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Organization DBA --
Former Names World Literacy, Inc. (1951)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

World Education, Inc. (WEI) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of the poor through education, and economic and social development. WEI has worked in over 60 countries in Asia, Africa, and the U.S., and currently has projects in adult education, girls’ and women’s education, community development, maternal and child health,  HIV/AIDS prevention and care, and support for AIDS orphans. 

In the U.S., WEI strengthens the effectiveness of educators, organizations, and systems to support adults, older youth, and communities to thrive. WEI provides training, technical assistance, publications, research, and advocacy. Our strengths include providing and evaluating evidence-based professional development (online and face-to-face); designing and implementing demonstration projects; developing practical tools for adult educators to use in instruction, counseling, and program planning; creating and maintaining practitioner networks; and collaborating with local, state, and national adult education administrators and policy makers.

This profile focuses on World Education's work in the United States.
 

Mission Statement

World Education, Inc. (WEI) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of the poor through education, and economic and social development. WEI has worked in over 60 countries in Asia, Africa, and the U.S., and currently has projects in adult education, girls’ and women’s education, community development, maternal and child health,  HIV/AIDS prevention and care, and support for AIDS orphans. 

In the U.S., WEI strengthens the effectiveness of educators, organizations, and systems to support adults, older youth, and communities to thrive. WEI provides training, technical assistance, publications, research, and advocacy. Our strengths include providing and evaluating evidence-based professional development (online and face-to-face); designing and implementing demonstration projects; developing practical tools for adult educators to use in instruction, counseling, and program planning; creating and maintaining practitioner networks; and collaborating with local, state, and national adult education administrators and policy makers.

This profile focuses on World Education's work in the United States.
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $41,366,600.00
Projected Expense $41,254,611.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • LINCS Region 1 Regional Professional Development Center (RPDC)
  • National College Transition Network (NCTN)
  • Networks for Integrating New Americans
  • New England Literacy Resource Center (NELRC)
  • System for Adult Basic Education Support

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

World Education, Inc. (WEI) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of the poor through education, and economic and social development. WEI has worked in over 60 countries in Asia, Africa, and the U.S., and currently has projects in adult education, girls’ and women’s education, community development, maternal and child health,  HIV/AIDS prevention and care, and support for AIDS orphans. 

In the U.S., WEI strengthens the effectiveness of educators, organizations, and systems to support adults, older youth, and communities to thrive. WEI provides training, technical assistance, publications, research, and advocacy. Our strengths include providing and evaluating evidence-based professional development (online and face-to-face); designing and implementing demonstration projects; developing practical tools for adult educators to use in instruction, counseling, and program planning; creating and maintaining practitioner networks; and collaborating with local, state, and national adult education administrators and policy makers.

This profile focuses on World Education's work in the United States.
 

Background Statement

World Education (WEI) was founded in 1951 in Lucknow, India by a U.S. national, a visionary woman, Welthy Fisher, who understood the transformational power of literacy to improve the lives of individuals and communities. Since its founding, WEI has used experiential, evidence-based, and participatory methods to equip people with the skills, knowledge, and confidence they need to address their most pressing issues by linking basic education to health, economic, civic, and social initiatives in the U.S. and around the globe. 

In the U.S., WEI has played a leadership role in providing high-quality, evidence-based professional development for adult educators since the 1970s. In 1988, Governor Michael Dukakis launched the Commonwealth Literacy Campaign and WEI trained hundreds of literacy and English as a Second Language volunteers who went on to improve adults’ literacy skills across the Commonwealth. In 1990, following the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s launch of the System for Adult Basic Education Support (SABES), WEI created the SABES Central Resource Center and still holds this leadership role today. Since 1993, WEI has been leading the New England Literacy Resource Center (NELRC), a collaborative of literacy professional developers, departments of education, and providers in the six New England states, whose goal is to strengthen the capacity of adult education programs in the region.  In 1996, Harvard University, WEI, and others formed the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) with the goal of improving the quality of literacy services by linking research to practice. This work was disseminated in part through WEI's signature Focus on Basics publication that created a national forum for bridging research and practice in adult education. In 2000, WEI established the New England ABE-to-College Transition project with 25 adult education program partners, which supported adult secondary program graduates to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. Our current work is discussed in other sections of this profile.


