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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Strong Women, Strong Girls empowers girls to imagine a broader future through a curriculum grounded on female role models delivered by college women mentors, who are themselves mentored by professional women.

Mission Statement

Strong Women, Strong Girls empowers girls to imagine a broader future through a curriculum grounded on female role models delivered by college women mentors, who are themselves mentored by professional women.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2016 to Aug 31, 2017
Projected Income $540,313.00
Projected Expense $532,041.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Structured, Group Mentoring for Low-income Girls in Grades 3-5
  • SWSG Leadership Development and Civic Engagement for College Women

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Strong Women, Strong Girls empowers girls to imagine a broader future through a curriculum grounded on female role models delivered by college women mentors, who are themselves mentored by professional women.

Background Statement

Strong Women, Strong Girls (SWSG) is a nationally recognized mentoring program empowering women and girls at three critical life transitions: girls on the cusp on adolescence, college women preparing to enter the workforce, and professional women on the path toward leadership roles.

Strong Women, Strong Girls was founded in 2001 as a student group at Harvard University by Lindsay Hyde. Seeing a need for free, high-quality programming for disadvantaged girls, Lindsay created Strong Women, Strong Girls during her freshman year of college. In 2004, to meet growing requests for programming, SWSG filed for incorporation as a nonprofit organization in Boston.

Since 2004, SWSG has partnered with 6 academic institutions in Boston, Boston College, Harvard University, Northeastern University, Simmons College, Tufts University, and UMass Boston. In the 2013-2014 program year, 220 undergraduate women from these institutions served as mentors to girls in grades 3-5 at 60 schools and community centers throughout the Greater Boston area.

SWSG offers programming in Allston, Brighton, Cambridge, Charlestown, Chinatown, Dorchester, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Medford, Roxbury, Somerville, South Boston, and the South End. SWSG provides programming at schools and community centers where at least 50% of students receive free or reduced-price lunch, an indicator of low-income status. SWSG is currently serving over 700 girls, a small portion of the girls eligible for and in need of our program.

Impact Statement

Strong Women, Strong Girls has made a tremendous impact on the Boston community. Since its inception, Strong Women, Strong Girls has touched the lives of over 10,000 individuals, including elementary school girls, college women, and adult volunteers. SWSG's growth, mission, and success within the past year are a reflection of the organization's unending commitment to supporting women and girls through a unique, multi-generational program.

 

Boston's Accomplishments during 2013-2014:

  • 220 mentors from higher education institutions - Harvard University, Boston College, Northeastern University, Simmons College, Tufts University, and UMass Boston – volunteered as mentors to 3rd-5th grade girls
  • Over 750 girls from 60 schools and community centers across Boston from Allston to Dorchester to Jamaica Plain were empowered by weekly SWSG lessons, in which they learned about strong women throughout history, did hands-on skill-building projects, and implemented service projects in their community.
  • Over 150 professional women volunteered as Professional Mentors with SWSG. Our Professional Mentors coached the undergraduate participants to prepare them for careers and life after college. 

 Organizational Goals:

·         For Girls

o   Foster leadership abilities of elementary-school girls in a gender-specific setting

o   Increase education and career aspirations through field trips to mentors’ college campus

o   Develop girls’ social-emotional skills to teach girls how to express themselves and interact in healthy ways

·         For College Women

o   Foster a commitment to service among local college students by engaging women committed to SWSG’s mission and celebrating their successes

o   Encourage mentors’ leadership and professional development by providing them with Professional Mentors to enhance mentors’ experience in community leadership and self-development


Needs Statement

Strong Women, Strong Girls (SWSG) thrives because of our united and compassionate female community—professional women encourage young college women who mentor 3rd- 5th grade girls, thus building cycles of mutual empowerment. SWSG is a volunteer-driven, sustainable organization because it leverages the dedication and expertise of its volunteers to run an effective mentoring program across Boston.

 

SWSG depends on the support of the community in order to provide free programming to low-income girls throughout Greater Boston. Ways to support SWSG include:

 

Financial Capital

  • Event Sponsorship: SWSG believes in the importance of celebrating the successes of the girls and women through annual events
  • Individual Donations: SWSG’s work depends on contributions from supporters in the Greater Boston community
  • Grants: SWSG is always looking for new grant support in order to extend services and improve the lives of more girls in Greater Boston

In-In-Kind Resources

  • Space: for volunteer trainings, events, and programming
  • Program supplies
  • Office supplies

Human Capital

·         Joining the SWSG Volunteer Corps is a fantastic opportunity to help girls and young women across Boston. You can serve as a Professional Mentor to a college woman mentoring girls, or be an Event Volunteer on a one-time basis


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- North Dorchester
NATIONAL
Strong Women, Strong Girls serves girls in the greater Boston area including: Allston, Brighton, Cambridge, Charlestown, Chinatown, Dorchester, East Boston, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Medford, Mattapan, Roxbury, Somerville, South Boston and the South End. Strong Women, Strong Girls is a national organization headquartered in Boston. 

