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Organization DBA PAWS
PAWS Wakefield
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

To promote and protect the rights and well-being of all domestic animals and wildlife, and to foster greater understanding of animal welfare and animal rights through education.

Mission Statement

To promote and protect the rights and well-being of all domestic animals and wildlife, and to foster greater understanding of animal welfare and animal rights through education.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2012 to Sept 30, 2013
Projected Income $80,000.00
Projected Expense $91,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Adoption Program
  • Education and Outreach Program
  • Humane Response Line
  • Medical Care Program
  • Spay and Neuter Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

To promote and protect the rights and well-being of all domestic animals and wildlife, and to foster greater understanding of animal welfare and animal rights through education.

Background Statement

PAWS is an all-volunteer, non-profit animal welfare organization, founded in Wakefield, MA, in 1982 by the late Esther Nowell.PAWS grew out of Wakefield’s Canine Control Committee and now responds to various types of animal-related needs in the Greater Boston area—especially north and northwest of Boston in Eastern Middlesex and Southern Essex Counties. Although our name, PAWS, Protection of Animals in Wakefield Society, implies a focus on animals, our mission and our services are equally geared to the health and welfare of the people in our communities as should be evident from our primary services, listed below: HUMANE RESPONSE LINE We have a 24-hour answering service, linking our members and the public to our volunteers to help the caller find answers to their questions and potential solutions to their animal-related issues and needs. PET ADOPTIONS AND RE-HOMING We match pets and people for companionship and assist families who can no longer care for their pets. Adoptions promote the human-animal bond, increase the well-being of the pet owner. Rehoming provides a second chance for the pet and provides the family comfort that their pets will be well-cared for and adopted into pre-screened, appropriate homes. LOST AND FOUND ASSISTANCE We help families search for a lost pet, individuals who have found a stray pet, and friendly strays to either find their homes, or new ones. LOW-COST SPAY/NEUTER. We work with the community to ensure that pet guardians have access to affordable spay/neuter and vet-care options for their companion pets. FERAL COLONY MANAGEMENT We work with the community to ensure that free-roaming cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and provided with food and appropriate shelter. Colony management improves the lives of the cats and reduces the possibility of nuisance problems and disease that might affect humans. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS We host speakers and educational opportunities and provide literature and other educational material at meetings and community events. Our programs provide information and resources for teaching people about pets, pet care, wildlife and other topics that promote an understanding of humans and non-humans living together.

Impact Statement

Some of our accomplishments from this last year include:
 
1. We took in 218 new animals and found homes for 166 cats, 10 dogs, and 1 rabbit.  Our new adoption center partnership at PetSmart provided increased exposure for our adoptable animals. 
 
2. We spayed or neutered, vaccinated and cared for 246 animals, including more than 50 free-roaming cats in our communities.
 
3. We work with VCA Wakefield Animal Hospital and Park Street Vet Clinic to provide low-cost rabies vaccinations and microchips for more than 100 pets at spring and fall clinics.
 
4. We responded to over 3500 inquiries, providing access to our services to people from all over NewEngland, including 19 requests for financial assistance for families whose pets needed medical care that they could not afford, and over 400 calls about lost or found pets.
 
5. We  provided KIND News subscriptions to 1943 Wakefield elementary students and sponsored the Wonders of Animal Life program for all fifth grade students in Wakefield schools.  This program provides a series of presentations by local animal-related experts and includes topics such as Eyes on Owls and Living with Coyotes.
 
This year, our goals are to
 
1. Deepen and extend our relations with current donors and encourage financial support from new individual and corporate donors and foundations.
 
2. Increase our ability to provide for abandoned or surrendered pets who need medical procedures or long-term care.
 
3. Provide financial assistance to needy families so they do not have to surrender their pets.
 
4. Increase educational programs, events, and opportunities to reach out to greater numbers of people and provide information about animal care, humane living and and opportunities available to help individuals provide for their family pets.
 