Impact Statement

World Education is a national leader in designing and providing professional development for the adult education sector.  We develop, lead, and collaborate on local, regional, and national capacity building projects.  WEI built and operates six centers and a statewide adult literacy hotline:  Educational Technology Center, National College Transition Network, New England Literacy Resource Center, LINCS Region 1 Professional Development Center, System for Adult Basic Education Support Coordination Center, System for Adult Basic Education Support Center for Education andn Career Planning, and the Massachusetts Adult Literacy Hotline. Key recent accomplishments include:

1.  College for a Day served 390 adult learners representing 15 Boston adult education programs.  Participants increased their college knowledge through college visits, including participation in demonstration classes.  WEI developed a Mentoring Toolkit which was piloted by 16 pairs of mentors and mentees from three Boston area adult education programs.  In FY16, the Mentoring Toolkit will be adapted for use with migrant out-of-school youth statewide.
2.  A College and Career Readiness Standards/Curriculum Conference was sponsored by WEI's Coordination Center for the System for Adult Basic Education Support.  380 participants from 111 Massachusetts adult education programs  participated.  94% of participants rated the conference "very good" or "excellent."
3.  WEI coordinated Digital Literacy Outreach and Dissemination for the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education.  Through hosting webinars, giving workshops at national conferences, and training trainers, WEI provided professional development to adult education program staff and professional developers on new resources to support digital literacy and access to technology in the adult education field.  The Tech Tips for Teachers blog and social media efforts promoted new resources and provided lesson ideas.  The pilot of the Integrating Digital Literacy and Problem Solving into Instruction lesson packet provided a way in for teachers to integrate digital literacy with instruction while increasing student access. 
4.  38 online courses (27 facilitated courses and 11 self-paced courses)  on topics such as college and career readiness and numeracy improved the skills of 998 adult educators in FY15 who rated them 4.37 on average in every category on a scale of 1-5.  The course completion rate was 76% for facilitated courses.
5.  The national immigrant integration project worked with networks in five U.S. cites to develop strategies and approaches for welcoming and integrating new Americans.
 
Current key goals include: 
 
1.  Increased integration of new Americans through a sustained, national immigrant integration effort.
2.  Increased professionalization and skills development for adult educators through sustained online and face-to-face, effective professional development.
3.  Better informed and active community participation by adult learners.
4.  Increased persistence rates among adult learners participating in adult education programs.
 

Needs Statement

The following are some pressing needs in the U.S. for which WEI seeks funding:

1. Professional Development: Most adult educators nationwide receive their training while in-service. The implementation of effective, evidence-based adult education services requires ongoing professional development, and the new College and Career Readiness Standards for Adult Education further underscore this need.
2. Immigrant Integration:  Adult education programs need support to serve as facilitators of successful integration of newcomers into their local communities, of cross-cultural understanding between U.S.-born and immigrant community members, and as cultivators of immigrant leadership.
3. Civic Literacy and Social Change: Adult education has an important role to play in helping undereducated adults become informed and active members of their communities. 
4. Young Adults in Adult Basic Education:  In all New England states a growing number of young adults ages 16-24 are choosing adult education over traditional high school.This places new demands on adult education programs and teachers to serve the so-called millennial generation.
5. Learner Persistence: Poverty-related stressors affect adults' ability to attend school consistently, to learn, and to meet their goals.


CEO Statement

I’ve had the pleasure of leading World Education since 1982. Throughout these years I’ve witnessed the impact of our work near and far. From Mali to Maine, World Education strives to educate and empower adults so that they can improve their livelihoods and be informed and active members of their communities. We pride ourselves for the innovative and high quality training and support we provide. Evaluations and more informal feedback from educators and administrators who participate in WEI’s programs have been consistently positive across time and geography. I have the highest respect for our talented staff who regularly go beyond the call of duty to make a difference in the lives of undereducated adults and families. World Education is truly an example of an organization that thinks globally and acts locally.

 

Joel Lamstein, President, World Education, Inc.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Massachusetts-All Regions
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
In the United States, World Education has local, regional, and national projects. In 2015 World Ed/US worked in 29 states, and our national Effective Transitions in Adult Education conference has drawn participants from all 50 states. Outside of the U.S., WEI has 97 active projects and offices in 17 countries, in Africa and Asia. This profile focuses on our work in the U.S.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Management & Technical Assistance
  3. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - International Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

LINCS Region 1 Regional Professional Development Center (RPDC)

World Education serves as the Regional Professional Development Center (RPDC) for the New England and Mid-Atlantic states along with Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The RPDC provides high quality, evidence-based professional development and resources to adult educators. Recent areas of focus have included adult numeracy instruction, health literacy, technology integration with instruction, career awareness, and learning disabilities. LINCS is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education. 

