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The I'm Still Here Foundation (Formerly Hearthstone Alzheimer's Foundation, Inc.)

 130 New Boston Street, Suite 103
 Woburn, MA 01801
[P] (781) 305-7117 x 117
[F] (781) 674-2326
http://imstilhere.org/
info@imstillhere.org
Bridgit Ganson
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1995
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3316917

LAST UPDATED: 06/13/2016
Organization DBA It Takes a Village
Former Names Hearthstone Alzheimer Foundation (2010)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

 The mission of the I’m Still Here Foundation is to give people living with cognitive challenges the opportunity to have a life worth living by developing, implementing and evaluating evidence-based engaging nonpharmacological treatment programs for people with Alzheimer's, their care partners, caregivers, and for those in the communities in which they live.

Mission Statement

 The mission of the I’m Still Here Foundation is to give people living with cognitive challenges the opportunity to have a life worth living by developing, implementing and evaluating evidence-based engaging nonpharmacological treatment programs for people with Alzheimer's, their care partners, caregivers, and for those in the communities in which they live.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $227,668.00
Projected Expense $229,531.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • It Takes a Village
  • Meet me at the Movies... and Make Memories
  • Museum Network

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

 The mission of the I’m Still Here Foundation is to give people living with cognitive challenges the opportunity to have a life worth living by developing, implementing and evaluating evidence-based engaging nonpharmacological treatment programs for people with Alzheimer's, their care partners, caregivers, and for those in the communities in which they live.

Background Statement

 The I’m Still Here Foundation is twenty-years old. For the last decade it has focused on artistic and cultural interventions in community settings to engage people with dementia in life, and thereby reduce the four A’s of Alzheimer’s—Anxiety, Agitation, Aggression, and Apathy. These interventions, developed through ARTZ: Artists for Alzheimer’s,have been extremely successful. ARTZ has developed and implemented evidence-based dementia-friendly programs in museums, movie theatres, cafes, musical venues, and other such settings in Massachusetts. These programs have become models for similar initiatives nationally and internationally.

 Over time the number of specific programs the Foundation runs has grown. Every Tuesday people with dementia and their care partners have the opportunity to visit a community museum with the assurance that the program will be evidence-based and appropriate for someone with memory challenges. They can be confident that the guides will not ask them pointed questions that require them to use memory areas in the brain that are damaged by Alzheimer’s and will in every way avoid dementia becoming an issue. Similarly when hundreds of people with dementia from all over Boston attend the Brookline-basedMeet Me at the Moviesprogram at the Coolidge Theatre every three months, they remember coming before because they have done so often, and they know the program will be welcoming, fun, and will build on their strengths rather than test their weaknesses.

The success of the ARTZ Museum Network and the Meet me at the Movies program in Brookline led to the development of the community-wide It Takes a Village-Brookline program.  This program consists of weekly events in public settings such as group story creation at the Village Booksmith, poetry making at the Brookline Arts Center, and discussions of public affairs at the John F. Kennedy Birthplace, to name a few.

Responding to public demand for its programs, the Foundation shifted focus from individual programs in dispersed communities (like the Meet Me at the Museum program in a dozen communities throughout Massachusetts) to developing varied yet coordinated programs in a single community. With this shift in scale came a new awareness that community solutions are more likely to effectively solve problems faced by couples in the grasp of dementia than programs focused on the problems of the individual or dementia dyad such as support groups, day care centers, and respite programs.


Impact Statement

2014:

Continuing to change the paradigm of the stigma of a
diagnosis by enabling people affected by dementia, those diagnosed and their companions, to become participants within their town or city.

Expanding the It Takes a Village program (ITAV) from
Brookline to Roxbury, Dorchester and the entire Greater Boston area (ITAV – Greater Boston)

Anticipate to serving over 5,500 community members living
with dementia, reaching over 10,000 people community wide through community programming, education and outreach.

Increase programming funding by 40%.

Develop more intergenerational programming as part of the
expanding ITAV-Greater Boston
 
2016/2016:
*Collaborated with new partnerships, Jewish Community Housing for the Elderly, Goddard House, to implement It Takes a Village program model
*Diversified population of clients served
*Expanded It Takes a Village program through the Fund for Wellesley Grant
*Actively applying for funding from various sources 
*Newly created Board of Directors to advise program which can constitute a volunteer fundraising group so that the Foundation can go after larger sustaining grants, guaranteeing the future viability of the I’m Still Here Foundation.