5. Recruit and train new volunteers, especially in leadership roles, to ensure long-term sustainability of PAWS.
 
 
 

Needs Statement

1. Raise an additional $25-35,000/year to cover increased medical costs due to rising costs of medicine and vet care, an increase in the number of elderly and ill animals being surrendered and an increase in the number of feral or stray cats that need medical care before they can be returned to their colony or rehomed (if friendly).
 
2. Recruit, train and support additional foster homes so we can help more animals. To do this, we propose to increase our publicity budget by about $1000. In addition, we will need to budget about $1000 to support foster homes with equipment, food, and other pet supplies.
 
3. Engage a new Volunteer Coordinator to recruit, interview, and train new volunteers and to manage our volunteer program. Strong leadership for this part of our program will help us respond more quickly to volunteering offers and to match these individuals with the many tasks involved in running our organization.
 
4. Improve the accessibility and visibility of our website and ensure that it is in sync with our primary database. (Estimated cost: $1000)
 
5. Enlist a development manager/consultant to review and improve our fundraising initiatives, recruit and train a development team, and set up an ongoing, sustainable program. (Estimated cost: $8-12,000 over several years)

CEO Statement

The following qualities are examples of what I believe makes PAWS unique in the world of animal welfare: 1.We are an all-volunteer organization with a $90,000 budget that is used exclusively for the direct costs of caring for the animals and providing our services. 2. As a foster-network, our animals are cared for in the homes of our volunteers and are loved members of the foster family until we can find the appropriate forever home for each of them. 3. Our adoption team is known for carefully matching pets and people, with the goal of making everyone happy.We get very few returns. However, if an adopter is no longer able to care for a pet adopted from PAWS, we always find a way to take the pet back into foster care or otherwise find another solution for the situation.We have accepted returned pets who were adopted as much as 10 years ago. 4. Even though our core area consists of a few towns north of Boston, we respond to requests from all over New England.We have been praised for our quick responses, even when we are not in a position to directly provide a solution for the caller.We make it a priority to help everyone within our jurisdiction and we do everything we can to help people outside our area by recommending organizations in their area and other resources for their needs. We are committed to our animals and to our community because we believe healthy animals populations make for healthy citizens and a healthy environment.

Board Chair Statement

As Board Chair and President of PAWS, I am responsible for shepherding the organization through the many challenges of animal rescue work. Our Humane Response Line gets dozens of calls/emails per day and behind each call is a human story. Sometimes it is a person whose beloved pet has been lost. At other times it is someone whose parent has suffered a debilitating medical event and who now must rehome an elderly pet. Or perhaps it is a resident concerned about an injured animal they have seen, or a female stray with kittens delivered in a downspout. And, sometimes, it is the town officials calling for our help with pets left behind as a result of foreclosures or evictions or a landlord whose tenants have left pets behind. As an all-volunteer organization that does not have a physical shelter, we are constantly juggling to meet all the needs of the people and animals in our communities. Our foster homes sacrifice a little more space to fit just one more cat or a litter of kittens. Our Response Line Team works hard to return calls and emails on the same day that they come in. Our adoption team makes appointments to meet potential adopters and tries to help them find a good match for their wants and needs. With the help of a terrific team of volunteers, we vet new volunteers and foster homes, interface with the local animal control officers, discuss finances with our veterinary partners, write grants, solicit donors, and do all the things many salaried professionals do in nonprofit and for profit organizations with budgets our size and larger. This is a labor of love and one of commitment to caring for the animals as well as the people of our core communities.What keeps me at this grueling and time consuming work? What is my remuneration if it is not dollars and cents? It is the small victories as well as the large ones. It is kittens like Monica, born with a cleft palate and needing specialized surgery, who is now healthy, and happy in a new, loving family. Or Toby, the two week old kitten found injured at a construction site. Or Saffron, the one-day old kitten brought in to a local vet by a Good Samaritan. All of these babies needed bottle-feeding and round-the-clock care in order to survive…and they got it from our volunteers. It is about Beary, a sweet elderly dog who could no longer be cared for by his elderly owners but now has a wonderful new home while her previous owners have updates on her life when they call in to check on her. Finally, it is about all those cats roaming neighborhoods, the ones too wild to be adopted, that we spay, neuter, and release back to their colonies. Instead of spreading disease and multiplying, they are all vetted and cared for. These are the challenges that face us and the experiences that make this no-pay job the most rewarding one I have ever had.

Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Our priority service area includes the towns of Wakefield, Reading and Lynnfield, and extends to many surrounding towns in Middlesex and Essex counties, including Stoneham, North Reading, Malden, Melrose, Winchester, Woburn, Saugus and Peabody. Our Humane Response Line responds to calls from all over New England.

Organization Categories

  1. Animal Related - Animal Protection & Welfare
  2. Human Services -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Adoption Program

Our Adoption program matches pets and people for companionship and assists families who can no longer care for their pets to surrender them to us. We also micro-chip all of our animals and offer low cost micro-chipping to the community.
Budget  $3,000.00
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served General/Unspecified Families General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Adoptions promote the human-animal bond, increase the well-being of the pet owner. Re-homing provides a second chance for the pet and provides the family comfort that their pets will be well-cared for and adopted into pre-screened, appropriate homes.
Program Long-Term Success  In 2009-2010, we re-homed 173 animals, in 2010-2011 we re-homed 165 animals, and in 2011-2012 we re-homed 179 animals.
Program Success Monitored By  Our Databases track all adoptions.
Examples of Program Success  We are known in the region for our thoughtful matching of families to pets, including matching new pets to animals already in the home. We do follow up and take back our animals even ten or more years after the adoption.

Education and Outreach Program

We host speakers and educational opportunities and provide literature and other educational material at meetings, community events, and in the Wakefield Schools.
Budget  $3,000.00
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Animal-Related, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) General/Unspecified General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  1800 KIND News distributed in Wakefield Schools K-6 and Wonders of Animal life programming for all the Wakefield 5th graders. Lynnfield Library Reading Hour for Be Kind to Animal Week. Also distribution of materials at local fairs in Reading, Wakefield, Stoneham and at other local events.
Program Long-Term Success  Providing information and resources for teaching people about pets, pet care, wildlife and other topics promotes an understanding of humans and non-humans living together.
Program Success Monitored By  We receive thank you notes from the teachers and children giving us feedback on their experience.
Examples of Program Success  The schools are happy to continue these ongoing programs and we make contact with many people at the events we attend to distribute materials about spay/neuter, animal adoption, and other animal related issues.

Humane Response Line

Our Humane Response Line is a program that provides a 24-hour, seven day a week, answering service providing callers and email users answers and solutions to their animal-related issues and needs.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served General/Unspecified Elderly and/or Disabled Families
Program Short-Term Success  We are able to help our community and beyond with questions, crises, and animal needs (adoption, surrender, etc.)
Program Long-Term Success  In 2012 we handled over 3500 calls and emails providing help either directly or by referral to other organizations.
Program Success Monitored By  All calls and emails are logged and monitored by volunteer staff.
Examples of Program Success  We are known for answering each query promptly and the number of calls we receive is increasing due to our reputation.

Medical Care Program

Our medical care program funds the cost of spay/neuter, exams, vaccinations, medicines, blood work and diagnostic tests, medical supplies and emergency interventions for all the animals in our care.
Budget  $69,000.00
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  For 2013, we continue to manage the medical needs of our 15 long-term care cats, the 250-300 animals that we expect to come through our system in a normal year, and the current hoarding situation involving over 20 cats, including 4 pregnant females.
Program Long-Term Success  We are able to afford the medical needs of all the animals in our care and have the ability to address emergency situations as they arise.
Program Success Monitored By  All medical costs are recorded and monitor for each case in our Petpoint database as well as at our primary vet office.
Examples of Program Success  The medical cost is 2012 were $20,000 more than the previous year.  However, our reserve savings were able to cover this need while our team increased efforts to raise funds and apply for grants. An example of grants awarded to further our mission is the ASPCA award of  $20,000 received for our Share the Love collaborative program with Subaru of Wakefield.

