked in Asia throughout the 1990’s and was able to observe first-hand the difficulties faced by rural men and women struggling for resource rights. One billion people still go hungry each day, and 80% of them are farmers. The irony is hardly bearable. For nearly thirty years, Grassroots has supported rural and indigenous people around the world as they organize for a fair share of the earth’s precious resources: land, water, food, seeds. More significantly, Grassroots maximizes the impact of its funding by supporting strong local work that is internationally linked in a network of social justice movements.   

 

With my roots in Bangladesh, I am deeply affected by a related concern: global warming. With sea levels rising, a low-lying country like Bangladesh will be devastated. Industrial agriculture contributes 55% of global greenhouse gas emissions, which means small scale sustainable farming contributes to cooling the planet. I draw hope from the fact that millions of farmers, fishers, and indigenous groups are organizing themselves globally on initiatives to defend food sovereignty and sustainable agriculture. GRI is taking a leading role in the climate justice movement.

 

The challenge in international organizing is lack of coordination and communication. Grassroots meets this challenge by supporting an extremely popular learning exchange program between organizations, nationally, regionally and internationally. Another challenge is to ensure the centrality of women when it comes to policy-making, personal safety, security, and access to resources. Grassroots pays special attention to funding social movements that nurture the leadership of women and youth.

 

Grassroots International is efficiently run and, as Chair of the Board, I work with a solid team. The Executive Director and staff are professionals with expertise, who are completely committed to achieving Grassroots’ mission. Our dedicated Board members take their fiduciary responsibilities seriously and are vigilant in their oversight of GRI. Our challenge is to continue to prosper so our work can have impacts long into the future. To that end, the central focus of our next strategic plan is the issue of sustainability.

 

I consider it an honor to serve this excellent organization and commend it to you!

 

Sincerely,

Hayat Imam

Board President and Chair, Grassroots International


Geographic Area Served

Internationally
INTERNATIONAL
International/the Global South:  Latin America, Caribbean, Africa, Middle East, Southeast Asia

Organization Categories

  1. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - International Human Rights
  2. Environment -
  3. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - International Economic Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Brazil: Innovative Approaches to Ecological Farming and Social Equality

Brazil:  Innovative Approaches to Ecological Farming and Social Equality

 

Brazil’s official approach to development has emphasized models that leave a majority of citizens out of the picture. This has magnified the enormous inequalities that afflict Brazilian society, where a mere 1.6 percent of Brazilian landholders control 47 percent of the nation's privately owned land. Foreign companies’ control over local resources has increased as Brazil continues down its neo-liberal economic path. Coupled with the destructive practices of industrial agriculture, land grabbing by international agribusinesses threatens Brazil’s vast forest, land, water and biodiversity.

 

Yet indigenous peoples and rural landless workers are at the forefront of a movement striving to counter these trends.  Since 1998, our Brazil Program has focused on the rights to land and water, and defending social movements that are being criminalized. The focus is primarily on the northeast and central plateau regions of Brazil.
Budget  $172,554.00
Category  International, Foreign Affairs & National Security, General/Other International Agricultural Assistance
Population Served At-Risk Populations Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

 

Grassroots International supports local community-led sustainable development projects that advance democratic access to and management of crucial local food production and the right to natural resources.  The projects we support are not just ‘seeds and tools’ initiatives; they also serve as catalysts for bringing together and galvanizing communities whose collective strength can push for and obtain better agricultural and economic policies in their respective nations.

Our grantmaking philosophy prioritizes building local leadership and strengthening alliances among organizations sharing a vision. For example, Grassroots facilitates learning exchanges on seed saving techniques between Haitian and Brazilian organizations to preserve biodiversity and lower the cost of farming.  


 

Program Long-Term Success 

Our global food system is terribly broken. Through long-term partnerships with grassroots organizations and movements around the world, Grassroots International seeks to advance families’ access to food, land, and water. Through grants, advocacy, and education, we support community-led development projects and activism for a just food system that puts healthy food on families’ tables.

 

Our partners in Brazil are primarily rural organizations of farmers and non-governmental organizations advocating for the right of small farmers to produce for their local markets, and for consumers to eat local, healthy foods.The goal is to implement innovative local strategies to combat hunger and promote sustainable livelihoods.  We also support efforts to reform harmful trade policies and to increase public support for small-scale agriculture. 