Needs Statement

* Funds for an It Takes a Village Director to serve as the point person for all programs within each community that adopts the It Takes a Village approach to becoming a dementia-friendly community
 
* Funds to support It Takes a Village programs in Boston communities The program associate and program coordinator will spend his/her time working with Community Partners—housing projects, assisted living programs, retirement communities, day centers and schools to overcome the threshold problems they face—difficulties of getting persons with dementia into the community and participating in engaging and free programs.
 
* Capacity building funds to enable the Foundation to grow in response to program demands.
 
 *Raise funds for program coordination and program implementation.  Our programs include a traveling movie program, weekly museum trips, a walking club, and continued partnership with Boston and greater Boston communities.

CEO Statement

 The I’m Still Here Foundation intends to be to Alzheimer’s (albeit much smaller and less well known and funded) what the Make a Wish foundation is to cancer—hope for a life worth living for those affected by the disease. The name of the foundation reflects the cry so often heard from people living with Alzheimer’s who feel that society as a whole considers them non-persons—persons without a self. Rather than investing in drug research with the hope of a solution for future generations, we develop community art and cultural events that engage everyone’s creativity in the present to solve the problems faced by individuals with dementia, their care partners, and entire communities. Donations to the I’m Still Here Foundationare used exclusively to develop and implement programs that provide the opportunity for people with dementia to use all his or her capacities using an asset-based approach to care and community integration. 

Board Chair Statement

 Today, Alzheimer’s and other dementias are one of the most feared health condition in the world, and the pandemic is anticipated to get worse as the baby-boomer generation ages, and the expected life span continues to increase with the advancement of medical treatments globally. Estimates of national costs reported in a recent Rand Corp study total $2.15 billion annually in the US. Predictions are that these costs will double in the next decade or two. This pandemic will only be successfully addressed if we change our entire view of this condition—instead of spending costly health care dollars on the condition, spend less costly community resources on giving those with Alzheimer’s a life worth living. If we only cut into this condition 10%, we will already save $20 billion annually. As a society we need to figure out how to live with this condition—at least for the next two decades; the time frame that the most optimistic scientists predict there might be a medical solution. This is the reason I am involved pro-bono with theI’m Still Here Foundation.

 The Foundation does not lack in creative solutions to treating Alzheimer’s with non-pharmacological interventions. What it lacks are: A strong fundraising board; capacity to develop this board and raise funds; and funding to scale up the programs already in place.

 In the foundation we have hired consultants to advise us on these issues—board development and strategic fundraising. As a result foundation staff are writing more proposals and working to develop a concrete strategic plan.


Geographic Area Served

STATEWIDE
 The Foundation serves mainly Massachusetts where it runs 100 days of community programs annually. In 2014-2015 Museum programs were held in Brockton, Cambridge, Brookline, Salem, Worcester, Lincoln, Boston, and Lowell and the Meet Me at the Movies iconic film clip program quarterly at Brookline’s Coolidge Cinema. The Movies Road Show served underserved areas in Lowell, Dorchester, and Charlestown.  

Organization Categories

  1. Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines - Alzheimer's Disease
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Alliances & Advocacy
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Seniors' Rights

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village is a community-wide program to support mostly elderly people facing cognitive challenges who want to remain engaged in living with a quality of life—a life worth living. This win-win program employs minimal new resources to leverage untapped community services. Essential partners ofIt Takes a Villageare community, cultural, and research. The ARTZ Center is the hub of the virtual village, and its Director, coordinates weekly events throughout the community specially planned for those with cognitive challenges. Trained in theI’m Still Hereapproach to interaction, care, and engagement of this population, the Director facilitates programs with partners like museums, zoos, symphonies, and trains volunteers so that as demand for programs increase through greater community awareness; and correspondingly, resources will grow to meet these needs. The ARTZ Center establishes programs, invites community and cultural partners to participate, takes reservations, runs the programs, coordinates artists, and manages PR essential to increase community awareness
Budget  $43,000.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Families General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term success is seen through a greater number of people attending ITAV public events, more cultural partners opening their doors and hearts to people with dementia, and positive feedback in the surveys distributed after eachIt Takes a Villageevent. Another measure of short-term success is the decreasing effort required to attract participants—which is already the case for the museum and film program in the “village” of Brookline and elsewhere.
Program Long-Term Success   The long-term outcome ofIt Takes a Villageis inclusion in the community of people facing cognitive challenges, exemplified by increased awareness and programming in a given community for elders—many of whom experience mild cognitive decline and specifically those with Alzheimer’s and related dementias. This is achieved by working with community groups to address the threshold barrier problem and stigmas surrounding Alzheimer’s. Both inclusive programming and community education are necessary for this goal to be achieved. Long-term success ofIt Takes a Villagecan be seen in increased participation, an increase in the number and scope of participating artists and cultural institutions, and the expansion of this program into different communities outside of Brookline. Attracting increased and sustained funding would also indicate and exemplify long-term success.
Program Success Monitored By  A major success of theIt Takes a Villageprogram is the establishment of a high powered and well-connected Village Board of Advisors. This has been established in Brookline. Also, after eachIt Takes a Villageevent the Foundation team distributes and collects surveys to accompanying caregivers. This provides informative data to improve programming, and to recognize aspects of programming that are working effectively. An analysis of this data demonstrates that program outcomes are being achieved, as well as recognizing areas of improvement.
Examples of Program Success  In the pilot program, run from 2011-2012, bi-weekly events were held forIt Takes a Village:Brookline with a total of 322 Brookline residents participated with three times as many participants from surrounding communities. Success was also seen in the length of time participants held memories of the event, and their levels of engagement and actual participation during events, as documented in survey responses. During the 2012-2013 cycle the Foundation team has already seen a marked increase in the number of people participating in workshops. In addition, there is a marked increase in the number of cultural institutions coming to us seeking partnership in this particular program.

