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uAspire (previously known as ACCESS)

 31 Milk Street, Suite 900
 Boston, MA 02109
[P] (617) 778-7195
[F] (617) 778-7196
http://www.uaspire.org
[email protected]
Bob Giannino
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INCORPORATED: 1985
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 46-1314848

LAST UPDATED: 08/11/2016
Organization DBA uAspire
Former Names ACCESS (2012)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

uAspire works to ensure that all young people have the financial information and resources necessary to find an affordable path to – and through – a postsecondary education. To accomplish this mission, uAspire places financial aid advisors inside high schools and community organizations to provide free financial aid advice and advocacy to all the students of Boston, Springfield and Lawrence - and soon, in Miami, FL - to help them overcome the financial barriers to higher education. Our programs work with students and their families from middle school to high school through college graduation – serving more than 11,000 students and families last year alone – to ensure that finances never get in the way of potential. In the last three years, uAspire has helped students secure more than $150 million in financial aid. Through partnerships with high schools, community organizations and local universities, uAspire has helped more than 60,000 students achieve their dream of higher education since our founding in 1985.

Mission Statement

uAspire works to ensure that all young people have the financial information and resources necessary to find an affordable path to – and through – a postsecondary education. To accomplish this mission, uAspire places financial aid advisors inside high schools and community organizations to provide free financial aid advice and advocacy to all the students of Boston, Springfield and Lawrence - and soon, in Miami, FL - to help them overcome the financial barriers to higher education. Our programs work with students and their families from middle school to high school through college graduation – serving more than 11,000 students and families last year alone – to ensure that finances never get in the way of potential. In the last three years, uAspire has helped students secure more than $150 million in financial aid. Through partnerships with high schools, community organizations and local universities, uAspire has helped more than 60,000 students achieve their dream of higher education since our founding in 1985.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $4,344,000.00
Projected Expense $4,158,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Engagement Program
  • Early College Affordability Awareness (ECAA)
  • High School Advising
  • Last Dollar Scholarships
  • Postsecondary Success

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

uAspire works to ensure that all young people have the financial information and resources necessary to find an affordable path to – and through – a postsecondary education. To accomplish this mission, uAspire places financial aid advisors inside high schools and community organizations to provide free financial aid advice and advocacy to all the students of Boston, Springfield and Lawrence - and soon, in Miami, FL - to help them overcome the financial barriers to higher education. Our programs work with students and their families from middle school to high school through college graduation – serving more than 11,000 students and families last year alone – to ensure that finances never get in the way of potential. In the last three years, uAspire has helped students secure more than $150 million in financial aid. Through partnerships with high schools, community organizations and local universities, uAspire has helped more than 60,000 students achieve their dream of higher education since our founding in 1985.


Background Statement

uAspire provides students and families with a full understanding of the financial aid process through four innovative programs that leverage the strong relationships we have built throughout Massachusetts. uAspire was founded in 1985 as a program of the Boston Plan for Excellence (BPE). Our program grew out of a concern, expressed by business and community leaders, about the drop-out problem facing high school students in the mid-1980s. These first leaders had a desire to create a continuum of programs, from early education through college and into careers. Early reaction was positive, with news coverage at our opening and a feature in Time magazine at the one-year anniversary. uAspire became its own 501(c)(3) in 2001 for greater autonomy, yet with a mission to still serve Boston's high school students.
 
During more than 25 years, uAspire has grown to have a greater impact in Boston, and increasingly throughout Massachusetts. Through the Community Engagement Program we partner with leading community organizations, such as College Bound Dorchester and SquashBusters, to enhance their college access programming by providing their constituents with expert financial aid advice, as well as build organizational capacity by providing financial aid training to their staff. Our High School Advising Program places financial aid advisors in all pubilc high schools in Boston, Springfield and Lawrence to help students navigate the complicated and often frustrating financial aid process. Through group workshops and multiple one on one advising sessions, uAspire Advisors explain the financial aid process, provide scholarship search advice, assist with financial aid forms and analyze financial aid awards. Working alongside guidance counselors, uAspire fills a critical gap in schools’ college access programming. Our Postsecondary Success Program supports our students through college, ensuring no financial obstacles prevent graduation, and plays a lead role in the city-wide Success Boston initiative that aims to double the college graduation rate of the Boston Public Schools Class of 2011. Through our Last Dollar Scholarship Program, uAspire provides critical need-based gap scholarships to eligible students who have participate in our High School Advising Program.

