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Mass Insight Education and Research Institute Inc

 18 Tremont Street, Suite 1010
 Boston, MA 02108
[P] (617) 778-1500
[F] (617) 778-1505
www.massinsight.org
[email protected]
Sam Pipp
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INCORPORATED: 1997
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3369687

LAST UPDATED: 12/15/2017
Organization DBA 04-3369687
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

MIE’s mission is to provide leadership in closing the achievement and opportunity gaps for underserved students by focusing on system transformation and student academic success. We seek to dramatically improve student achievement at scale by transforming state and local education systems, structures, and policies.

Mission Statement

MIE’s mission is to provide leadership in closing the achievement and opportunity gaps for underserved students by focusing on system transformation and student academic success. We seek to dramatically improve student achievement at scale by transforming state and local education systems, structures, and policies.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $7,559,186.00
Projected Expense $7,333,003.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Advanced Placement (AP)Program
  • Gateway to College Success
  • School Improvement

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

MIE’s mission is to provide leadership in closing the achievement and opportunity gaps for underserved students by focusing on system transformation and student academic success. We seek to dramatically improve student achievement at scale by transforming state and local education systems, structures, and policies.

Background Statement

Founded in 1997, Mass Insight Education is a national leader in supporting rigorous academic programs and providing strategic consulting and thought leadership to schools, districts, and stakeholders. MIE’s mission is to provide leadership in closing the achievement and opportunity gaps for underserved students by focusing on system transformation and student academic success. Our work is administered through three interwoven programs:

1. Advanced Placement (AP) STEM and English Program: A unique partnership with high schools that creates a coherent pathway to increase and diversify students’ participation and performance in AP courses;

2. Gateway to College Success Network: A learning network of representatives from school districts in Gateway Cities across Massachusetts whose primary goal is to develop greater instructional coherence and vertical alignment in targeted content areas and in grades 6-12; and

3. School Improvement: A national district and school support program that facilitates the development and implementation of evidence-based improvement plans.


Impact Statement

Founded 1997, just three years after Massachusetts passed its landmark education reform law, MIE’s original focus was on supporting model academic standards and a fair high school graduation requirement. MIE formed a network of suburban and urban superintendents, the Coalition for Higher Standards, to advance the development of high standards and assessment as important tools for school reform. Through that effort, we connected policymakers with practitioners to help build what became a national model of effective standards-based reform and vaulted Massachusetts to a leadership position in education reform.

MIE next turned our attention to helping low performing schools improve. By launching the Great Schools Campaign in 2004, MIE spotlighted 100 failing schools in Massachusetts--the bottom 5%--and worked with educators and policymakers to create a greater sense of urgency for school turnaround. We also began to research the problem of low performing schools nationally, and hereby developed a theory of action for district and state interventions in failing schools to turnaround the bottom 5% of schools in the country.

In 2007, MIE released The Turnaround Challenge, a research report and call to action that highlighted the need for intervention in America’s lowest-performing schools – former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan called the report, “the Bible of school turnaround.” The report also established the framework for our school turnaround theory of action. Since 2009, MIE has worked with schools, districts, and state education agencies in Massachusetts and across the country to redesign the systems that support chronically underperforming schools and to drive gains in student achievement.

Building on lessons learned throughout our 20-year history, we redeveloped our Theory of Action (TOA) in 2017 to support our efforts to ensure student learning and close achievement gaps. Our TOA is focused on key elements that lead to dramatic school improvement. We believe that if we work with low-performing schools to ensure:

  • Conditions: Sufficient school-level control over people, time, money, and program to address the root causes of low performance;
  • Planning: Evidence-based, actionable improvement plans that address the root causes of low performance informed by a review of existing conditions and input from school, district, and community stakeholders;
  • Leadership: A principal who can manage and communicate complexity while maintaining focus on the school’s vision and key priorities;
  • Instructional Focus: Processes and supports that help teachers work together to constantly improve and refine standards-based instructional practice so that students can engage in deep learning tasks;
  • Collective Responsibility: The school faculty and staff ensure there is collective responsibility for both the quality of instruction and student learning and success;
  • Performance Management: Consistent processes for using data to measure both implementation and outcomes to determine what’s working and inform efforts to improve; and,
  • Partnerships: Partnerships that help the school meet the multiple needs of teachers and students,

THEN schools will dramatically improve and student learning will increase.


