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On With Living and Learning Inc.

 15 Channel Center Street, #314
 Boston, MA 02210
[P] (617) 6610363
[F] --
www.onwithlivingandlearning.org
mcdaspire@gmail.com
Mary Driscoll
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 2001
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3562307

LAST UPDATED: 05/31/2016
Organization DBA OWLL
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

·    Amplifying the voices of  previously incarcerated women  to assist their successful transition to  productive citizenship

·     Bringing previously incarcerated women , theatre professionals, and the public together to intentionally engage and foster greater  understanding

·     To contribute  to the social capital of our underserved communities

Mission Statement

·    Amplifying the voices of  previously incarcerated women  to assist their successful transition to  productive citizenship

·     Bringing previously incarcerated women , theatre professionals, and the public together to intentionally engage and foster greater  understanding

·     To contribute  to the social capital of our underserved communities


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $50,000.00
Projected Expense $50,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • On With Living and Learning Inc

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

·    Amplifying the voices of  previously incarcerated women  to assist their successful transition to  productive citizenship

·     Bringing previously incarcerated women , theatre professionals, and the public together to intentionally engage and foster greater  understanding

·     To contribute  to the social capital of our underserved communities


Background Statement

On with Living and Learning (OWLL) was established in 1999 when the founder, Dr. Mary Driscoll , an occupational therapist and professionally trained actor, began working with women living  with HIV/AIDS to write and present their stories in theatrical presentations. Up to that point, the voices of these women were under-represented in the pandemic.   The resounding success of the initial project led to OWLL 's  incorporation  in 2000 for the purpose of continuing  OWLL's  model that blends  the humanities with the skills  of theatre to successfully  develop 21st century job skills with women ex-offenders and/or  in recovery  as they re-enter society. Through storytelling, they work through challenging pasts, creating art that is healing for the individual, while building self esteem and developing skills that will enable them to successfully re-enter society.  They now have real tools that will help them actively change their lives and the lives of their children.  As they proudly bring their work to the community, they probe important social questions.  Their impressive productions are a richly interwoven cultural tapestry that beautifully illuminates the need for appropriate and effective resources for other women just like themselves. Their monologues have been  produced by Boston Theatre Works, for Fort Point Theatre Company, African American Play festival  and at the Provincetown Fine Arts Center

OWLL has a longstanding history in the community with previous work in the same vein, sharing community partnerships with many well known outreach programs: Most of OWLL's participants have gone on to careers in advocacy, public speaking, and social services .   OWLL was recognized by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health for our cultural programming for women of color.

OWLL has a longstanding history in the community with previous work in the same vein, sharing community partnerships with many well known outreach programs:

Project Hope, Roxbury

International HealthOrganization, Brighton

Community Research Initiative, Boston

African Assistance Program, Lowell

Women’s Educational Center, Boston

Massachusetts  General Hospital

Middlesex Community College

Cambridge Cares About AIDS

Boston Living Center

Lowell Community Health Center

Worcester GLBTQ Youth Program

University of Massachusetts Medical School




 


Seattle

 



Impact Statement

  •  Accepted as an associate member of  Community Works
  • Two developmental readings of the script written with and presented by  the women in the workshops  Quinsigamond Community College . 
  • A pre and post questionnaire completed by 40 criminal justice and health care students   showed  positive attitude change toward ex-offenders 
  • OWLL's Facebook and Twitter  streaming  significantly increased our individual donor base.
  •  A semi-staged developmental workshop reading of Hidden Faces of Courage yielded significant and unexpected opportunities          
  •  OWLL  U tube Hidden Faces of Courage
  • Awarded 3 major grants
  • From an unexpected audience member "I am an 11 year old boy from Lexington.  My parents brought me to the play. I thought the plays message was clear and the play was very deep.  I learned that people out of jail aren't really those bad guys in the movies.  They are normal but they are just in an bad predicament" Jonny 

                        From OWLL Workshop participants.

"I pray that it will give knowledge to those who have never had to face the trauma we did"  Taisha

"Before I wouldn't talk ..after this workshop I can be an advocate to help others."   LaVerne

 https://vimeo.com/51738332

Goals

To increase financial resources to support workshops  presentations  at professional conferences

To enlarge  our workshop  partnerships with agencies serving women ex-offenders

To bring the full production of Hidden Faces of Courage to Boston's  theatre going audiences.