Program Success Monitored By 

MONITORING AND EVALUATING PROJECTS

Grassroots monitors and evaluates all projects we support through reports provided by our partners and on-the ground consultants, as well as through ongoing correspondence and site visits.  Grassroots looks at both quantitative and qualitative indicators in assessing projects.  We evaluate all of our projects according to the extent to which:

•             All planned activities are undertaken and completed;

•             Local communities are involved in conceptualizing, planning, implementing, and evaluating the project;

•             Participants’ well-being has improved; women’s roles and status have been enhanced;

•             The project has produced a replicable model;

•             The project becomes self-sustaining;

•             The impact on the environment is positive;

•             The funds are appropriately used as agreed upon by Grassroots International and the partner.

Examples of Program Success 

§    Last year, over 1000 families in the state of Goias, Brazil produced heirloom seed varieties of corn, beans, rice, sweet potato and cassava, resulting in an estimated 3.5 million tons of organic, local food. 

§    In Maranhão, one of Brazil’s most impoverished states, 180 organizers and leaders from camps and settlements gained leadership and advocacy skills to support land reclamation efforts.  

 §    A good example of our partnership model is our relationship with Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement (MST), a highly successful movement which has won land rights for over a third of a million formerly landless farmers. With our support (and that of other donors), they not only secure the rights to arable land, they also train the farmers in innovative, agroecological farming methods that rehabilitate damaged lands, restore agro-biodiversity and encourage local, organic agriculture.  

Haiti Program: Haitian-led Solutions and Reconstruction

Haiti Program: Haitian-led Solutions and Reconstruction


      

 

Despite the fact that Haiti has many natural resources and a history as the richest colony in the Western Hemisphere, indicators continue to place Haiti among the world’s poorest nations: 10 percent of Haitian children die before their fifth birthday and at least 81 percent of the rural population lives in absolute poverty. Civil and political rights exist on paper but human rights violations abound.

 

Through our Haitian-led partnerships, Grassroots International aims to help eliminate hunger, build food sovereignty and increase social justice. Among the objectives of the program are: to promote sustainable food production and distribution; to foster community-based economic development, especially for women; to strengthen grassroots communities’ capacities to become the authors of their own future; to secure human rights; and to contribute to the restoration of Haiti’s natural environment.
Budget  $110,000.00
Category  International, Foreign Affairs & National Security, General/Other International Development
Population Served At-Risk Populations Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Our grantmaking philosophy prioritizes building local leadership and strengthening alliances among organizations sharing a vision. For example, Grassroots facilitates learning exchanges on seed saving techniques between Haitian and Brazilian organizations to preserve biodiversity and lower the cost of farming.  

Program Long-Term Success 

Our global food system is terribly broken. Through long-term partnerships with grassroots organizations and movements around the world, Grassroots International seeks to advance families’ access to food, land, and water. Through grants, advocacy, and education, we support community-led development projects and activism for a just food system that puts healthy food on families’ tables.

 

Our partners in Haiti are primarily rural organizations of farmers and non-governmental organizations advocating for the right of small farmers to produce for their local markets, and for consumers to eat local, healthy foods.The goal is to implement innovative local strategies to combat hunger and promote sustainable livelihoods.  We also support efforts to reform harmful trade policies and to increase public support for small-scale agriculture. 

Program Success Monitored By 

Monitoring and Evaluating Projects

Grassroots monitors and evaluates all projects we support through reports provided by our partners and on-the ground consultants, as well as through ongoing correspondence and site visits.  Grassroots looks at both quantitative and qualitative indicators in assessing projects.  We evaluate all of our projects according to the extent to which:

•             All planned activities are undertaken and completed;

•             Local communities are involved in conceptualizing, planning, implementing, and evaluating the project;

•             Participants’ well-being has improved; women’s roles and status have been enhanced;

•             The project has produced a replicable model;

•             The project becomes self-sustaining;

•             The impact on the environment is positive;

•             The funds are appropriately used as agreed upon by Grassroots International and the partner.

Examples of Program Success 

§    In July 2011, residents of Marmont, in Haiti’s central plateau, joined hands with earthquake refugees to complete construction of a community-led drinking water system for the town.  As a result, 100 percent of Marmont’s population, or close to 6,000 people, now has access to potable water. 

§    Sixty (60) young Haitians from various communities received training in risk management and disaster response planning in order to help at-risk, low-income neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince prepare for natural disasters.

§    National radio programs were produced in Haiti to build public support for a reconstruction strategy and economic policies that place the Haitian population at the center.


