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One Can Help Inc

 PO Box 56
 Waban, MA 02468
[P] (617) 930-3468
[F] --
http://www.onecanhelp.org/
info@onecanhelp.org
Jenn Martin
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INCORPORATED: 2007
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 20-4281579

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

One Can Help provides critical resources. Juvenile court-involved children and families living in poverty frequently need additional supports to help them improve their lives. When this assistance is not available in the community or from state agencies, OCH can help.

We help underserved homeless families, at-risk teens, struggling students, parents or children exposed to abuse or neglect, as well as foster kids.

We provide funds for verified basic needs and for child-specific assistance. These can include school supplies, laptops, sports equipment, after-school activities, camp, daycare, emergency food, clothing, rent, car repair, and public transportation passes. And because needs can be urgent, we try to provide assistance in 1-3 days.

Mission Statement

One Can Help provides critical resources. Juvenile court-involved children and families living in poverty frequently need additional supports to help them improve their lives. When this assistance is not available in the community or from state agencies, OCH can help.

We help underserved homeless families, at-risk teens, struggling students, parents or children exposed to abuse or neglect, as well as foster kids.

We provide funds for verified basic needs and for child-specific assistance. These can include school supplies, laptops, sports equipment, after-school activities, camp, daycare, emergency food, clothing, rent, car repair, and public transportation passes. And because needs can be urgent, we try to provide assistance in 1-3 days.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $80,750.00
Projected Expense $80,386.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • One Can Help

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

One Can Help provides critical resources. Juvenile court-involved children and families living in poverty frequently need additional supports to help them improve their lives. When this assistance is not available in the community or from state agencies, OCH can help.

We help underserved homeless families, at-risk teens, struggling students, parents or children exposed to abuse or neglect, as well as foster kids.

We provide funds for verified basic needs and for child-specific assistance. These can include school supplies, laptops, sports equipment, after-school activities, camp, daycare, emergency food, clothing, rent, car repair, and public transportation passes. And because needs can be urgent, we try to provide assistance in 1-3 days.


Background Statement

In 2005, attorney Anne Bader-Martin, with other concerned members of the community, started a non-profit because no other resource existed in the community that court-appointed attorneys and social workers could reliably turn to to help many of their poorest child and family clients. 

It was difficult to see situations where children and families were only being held because of a lack of resources. Often it was clear that even a small amount of money might make an enormous difference, and possibly change the outcome of a court case that affected parental rights, or how a child behaved. For example: bus fare so a parent could visit their child in foster care and maintain their relationship, babysitting money to allow a parent to attend drug treatment so they would be a better parent, funds to help a teen purchase a guitar or sports equipment so he could develop a skill instead of just hanging out on the street, camp fees for a child who otherwise would have nothing to do all summer with no one home to supervise her.

Addressing dire needs in a timely fashion not only reduces stress on a child, but can reduce long-term costs to the community at large as well. Transportation assistance means a client can regularly attend therapy; missed treatments slow down progress while also wasting scarce community resources. Providing resources also can prevent or reduce the need for foster care, leaving foster homes to be used only when truly necessary.

OCH’s streamlined system allows court-appointed professionals to apply online for funding for a specific need that otherwise cannot be paid for. Assistance is restricted to underserved children, teens and families who are court-involved and all requests for assistance are subjected to our standardized criteria (available upon request).

We have processed almost 1500 requests for assistance benefitting approximately 4,000 children in the past ten years. One Can Help has been credited by numerous juvenile court appointed attorneys, social workers and judges for providing very impactful assistance that has actually turned around some of their clients’ lives, even though the costs involved are often quite modest.


Impact Statement

Key achievements in 2016:

  1. Formalization of the board and board committees with specific goals which tie into a strategic plan and our mission/vision. Organization of an Advisory Council whose directive is to provide non-binding strategic advice and consists of accomplished experts from the community who have specific skills we need.
  2. In April we received our 1,000th application! We have now provided more than $150,000 in services across 10 years and paid for services or needed items for over 3,000 children and teens.
  3. On May 8 we hosted a 125-person celebration at the Windsor Club in Newton, featuring Child Advocate Maria Mossaides, and continued to double our previous year’s fundraiser contributions.
  4. July 1, expanded state-wide! For our first 10 years, One Can Help focused only on serving children and families in Middlesex County. Thanks to our successful fundraiser, we are currently piloting an expansion across the Commonwealth, which we hope to be able to continue pending additional funding30
  5. Developed a dashboard with financial, operational and outcomes measurement indices. This work was paid for by a grant from the Sudbury Foundation and designed with consultant Dr. Julia Gittleman.