To continue to involve women ex-offenders in OWLL workshops  

To present OWLL workshops at professional conferences concerned with women and overincarceration 

 



 



Needs Statement

1  Hire an office manager as our first paid staff ..$35,000
2.  Increase financials to provide for a quality professional production to        leverage grants ..$10,000
3.   Develop a gender specific syllabus for students involved with
       justice involved women who are   reentering from prison  $1000
4.  Implement a program for conference presentations $5000 for stipends and travel
 5.    Stipends for 5  post show panelists @150 each 
 
 
 
 

CEO Statement

Nationally, the female incarceration rate has increased 800% in the last 15 years; 126% in Massachusetts.  78%  of that large number consists of mothers.  . Their success as they re-enter society dictates how their children’s lives will unfold.. In Massachusetts there are reform discussions underway in an effort to protect vulnerable  populations but  the impact of the "war on drugs" , which has been  particularly astounding for incarcerated mothers and their  children , have remained a relatively invisible population to the public, to policymakers, and to funders. How can we address the social costs to our communities —the broken homes, unemployment, and stigma that can follow mothers and their children after  imprisonment?    In a democracy,  how can this crisis not be taken seriously?  How can we as citizens, not put their future in our hands?  We are bound up with th

 

Very few gender appropriate programs are out there .  Moreover, very few  of incarcerated women have been given the chance to gain the self knowledge and critical thinking skills that comes from  engagement  with the humanities.   This   project  provides  women ex-offenders the opportunity to do just that so they may step forward with skills, grace and self worth in a manner that will impact  a wide audience about an issue fraught with complexity and need.  Bringing stories to a diverse audience and sharing  them in a setting that challenges viewers expectations  will  reach  people in our communities who care about democracy and    inspire a commitment to  change our collective  public consciousness.  OWLL's  Generational Legacy  project  brings women ex-offenders, and the public  together  to foster empathy and a common purpose to  restore the dignity and opportunity for women ex-offenders and their children. 

 


Board Chair Statement

Daniel J. Curley, MS Ed

Board Chair: 2000 to present

 

Throughout the past eleven years I have watched Dr. Driscoll and the participants of On With Living and Learning (OWLL) shape not only the performances, the board and the audience’s experience but I have witnessed these same women finding pride - pride based in understanding, insight into the context of their lives and belief that they could change their experience and the lives of other women like themselves and in their community.

 My contribution includes networks of collaborative and supportive community partners, introductions to places where women gathered to access both services and resources.  Going forward I would happily continue this network building.  In my most recent role as Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Transitional Assistance, I will use the lessons I have learned from Dr. Driscoll and this ever expanding troop of women (and now their children] in designing programming and ways of measuring what “success” looks like in communities under served by our society’s educational and social service systems.  I will continue on the Board of Directors, provide organization and program linkage services and will look forward to working with Dr. Driscoll throughout the coming years.

 Marc S. Miller, PhD   board vice chair board member

Collaborating with On With Living and Learning for the Generational Legacy Project is a pleasure that draws on several parts of my professional life: as a historian, journalist,   writer, and in the arts as producer and co-artistic director of Fort Point Theatre Channel.

A Generational Legacy Project as a humanist are clear: it is part and parcel of my efforts to help create a “new narrative” for vulnerable populations, one that offers them both a vision of a better future and real pathways to good jobs. 

As artistic director of Fort Point Theatre Channel and a member of the OWLL advisory board, my role in the Generational Legacy Project is as an advisor and consultant on several aspects. First, on the dramatic side, I bring experience on making connections between art and inquiry into societal issues. For example, I have encouraged Dr. Driscoll to present her stories at our various events, and worked with her to make these a success. More concretely, as a producer, I provide advice and assistance on the organizational aspects of the project: fundraising, identifying appropriate personnel, publicity and marketing, and securing space for workshops, rehearsals, and performances. I will take part in the workshops as a combination dramaturg and artistic advisor, drawing on my experience in theatre and as an historian. This is central to my work for all Fort Point Theatre Channel, including our collaborations with OWLL and other organizations. I will also act as liaison between the two organizations.