Meet me at the Movies... and Make Memories

Meet me at the Movies… and Make Memories runs a quarterly program at the Coolidge Corner Theater in Brookline. This is an interactive film program where several classic and contemporary clips are explored and discussed with two actors. The actors engage the audience in both reminiscing and unpacking the clips before and after they are shown. Approximately three-hundred participants come to everyMeet me at the Movies… and Make Memoriesevent at the Coolidge Corner Theater. Additionally, this year ARTZ expanded the movies programming to include fourMovie Road Showwhere a smaller scale presentation of the movies program is shown in underserved populations throughout Massachusetts. This past year theMovies Road Showtook place in Roxbury, Dorchester, Lincoln and Lowell.
Budget  $34,000.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Elderly and/or Disabled Families
Program Short-Term Success  The short-term success of theMeet me at the Movies… and Make Memoriesprogram is seen by an increase in participation, operating at the full capacity of the Coolidge Corner Theater, marked emotional engagement, and social participation in the discussions led by the actors. We know that the program is successful based on the level of participation, with numbers continuing to rise.
Program Long-Term Success  The anticipated long-term outcome ofMeet me at the Movies… and Make Memoriesis community inclusion, exemplified by increased awareness and programming for elders; specifically those with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, in a given community. This will be addressed through facing the threshold barrier and stigmas surrounding Alzheimer’s and related dementias through community education and the facilitation of inclusion through programming. For the ARTZ staff, long-term success can be quantified by the number of organizations engaged in “Meet me at the Movies… and Make Memories”. Since the program’s inception, the movies program has quickly become disseminated across the nation, used at large theaters, smaller theater venues, art galleries, residences, and at national conferences. ARTZ is undergoing a “movies project” that will allow for an accessible utilization of the movie clips and scripts used in the original programming.
Program Success Monitored By  Like the ARTZ Museum Network, after aMeet me at the Coolidge… and Make Memoriesevent or aMovies Road Showthe ARTZ administrative team distributes and collects surveys that provide insight with informative data to improve programming, and to recognize aspects of programming that are working effectively.
Examples of Program Success  This past year, in 2012, the four events at the Coolidge Corner Theater reached over one-thousand five-hundred participants. Additionally, the four “Movie Road Shows” in underserved populations reached over two-hundred people. Initial analysis of the surveys conducted shows high ratings in satisfaction, with a high percentage of people marking that they would engage with the program again.