Mesoamerica: Vibrant Social Movements Paving the Way to Justice

Mesoamerica:  Vibrant Social Movements Paving the Way to Justice

 

Mesoamerica is one of the world’s most impoverished regions, with indigenous peasant farmers and especially women being the poorest of the poor. The impact of international trade policies, has exacerbated the plight of small farmers and rural communities. Yet family farmers and indigenous peoples constitute the two most vibrant and significant social justice movements in Mesoamerica today. These two parallel, sometimes intersecting movements are at the forefront of efforts to challenge the growing inequities caused by globalization in the region.

 

Grassroots’ Mesoamerica Program supports cross-border work from Southern Mexico throughout Central America, particularly among these indigenous, peasant and women’s movements and organizations. All of our partners in the region work to defend the human rights to land, water and food, by developing successful local, sustainable agricultural and development alternatives.
Budget  $235,000.00
Category  International, Foreign Affairs & National Security, General/Other International Development
Population Served At-Risk Populations Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Grassroots International supports local community-led sustainable development projects that advance democratic access to and management of crucial local food production and the right to natural resources.  The projects we support are not just ‘seeds and tools’ initiatives; they also serve as catalysts for bringing together and galvanizing communities whose collective strength can push for and obtain better agricultural and economic policies in their respective nations.

Our grantmaking philosophy prioritizes building local leadership and strengthening alliances among organizations sharing a vision. For example, In Oaxaca, Mexico, our Women's Organic Vegetable Gardening Cooperative project continued to expand. In the course of last year 300 additional family gardens were established principally in two new communities, Guadalupe Nuevo Centro and Guadalupe Zacatepec bringing the total number of family gardens to 1300 so far.

Program Long-Term Success 

Our global food system is terribly broken. Through long-term partnerships with grassroots organizations and movements around the world, Grassroots International seeks to advance families’ access to food, land, and water. Through grants, advocacy, and education, we support community-led development projects and activism for a just food system that puts healthy food on families’ tables.

 

Our partners in Mesoamerica (Central America and southern Mexico) are primarily rural organizations of farmers and non-governmental organizations advocating for the right of small farmers to produce for their local markets, and for consumers to eat local, healthy foods.The goal is to implement innovative local strategies to combat hunger and promote sustainable livelihoods.  We also support efforts to reform harmful trade policies and to increase public support for small-scale agriculture. 

Program Success Monitored By 

MONITORING AND EVALUATING PROJECTS

Grassroots monitors and evaluates all projects we support through reports provided by our partners and on-the ground consultants, as well as through ongoing correspondence and site visits.  Grassroots looks at both quantitative and qualitative indicators in assessing projects.  We evaluate all of our projects according to the extent to which:

•             All planned activities are undertaken and completed;

•             Local communities are involved in conceptualizing, planning, implementing, and evaluating the project;

•             Participants’ well-being has improved; women’s roles and status have been enhanced;

•             The project has produced a replicable model;

•             The project becomes self-sustaining;

•             The impact on the environment is positive;

•             The funds are appropriately used as agreed upon by Grassroots International and the partner.
Examples of Program Success 

§    In Southern Mexico, 10 indigenous communities in Mixe territories have been able to resolve territorial rights conflicts and claims because of indigenous-led advocacy and legal assistance we support.

§    As a result of the Campaign to Stop Violence against Rural Women, Nicaragua's government recently passed a landmark bill to stop violence against women and protect their human rights.

§    In Oaxaca, Mexico, community radio programs, workshops and regional forums were organized to educate indigenous communities on their territorial rights to land and water.

§    In Guatemala, 40 women from six communities have established family and community vegetable gardens, attended “training-of-trainers” workshops, and have begun training an estimated 850 other women in sustainable, organic  gardening.

§    Close to 600 peasant and indigenous women from across Central America were trained at Nicaragua’s Peasant School in agrarian reform, food sovereignty, and strategies for securing land rights for women. 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Chung-Wha Hong
CEO Term Start Dec 2014
CEO Email development@grassrootsonline.org
CEO Experience Human rights campaigner Chung-Wha Hong will soon join the Boston-based global justice organization Grassroots International as Executive Director. Chung-Wha served most recently as the executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC), which during her tenure developed into one of the largest and most diverse statewide immigrant rights groups in the country and played a significant role with national policy.

“We are delighted to welcome Chung-Wha to Grassroots International,” said Soya Jung, chair of the Board of Directors. “She brings proven leadership and management skills, and a profound understanding of and passion for social change and global justice.” Chung-Wha begins her new position in December.

