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Boston Women's Fund, Inc.

 14 Beacon Street, Suite 805
 Boston, MA 02108
[P] (617) 7250035
[F] (617) 7250277
www.bostonwomensfund.org
info@bostonwomensfund.org
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INCORPORATED: 1984
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2475551

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2015
Organization DBA Boston Women's Fund, Inc.
Boston Women's Fund
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Boston Women’s Fund is a progressive foundation that supports community-based organizations and grassroots initiatives run by women and girls in order to create a society based on racial, economic and social justice.

Core Values of the Boston Women’s Fund: 
1. We believe that change starts at the grassroots level, and systemic change is necessary to achieve racial, economic and social justice
2. We believe that power and wealth must be redistributed to attain equity and systemic change
3.We believe that the fight for women’s rights is an integral part of a larger struggle to end oppression based on race, class, gender, age, religion, ability or sexual orientation
4.We believe all movements must combat racism by being racially and culturally diverse in both membership and leadership if progressive change is to occur
5.We believe that women and girls of color as well as those of extremely low-income must and can be leaders within all movements if progressive change is to occur
6.We believe that educating and organizing a diverse donor base is a critical strategy for amassing broad support for social change movements
7. We strive to reflect our commitment to shared leadership, equity and cultural diversity in all aspects of foundation’s operations

Mission Statement

The Boston Women’s Fund is a progressive foundation that supports community-based organizations and grassroots initiatives run by women and girls in order to create a society based on racial, economic and social justice.

Core Values of the Boston Women’s Fund: 
1. We believe that change starts at the grassroots level, and systemic change is necessary to achieve racial, economic and social justice
2. We believe that power and wealth must be redistributed to attain equity and systemic change
3.We believe that the fight for women’s rights is an integral part of a larger struggle to end oppression based on race, class, gender, age, religion, ability or sexual orientation
4.We believe all movements must combat racism by being racially and culturally diverse in both membership and leadership if progressive change is to occur
5.We believe that women and girls of color as well as those of extremely low-income must and can be leaders within all movements if progressive change is to occur
6.We believe that educating and organizing a diverse donor base is a critical strategy for amassing broad support for social change movements
7. We strive to reflect our commitment to shared leadership, equity and cultural diversity in all aspects of foundation’s operations


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $750,000.00
Projected Expense $930,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Organizing Institute

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Boston Women’s Fund is a progressive foundation that supports community-based organizations and grassroots initiatives run by women and girls in order to create a society based on racial, economic and social justice.

Core Values of the Boston Women’s Fund: 
1. We believe that change starts at the grassroots level, and systemic change is necessary to achieve racial, economic and social justice
2. We believe that power and wealth must be redistributed to attain equity and systemic change
3.We believe that the fight for women’s rights is an integral part of a larger struggle to end oppression based on race, class, gender, age, religion, ability or sexual orientation
4.We believe all movements must combat racism by being racially and culturally diverse in both membership and leadership if progressive change is to occur
5.We believe that women and girls of color as well as those of extremely low-income must and can be leaders within all movements if progressive change is to occur
6.We believe that educating and organizing a diverse donor base is a critical strategy for amassing broad support for social change movements
7. We strive to reflect our commitment to shared leadership, equity and cultural diversity in all aspects of foundation’s operations


Background Statement

In 1983, when the Boston Women's Fund was founded, less than 1% of all foundation funding went to programs by and for women and girls. Today, after 25 years, foundation funding for women and girls hovers between 3% and 6% of total grantmaking. Only 5% of private donations are directed to programs dedicated to progressive social change. We are the largest grantmaking organization in Greater Boston specifically directing funds to programs led by women and girls. The Boston Women's Fund's grantmaking and other programming goes beyond addressing immediate needs only, to generating long-lasting solutions which benefit all women and the community as a whole. We support women in taking an active role in controlling our resources and meeting community needs. Our programs in the areas of grantee capacity-building, collaboration, education, and advocacy are dedicated to expanding the leadership and impact of women and girls working for racial, social, and economic justice.