Impact Statement

uAspire has undergone dramatic growth over the last three years due to the increasing need for our services and the effectiveness of our programs. The increase in tuition and fees, by more than 68% between 2001 and 2006 for Massachusetts four-year public colleges, is perhaps hardest felt by students in the Boston Public Schools, where more than 70% of the students come from families at or below the federal poverty line. This has resulted in the significant growth of our Senior Advising program over the past few years. In 2004, uAspire held 1,388 one on one advising sessions with 600 high school seniors. Last year, uAspire served more than 4,000 high school seniors in three sites across Massachusetts - Boston, Springfield and Lawrence. As a result of these advising sessions, last year uAspire helped high school seniors secure more than $85.4 million in grants, loans and scholarships. Thanks to proper management and our highly trained Advisors, for the past two years uAspire has been able to show a return on investment of $62 in financial aid secured for every $1 invested in the program.
 
uAspire’s financial aid advising services have already had a remarkable effect on the students of Boston. uAspire completed a survey with the help of the National Student Clearinghouse of 250 Boston students from the Class of 2000 who participated in the uAspire Senior Advising Program and received an uAspire Last Dollar Scholarship and found that 75% graduated from a two or four year college within seven years. This number is remarkable given the report released by Northeastern University and the Private Industry Counsel, funded by the Boston Foundation, which indicated that only 35.5% of the graduates from the Boston Public Schools Class of 2000 who enrolled in college had earned a two-year or four-year post-secondary degree or certificate within the same time period.

Needs Statement

uAspire's organizational needs include:
* Strategic Planning - development and implementation of growth strategy to serve more students and families in the coming years, both inside and outside Massachusetts
* Evaluation - streamline data capturing to better measure impact and inform new methods to support students through their pursuit of a college degree
* Systems - creating the systems capacity (i.e. Salesforce) to support a growing, multi-site organization
* Technology - utilize technology so that financial aid Advisors can most effectively serve students in all high schools and community organizations where we operate
* Fundraising - building strong relationships with both national funders and local funders in new cities where uAspire seeks to launch our programming, and continue to build relationships with funders/donors locally in Massachusetts

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Northeast Massachusetts Region
Pioneer Valley Region
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
METROWEST REGION, MA

Boston, Springfield, Lawrence, Fall River, Cambridge, and Somerville MA

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Scholarships & Student Financial Aid
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Community Engagement Program

uAspire has developed partnerships with more than 20 community-based organizations, including Artists for Humanity, Boys & Girls Club of Boston, College Bound Dorchester and Year Up. These partnerships allow uAspire Advisors to build capacity within the community to increase awareness of how to make a college education affordable. The Community Engagement Program enables uAspire to do the following:
 Collaborate with each community partner to design a plan of activities and goals to best meet the needs of the young people and families they serve
 Build the capacity of partner organizations to reinforce financial aid messages through staff training and ongoing support
 Depending on uAspire capacity and services requested, some organization choose to cost-share partnerships
Budget  $324,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Student Financial Aid
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • more than 2,200 students, families impacted by community engagement last year
  • more than 60 partnerships with community-based organizations
  • popular events such as FAFSA completion day are successful      
Program Long-Term Success 
  • uAspire's geographic scope is expanded beyond high schools, becoming well-known name in community
  • CBO professionals are better equipped to handle financial aid questions that they young people and families they serve have
  • college-going cultures are built and grown in neighborhoods across Boston, Springfield, Lawrence
Program Success Monitored By 
  • partner surveys
  • student/family feedback   
Examples of Program Success  uAspire has maintained valuable partnerships with more than 60 community partners in the three cities where we operate. Through these partnerships, uAspire offered more than 100 workshops, directly impacting 2,200 students and families. The services we offered include:  Financial Aid 101 workshops, FAFSA Completion Day, one-on-one advising, and staff training.