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Centers and Clubs (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose
  2. Education -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Structured, Group Mentoring for Low-income Girls in Grades 3-5

Strong Women, Strong Girls (SWSG) is a nationally recognized mentoring program empowering women and girls at three critical life transitions: girls on the cusp on adolescence, college women preparing to enter the workforce, and professional women on the path toward leadership roles.

Strong Women, Strong Girls was founded in 2001 as a student group at Harvard University by Lindsay Hyde. Seeing a need for free, high-quality programming for disadvantaged girls, Lindsay created Strong Women, Strong Girls during her freshman year of college. In 2004, to meet growing requests for programming, SWSG filed for incorporation as a nonprofit organization in Boston.

Budget  $177,338.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Females
Program Short-Term Success 

·       Within a short period, SWSG has witnessed considerable growth and interest in its program. Enrollment in SWSG increased from 450 girls during 2009-2010 to 650 girls participating in 2011-2012. SWSG plans to continue this progress and aims to serve 720 girls during the 2012-2013 school year.

Program Long-Term Success 

·       In end-of-year surveys, at least 75% of girls will demonstrate increased leadership skills. SWSG includes leadership opportunities for girls throughout each lesson, from passing out supplies to reading the week’s biography. These small opportunities translate into longer-term confidence for girls, who face gender-specific barriers to their leadership.

·       At the end of the program year, at least 75% of girls will demonstrate increased aspirations to attend college and increased knowledge of career opportunities. This will demonstrate the impact of SWSG field trips to college campuses, relationships with mentors, and exposure to strong women throughout history. By exposing girls early to higher education and career opportunities, SWSG sets them up for lifelong college and professional success.

·       At least 75% of girls will demonstrate increased knowledge of and desire to participate in service. Through the spring service project curriculum, SWSG both exposes girls to the value of service and gives them the tools to make an impact in their community. Girls get to see the impact of their work, fostering a lifelong commitment to service.

Program Success Monitored By 

The success of SWSG programming is monitored by a team at all levels of the organization. The Program Managers regularly communicate with mentors and site monitors about programming. They also visit programming sites throughout the year in order to ensure its success and progress. Volunteer site monitors also frequently observe programming and offer feedback and support to the mentors.

The evaluation system for the success of programming was developed by TDC, a nonprofit consulting firm. Staff collects and analyzes data gathered in surveys. Pre-, mid-year, and end-of-the-year surveys are administered to SWSG girls, mentors, site monitors, and the girls’ guardians about the progress of the programming. SWSG’s success is evaluated by the increase in career and college aspirations, self esteem, leadership abilities, connection to female community, knowledge and desire to participate in community service and social-emotional skills among the participating girls.

Examples of Program Success 

In an SWSG lesson that took place shortly before Halloween, the girls and their mentors learned about Bessie Coleman, who was the first African American female pilot. A few weeks later, one of the girls wrote to her mentors, “I was going to be a witch for Halloween, but after learning about Bessie Coleman, I decided to be her for Halloween. Now, I want to be a pilot when I grow up.”


SWSG Leadership Development and Civic Engagement for College Women

Mentoring at Strong Women, Strong Girls is a wonderful leadership development and civic engagement opportunity for college women. SWSG has partnered with 6 institutions of higher learning in Boston, Boston College, Harvard University, Northeastern University, Simmons College, UMass Boston and Tufts University to train and recruit passionate and accomplished mentors.

In addition to mentoring girls for 1.5 hours each week, the college women dedicate their time to lesson planning and regular training at SWSG. At the beginning of each semester, mentors participate in an eight-hour training day, which includes workshops on topics such as Girl Development, Working with Diverse Girls, and the SWSG Program Model. By committing to a year of service with SWSG, mentors also develop leadership, teamwork, and facilitation skills that translate into their future careers. For many mentors, their positive experience with SWSG inspires a lifelong commitment to service or youth work.

As college mentors foster strong relationships with our girls, they too can connect with role models through the Strong Leaders program. Professional women in Boston volunteer to mentor undergraduate women involved with Strong Women, Strong Girls. Through one-on-one monthly meetings, Professional Mentors support our college women as campus leaders, mentors to girls, and pre-professionals. 

Budget  $60,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Females
Program Short-Term Success 

During 2009-2010, 130 undergraduate women volunteered from Boston College, Harvard University, Northeastern University, and Tufts University. 155 mentors joined SWSG in 2011-2012. SWSG will continue to foster young leaders and plans to work with 185 mentors during the upcoming year.

Program Long-Term Success 

·       At least 75% of mentors will report increased leadership skills. SWSG provides mentors with a significant leadership opportunity; mentors lead a classroom and serve as role models to girls. By fostering leadership skills among young women committed to volunteerism, SWSG supports Boston’s future generation of social-change leaders.

·       At least 75% of mentors will demonstrate increased desire to participate in service. The SWSG model leverages undergraduate talent to support Boston’s girls, bringing college women out into Boston communities. By involving young women in meaningful service, SWSG aims to spark a lifelong commitment to volunteerism in Boston.