Needs Statement

Mass Insight Education has been on a trajectory of growth by every measure, most importantly in terms of our impact both locally in Massachusetts and nationally. To support and expand our performance partnerships with school districts and the thought leadership expected of us, we are committed to strengthening our corporate organizational capacity, particularly in: 1) marketing/communications, 2) strategy, 3) research, and 4) fundraising. THEN schools will dramatically improve and student learning will increase.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL

Mass Insight Education serves more than 10,000 students across 70 public high schools in Massachusetts. We provide access to rigorous AP and college-level coursework for low-income and minority students. Furthermore, we track student data within and across schools to ensure that we are providing access to rigorous coursework for all students. Additionally, MIE has conducted successful national school improvement engagements in Delaware, Rhode Island, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Connecticut, and Jefferson Parish, the largest school district in Louisiana.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. Education - Secondary & High Schools
  3. Science & Technology - Mathematics

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Advanced Placement (AP)Program

MIE’s AP STEM and English Program is a comprehensive, strategic partnership with high schools combining pathways to increasing student participation and performance in AP courses with high quality support for AP faculty. Working with schools to develop plans to expand rigorous AP STEM courses, we create conditions to increase AP enrollment and participation of underserved students. For the 2017-2018 school year, MIE is partnering with 79 Massachusetts high schools, representing 54 districts and over 10,000 students. The program is designed to prepare students for college and career readiness in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), as well as English. Over the program’s ten year history, we have partnered with 127 high schools, serving over 50,000 students.

In addition to our district-level support, MIE achieves its desired impact by implementing elements of success that engage and educate teachers, while providing students with the resources they need to thrive. MIE provides professional development that offers teachers the support and training needed to teach a variety of AP courses, including:

  • The Advanced Placement Summer Institute: Two five-day, College Board endorsed workshops held consecutively in the summer that provide subject-specific training and strategy development to new and returning AP teachers;
  • Two-Day Teacher Workshops: Comprehensive training held in the fall that instructs best practices and informs teaching methods; and
  • Instructional Coaching: Mentoring and consultation by MIE and designated content experts throughout the course of the school year.

In order to augment content comprehension, MIE provides comprehensive guidance and instructional opportunities to students including:

  • Saturday Study Sessions: Day-long sessions that provide students with additional support from teachers and other content experts, held throughout the course of the school year;
  • Mock Exams: Facilitated by MIE once per school year (per subject area), this gives students the opportunity to adequately prepare for the exam process; and
  • Instructional Resources: AP-level textbooks, equipment, and other AP-level resources.
Budget  --
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Increase AP Participation: Greater student participation in math, science, and English AP courses.

Increase AP Performance: More qualifying scores (scores of 3, 4, or 5) on AP examinations.

Program Long-Term Success 

Increase College Success: A greater number of students matriculating to and graduating from college.

Program Success Monitored By 

Mass Insight, in collaboration with the Institute for Strategic Leadership and Learning (INSTLL) Inc., collects and publishes data on AP participation and performance annually by school, by various student subgroups, and in the aggregate across the initiative. Additionally, Mass Insight has developed a national research agenda, guided by a research advisory committee. To facilitate our research agenda, we have established data sharing agreements with 11 local community colleges, UMASS Boston, and UMASS Dartmouth to track the success of our students through college.

Examples of Program Success 

Our results are impressive. Schools that have participated in a three year Core partnership with MIE have reported dramatic increases in student enrollment and success in AP coursework, especially among underserved students. This includes:

  • A 169% increase in AP STEM and English exams taken, and a 229% increase in qualifying scores among low-income students;
  • A 133% increase in AP STEM and English exams taken, and a 171% increase in qualifying scores among African American and Hispanic students; and
  • A 123% increase in AP STEM and English exams taken, and a 124% increase in qualifying scores among female students.

In 2016, Massachusetts students led the nation in qualifying scores on AP exams, and the Elementary and Secondary Education Commissioner specifically recognized the significant contribution that MIE’s work has played in this achievement.

Increasing AP Participation:

MIE serves approximately 25% of the African American and Hispanic student population in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, yet accounts for approximately 50% of the state’s AP enrollments and 36% of the state’s qualifying AP scores for these populations.

Increasing AP Performance:

The rate at which African American and Hispanic students receive AP Qualifying Scores in MIE schools is higher than the rate at which African American and Hispanic students take AP exams at non-MIE comparison schools.

Increasing College Success:

Low-income MIE students are 14% more likely and African American MIE students are 18% more likely to attend college than the Massachusetts state average.

Over 90% of MIE students persist into a second year of college.


Gateway to College Success

The Gateway to College Success Network is a learning network of representatives from school districts in Gateway Cities across Massachusetts whose primary goal is to develop greater instructional coherence and vertical alignment in targeted content areas and in grades 6-12.