Budget  $400,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

The RPDC's approach to adult education professional development is at three levels of intensity:  dissemination (flyers, newsletters, announcements); training (webinars, conference sessions, workshops); and professional development (institutes, online courses, study circles).  RPDC supported professional learning networks (communities of practice) and increased the use of intensive, extended, and blended professional development initiatives.  Professional development activities included four extended initiatives, 13 online courses, four practitioner webinars, one virtual study circle, 17 in-person trainings, and 15 in-conference sessions.  RPDC partnered with the New England Literacy Resource Center for the extended (36 hours) and blended Technology Integration Project.

Program Long-Term Success 

The RPDC provided more than 6,670 hours of professional development to 1,756 adult educators. Participants rated the PD activity at an average score of 3.64 using a 1-4 scale.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Region 1 Professional Development Center  meets monthly with and reports directly to the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education at the U.S. Department of Education. The metrics that are the most closely monitored are:

1a. The percentage of recipients of information through LINCS technical assistance who report they are likely to implement instructional practices grounded in the most rigorous research available. Target=70%

1b. The percentage of individuals who receive LINCS technical assistance who can provide examples or other evidence that they implemented instructional practices based on the most rigorous research available within six months of receiving the technical assistance.Target=70%

 
The RPDC Director reports to the U.S. Division Vice President. 
 
Examples of Program Success 

Adult Numeracy Instruction - This 6-day (three 2-day institutes) was provided to adult numeracy instructors in Maine and Vermont in FY15 serving 23 participants in Maine and 34 participants in Vermont.

Teaching Excellence in Adult Literacy (TEAL) - Professional development on formative assessment, effective questioning, differentiated instruction, student-centered instruction, self-regulation for learning was provided to 193 adult educators representing all of the states in region 1.


National College Transition Network (NCTN)

The mission of the NCTN is to strengthen policy and practice related to college and career readiness of adult learners. The NCTN works with adult education programs, professional development providers, and policymakers to enable adult learners to succeed in postsecondary education that leads to jobs with family sustaining wages. The adults, who ultimately benefit from NCTN’s services, are typically first generation college goers. www.collegetransition.org

Budget  $500,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 

1. 435 adult educators from 33 states participated in the 2014 national Effective Transitions in Adult Education conference.

2. 390 adult learners from 15 Boston adult education programs increased their “college knowledge” through participating in college visits and demonstration classes as part of the College for a Day project.

3. 642 adult educators participated in one or more of NCTN’s online courses (five facilitated courses and two self-paced courses) and rated their subsequent ability and interest to apply in practice what they had learned 4.37 on average on a scale of 1–5.

Program Long-Term Success 

Adult educators increase their understanding of the components of college readiness, and how to teach adults related knowledge and skills.

Program Success Monitored By 

The NCTN leadership team meets monthly to monitor program progress, make adjustments and improvements, assess needs, and plan future programs. In addition, the staff holds two all-day staff retreats a year. The NCTN Director reports to the U.S. Division Vice President.

Individual projects are also monitored by their funders to whom NCTN reports using their guidelines. For bigger projects that entail funding for program level implementation, NCTN has designed and maintains a comprehensive and adjustable web-based data collection system adapted from and donated by Salesforce.

Examples of Program Success  Since its founding in 2005 with a two-year seed grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education, the NCTN has become recognized for its national leadership and contributions to improving the adult education field’s capacity to provide effective college and career readiness. The NCTN now has over 3,900 individual and institutional members in all 50 states. Thousands of its flagship products (College Transitions Toolkit, the Integrating Career Planning in ABE and ESOL Instruction curriculum guide, and Planning Your Financial Journey for College) have been distributed and are being used across the country. The NCTN serves in the leadership team and provides technical assistance for the Retraining the Gulf Coast Workforce through IT Consortium.

Networks for Integrating New Americans

This is a national demonstration project through which World Education provides technical assistance to networks of immigrant-serving organizations in five communities across the US, funded by the U.S.Department of Education. Our partners are Welcoming America, the National Partnership for New Americans, and IMPRINT.
Budget  $1,400,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

- Thriving networks with common agendas, pooled resources, and coordinated services.