Top Goals for 2017: 

  1. Increase the number of applications by 25%.
  2. Finalize a communications plan with an integrated social media aspect and newsletter.
  3. Expand our fund development programs for both individual and corporate charitable contributions and foundation grants, to include several years of capacity-building assistance.
  4. With our new dashboard, measure our impact and successes and identify areas for improvement.
  5. Increase visibility to include speaking engagements at meetings of professional colleagues in the field as well as with potential donors

 


Needs Statement


 

  1. Expanding our Program. During our pilot expansion, we saw an average 40% increase in applications from outside of Middlesex county. Approximately $80,000 of the budget is needed to continue to support our program expansion into the entire Commonwealth of Massachusetts and within Middlesex County.
  2. Summer Camp and After-School Programs. We provide funding for activities to keep underserved children supervised and teenagers engaged. These activities include but are not limited to after-school programs, sports, the arts and summer camps. Approx $30,000/year.
  3. Homelessness Prevention. Keeping families and children in stable housing is a vital piece of programing. We not only provide emergency rental assistance but also funding for basic necessities from heating to replacing clothing and furniture ruined by bedbugs. Approx $20,000/year.
  4. Transportation Assistance. We provide funding for transportation passes and other related expenses to help parents work or visit their children in foster care and hospitals. Approx $10,000/year.
  5. Educational Supports. Providing for the educational needs of students living in poverty or in foster care including access to Internet or computer, is essential in order for them to be able to keep up with their peers. Approx $20,000/year.

 


CEO Statement

Why provide funds?
Being involved in the juvenile court system is the ideal time to inject this assistance since judicial oversight and professional services are already in place. Often the only things missing are the financial resources necessary to make constructive gains. Providing this assistance helps break the cycle of poverty and supports children and families trying to build better futures.

Our measurable short term impact:

  • Reduced risk of substance abuse
  • Improved academic performance
  • Improved mental health
  • Facilitating employment
  • Helped stabilize housing or prevent homelessness
  • Reduced likelihood of future court involvement
  • Improved physical health
  • Reduced truancy
  • Created a safer environment
  • Improved family connections
  • Reduced child stress
  • Improved self-esteem

Our long-term vision:

  • Making it possible for kids to reach goals they couldn’t before.
  • Removing the barriers of poverty impeding opportunity.
  • Encouraging family stability and well-being.
  • Preventing or reducing the need for foster care or court.
  • Making tax payer-funded social services more effective.
  • Helping juvenile courts better support children and families.
  • Leveling the playing field for our most underserved children and families results in healthier communities for everyone.

How One Can Help is different from many organizations:

  • Assistance is available in 1-3 days.
  • We help needy parents improve, too. Not just their children.
  • We help all underserved at-risk children in juvenile court. Not just foster children.
  • All One Can Help beneficiaries must be juvenile court-involved.
  • We only partner with juvenile court-appointed professionals.
  • We provide exactly what a particular child or family needs in order to get the best result.
  • Careful screening of applications by seasoned professionals in the field ensures the need is real, urgent and that resources aren’t available elsewhere.
  • Working with juvenile court-appointed professionals creates a unique and efficient model for connecting those in need, at a pivotal time, with resources.
  • Working directly with the court-appointed professionals is a scalable operation that has the ability to maximize dollars available to provide effective assistance to this underserved population statewide.

In essence, we plug gaps. By working in collaboration with the court-appointed attorneys and state social workers who know their child or family client and understand what help they need, we help underserved children and families improve their lives, effectively and efficiently.


Board Chair Statement

In 2005, I decided to create a non-profit that was badly needed and that could really make a difference.

As a court-appointed attorney working with children and families involved with the juvenile courts who are in crisis, it was demoralizing to see a revolving door of families unable to break out of the cycles of depravation, and to observe generations of kids whose own parents - and often grandparents - have also endured very traumatic experiences growing up in marginal homes and/or in foster homes, because insufficient services were ever put in place.

And because I work in the heart of the juvenile court system, I could see not only the gaps that existed in the system but also a way to address this problem.

I believed that by utilizing the then somewhat still new internet, we could create a streamlined organization that would partner with the professionals already assigned by the court to work with these very needy children and families, thereby efficiently and effectively providing meaningful and specific assistance to each child or parent.

