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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

S3IDF’s mission is to reduce poverty by applying and disseminating its paradigm-shifting Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA). The SMBA bundles business development support, technological know-how, and co-financing to create small-scale enterprises. This support provides energy and other infrastructure services and related productive-use investments that are focused explicitly on the poor and the environment. S3IDF pursues two mission objectives to affect change on both local and global levels:To employ its Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA) in India to build micro-, small-, and medium-scale enterprises that positively impact the poor and the environment, To promote, disseminate, and transfer the SMBA to achieve a broader and greater impact within poor communities by enabling other development institutions to leverage both philanthropic and development capital to facilitate local commercial co-financing for micro-, small-, and medium-scale enterprises that explicitly benefit the poor.

Mission Statement

S3IDF’s mission is to reduce poverty by applying and disseminating its paradigm-shifting Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA). The SMBA bundles business development support, technological know-how, and co-financing to create small-scale enterprises. This support provides energy and other infrastructure services and related productive-use investments that are focused explicitly on the poor and the environment. S3IDF pursues two mission objectives to affect change on both local and global levels:To employ its Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA) in India to build micro-, small-, and medium-scale enterprises that positively impact the poor and the environment, To promote, disseminate, and transfer the SMBA to achieve a broader and greater impact within poor communities by enabling other development institutions to leverage both philanthropic and development capital to facilitate local commercial co-financing for micro-, small-, and medium-scale enterprises that explicitly benefit the poor.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $795,000.00
Projected Expense $794,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Program Services: Dissemination
  • Program Services: Projects

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

S3IDF’s mission is to reduce poverty by applying and disseminating its paradigm-shifting Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA). The SMBA bundles business development support, technological know-how, and co-financing to create small-scale enterprises. This support provides energy and other infrastructure services and related productive-use investments that are focused explicitly on the poor and the environment. S3IDF pursues two mission objectives to affect change on both local and global levels:To employ its Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA) in India to build micro-, small-, and medium-scale enterprises that positively impact the poor and the environment, To promote, disseminate, and transfer the SMBA to achieve a broader and greater impact within poor communities by enabling other development institutions to leverage both philanthropic and development capital to facilitate local commercial co-financing for micro-, small-, and medium-scale enterprises that explicitly benefit the poor.

Background Statement

The Small-Scale Sustainable Infrastructure Development Fund (S3IDF) was created in 2001 by a group of development professionals with extensive experience spanning more than sixty countries. These founders created S3IDF in response to the limitations of conventional development approaches to providing infrastructure services to the poor. The S3IDF founders developed an alternative paradigm, the Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA), to be very widely applicable across technologies and geographies. The SMBA addresses the shortcomings of conventional approaches of infrastructure provision for the poor and takes advantage of the proliferation of technological and material evolutions that made small-scale infrastructure options more cost-effective.

Impact Statement

Enterprises supported by S3IDF increase income and/or savings through additional employment opportunities, provide access to local basic services, and create safer, healthier living environments. Examples of social impact in India include:

  • Improved indoor air quality through efficient cook stoves and clean-burning fuels, such as biogas
  • Increased productivity in the evening hours with reliable lighting for students and parents through pico-hydro electrification schemes
  • Reliable access to safe drinking water for villagers through water purification plants

To date, S3IDF has impacted more than 140,000 poor individuals in India as business owners or operators, employees, and customers and their families. The application of S3IDF’s Social Merchant Bank Approach (SMBA) in Nepal, through collaboration with the Asian Development Bank (ADB), has the potential to impact hundreds of thousands of households as it increases the capacity of small water mills and adds additional productive-use technologies which harness energy from the mills.

In India, every dollar that S3IDF invests from its revolving fund (RF) in micro, small and medium enterprises typically leverages at least two dollars, and sometimes up to four dollars, in capital injected by local entrepreneurs and banks (and in some cases, government subsidies and equipment suppliers). This financial leverage, along with the technology and business development services that S3IDF provides, makes it possible to alleviate poverty on a larger scale than would otherwise be possible.Such leveraging is also being achieved in Nepal through the deployment of a RF that the ADB is capitalizing. In India, examples of financial impact include:

  • Increased income for women’s sewing cooperative workers though access to computerized embroidery machines.
  • New opportunities for solar battery recharge businesses through access to three-wheel vehicles
  • Increased wealth for owners of electric flour and spice grinding machines

S3IDF’s use of clean and renewable energy helps the environment by reducing or eliminating the poor’s reliance on inefficient fuels, thereby improving energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions. Examples of environmental impact include:

  • Reduced fuel wood consumption for ovens used in silk reeling through improved kilns
  • Replacement of inefficient cooking fuels, such as wood, with cleaner, more efficient biogas
  • Reduced kerosene consumption in homes and shops through solar lanterns

Needs Statement

As an organization striving to make a big impact and bring poor and under-served communities and people out of poverty, we appreciate any contributions from the public. Currently, we are concentrating on gaining funding for the creation of a permanent revolving fund (RF), which can be used to increase our reach to other poor communities and give them the equity, partial guarantees, and the other credit conditioning instruments they need to access commercial lending institutions. Additionally, we always welcome funds that we can use to build on our dissemination initiatives to begin projects in other provinces in India and countries around the world. We appreciate any and all support people are willing to give us, as we continue to tackle widespread poverty with small-scale investments and enterprising solutions. 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Internationally
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Organization Categories

  1. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - International Economic Development
  2. Science & Technology - Engineering & Technology
  3. Environment - Energy Resources Conservation & Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Program Services: Dissemination

As part of its dissemination initiatives, S3IDF works to bring its innovative Social Merchant Bank ApproachSM to new countries and to additional regions in India. S3IDF also works to change mindsets of development practitioners, organizations, and other entities about the importance of offering bundled services and leveraging capital.
Budget  $130,000.00
Category  Community Development Community Economic Development
Population Served Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
Program Short-Term Success  S3IDF’s short-term success is indicated by tangible efforts it makes to spread awareness about the importance of bundling services and using financial leverage. Examples include: speaking engagements and presentations at academic and international development institutions and new partnerships and implemented projects/program initiatives that integrate Social Merchant Bank ApproachSM (SMBA).
Program Long-Term Success  S3IDF works to affect a “systems change” in the way that development institutions and other nonprofit and for-profit entities implement programs and projects. To work toward achieving this long-term objective, S3IDF enables other development institutions to leverage both philanthropic and development capital to facilitate local commercial co-financing for micro-, small-, and medium-scale enterprises that explicitly benefit the poor.
Program Success Monitored By  S3IDF monitors the success of its dissemination initiatives through both the quantity and quality of its speaking engagements and presentations, conversations with development practitioners, and new partnerships and implemented projects/program initiatives that integrate Social Merchant Bank ApproachSM (SMBA).
Examples of Program Success  To date, S3IDF has explored opportunities for transferring the Social Merchant Bank ApproachSM (SMBA) beyond India to East Africa, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Opportunities in Sri Lanka and Nepal have been pursued through reconnaissance studies and, in the case of Nepal, through additional investigation and implementation, including an examination of the requirements for setting up a revolving fund (RF) and an active pilot test of the SMBA in a project to expand Nepal’s Improved Water Mill Programme (IWMP).  S3IDF also routinely give presentations on the SMBA and its utility to international audiences, such as the Asia Clean Energy Forum and USAID forums and workshops.

Program Services: Projects

S3IDF is currently expanding its use of the Social Merchant Bank ApproachSM (SMBA) to develop projects in three priority program areas. These areas are: Water Solutions (drinking water filters and small-scale hydropower), Solar Solutions (PV and other related solar technologies that expand access to energy), and Biomass & Biogas Solutions (technologies that turn waste products into multiple products, such as gas for cooking, natural fertilizer, etc).
Budget  $150,000.00
Category  Community Development Community Economic Development
Population Served Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
Program Short-Term Success  In every project that S3IDF implements, S3IDF ensures that its investment benefits the poor as buyers of the service, employees in the enterprise, and/or owners/operators of the enterprise. Example short-term outcomes include higher enterprise productivity, safer domestic air quality, access to affordable safe drinking water, etc.
Program Long-Term Success  The ultimate changes that S3IDF works to achieve through its project initiatives are poverty reduction and improved access of practical and affordable infrastructure technologies and related services for the poor. Improved access to infrastructure technologies and related services forms a foundation for poverty alleviation and economic development.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored through data collection from field surveys, interviews with project beneficiaries and stakeholders and by social, financial, and environmental metrics (such as number of people who gain access to lighting, number of banks and branches making first loans to low-income individuals as a result of the project, improvements in energy efficiency).
Examples of Program Success  S3IDF uses the data its collects through its monitoring and evaluation activities to create reports and videos, including case studies that highlight examples of successful projects. These documents and videos capture important positive changes in the behaviors and lives of project beneficiaries whose testimonials are provided alongside impact statistics and project explanations.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Russell deLucia
CEO Term Start Sept 2001
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Trained in engineering and economics (Ph.D., Harvard University), Dr. deLucia is a pioneer in the field of development finance and infrastructure development with experience in more than sixty countries with developing or transition economies, covering every geographic area of the world. Prior to creating S3IDF, he was a consultant for bilateral and multilateral development finance institutions (ADB, IBRD, IDB, IFAD and IFC) and their member countries, serving both as team leader and/or specialist expert.  He has advised governments, private firms, financial institutions and NGOs regarding policy and project matters. Much of his prior consulting was on small-scale infrastructure and related investments (e.g. energy-dependent agro-processing schemes) and mechanisms to yield greater development synergies. His experience has influenced the practicum of institutional, regulatory and financing approaches to facilitate small-investments and broader program efforts in different contexts.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience

 

 

Russell J. deLucia is the primary founder, President and Executive Director S3IDF-US. He was also the Founding Chairman, now Senior Advisor, of its affiliate S3IDF-India. Trained in engineering and economics (Ph.D., Harvard University), Dr. deLucia is a pioneer in the field of development finance and infrastructure development with experience in more than sixty countries with developing or transition economies, covering every geographic area of the world. Prior to creating S3IDF, he was a consultant for bilateral and multilateral development finance institutions and their member countries, serving both as team leader and/or specialist expert.  He has advised governments, private firms, financial institutions and NGOs regarding policy and project matters. Much of his prior consulting was on small-scale infrastructure and related investments (e.g. energy-dependent agro-processing schemes) and mechanisms to yield greater development synergies. His experience has influenced the practicum of institutional, regulatory and financing approaches to facilitate small-investments and broader program efforts in different contexts.

Dr. de Lucia has written and presented extensively on infrastructure, financing, environment and development issues. For the first IFAD World Poverty Study (for which he was a consultant), he prepared a manuscript entitled The Energy Dimensions of Poverty. He served as an Editorial Adviser for the UN journal, Natural Resources Forum. As Guest Editor, he organized and wrote several articles for the November 2000 Special Issue on “Small-Scale Natural Resources and Related Infrastructure Development.”  This Issue “makes the case” for local private participation and financing of small-infrastructure investments in various sectors with examples from Asia, Africa and Latin America.  In recent years he has been a regular invited presenter at the sessions on financing energy access at the Asian Clean Energy Forum (ACEF) held at the ADB.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Elizabeth Friend Senior Program Officer Elizabeth Friend holds an MA in Sustainable International Development from the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University and a BA in Leadership Studies from the Jepson School of Leadership Studies at the University of Richmond. Elizabeth most recently served as International Director of Village Forward, an organization that provides access to safe water and economic opportunity through social enterprise in Nepal. She is an international development practitioner with experience in international program management, strategic planning, and field research with a focus on household-level appropriate technologies and micro-enterprise development. 
Mr. Nakul Kadaba Project Associate Nakul Kadaba joined S3IDF in late, 2013. He holds a Masters in Public Administration with a concentration in International Management from George Mason University and a BA in Economics and History from The College of William and Mary. His experience working and living in India, coupled with working for several international development organizations, demonstrate his passion for sustainable development and poverty alleviation. He serves as a liaison between the US and India offices and assists with programs and operations. 

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? No
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Dr Russell deLucia
Board Chair Company Affiliation Executive Director, S3IDF
Board Chair Term June 2001 - July
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Robin Brenner No Affiliation Voting
Russell deLucia Executive Director, S3IDF Voting
Somak Ghosh YES Bank Voting
Michael Lesser No Affiliation Voting
Marco Palmieri President of DECK Associates, LLC Voting
Scott Sklar The Stella Group, Ltd Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 17%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $795,000.00
Projected Expense $794,000.00
Form 990s

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2012 Review

2011 Review (with 2010 comparative data)

2009 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $338,121 $381,255 $404,631
Total Expenses $388,189 $487,425 $345,484

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $130,000
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $117,660 $10,513 $13,150
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $15,958 $152,214 $45,000
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,272 $1,295 $5,923
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $202,231 $217,233 $210,558
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $264,333 $388,646 $180,890
Administration Expense $72,999 $78,879 $106,189
Fundraising Expense $50,857 $19,900 $58,405
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.87 0.78 1.17
Program Expense/Total Expenses 68% 80% 52%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 43% 189% 41%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $1,012,911 $1,042,021 $1,158,543
Current Assets $1,011,600 $1,039,836 $1,158,543
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $27,529 $6,571 $16,923
Total Net Assets $985,382 $1,035,450 $1,141,620

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 19.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 36.75 158.25 68.46

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's Reviewed financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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