- Increased number of low- and high-skilled immigrants who are:

· More English proficient

· Job ready

· Gainfully employed at skill level

· College and career ready

· Pursuing citizenship

· Registered to vote

· Active as participants and leaders in larger community and their children’s schools

- Increased trust between and activities among immigrants and receiving community members

Program Long-Term Success 

- Improved linguistic, economic, and civic integration of immigrants.

- Improved cohesion between immigrant and receiving communities.

that lead to:

Stronger, local economies and healthier communities

A more globally competitive nation

 
Program Success Monitored By 
WEI is helping each of the five networks develop Action Plans with measurable benchmarks focused on both network development and what we call "integration activities". Each area of work is assessed through a pre-post Strengths and Needs Self-Assessment triangulated against monthly coaching notes and interviews with key stakeholders in all five networks. Network Development focuses the networks' capacity and growth in five areas shown in the research literature to be critical to the success of Networks: clear and common purpose, leadership, membership, structure, and operations and performance -  each of which has its specific indicators. 
 
Data about the individual-level changes as well as programmatic changes made by participating network member agencies is collected in order to demonstrate the networks' progress towards integration as well as to test the network theory underlying the Initiative. Three out of five networks aim predominantly for economic integration activities (Lancaster, Idaho Neighbors United, and We Rhode Island) whereas Central Valley and White Center have prioritized civic integration. Four out of five Networks’ integration activity goals also include varying levels of focus on promoting immigrants as assets and making the community more welcoming to immigrants. Linguistic integration is a component of all five networks’ activities, typically embedded in other goals. The protocol by which the Networks’ integration activities outcome data is collected depends on each Network’s Action Plan and related, anticipated outcomes and its existing data collection system and capacity.  
Examples of Program Success  The local implementation is in its second year. All five networks have established anchor projects that advance either immigrant's economic or civic integration through education. Neighbors United Network in Boise Idaho launched Global Talent Idaho with funding from the U.S. Department of Labor. They have provided education and employment services to over 60 immigrants with professional backgrounds but limited English. They are working through an employer advisory council to secure jobs and internships for their clients.  The Central Valley Immigrant Integration Network has provided citizenship instruction for 121 immigrants in FY 2014 of whom 74 attained citizenship. They have also sponsored a week of events promoting immigrants as assets in Fresno, CA. The Lancaster network secured funding to establish a Community Center for Refugees and Immigrants that will provide parent engagement, health services, after school program and adult ESOL classes. The White Center Promise Network is gearing up to do a community-wide Big Read campaign that entails a series of events and where immigrant and US-born community members read the same book on an immigrant theme.

New England Literacy Resource Center (NELRC)

The New England Literacy Resource Center helps the region's adult education programs to improve their effectiveness in enabling adult learners to realize their goals as workers, parents, and community members. NELRC was established in 1994 as part of World Education through an inter-state agreement signed by all six states' governors who are represented on the governing board by each state's director of adult education. NELRC works to advance its mission in collaboration with these policymakers, as well as professional development providers and practitioners from Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. www.nelrc.org

In recent years, NELRC’s work has largely focused on capacity building in five areas: 1) college and career readiness standards implementation; 2) adult learner persistence; 3) civic literacy and social justice; 4) integrating technology in instruction; and 5) advocacy.

Budget  $200,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
  1. 22 adult educators participated in a 32-hour hybrid course on integrating technology in instruction.
  2. WEI has published 41 issues to date of The Change Agent social justice magazine and disseminated over 12,000 copies of each issue.
Program Long-Term Success 

All six New England states improve the quality of their adult education  services. At least 75% of participants in NELRC professional development implement one or more strategies covered. As a result, adult learners’ improved progress enables them to pursue further education and reach long-term life goals.Increased number of adults in Boston and beyond are college and career ready and pursuing postsecondary education and training and securing better jobs. Adult educators creatively and confidently integrate civic literacy and participation into instruction on a regular basis. Students and teachers are active in their communities and help to solve common problems directly or through advocacy.

Program Success Monitored By 

The 25-member NELRC governing board meets three times a year, all day, to monitor program progress, make adjustments and improvements, assess needs, and plan future programs. The NELRC Director reports to the U.S. Division Vice President and to the NELRC Board.

Individual projects are also monitored by their funders to whom we report using their guidelines. For bigger projects that entail funding for program level implementation, we have designed and maintain a comprehensive and adjustable web-based data collection system adapted from and donated by Salesforce.