The Boston Women’s Fund raises money from a broad base of donors across economic backgrounds to provide grants and develop programs that strengthen the grassroots initiatives and leadership of women and girls. We provide opportunities for women and girls to develop skills and gain confidence in their leadership abilities, while organizing peers and making their voices heard in public policy debates and educating their communities about root causes and just solutions that impact their lives. Our unique allocations process is critical to our social change grantmaking model which ensures that those most affected by injustice take the lead and work together to create solutions. Therefore, emerging social change groups are able to expand and effective organizations neglected by mainstream funding sources continue to impact and strengthen the foundations of social justice. Our Allocations Committee is comprised of volunteers and activists—women who are also actively involved with community based organizations. The Committee’s function is to evaluate proposals within the context of the Boston Women’s Fund’s priorities and make funding recommendations to our Board of Directors.


Impact Statement

  The Boston Women's Fund has never stopped our grantmaking activities over the past 30 years. In spite of some recent financial challenges, this year we gave away $300,000 to 20 community-based organizations and grassroots initiatives supporting the needs of women and girls in the Greater Boston area. We continue to invest in and collaborate with grassroots organizations to expose and address the root causes of social and political inequities. These organizations are run by and for the very constituencies directly impacted by injustice.
   Another significant contribution of the recent past is the creation of a 5 year strategic plan, with the collaboration of consultants, current and past Board Members, staff and volunteers, as well as some current and former grantees. This strategic plan will help us move forward on our key goals, which is to expand our grantmaking capacity outside of Greater Boston and eventually to the rest of New England outside of Massachusetts.
   Some key goals for the current year include increasing our overall funding capacity; increasing awareness of our work in the overall community as well as within specific communities such as that of young progressive women; expanding our individual donor base; potentially gaining access to new forms of sponsorship; obtaining support for our business and marketing efforts and providing more funding for exceptional grassroots organizations.
 
 
 
 
 

Needs Statement

The most pressing needs of the Boston Women’s Fund include:

Capacity Building: Capacity building continues to be the key need of the Fund in order to remain firm in our standing as a strong organization poised for significant growth.

Business Plan: The Boston Women's Fund has developed a strategic plan calling for further geographic and financial expansion. We require funding in order to create and execute a business plan.

Marketing: The Boston Women’s Fund seeks to enhance recognition/awareness of both our organization and the need for support of the leadership of women and girls in order to achieve racial, social and economic justice.

Programs: At this time we are developing our internship program in order to create a fellowship incorporating the mentoring of college students to high school students, both of whom will learn of the importance of women’s philanthropy and grassroots organizing through hands-on experiences with progressive foundations and community-based organizations.

Staff Development: Organizationally, we realize the importance of developing and maintaining highly trained professional staff, capable of framing the public discourse on social issues.


CEO Statement

When I first learned about the Boston Women’s Fund’s dedication to supporting community building via the leadership of women and girls, I thought it showed a clear commitment to movement building. Since day one, I supported the Boston Women's Fund's focus on social justice. The uniqueness of our foundation shines through our mission. The commitment to strengthen ourselves as a progressive foundation that supports community-based organizations and grassroots initiatives run by women and girls remains an integral component of creating a society based on racial, economic, and social justice.

We remain committed to performing as best we can in upholding the principles of racial, social and economic justice. We strategically seek to help each other to excel. Within the Boston Women’s Fund, we view the nature of our efforts as critical to undergirding the work of our grantee community, who actively struggle in the areas of  housing, health, educational opportunities, immigrant rights, and more. We assure that these grassroots organizations led by women and girls receive appropriate resources and ongoing professional training to succeed organizationally.

Likewise through our foundation’s values, we share an internal responsibility of being introspective when utilizing our strategic agenda. This also helps us organizationally in guiding ourselves to meet our philanthropic priorities. We regularly reach out to our donors to update them, for example, on innovations such as our new strategic plan; on the incredible successes achieved by our grantees; as well as on key issues, initiatives, concerns or ideas that impact us both as individuals and as a community overall.


Board Chair Statement

From the governance perspective, I embrace the diversity of the Boston Women’s Fund’s Board of Directors as a key criterion to our success in moving forward organizationally. The nine women on the board including the executive director as ex officio member share the expectation of organizational growth as we unanimously agreed to support the Fund’s five year strategic plan (2012 – 2016). We are seven women of color and two white women, our ages run the gamut from young women in their twenties to elder women in their eighties. And, we all agree to ensure the accountability of the Boston Women’s Fund to the community of women and girls we support through the effectiveness of our governance as a board.