Museum Network

The Museum Network runs dementia-friendly museum tours every Tuesday, drawing twenty to thirty participants weekly, at eleven museum partners throughout Massachusetts, including: The Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston), The Worcester Art Museum (Worcester), The American Textile History Museum (Lowell), the Museum of Science (Boston), The Arthur M. Sackler Museum at Harvard (Cambridge), the Harvard Natural History Museum (Cambridge), the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum (Lincoln), the Peabody Museum of Ethnology and Archeology at Harvard (Cambridge), the Peabody Essex Museum (Salem), the Fuller Craft Museum (Brockton), and the Larz Anderson Auto Museum (Brookline).
Budget  $108,000.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Families General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  The short-term goal of theARTZ Museum Networkis to create innovative, sustainable, and engaging museum programming for people with dementia and their care partners. Measures of success that indicated successful programming can be seen in the number of people attending the tours, the number of museum partners in Massachusetts, as well as the data collected in survey form following the museum tours.
Program Long-Term Success  The anticipated long-term outcome of theARTZ Museum Network is community inclusion, exemplified by increased awareness and programming for elders; specifically those with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, in a given community. This will be addressed through facing the threshold barrier and stigmas surrounding Alzheimer’s and related dementias through community education and the facilitation of inclusion through programming. Currently partnering with eleven museums in Massachusetts, ARTZ staff is often hired as consultants to museum programs all over the United States and internationally to teach the ARTZ Museum pedagogy. Known for its ability to effectively adapt to all levels of dementia, it distinguishes itself as a truly inclusive program. Ideally, the ARTZ team would like to see this program run as a habitual program at every museum in the world. For now, we’re working on reaching out to museums that show interest and initiative in bringing this pedagogy into practice, with a strong educational team to continue effective implementation.
Program Success Monitored By  The long-term success of the program can be quantified by the number of museum partners who offer ARTZ based tours annually. The short-term success of each individual tour is measured in engagement during the tours, as well as interviews and surveys returned after the museum tours. Additionally, the number of museum partners in Massachusetts, as well as the number of participants on the ARTZ tours, are indicative of successful programming.
Examples of Program Success  The ARTZ Museum Network has run successfully since 1995. The information collected post-tours has shown a decrease in the four A’s of Alzheimer’s: anxiety, aggression, apathy and agitation. Participants, museum docents and educators, and volunteers have given accolades about the program. Ellen Soares, Manager of Accessibility Programs at the Peabody-Essex Museum in Salem wrote: “I am so pleased that the museum is part of this exciting project. As someone who works in an art museum I believe that art has the power to transform someone’s life. The ARTZ Museum Network is a great example. It is amazing when you can see how look at and talking about art provides an avenue to successful engagement and conversation that is completely different from what one might expect from someone with Alzheimer’s disease. It has been such a satisfying experience for me and others in the museum and from what I observed, for participants as well.”

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. John Zeisel
CEO Term Start Dec 1995
CEO Email Zeisel@thehhearth.org
CEO Experience

Dr. Zeisel, President and co-founder of Hearthstone Alzheimer Care, Ltd., has a background that includes sociology and architecture. He received a Ph.D. from Columbia University and a Loeb Fellowship at Harvard's Graduate School of Design. Dr. Zeisel focuses his attention at Hearthstone on new development, design, teamwork and research. He serves on committees for the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Association, the New York City Office of Aging's Alzheimer's Unit, the International Healthcare Institute, and Centre for Health Design. John has been on the faculty of Harvard University's Department of Architecture, and received a fellowship at the National Institute for Advanced Studies near The Hague in the Netherlands. He has also taught at Yale and McGill Universities and at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design. In 1994 he lectured at the University of Minnesota Architecture School as its Cass Gilbert Visiting Professor. Dr. Zeisel has carried out research into the needs of seniors through basic and applied research, including post-occupancy evaluations and policy research studies. He was Principal Investigator on a three-year National Institute on Aging study to determine the relationship between environmental design characteristics in Alzheimer's Special Care Units and health and well-being outcomes of residents in such settings. John's research and practice over two decades has resulted in award-winning design and planning guidebooks, successful developments, award-winning prototype facilities, as well as books and articles used by developers, designers and service providers internationally. John is the author of: Independence through Interdependence: Congregate Housing for Older People,I’m Still Here, andLowrise Housing for Older People and Midrise Elevator Housing for Older People. Numerous articles on and by Dr. Zeisel have appeared in US and European publications.

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Sean Caulfield Creative Director

Sean Caulfield's Alzheimer's advocacy developed from his early experience as a care partner. Prior to co-founding ARTZ, he had served as an Executive Director of an Alzheimer’s residential program and as a support group facilitator for Alzheimer’s care partners in Boston, Massachusetts.

In 2005 Sean collaborated in the writing of I’m Still Here, a play about a family’s trials at learning of an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The play was performed in Boston, New York City, and Connecticut. In 2005 he helped organize a traveling exhibition of art created by people living with Alzheimer's. Entitled, I’m Still Here: Alzheimer’s and Creative Expression, the exhibition made its debut at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, with further showings at Banner Health Hospitals in Arizona, the Alzheimer’s Association of Massachusetts and Connecticut, Merck Research Laboratories in Boston, the International Health Aging Conference in Portugal, and the 2008 EU Conference on Alzheimer’s in Paris, France.