Examples of Program Success 

NELRC designed and managed all aspects of both projects described below for Nellie Mae Education Foundation; developing project implementation guidelines, standards, and tools; proving technical assistance; and collecting and analyzing project data.

 
From 2000-07, NELRC implemented the New England ABE-to-College Transition Project with 26 programs partnered with over 40 colleges across New England. The goal of the project was to enable Adult Secondary Education graduates to prepare for, enter, and succeed in postsecondary education to help them improve their own and their families’ lives. Of the 3,740 adult students served, 67% completed the 14-week program and 67% of those who completed enrolled in postsecondary education.

From 2009-2010, the Transitions to College and Careers (TCC) Demonstration Project focused on preparing undereducated adults to enter health careers. Of the 379 students served, 66% completed the 14-week program and 83% of those who completed enrolled in college.

System for Adult Basic Education Support

Since 1990, World Education has served as the Central Resource Center (and now Coordination Center) for the System for Adult Basic Education Support (SABES), the Massachusetts adult education professional development and program improvement system. WEI promotes high quality adult basic education services through training, support, and resources in Massachusetts working in partnership with content-specific professional development centers and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). DESE also funds WEI to operate the Education and Career Planning Professional Development Center and the MA Adult Literacy Hotline.

Budget  $350,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2014-15, SABES provided 11,401 hours of training and technical assistance to 1,844 individual adult educators throughout Massachusetts.

80% of training participants reported that they met the training learning objectives, and 99% reported that the information would be useful and applied in their practice.  WEI provided a statewide conference on the College and Career Readiness Standards for Adult Education serving 380 adult educators from 111 programs.  WEI provided 13 trainings, including three distance learning courses, serving 266 participants for a total of 1303 hours.

 
In FY15, total annual usage of the Hotline resources (website and call center) increased by 45% from 36,084 in FY14 to 52,479 in FY15.  The average monthly usage of the Hotline increased by 45% per month from 3,007 in FY14 to 4,373 per month in FY15. 
 
 
 
 
Program Long-Term Success 

SABES supports the MA Adult Basic Education system’s mission to provide every adult with opportunities to develop literacy and numeracy skills needed to qualify for further education, job training, and better employment, and to reach his/her potential as a family member, productive worker, and citizen by providing evidence-based, high-quality professional development. In addition, the Adult Literacy Hotline supports low-skilled adults’ ability to locate and access adult education services and prospective volunteers’ ability to locate programs that could benefit from their services.


Program Success Monitored By 

SABES administers evaluations of each training event. In addition, an in-depth evaluation of selected training events is conducted using follow-up interviews and questionnaires with participants. Pre- and post-evaluations, observation tools, and peer-mentoring notes provide data about the success of professional development provided. The WEI contract is performance-based. The SABES director reports to the US. Division Vice President.

Examples of Program Success 

In 2014-2015, WEI:

- Coordinated the start-up of the new SABES system's eight professional development center.
- Helped to develop systems for monitoring and evaluation including a database to capture participation data, draft performance measures, and indicators for high quality professional development.
- Provided support for practitioners seeking the MA ABE Teacher’s License through provision of information sessions, cohort meetings, and individual TA.
- Provided statewide trainings on education and career planning.

 

For a description of the Adult Literacy Hotline's success, please see above.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Joel Lamstein
CEO Term Start June 1982
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Joel Lamstein is founder and president of John Snow, Inc., an international public health consulting firm. Founded in 1978, JSI now has more than 1,600 people in the United States and throughout the world working to enhance the lives of underserved and vulnerable populations. He is also president of World Education, Inc.

Mr. Lamstein is a lecturer at both the Harvard School of Public Health and the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a frequent speaker on organizational strategy, nonprofit management, international development, and strategic management at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; The Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; and the Sloan School, MIT.

Mr. Lamstein serves on the board of Physicians for Human Rights and the advisory council of the Children's Health Fund in New York.  He was on the Global Health Council's board of directors from 1998-2012 and served as board chair between 2004-2012.  He is currently on the boards of advisors at Boston University Public Health School and the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and served on the board of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies.