The recipient of numerous awards, Ms. Hong was named by New York Magazine as one of the most Influential People in Politics. She has played a critical role in national coalitions that won President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which provided work permits and relief from deportation for young immigrants.

At NYIC Chung-Wha worked with a global diaspora of immigrants -- many of whom fled poverty and violence in their homelands seeking safety and opportunity in the United States. She worked tirelessly to create those opportunities by empowering communities to win policy victories for civil rights, worker rights, and access to education and services. She now joins a global foundation that advocates for innovative, bottom-up economic development solutions in "sending" countries throughout the Global South.

“I look forward to joining Grassroots International and the amazing community of partners, supporters and activists,” Chung-Wha said. "Whether in Haiti or Brazil or Palestine, conflicts over access to and control of water, land, and food deepen global inequality, war, and migration. I'm honored to be leading an organization that supports effective, local solutions to these problems."
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Nikhil Aziz May 2005 Aug 2014
Mr. Kevin Murray Aug 1998 Apr 2005

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Sara Mersha Director of Grantmaking & Advocacy --
Orson Moon Director of Administration --
Carol Schachet Director of Development and Communications --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Associated Grant Makers --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

 

Funder networks (Donor/Funder Education):

Funders Network on Transforming the Global Economy (FNTG)

Grantmakers without Borders (Gw/oB)

Africa Grantmakers Group

Gender & Grantmaking Group

Haiti Grantmakers Group

Mesoamerican Grantmakers Group

Asia Grantmakers Group

International Funders of Indigenous Peoples (IFIP)

International Human Rights Funders Group (IHRFG)

New England International Donors

Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems Funders (SAFSF)

 

Advocacy & Education

Action Aid - USA

Agricultural Missions

Border Agricultural Workers Project

Center for Food Safety

Community Food Security Coalition

Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy

Food & Water Watch

Grassroots Global Justice Alliance

Haiti Advocacy Work Group

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Institute for Policy Studies

International Partners for Sustainable Agriculture

Jewish Voice for Peace

Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

National Family Farm Coalition (and its regional and state members)

Oakland Institute

Pesticide Action Network of North America

Presbyterian Hunger Program 

Rainforest Action Network

Rural Coalition

US Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation

US Food Sovereignty Alliance

World Hunger Year


 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 91%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Hayat Imam
Board Chair Company Affiliation Fundraising Consultant
Board Chair Term June 2011 - Dec 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Leticia Alcantar Foundation Consultant Voting
Nikhil Aziz Grassroots International NonVoting
Jean Entine Jewish Voice for Peace Voting
Meg Gage Proteus Fund Voting
Ellen Gurzinsky Organizational Consultant & Leadership Coach Voting
Catherine Hoffman Peace & Justice Activist Voting
David Holmstrom Finance/Tax Professional Voting
Hayat Imam Fundraising Consultant Voting
Chad Uhlenhopp Jones Community Investment Network Voting
Soya Jung Justice Activist Voting
Marie Kennedy Visiting Professor of Urban Planning Voting
Taij Kumarie Moteelall Development Consultant and Philanthropic Advisor Voting
Anil Naidoo Blue Planet Project Voting
Amelita Pascual East LA Community Corporation Voting
Tarso Luis Ramos Political Research Associates Voting
Wenda Tai Social Justice Activist/Community Building Specialist Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 5
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 3
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 11
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Nov 01, 2014 to Oct 31, 2015
Projected Income $2,461,076.00
Projected Expense $2,366,062.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $2,510,987 $2,224,585 $2,317,536
Total Expenses $2,604,386 $2,450,946 $3,090,803

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $2,047,319 $1,769,721 $1,374,152
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $5,831 $120,873 $77,366
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $59,812 -- --
Revenue In-Kind $398,025 $333,991 $866,018
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $1,844,421 $1,737,257 $2,338,502
Administration Expense $249,330 $233,266 $252,698
Fundraising Expense $510,635 $480,423 $499,603
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.96 0.91 0.75
Program Expense/Total Expenses 71% 71% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 24% 27% 36%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $1,244,282 $1,325,478 $1,677,532
Current Assets $184,784 $408,101 $364,802
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $149,088 $136,885 $262,578
Total Net Assets $1,095,194 $1,188,593 $1,414,954

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
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2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.24 2.98 1.39

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.  Total revenue for 2011 was adjusted from the total revenue listed on the audit to be the total of the items listed on the audit.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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