Sean co-developed the training, research, planning, and implementation of Alzheimer’s-specific museum tours at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. The project, three years in the making, was open to the public in January of 2006 and is now a permanent part of MoMA’s Community & Access programs.

Sean frequently lectures on art, creativity, and Alzheimer’s at museums, hospitals, universities, and community agencies throughout the U.S. and internationally. He has been a keynote speaker for the
Alzheimer’s Association in Rockland County, New York, and has led workshops at the Alzheimer’s Association’s annual Map through the Maze conference in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York City, and New Jersey. He most recently facilitated a workshop on 'Art, Alzheimer's, & Creativity' at the 1st Annual UK Arts & Dementia Conference at St. Hilda's College in Oxford.

Sean is a contributing author to Enhancing Cognitive Fitness in Adults: A Guide to the Use and Development of Community-Based Programs; Hartman-Stein, Paula E.; LaRue, Asenath (Eds.); Springer Books, 2011; Chapter 19, Art, Museums & Culture, pp. 301 – 326

Sean holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts and a M.Ed. in Arts in Education from Harvard University's Graduate School of Education.

You can contact Sean via email at Caulfield@ArtzAlz.org

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The staff of the I’m Still Here Foundation is small. The main management challenge we face is working within financial constraints, rather than spreading ourselves too thin trying to meet the growing demand for our programs.
 
 
Research: There is no other place in this profile to describe the important research we carry out at the Foundation, so we are inserting this information here. The Foundation assesses the impacts of each of its programs on persons with dementia and caregivers by collecting both qualitative and quantitative data following each major event. Demonstrated effects include improved quality of life, increased
engagement, reduced depression, reduced stigmatized attitudes towards dementia, and reduced prevalence of the four A’s of Alzheimer’s (anxiety, agitation, aggression, and apathy). Published research conducted on Foundation programs by independent research organizations has demonstrated similar positive outcomes.
Data demonstrating positive effects have primarily been collected on the
Foundation’s two main programs—Meet Me at the Museum and Meet Me at the Movies. Evaluation of the It Takes a Village program is ongoing.
 
 
The Foundation is also presently conducting two National Institutes of Health (NIA) / National Institutes on Aging (NIA)-funded clinical treatment trials on non-pharmacological arts and culture interventions for persons with dementia. The Scripted-IMPROV Project is a program in which persons in all stages of Alzheimer’s become engaged as actors in carefully-planned and evidence-based semi-improvisational dramatic performances. The Hearthside Book Club Project involves developing and
testing specialized reading materials that are tailored to persons with varying levels of dementia. Across both projects, data is being gathered on over 400 subjects. We are especially interested in measuring the effects of these non-pharmacological interventions on depression, engagement, affect, communication patterns, stigma, and quality of life.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Drl Jacqueline Viscer PhD
Board Chair Company Affiliation University of Montreal
Board Chair Term Feb 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Faith Ott Sage Age Strategies Voting
Meredith Patterson MSW, LICSW, CMC Elder Care Consultants of Choice,LLC Voting
Dr. Jennifer Pilcher-Warren PhD Overlook C.A.R.E. Voting
Jerry Pucillo MA Centergreen LLC Voting
Dr. Paul Raia PhD Volunteer Voting
Dr. Jacqueline Vischer PhD The University of Montreal Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $227,668.00
Projected Expense $229,531.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $199,776 $192,243 $242,546
Total Expenses $173,684 $285,770 $213,892

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $199,776 $19,350 $113,316
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- $172,893 $129,230
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $117,803 $119,564 $105,405
Administration Expense $26,209 $139,290 $80,045
Fundraising Expense $29,672 $26,916 $28,442
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.15 0.67 1.13
Program Expense/Total Expenses 68% 42% 49%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 15% 14% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $100,282 $182,198 $155,073
Current Assets $100,282 $182,198 $155,073
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $15,354 $123,362 $2,711
Total Net Assets $84,928 $58,836 $152,362

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Private Trust Donation $75,000.00
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Llewellyn Foundation (Private Grant, project specific) $20,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Charity Buzz (Fund Raiser – Auction) $34,495.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 6.53 1.48 57.20

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Financial issues have been discussed above. This is our major challenge—having the financial and personnel resources to meet demand for programs.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, this nonprofit is working with its tax preparer to amend its fiscal years 2012 and 2011 IRS Form 990s to more accurately report on and reflect its functional expense breakout across program, administrative and fundraising expenses.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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