Early College Affordability Awareness (ECAA)

uAspire began the Early College Affordability Awareness program (ECAA) in 2009 with the goal of providing direct advising and workshops to students in Boston high schools as early as the 9th grade. With continued reinforcement of the importance to start preparing for college early, students will have more time and opportunities to plan ahead for their education once they reach senior year. Components include:
 9th – Students learn about the positive benefits of investing in college; the connection between academics, extracurricular activities and financial aid; and an understanding of the financial aid process.
 10th – Students learn about the different types of financial aid; the difference between the “sticker price” and the actual cost of a college education; and the different types of colleges.
 11th – Students learn about how different choices can help make college more affordable; the need for a “financial safety” school; and the basics of a financial aid award letter.
Budget  $200,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Student Financial Aid
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 83% of 9th grade students were able to correctly answer three or four questions from a four-question survey (vs. 69% pre-test) and 91% of 10th graders were able to do the same (vs. 79% pre-test)
  • 75% of 9th graders know that uAspire is in their schools and is a service for them – up from 35% at the beginning of the year.
  • 9th grade students who spoke with a college graduate rose from 45% to 53%. The number of 10th graders participating in a club or after-school activity rose as well, from 55% to 63%.

Program Long-Term Success 
  • increased knowledge of college financial aid process
  • change in behavior towards positive choices re: college (i.e. taking advanced courses, joining extracurricular activities, saving for college early, visiting colleges)
Program Success Monitored By 
  • student surveys, questionnaires
  • use of Salesforce database to record outputs, impact
Examples of Program Success  The data shared above which show increased knowledge of the financial aid process has been very promising and is evident of the impact that ECAA advising has on students. We anticipate that, by the time these students enter senior year of high school, they will be better prepared to navigate the complex financial aid process and make informed decisions about their college education.

High School Advising

uAspire’s financial aid Advisors offer one-on-one advising to high school seniors and guide students through the process, from initial intake to review of the financial aid award letter. Support includes: an initial conversation with students to understand their situation and educational goals; assistance completing the FAFSA; and review of financial aid award letters. Advisors also host workshops for students to help build awareness of the financial aid process.
Budget  $987,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Student Financial Aid
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • more than 4,000 HS seniors receive uAspire advising services
  • FAFSA completion and award letter review
  • $62 leveraged in financial aid for every $1 given to senior advising program
Program Long-Term Success 
  • students have an affordable plan to graduate from college, earn their degree
  • reduced/eliminated student debt upon graduation
  • more than 84% of uAspire advisees persist to 2nd year of college, compared to 66% of all students nationwide across all incomes
  • MA leads nation in FAFSA completion, college access and success
Program Success Monitored By 
  • advisor notes
  • use of Salesforce database to track progress
  • family financial data
  • National Student Clearinghouse data
Examples of Program Success 

“Before freshman year started, my family and I were financially stressed trying to figure out how we could pay my fall semester bill for Boston College. Every little bit of financial assistance helped my family and I out. I was financially set and was able to get the full experience of college without any financial disturbances.

–J.I.

Last Dollar Scholarships

uAspire provides direct scholarships to students with the greatest amount of unmet financial need upon completion of a full year of advising in their senior year of high school. Scholarships average $1,000 per student and are renewable for six years. This amount often means the difference between a student being able to attend the college of their choice or not attending. 40% of BPS Valedictorians have applied for our Last Dollar Scholarship.
Budget  $310,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Student Financial Aid
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • nearly 300 students in Boston and Springfield received a Last Dollar Scholarship in 2012
  • more than $270,000 granted in scholarships
Program Long-Term Success 
  • students fill critical gaps of funding that otherwise may derail their track towards a college degree
  • with finances in order, students focus on their academics, rather than whether or not they can afford tuition next semester
Program Success Monitored By 
  • student feedback
  • Salesforce database
Examples of Program Success 

“This scholarship has meant a great deal to me. It was the perfect gift a college student could ever ask for, truly was a blessing. With this scholarship I was able to attend my top choice school that someone told me I'd never be able to afford. I am beyond thankful for the support system that came along with the scholarship.”

–L.S.