The types of things that we can provide can make an enormous difference not only to kids in the foster care system, but also to the far greater number of children who are not actually “in foster care” but who are suffering in many of the same ways, and who often have even greater levels of need because they are not in DCF foster homes, although they are still court involved. We can also help their parents when they are trying to better support their children.

Last year we celebrated 10 years of helping children and families in Middlesex County. We continue to expand and focus primarily on the Greater Boston and MetroWest area, although we are accepting a limited number of applications from around the state since the need is so great and there are few if any other organizations in existence that target the entire population we do from this particular vantage point.

Our primary challenge as we expand and try to help more people outside of our base is funding infrastructure. To date we have relied primarily on individual donors who we have slowly cultivated and who donate generally between $18 and $500 for the funds we have used to directly help the children and families we are assisting.

By explaining the level of need and telling the stories we see in court at our fundraisers, in our newsletters and with the assistance of other court-appointed attorneys and social workers, we have received much empathy from the public.

However, our growth presents new challenges. For many years, the board was entirely volunteer in nature and performed and paid for all functions of the operation. In 2012, the board also paid at their own expense to hire a part-time executive assistant. Last year, and with some foundational support, we expanded to hire two part time people in total. Isil Waxman, our Program Director, and Jenn Martin, our Director of Development. Meanwhile I have served as both Chairman of the Board and volunteer Executive Director/President since 2005.

We have reached a tipping point where we now need to professionalize our work staff in order to make sure that we have the infrastructure that could support succession planning and further growth. It is no longer viable to solely rely on volunteer workers for a professional organization. team. We need to attract the resources necessary to help underwrite One Can Help’s already very streamlined infrastructure so that we can continue to support the very vulnerable population we serve who are at a very critical juncture in their lives when we help them in the juvenile court.


Geographic Area Served

METROWEST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE

For our first 10 years, we served all of Middlesex County, helping over 1,000 children, teens and parents. As of July 1, 2016, we now serve families across the Commonwealth of Massachusetts with a strong focus on Middlesex County and the MetroWest.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Youth Development -
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

One Can Help

One Can Help has one basic program: to provide the scarce resources that underserved children and families involved in the juvenile court need to improve their lives and reach higher.

We help all kids in need, not just foster kids.

We also help struggling families living in poverty.

We provide up to $1,000 of assistance for things like transportation passes, laptops, after school activities, housing supports and many basics of daily living, usually within 1-3 days.

We are uniquely positioned to directly help.

We are able to be extremely effective and efficient because we work with the court-appointed attorneys and social workers who are already trying to help their clients in need, but lack the specific resources necessary.

Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

 

Our short/intermediate success is measured at two months out: as a result of the assistance from OCH, professionals report that the resources provided serve the intended purpose and made a positive difference in the lives of their clients.

Some examples of short-term successes.

  • Reduced risk of substance abuse
  • Improved academic performance
  • Improved mental health Facilitated employment
  • Helped stabilize housing or prevent homelessness
  • Reduced likelihood of future court involvement
  • Improved physical health
  • Reduced truancy
  • Created a safer environment
  • Improved family connections
  • Reduced child stress
  • Improved self-esteem
Program Long-Term Success 

One Can Help‘s goals are to encourage positive behavior and to provide opportunities for success that can lead to family reunification, a reduced need for foster care, improved education and job prospects, and more stable families. Addressing the needs of underserved children and families not only helps court-appointed professionals do their own jobs more efficiently, it allows the court system to better support the children and families they are overseeing and to work more effectively.

Program Success Monitored By 

We have a grant from the Sudbury Foundation that paid for a consultant, Dr. Julia Gittleman, to help us develop outcome measurement tools. This includes a brief survey to professionals two months after the completion of their grant. All data from original application to final survey feed into a dashboard that gives us an up to date snapshot of how we are doing at a given time as an organization and meeting our short term goals of client success. 

We also receive many letters of thanks from the families who are our ultimate beneficiaries as well as the social workers and attorneys with whom we work directly. These are rich with detail of individual successes.

Examples of Program Success 

We implemented our outcomes measurement tool in July 2016 so will have results in early 2017. Meanwhile, we receive many letters of thanks from the families who are our ultimate beneficiaries as well as the social workers and attorneys with whom we work directly. Here are a few recent examples.