In the Gateway to College Success Network, the primary goal is that districts will develop greater instructional coherence and vertical alignment in targeted content areas and in grades 6-12, leading to improved teacher practice (instruction) and student outcomes. In January 2016, the five districts met with MIE and identified two key Problems of Practice that they felt had be addressed in order to continue to increase the numbers of students taking advanced coursework in middle and high school, and to close the gap in college preparedness and subsequent long-term success among all students.

Budget  --
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Aligning teacher and classroom instruction both vertically and horizontally in grades 6-12 within and across schools so that all teachers are providing rigorous instruction and personalized learning opportunities that enable students to have access to college-level courses while in high school and graduate prepared for college and career.
Program Long-Term Success  Removing barriers to the time and flexibility required to align instruction within schools and across schools, so that teachers have the time and opportunity required to form the communities of practice needed to provide rigorous and personalized instruction.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

During the first year of the Gateway to College Success Network, MIE networked five districts—Springfield, Fitchburg, Holyoke, New Bedford, and Worcester—into a Network Improvement Community designed to accelerate the development and implementation of strategies leading to greater instructional coherence and provide support to districts in addressing barriers that may impact rapid improvement in teacher practice. The key activities facilitated were:

1. District assessments with key stakeholders and the development of logic models depicting how the district is working to address instructional coherence across the district.

2. Act as a “connector” and initiate within-district multi-school networks. Prior to our work, none of the districts had undertaken this type of collaboration; the initiation of these within-district multi-school networks was a crucial first step.

3. Facilitate and support the development of tools, strategies, and processes with each of the districts; oversee the piloting of their implementation in the classrooms.

4. Convene three cross-district network meetings to bring together superintendents, district staff, principals, key leaders, and teachers from each of the five districts.

5. Formalize a cross-district Governing Board to facilitate network leadership and oversight.

6. Conduct site visits and School Readiness Assessments for each of the schools within the network. These were formalized into reports provided to superintendents, and they allowed districts to gain a deeper understanding of how their system strategies are impacting school-specific actions.


School Improvement

This initiative works with districts across the nation to turnaround the lowest-performing schools through reorganization of underlying operating procedures. In 2007, MIE published "The Turnaround Challenge", the framework for a multi-phase effort focused on strategies to turn around the nation's worst-performing schools and transform urban district structures to create community-based school clusters. Across the nation, hundreds of thousands of students, who are disproportionately low-income and minority, are trapped in persistently low-performing schools. If we are to dramatically and systematically improve our nation's failing schools, we must fix the state and local systems, including structures, policies, and incentives, that are fundamentally broken. Since this preliminary work, MIE has gone on to conduct successful national turnaround engagements in Delaware, Rhode Island, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Connecticut, and Jefferson Parish, the largest school district in Louisiana.
Budget  --
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Establish a series of turnaround initiatives in districts throughout the country. Goals are specific to the needs of each district that we serve.
Program Long-Term Success  Establish a series of turnaround initiatives in districts throughout the country. Goals are specific to the needs of each district that we serve.
Program Success Monitored By 

  

Examples of Program Success 

Providence and Central Falls, RI: We focused on building district-wide data systems, revamping teacher evaluation processes, and vesting a deputy superintendent with significant authority to manage an immense turnaround process. This resulted in an 18.8% increase in the high school graduation rate and a 19% decrease in the drop-out rate.

Delaware: We helped design state regulations, filled capacity gaps before the state’s turnaround office was fully staffed, and created the policies and procedures that governed this work. This resulted in significant growth for math performance compared to the state average (a 23 point increase at our four Delaware schools versus a 10 point increase for the state).

Jefferson Parish, LA: We are focusing on reorganization of the central office; for instance, 259 positions were eliminated, and 50 more functional positions were added, for a total of $9.9 million in re-purposed funding. Our efforts have resulted in shifting from 18 failing schools in the J. Parish district in 2010 to only 4 failing schools in 2013.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Susan F. Lusi
CEO Term Start Apr 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Sue has worked in both urban and suburban settings, and in practice, policy and research, during her nearly 30-year career. She most recently served as Superintendent of Schools in Providence, R.I., where she is credited with increasing student achievement and opportunity. Most notably, she improved graduation rates as well as reading proficiency scores for Grades 4 and 11, particularly among English Language Learners.

Sue was a champion for Providence students. To enhance their college and career readiness, she and her team increased Advanced Placement, Career and Technical Education, and dual credit offerings in all high schools, as well as established partnerships with institutions of higher education. Sue also collaborated with the Providence School Board and Providence Teachers’ Union to develop board policy and teacher contract language supporting increased school autonomy.