Mr. Lamstein also co-founded Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in 1973. He has been advisor to numerous public health programs throughout the world on issues of public health management. He received his BS in math and physics from the University of Michigan, and MBA from the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Silja Kallenbach Vice President

Ms. Kallenbach oversees the operations of WEI’s U.S. and she also directs the national Networks for Integrating New Americans demonstration project funded by the U.S. Department of Education. She has over 30 years of experience in adult education as administrator, professional development provider, program developer, researcher, and teacher. Some of the projects that Silja has helped to design, secured funding for, and worked on include: New England ABE-to-College Transition Project, the National College Transition Network, the New England Learner Persistence Project, and the Adult Multiple Intelligences Study. Silja is the recipient of the 2014 national award for Promoting Literacy Nationally and Internationally issued by the Commission on Adult Basic Education. Silja is also a Massachusetts Literacy Champion selected by the Massachusetts Literacy Foundation in 2006.

From 1994 to 2011, Silja served as the Director of the New England Literacy Resource Center (NELRC) at World Education, a six-state partnership of state adult education directors, professional development providers, and educators whose purpose is to build the capacity of the region’s adult education programs. Silja is former director of the City of Boston Adult Literacy Initiative, and a co-founder and former Associate Director of the Boston Adult Literacy Fund (now First Literacy). She began her adult education career as a teacher of English Language Learners and then became an incorporator and Coordinator of a Latina women’s learning center in Boston.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Promoting Literacy Nationally and Internationally awarded to Silja Kallenbach national Commission on Adult Basic Education 2014
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Commission on Adult Basic Education (COABE) --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Third Sector New England

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

In the United States and globally, World Education has an extensive history of collaboration with local, state, regional, and national organizations. In Massachusetts, WEI works with:

  • adult education programs that provide transitions to college and careers, adult secondary education, adult basic education, and English language services
  • English for New Bostonians
  • Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition
  • First Literacy
  • Boston Centers for Families and Youth
  • Bunker Hill Community College, Roxbury Community College, Benjamin Franklin Technical Institute, Leslie University, Cambridge College, Urban College, University of Massachusetts
  • MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
  • MA Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Commonwealth Corporation
  • Local workforce investment boards
  • Massachusetts community colleges
  • The Boston Foundation
  • Shapiro Family Foundation
  • State St. Foundation
At the national level, WEI works with state departments that oversee adult education services; adult education and workforce development organizations including Jobs for the Future, American Institutes for Research, ProLiteracy, and Kratos Learning Solutions; the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education; National Adult Education Professional Development Consortium; Learner Web; National Coalition for Literacy; and national immigrant integration organizations.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 63
Number of Part Time Staff 28
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 85%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 14
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 12
Caucasian: 60
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 2
Other (if specified): Multiple Race
Gender Female: 64
Male: 27
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Louis Kaplow
Board Chair Company Affiliation Harvard Law School, Harvard University
Board Chair Term Oct 2010 - Oct 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Hafiz Adamjee Winchester, MA --
Mr. Leland B. Goldberg Volunteer --
Ms. Linda Harrar Linda Harrar Productions LLC --
Mr. Louis Kaplow Harvard Law School --
Ms. Ginny Kirkwood The Shawnee Group --
Mr. Joel H. Lamstein World Education, Inc. --
Mr. Josh Lamstein Brooklyn, NY --
Mr. David P. Magnani Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
Mr. Paul Musante T. Rowe Price --
Ms. Betsy A. Nelson International Partnership Network --
Mr. Fred O'Regan International Fund for Animal Welfare --
Ms. Cathy Royal The Royal Consulting Group --
Ms. Cristine Smith University of Massachusetts --
Ms. Lisa Stockberger Vanguard Communications --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 50%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The additional Board is the Board of the New England Literacy Resource Center that World Education has housed since 1994.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $41,366,600.00
Projected Expense $41,254,611.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $2,084,728 $2,349,559 $2,125,848
Total Expenses $2,079,786 $2,317,668 $2,113,564

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$23,417 $79,248 $129,612
Government Contributions $1,404,118 $1,368,192 $1,053,905
    Federal $834,294 $676,050 $390,482
    State $486,873 $606,728 $620,301
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $82,951 $85,414 $43,122
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $657,193 $902,120 $942,332

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,626,389 $1,805,995 $1,644,660
Administration Expense $453,397 $511,673 $468,904
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.01 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 78% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets -- -- --
Current Assets -- -- --
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities -- -- --
Total Net Assets -- -- --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 1.20

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization and reflects its US-based programs only. Assets and liabilities are not available for the US-based programs. Audited financials and Form 990s included above represent the financials for the entire organization, including all international work.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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