“If [One Can Help] had not helped me, I would have been displaced from my apartment. It would have made it harder for me to do what I need to do to get my son back. It is a comfort to know that there will be someone who will be there for you and your family. Even when you make a mistake.”

“Thank you very much for the laptop for my client. She is thrilled to be able to research scholarships, apply to college, and be able to do her homework on the computer. Being homeless is very stressful and this put a big smile on her face!”


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We have the perfect storm in juvenile court:

Children and their families are brought to court to address concerns from homelessness to abuse.

Real problems, Real poverty, and Real needs.

Court-appointed social workers, attorneys and probation officers are involved.

Judicial oversight is in place.

But there are very limited resources available to help these children and families.

That makes it extremely difficult for children and families in poverty to improve their lives or reach higher.

So we help.

We hope you will join with us to make a difference.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Anne Bader-Martin
CEO Term Start Mar 2006
CEO Email Anne@onecanhelp.org
CEO Experience

As an attorney specializing in helping children and family law for the last 25 years. Anne Bader-Martin has seen how difficult if not impossible, it is for children and families living in poverty to improve their lives when there are insufficient resources available to help them.

Determined to help our neediest children and families have the chance they need to move forward rather than fall behind because they are impeded by a lack of resources, she has been involved in various social justice projects over the years, including the 2005 founding of One Can Help. Ms. Bader-Martin earned her bachelor’s in Education from the University of Florida and her J.D. from New England Law after completing her final year at Kings College’s School of Law, London.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Jennifer A Martin Director of Development Ms. Martin (no relation to Anne) currently serves as the part-time Director of Development for One Can Help, with whom she has been involved since 2012. She began her career at the University of Pennsylvania as the project manager of a large, federally-funded national survey of legal immigrants. While working there, she also studied community organizing, faith-based organizations and nonprofit management, culminating in a Master of Liberal Arts degree. Ms. Martin received her B.A. in French and Chemistry from Grinnell College and M.S. in Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Isil Waxman Program Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

The Massachusetts Juvenile Court System. The children and teens we help are all involved in the Massachusetts Juvenile Court System. The court identifies whether a child or family lives in poverty and, if so, assigns them an attorney and social worker. Therefore the children come to us pre-screened and we do not have to spend time and resources making sure the child/family is truly poor or that the need is genuine. We only work with social workers, attorneys and related professionals.

Department of Children & Families (DCF). We also help DCF social workers be more effective and efficient by providing funds for items and services DCF believes the clients they are working with truly need, but that they do not otherwise have the capacity to pay for.

The Children and Family Law Division (CAFL) and the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS). CAFL and CPCS attorneys and the social workers who help them also work with children involved in the Juvenile Courts. Similar to DCF social workers, they also identify motivated children and teens who will benefit from immediate assistance. This assistance not only helps their clients, but makes these professionals be more efficient and effective.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 14
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Anne Bader-Martin
Board Chair Company Affiliation attorney specializing solely in child welfare and delinquency law
Board Chair Term Mar 2006 - Mar 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Anne Bader-Martin Court-Appointed Attorney Voting
Ray Molly Goldberg Court-Appointed Attorney Voting
Ann Kurland Writer Voting
Allison Myers Fidelity Investments Voting
Pepe Portuondo Retired Voting
Susan Sayers Ceres Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Anne Fishman .edu Integrated Marketing NonVoting
Barbara Gaffin Zamir Chorale of Boston NonVoting
Ken Hodge Consultant NonVoting
Jim Kirk Consultant NonVoting
Veronica Zolina Attorney, CPCS NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Audit
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Board Governance
  • By-laws
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Community Outreach / Community Relations
  • Compensation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating
  • Governance and Policy
  • Marketing
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 
Establishing secure funding sources so that we can expand operations to address significant needs across the state.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $80,750.00
Projected Expense $80,386.00
Form 990s --
Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $65,493 $40,509 $31,146
Total Expenses $32,835 $26,243 $24,217

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$10,000 $8,222 $8,000
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $50,493 $27,287 $18,146
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $5,000 $5,000 $5,000
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $29,090 $24,243 $23,617
Administration Expense $3,245 $1,500 $500
Fundraising Expense $500 $500 $100
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.99 1.54 1.29
Program Expense/Total Expenses 89% 92% 98%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 1% 1% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $69,542 $37,548 $23,282
Current Assets $69,542 $37,548 $23,282
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,890 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $67,652 $37,548 $23,282

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 36.79 -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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