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

 Boston and beyond with a focus on Dorchester, Roxbury , and Mattapan 

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Women's Rights
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

On With Living and Learning Inc

We present a series of eight workshops that is rooted in the humanities to develop 21st century job skills for women who have previously been incarcerated.  The workshops culminate in a community performance allowing the women to apply the skills learned in the workshops and to bring their stories to a diverse audience and share them in a setting that challenges the viewers expectations.  We foster a greater understanding between women ex-offenders and the greater community.
Budget  $30,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Women's Rights
Population Served Females Offenders/Ex-Offenders Adults
Program Short-Term Success  Our short-term success is assessed by attendance at the workshops, timeliness, and completion of tests on time.  All of our attendees come on time and have no absences.
Program Long-Term Success  We assess our program based on the job success of participants in our program.  We also know our program is successful via woman staying in touch with the network and recommending the program to others, which allows women who have experienced social isolation to form enduring connections.  We also have documented prep and post test evaluation of college students and audience members before and after the performance.
Program Success Monitored By  Job retention, employment, and program evaluation including audience pre and post testing and participant testing are all monitors of success.
Examples of Program Success 
One evaluation said, "I am an eleven-year-old boy from Lexington  and my parents brought me to the play.  It was very deep.  I learned that people that go to prison aren't the bad guys I see in the movies.  They were just in a predicament."
 
A workshop participant who is now a Cambridge College student and employed as an office assistant at the college is truly an example of our success. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As it was in 1999 for women with HIV /AIDS, today  incarcerated mothers and their  children  have been a relatively invisible population to the public, to policymakers, and to funders.  Yet the number of women incarcerated in Massachusetts has grown 126% over the last 15 years,   the majority of whom have been convicted of non-violent offenses.  The majority are African American and Latina women from low income ,underserved urban and rural  communities. A disturbing  78% of these women are mothers and most are the sole income earners for their family. Statistics tell us  that 1 in 3 of those children will end up in jail.

Many OWLL participants are mothers who have been in prison.  I found myself  asking  the question of how being born into a legacy of poverty and prison affects succeeding generations.  Is poverty the real prison? How can we address the social costs—the broken homes, lack of sustainable employment, and stigma that  follow mothers after  imprisonment?   Could an OWLL workshops  culminating in performance help alter  the trajectory of re-entry  at the community level?

Questions such as these  led me  to spend  the last  two years exploring  a more fundamental concern: How can the legacy bequeathed to the  children of  parents   who have been incarcerated be reversed and American citizenship repaired  .  Seeking answers through  primary research ;   teaching in the Suffolk County prison; leading workshops and directing a performance with women living in a Roxbury family shelter;  meeting with university faculty   in criminal justice programs; interviewing  directors of re-entry programs in Boston, and conducting a focus group , led me to discover   an   astounding and appalling  lack of gender specific  resources for women ex-offenders and their children. 

The challenges  OWLL  this last year has been to   shape and implement a gender specific workshop  curriculum specifically for  women ex-offenders who are mothers from which a performance  project could  been solidified. The complexity and challenges of this work has been humbling and life changing. Recognizing the complexity of the lives of women ex-offenders requires flexibility and providing outcomes that validates their life experience as a source for creating social capital. Our opportunities are great since their is so much need. The challenge is finding funding sources that recognize outcomes of our work as increasing the social capital in our poor communities while providing skills for job upward mobility.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Mary Cook Driscoll PhD, OTR/L
CEO Term Start Jan 2000
CEO Email mcdaspire@gmail.com
CEO Experience

                                                              

Qualification Summary

  • Outstanding and motivational instructor to members of diverse cultures 
  • Skilled  in  design and facilitation of creative curriculums for clients  development activities in  agencies serving underserved  communities
  • Experienced adult educator

 2000 – Present   Founder/Executive  Director  

               

     Key Achievements

§         Developed the highly successful curriculum and   training  model  and education  combining  the disciplines of humanities with the activities used in the craft of acting  

§         Developed workshop and theater presentation On Stage: Job Skills for the 21st Century with  and for women living in shelters  and ex-offenders

§         Ongoing Collaboration  with agencies doing local and regional  multi- issue community based  performances

 

2010                Volunteer Instructor

 

                           Suffolk County Department of Corrections, Boston MA.