Postsecondary Success

uAspire is a participating organization in The Boston Foundation’s Success Boston initiative. The initiative was launched in November 2008 after a report found that only 35% of Boston Public Schools high school graduates from the Class of 2000 earned a college degree within seven years of graduation. uAspire’s role in this groundbreaking initiative is to provide students and their families with financial aid guidance, as well as convene meetings of the participating organizations and collect and manage student data.
Budget  $300,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Postsecondary Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 400 Success Boston students last year served through financial aid and financial education workshops, FAFSA fill-ins, 1-on-1 meetings, and indirect advising through their success coaches

Program Long-Term Success 
  • students successfully graduate from college
  • graduate with minimal, manageable student debt
  • PSE completion numbers are higher in Boston, Springfield, Lawrence
Program Success Monitored By 
  • data collection in collaboration with our CBO, Success Boston partners
  • National Student Clearinghouse data
  • Salesforce database to capture, track, analyze data
Examples of Program Success  uAspire's college students, as part of this program, appreciate the services we offer and turn to us for additional support. With FAFSA needing to be completed every year, we ensure that students continue their track towards their degree. 84% of uAspire Scholars persist into their second year of college, compared to a national average of 66%, which includes students across all income levels.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Bob Giannino
CEO Term Start May 2005
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Bob Giannino is the Executive Director of uAspire, the leading provider of financial aid advising in Massachusetts. Bob has 16 years of experience within the Boston nonprofit community. Prior to joining uAspire, he served as the Vice President of Business Development and Government Relations at Jumpstart for Young Children, a Boston-based national nonprofit organization that engages college-aged young people in service. While at Jumpstart, Bob held several senior level management positions, including three years as Executive Director of Jumpstart Boston, where he oversaw a threefold increase in the organization's impact on the City's children. Bob's previous experience includes being involved in the start-up of a number of other successful nonprofit ventures, and a stint in the for-profit sector with Procter and Gamble. As a product of the Somerville Public Schools and a graduate of Harvard College, Bob knows first hand the need for high quality advising services and the role that financial aid, in particular scholarship support, plays in making a difference in one's life. In addition to his work with uAspire, Bob serves on the Board of Directors of idealist.org - the leading nonprofit career internet site - and Social Capital Inc., is a member of the Selection Committee for the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Award for Campus-Community Collaboration, and has served as an advisor to the Institute for School/Community Collaboration. A member of the Boston Study Group, a panel of business, philanthropic and nonprofit leaders from across Boston who meet monthly to examine pressing issues facing the city, Bob was Co-Chair of the Education Convening for The Boston Foundation's 2006 Boston Indicators Project, a biennial gathering of Boston's educational leaders, and recently served as a member of EdVestors Educational Review Panel. Bob also serves an Alumni Interviewer for Harvard. Bob resides with his family in Dorchester, MA
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Erin Cox Weinberg Chief Program and Strategy Officer

Erin Cox Weinberg comes to ACCESS following nine years of service at Jumpstart for Young Children, a national social entrepreneurial early education non-profit. Erin’s tenure there included a multitude of roles all focused on building and growing programs, systems, and people. 

In her most recent role as the Vice President of Field Operations and Strategic Growth, she managed the fundraising, program quality, and growth across Jumpstart’s national network of five regional offices, 150+ staff, 74 higher education partnerships, and 3,800 volunteers.  As Executive Director of Jumpstart’s Northeast Region from 2004-2007, Erin managed the implementation of the first-ever Jumpstart School Readiness for All Initiative, a community-based growth effort aimed at securing the partnerships and sustainable funding necessary to grow Jumpstart’s services to scale, community by community, in Boston. Under her direction, the Initiative provided individualized mentoring to more than 900 children in Roxbury, received the prestigious Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Award for Campus-Community Collaboration, and expanded to neighboring Jamaica Plain, North Dorchester, and South Boston. Prior to that, Erin nearly tripled Jumpstart’s national impact as Director of New Site Development (2002-2004) and founded and ran the Jumpstart-Tufts partnership (2000-2002).  Erin received her Bachelor’s Degree in Child Development from Tufts University and is a graduate of the Commonwealth Seminar (2005) and LeadBoston (2007).
Dave Dore Chief Administrative and Financial Officer Dave became a member of the ACCESS staff in December 2011. He was formerly the Director of Finance for Partners Harvard Medical International, a not for profit organization that provides expert advice in the fields of health care delivery and medical education in developing countries. Dave has earned a MBA and a BS in Finance from the Wallace E. Carroll School of Management at Boston College and a Graduate Diploma in Professional Accounting from the Sawyer Business School at Suffolk University. He joined ACCESS to use his financial and operational expertise to help support the continued growth of the organization and the student population it assists in finding affordable pathways through college.
Gaby King Morse Chief External Affairs Officer Gabrielle King Morse brings over 20 years of experience in for-profit and non- profit management. With an MBA from Babson’s Olin School of Management, she comes to ACCESS having worked in development, marketing & communications, finances and operations at several local and national nonprofits, such as Discovering Justice, City Year, and Crossroads for Kids.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Best Nonprofit to Work For Opportunity Knocks 2012
College Access Organization Award of Excellence National College Access Network 2012
Ellen S. Jackson Award for Excellence in Education Freedom House 2010
20th Anniversary Award Highland Street Foundation 2009
Champion of Access Award Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Massachusetts 2009
Out of the Blue Grant Recipient The Boston Foundation 2008
Social Innovator Recognition Social Innovation Fund 2008