Sue previously served as Superintendent of Schools in Portsmouth, R.I., Chief of Staff for Providence Schools and Assistant Commissioner for the Rhode Island Department of Education. She started her career at Brown University working for the Coalition of Essential Schools and the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, as well as serving as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Taubman Center for Public Policy.

Sue is the author of The Role of State Departments of Education in Complex School Reform (Teachers College Press, 1997). She holds a B.A. in Economics and a M.A. in Teaching Social Studies from Brown University, and a M.P.P. and Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard University.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. William H. Guenther -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
At Scale Endorsement Governor's STEM Council 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

State Development Network (SDN)
Our State Development Network convenes 12 state education agencies to push bold new statewide reform policies. Since 2009, Mass Insight has convened this group of state leaders to create a toolkit for the “power levers” that state leaders can use to change the dynamics of school turnaround in their states.
 
Higher Education Partnerships

-Partnerships with 11 local community colleges, UMASS Dartmouth, and UMASS Boston’s Upward Bound Program will facilitate student transitions to local colleges.

-A significant portion of Boston college bound students attend UMASS Boston. MIE has therefore established a partnership with UMASS Boston to share student data using metrics such as college matriculation, course selection, persistence, and graduation rates.
 
Research Partnerships
-A Mass Insight Research Advisory Committee has been formed to provide expert feedback on the scope of our research agenda. Current members of the Advisory Committee include: Jonathan Cowan, Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP); J. Puckett, Boston Consulting Group; Dr. Jane Hannaway, Director of the Center for the Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER); Dr. Ronald Ferguson, Senior Lecturer in Education and Public Policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government; and Dr. Margaret Raymond, Director of the Center for Research on Educational Outcomes.

Career Partnerships:

-Students are paired with Student Partners, employees from local businesses including State Street and Thermo Fisher Scientific, who provide engaging career experiences, particularly in the STEM and financial service fields. 

-MIE will continue its partnership with The Boston Private Industry Council (PIC) to offer summer internships to students at local businesses, providing hands-on career experience and coaching. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 20
Number of Part Time Staff 9
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 6
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 27
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 20
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Richard Taggart
Board Chair Company Affiliation EVP, Global Head of Investment Operations, State Street Global Advisors
Board Chair Term Feb 2007 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
David Adams VP, New England and Middle States Regional Offices, The College Board Voting
James Balfanz President, City Year Voting
Carole Cowan Former President, Middlesex Community College Voting
Jeffery Davis Audit Partner, EY Voting
Susan Lusi President and CEO, Mass Insight Education Exofficio
Margery Piercey Partner-in-Charge, Boston Marcum LLP Voting
Richard Taggart EVP, Global Head of Investment Operations, State Street Global Advisors Voting
Marty Walz Principal, Marty Walz & Associates Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 5
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 50%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 25%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Mass Insight is currently seeking to expand our Board of Directors, to better reflect the scope and scale of our work, and to reflect the diversity of the students and educators that we serve.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Total Revenue $9,329,772 $9,833,374 $9,638,261
Total Expenses $8,490,869 $9,423,701 $11,385,024

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $2,390,116 $2,333,750 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $2,390,116 $2,333,750 $0
Individual Contributions $5,358,371 $2,624,341 $5,447,383
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $1,495,736 $4,874,709 $4,190,567
Investment Income, Net of Losses $926 $574 $311
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events $84,623 $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $0 $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Program Expense $7,007,885 $7,582,101 $9,065,665
Administration Expense $1,045,529 $1,047,724 $1,337,848
Fundraising Expense $437,455 $793,876 $981,511
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.10 1.04 0.85
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 80% 80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 16% 18%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Total Assets $3,137,656 $3,029,392 $3,770,771
Current Assets $2,968,139 $2,441,734 $2,903,532
Long-Term Liabilities $947,666 $630,448 $1,312,631
Current Liabilities $1,087,362 $956,686 $1,425,555
Total Net Assets $1,102,628 $1,442,258 $1,032,585

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.73 2.55 2.04

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 30% 21% 35%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, this organization changed its fiscal year from a Jan. 1 - Dec. 31 fiscal year to a July 1 - June 30 fiscal year. As such, the 2016 IRS Form 990 posted above covers six months (Jan. 1, 2016 - June 30, 2016) and the 2017 audit posted above covers 18 months (Jan. 1, 2016 - June 30, 2017). Given the change in fiscal year, the 2016 short-year data is not included in the charts and graphs above.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Mass Insight is dedicated to closing the education achievement gap in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, with a focus on supporting high-potential, low-income and minority students who are on track to attend college. 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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