Program Success Monitored By 

The success of SWSG’s undergraduate mentors is supervised by SWSG staff. Mentors complete surveys measuring six outcome areas concerningtheir skill development and civic engagement in partnership with full-time staff at each college. SWSG works to improve mentors’ abilities and confidence in professional skills, connection to a female community, leadership capabilities, desire to participate in community service, mentoring skills, and self esteem. Surveys also include questions about implementation of the curriculum, effectiveness of site monitors, and relationships with leadership coaches.

Examples of Program Success 

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“Having now worked in more than one city school, I realize what an important role education plays in the community and the lives of the people living in it. I hope to continue community service and advocating for urban education.”—SWSG Mentor·       “The mentors are absolutely wonderful role models for our students. I am very pleased with how they relate to our girls and inspire them to believe in themselves and help them achieve their goals. They are truly a gift to the community.” ---Parent of SWSG Girl

·       “I love what this program can offer to the young ladies in this community. You are a full year program. You don't just come and get the kids motivated and leave them to fulfill the dream. You stay and help the girl work through it to make it a reality.”—Parent of SWSG Girl


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Siiri Morley
CEO Term Start Nov 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Siiri Morley is a passionate women and girls rights activist, social entrepreneur, and changemaker. She is the Founder and former Executive Director of Prosperity Catalyst, a nonprofit organization focused on investing in women in distressed parts of the world to become successful leaders and entrepreneurs. Siiri has worked on poverty reduction and sustainable economic development projects focused on women in Afghanistan, Croatia, Ecuador, and Kenya. She began her career with the Peace Corps in Lesotho where she worked with a women-led weaving business. She received her MBA from the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University in 2009. In 2012, Siiri was recognized as 1 of 60 notable women in Fast Company's "League of Extraordinary Women" and was profiled as an "Agent of Change" by PBS Newshour in 2013.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Amy (Howard) Kingman 2012 Feb 2014
Ms. Amy (Howard) Kingman 2012 Feb 2014

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
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Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Communication Award Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2011
Leadership Award/Megan Trombly Comcast 2011
The Margaret Stewart Lindsay Inspiration Award- Presented to SWSG Founder and President, Lindsay Hyde Root Cause Social Innovation Forum 2011
American Express Scholars-Presented to SWSG Founder and President, Lindsay Hyde American Express 2010
Community Service Organization Award Wilkinsburg Boys & Girls Club 2010
Excellence in Hispanic Education Cervantes Awards for Hispanic Education 2010
Philanthropic Business of the Year Stay Classy 2010
Stark Young Leadership Award-Presented to Lynne Garifnkel, Executive Director SWSG Pittsburgh Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh 2010
Woman of Achievement Award- Presented to SWSG Founder and President, Lindsay Hyde National Coalition of Girls Schools 2009
Woman of Distinction Award- Presented to Lynne Garfinkel, Executive Director SWSG Pittsburgh Girls Scouts Western Pennsylvania 2009
Young Nonprofit Professional of the Year - Presented to SWSG National Director of Program Operations Meghan Trombly Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2009
Upstander Award - Presented to SWSG Founder and President, Lindsay Hyde Facing History and Ourselves 2008
Women of Achievement Award- Presented to Lynne Garfinkel, Executive Director SWSG Pittsburgh Celebrate & Share 2008
Jefferson Award for the Greatest Public Service by an Individual 35-years or Younger - Presented to SWSG Founder and President, Lindsay Hyde Jefferson Awards for Public Service 2007
Social Innovator - Presented to Strong Women, Strong Girls Root Cause Institute Social Innovation Forum 2007

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
MENTOR: National Mentoring Partnership - Respondent 2007
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 521
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Elaine Stokes
Board Chair Company Affiliation Loomis, Sayles & Co, L. P.
Board Chair Term Sept 2014 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Tara Abrahams The Girl Project Voting
Ms. Kate Bennett Bain and Company Voting
Ms. Susan Brady Linkage Voting
Ms. Carole Carlson Brandeis University Voting
Ms. Jahnavi Curlin Harvard University Voting
Ms. Jessica Lee Root Capital Voting
Ms. Kay Lynch MaidPro Voting
Ms. Kyle MacDonald Verrill Dana, LLP Voting
Ms. Sheila Moore Liberty Mutual Insurance Voting
Ms. Wilna Paulemon Tufts University Voting
Dr. Valerie Roberson Roxbury Community College Voting
Ms. Kait Rogers Citizen Schools Voting
Dr. Janelle Shubert Babson College Voting
Ms. Elaine Stokes Loomis, Sayles & Company, L.P. Voting
Ms. Kathryn Ward Natixis Global Asset Management Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 15
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $611,757 $646,550 $756,050
Total Expenses $698,702 $724,303 $832,101

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $585,685 $643,934 $678,821
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $27 $624 $1,458
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $26,045 -- $75,771
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $1,992 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $418,509 $509,021 $548,866
Administration Expense $137,528 $92,271 $133,672
Fundraising Expense $142,665 $123,011 $149,563
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.88 0.89 0.91
Program Expense/Total Expenses 60% 70% 66%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 23% 19% 20%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $279,511 $369,489 $442,095
Current Assets $277,011 $364,489 $434,595
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 --
Current Liabilities $46,923 $49,956 $44,809
Total Net Assets $232,588 $319,533 $397,286

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.90 7.30 9.70

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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