Our access to financial resources remains a challenge that we seek to address. In moving forward, we agree that board members must be trained and prepared to expand our foundation’s donor base. Therefore, we accept that among our responsibilities as board members is that of fundraising. This is where training and preparation becomes a key approach in raising the financial resource bar. Our presence as individual board members at meetings with donors and foundations takes on primary role via the development of necessary skills. Within this context, we recognize the importance of enhancing our relationships with the Fund’s community of donors.

Boston has been my adopted city. I came here from Honduras with my spouse. During my years in this country, I became an avid immigration activist. I was drawn to the Boston Women’s Fund because of the committed women who over the years have formed a part of the Fund. These have been women and girls, whose passion centered in realizing racial, economic and social justice. Their commitment brings to life the Boston Women’s Fund’s vision – “we strive for a world free of racism, poverty, sexism, and other oppressions.”


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Greater Boston Area

Organization Categories

  1. Philanthropy,Voluntarism & Grantmaking Foundations - Philanthropy/Charity/ Voluntarism Promotion (General)
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Women's Rights
  3. Public & Societal Benefit -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Organizing Institute

The Boston Women’s Fund’s Organizing Institute also provides for various community events geared toward networking, sharing best practices and developing effective strategies.

Budget  $5,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Other Named Groups
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of the first session with the Organizing Institute, participating organizations should be able to effectively assess and measure their programs and/or services.
Program Long-Term Success 

The Boston Women’s Fund’s Organizing Institute also provides for various community events geared toward networking, sharing best practices and developing effective strategies.

Organizations and employees of organizations completing work within the Organizing Institute will grow professionally and financially. 
Program Success Monitored By 
Making the Case assessment tool
meetings and interviews with grantees
site visits
 
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Josefina Vazquez
CEO Term Start Dec 2008
CEO Email josefina@bostonwomensfund.org
CEO Experience
December 5, 2008: The Boston Women's Fund, a pioneer in social justice grant-making and funding-source for women's and girls' organizations, announced that Josefina Vázquez of Oakland, California, is the organization's next Executive Director, effective December 1, 2008.
 
Before coming to the Boston Women's Fund, Vázquez was an independent management consultant on the West Coast. She has served as Executive Director of Jubilee West, a community housing development corporation in Oakland, CA, and of Urban Planning Aid in Boston. She earned her MA at Harvard University and was the New England Refugee Program Director for American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). In the early 1990's she moved to California to become the Northern California Division Manager for AFSC.
 
During the past four years as executive director at the Boston Women’s Fund, she has focused on women-led philanthropy and advocacy for the community organizing work and social policy issues that women and girls courageously seek to resolve in their struggle for racial, economic and social justice.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Amy Leung Program Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 37
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Patricia Montes
Board Chair Company Affiliation Executive Director, Centro Presente
Board Chair Term Jan 2013 - Jan 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. R. Ann Constable Esquire Attorney Voting
Ms. Rita Falzarano Chelsea Collaborative Voting
Ms. Beverly Gibson Retired Voting
Ms. Diana Hwang Asian-American Women's Political Initiative Voting
Ms. Emily Nielson Jones ImagoDei Fund Voting
Ms. Joyce King Retired educator & community activist Voting
Ms. Jasmine Lopez Respond, Inc. Voting
Ms. Patricia Montes Centro Presente Voting
Ms. Janet Santos Jobs for the Future Voting
Ms. Josefina Vazquez ED, Boston Women's Fund Exofficio

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 9
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $750,000.00
Projected Expense $930,000.00
Form 990s

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $398,270 $836,659 $1,895,073
Total Expenses $1,061,029 $967,697 $922,389

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $314,754 $547,929 $1,752,315
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $83,516 $288,730 $142,258
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- $500
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $705,223 $618,000 $372,792
Administration Expense $177,084 $187,401 $252,326
Fundraising Expense $178,722 $162,296 $297,271
Payments to Affiliates -- -- $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.38 0.86 2.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses 66% 64% 40%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 57% 30% 17%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $2,184,808 $2,842,118 $3,178,544
Current Assets $605,047 $1,133,020 $925,453
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $32,217 $26,768 $232,156
Total Net Assets $2,152,591 $2,815,350 $2,946,388

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $1,169,391.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 18.78 42.33 3.99

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

After ten years, funding from a regular source has not been renewed.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data, charts, and graphs are from audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakdown was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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