                         

       Key Achievements

 

 

§         Taught  course Entrenpeurship 101 to 22 male prisoners

§         Individual Business plans developed by  each student reviewed by  and pitched to  representatives of venture capital firms with feedback provided

§         Waiting list of male prisoners signed up for the following year

 


 

 

Sessional Faculty

   International Health Organization. Bihar, India

 

                             

§         Conducted one week workshops for physicians and agency executive directors

 


§         Achieved high rating and was invited back consecutive years

§         Provided the grassroots  ground work for the development of the first ever positive prevention  network in the state of Bihar

 

1991-1999            Associate  Professor

 

Tufts University, Boston School Occupational Therapy Medford, Ma                        


 

§         Responsible for developing  training protocols and supervision of occupational therapy graduate student interns; 

 


Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

This is all volunteer and has no paid staff.  The contact listed above as the CEO is an engaged board member.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Daniel Curley MS
Board Chair Company Affiliation D Curley Consulting
Board Chair Term Jan 2000 - Dec 2012
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Grace Bachamn Wellesly College NonVoting
MS Stacy Bordon-Holiday Cambridge College Student Voting
Mr. Daniel Curley MS D Curley Consulting Voting
Ms. Donna Daley community volunteer Voting
Dr. Mary Cook Driscoll PhD, OTR/L,FAOTA Founder/Executive Director OWLL Voting
Mr. Marc Miller PhD Fort Point Theatre Channel Voting
Mr. Michael Ricca BFA Harvard University --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
ms. Stacy Bordon-Holliday community volunteer Voting
Ms. Donna Daley Community Volunteer --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): mixed
Gender Female: 4
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 75%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Ambassadors

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As it was in 1999 for women with HIV /AIDS, today  incarcerated mothers and their  children  have been a relatively invisible population to the public, to policymakers, and to funders.  Yet the number of women incarcerated in Massachusetts has grown 126% over the last 15 years,   the majority of whom have been convicted of non-violent offenses.  The majority are African American and Latina women from low income ,underserved urban and rural  communities. A disturbing  78% of these women are mothers and most are the sole income earners for their family. Statistics tell us  that 1 in 3 of those children will end up in jail.

Many OWLL participants are mothers who have been in prison.  I found myself  asking  the question of how being born into a legacy of poverty and prison affects succeeding generations.  Is poverty the real prison? How can we address the social costs—the broken homes, lack of sustainable employment, and stigma that  follow mothers after  imprisonment?   Could an OWLL performance help alter  the trajectory of re-entry  at the community level?

Questions such as these  led me  to spend  the last  two years exploring  a more fundamental concern: How can the legacy bequeathed to the  children of  parents   who have been incarcerated be reversed and American citizenship repaired  .  Seeking answers through  primary research ;   teaching in the Suffolk County prison; leading workshops and directing a performance with women living in a Roxbury family shelter;  meeting with university faculty   in criminal justice programs; interviewing  directors of re-entry programs in Boston, and conducting a focus group , led me to discover   an   astounding and appalling  lack of gender specific  resources for women ex-offenders and their children. 

The focus for my work with OWLL  this last year has been to   shape and implement a job skill workshop  curriculum specifically for  women ex-offenders who are mothers from which a performance  project could  been solidified. The complexity of this work has been humbling and life changing.  

By showing how underserved women who are ex-offenders   have lived and thought about life, audiences will be helped to decide what is important in their own lives ; about what is right or wrong, what has shaped our history.   And importantly, what we can do as a Massachusetts community to make it better for formerly incarcerated women  and their children to get the  help and jobs they need to participate as full citizens in the Commonwealth.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $50,000.00
Projected Expense $50,000.00
Form 990s --
Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $50,000 $18,000 $46,550
Total Expenses $50,000 $18,000 $46,550

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$20,000 $3,000 $12,500
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $15,000 $5,000 $5,300
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $5,000 -- $3,225
Revenue In-Kind $10,000 $10,000 $20,000
Other -- -- $5,525

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $50,000 $18,000 $46,550
Administration Expense -- -- --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.00 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 100% 100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $0 $0 $0
Current Assets $0 $0 $0
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $0 $0 $0

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

This nonprofit completes a 990-N or 990 postcard.  As such, numbers in charts and graphs are per the organization.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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