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 37
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 22
Hispanic/Latino: 9
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 23
Male: 16
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration No

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Alexander Packard
Board Chair Company Affiliation Iora Health
Board Chair Term July 2012 - June 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Scott Aldsworth High Street Partners, Inc. Voting
Ms. Patti Bellinger Harvard Business School Voting
Ms. Michelle Cooper Institute for Higher Education Policy Voting
Mrs. Diane Exter Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Marcy Gefter Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Bob Giannino-Racine ACCESS Exofficio
Mr. David Hadden Jr. The Hadden Company Voting
Mr. Jeffrey F. Jones Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge Voting
Ms. Peggy Kemp Fenway High School Voting
Mr. EJ Landry Deloitte Voting
Mr. Rashaun Martin Cathedral High School Voting
Mr. Bill McClements Integreon Voting
Ms. Mary Jo Meisner The Boston Foundation Voting
Mr. J. Keith Motley University of Massachusetts Boston Voting
Ms. Jane Musser Nelson Cambridge Associates Voting
Mr. Alexander Packard Iora Health Voting
Mrs. Kathryn Plazak Plazak Associates Voting
Ms. Mandy Savitz-Romer Harvard Graduate School of Education Voting
Ms. Mora Segal Achievement Network Voting
Ms. Laurie Thomsen New Profit, Inc. Voting
Mr. C. Mark Vasu CMV Marketing Voting
Mr. Howard Wolk The Cross Country Group Voting
Ms. Megan Zug Uncommon Schools Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 18
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 13
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Operations
  • Personnel
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $5,378,107 $3,503,261 $3,593,584
Total Expenses $5,345,327 $2,334,246 $3,561,587

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $3,779,746 $3,012,661 $2,677,042
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $1,402,507 $349,751 $542,365
Investment Income, Net of Losses $34,158 $6,601 $22,872
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $161,696 $134,248 $351,305
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $3,302,480 $1,740,283 $2,591,918
Administration Expense $307,163 $111,689 $215,196
Fundraising Expense $1,735,684 $482,274 $754,473
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 1.50 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 62% 75% 73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 44% 15% 25%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,442,025 $1,465,670 $1,259,790
Current Assets $605,001 $659,434 $496,730
Long-Term Liabilities $91,544 $126,640 $261,348
Current Liabilities $156,140 $162,239 $170,442
Total Net Assets $1,194,341 $1,176,791 $828,000

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $557,909.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.87 4.06 2.91

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 6% 9% 21%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

uAspire has grown rapidly over the last six years, thanks to growing support from institutional and individual donors. Seven years ago, uAspire’s operating budget was $800,000. Today it stands at $3.5 million with the organization poised for continued growth of this kind. In FY10, uAspire did not raise sufficient revenue to meet expenses, in large part due to difficult outside economic situations beyond our control that restricted philanthropy, generally. Rather than dramatically cut programs during a significant time of need, uAspire decided to tap into built-up reserves in order to fund the continued building of organizational infrastructure and delivery of services. Today, uAspire is at its strongest point ever with an experienced development team, high performing programs and an organizational brand that has it poised for programmatic and financial success.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990 data and additional information provided by the organization. Contributions from corporations and foundations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, in conjunction with changing their name from ACCESS (Action Center for College Educational Svs & Scholarship Fdn) to uAspire in 2014, the organization opened a new nonprofit status for the new name, uAspire (EIN number 46-1314848). As such, the old nonprofit status for ACCESS (EIN number 04-3564307) has been closed. The final 990 (FY14) for that nonprofit status is included above for your reference, but is not included in the charts and graphs.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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