Spay and Neuter Program

Our Spay/Neuter Program works with the community to ensure that pet guardians have access to affordable spay/neuter and vet-care options for their companion pets. We also work with the community to ensure that free-roaming cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and provided with food and appropriate shelter.
Budget  28,000
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served General/Unspecified General/Unspecified General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Spay and Neuter increases life quality and expectancy for domestic pets. Colony management improves the lives of the cats and reduces the possibility of nuisance problems and disease that might affect humans.
Program Long-Term Success  All our adopted animals are spayed and neutered and community outreach assures spay and neuter available to all owners.
Program Success Monitored By  All spay and neuter records are maintained in our Petpoint database management system.
Examples of Program Success  In 2012 we spayed and neutered 130 cats and 9 dogs. We are on track for an increase in these numbers during 2013 and are currently working with the Wakefield Animal Control Officer on a population of 19 cats rescued from an eviction situation.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Susan DiMeo
CEO Term Start Mar 2002
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Susan Dimeo has been a volunteer with non-profit organizations in the Boston area for over 30 years.  She served as a director, treasurer and president of the Brown University Alumni Club of Boston.  In 1999, Sue became involved in the animal welfare movement as a volunteer foster home for PAWS of Wakefield and has been serving as the president of PAWS since 2002. 

 

In addition, Sue has served the New England Federation of Humane Societies as a member of the advisory council, communications committee chair and secretary.  She is currently serving her second term as a NEFHS board member and first term as treasurer. Sue is also a volunteer and member of the Massachusetts Animal Coalition (MAC), serving on the PILOT/Anamatch task force, and the State of Massachusetts Animal Rescue Team (SMART).

 

Sue’s professional career began in financial services and international banking. Now, as a consultant, Sue has provided information management, instructional design and documentation and training expertise in a variety of industries including high tech, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing, financial services, and both state and federal governments. She specializes in helping organizations to analyze their information needs, define their business processes, and develop effective and compliant documentation.

 

At home, Sue and her husband Chuck share their lives with their Aussie-mix, Sheila, several former PAWS cats, and an ever-changing population of short and long-term foster pets.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ruth Moser Oct 2000 Mar 2002
Christopher Barbagallo Oct 1999 Sept 2000

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 90
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 90
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 90

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Susan DiMeo
Board Chair Company Affiliation Self-employed Information Management and Instructional Design Consultant
Board Chair Term Mar 2002 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Becky Boccelli Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Susan DiMeo Self-employed Information Management and Instructional Design Consultant Voting
Ms. Robin Gorfine Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger Voting
Ms. Diane Hammerbeck Town of Lynnfield Voting
Ms. Elaine Leahy Astrazeneca (Randstad) Voting
Ms. Peggy Macunovich Aricent Group, Engineer Voting
Dr Abby Zanger Lecturer, Consultant Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Response

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2012 to Sept 30, 2013
Projected Income $80,000.00
Projected Expense $91,000.00
Form 990s

2013 PAWS990EZ

2012 PAWS 990EZ

2011 PAWS 990EZ

2010 PAWS 990EZ

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $79,910 $81,851 $59,781
Total Expenses $84,384 $86,157 $49,511

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $26,484 $50,181 $29,075
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $50,516 $31,562 $29,476
Investment Income, Net of Losses $81 $108 $236
Membership Dues $1,828 -- --
Special Events $601 -- $994
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $400 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $81,387 $85,884 $33,688
Administration Expense $2,289 $273 $15,536
Fundraising Expense $708 $0 $287
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.95 0.95 1.21
Program Expense/Total Expenses 96% 100% 68%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 0% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $87,251 $91,725 $96,081
Current Assets $87,251 $91,725 $96,081
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $87,251 $91,725 $96,081

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 13.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

PAWS is currently in process of conducting an internal review of expense allocations to its programs as we feel the expenses filed on our form 990 and state tax forms reflect too high a value for administrative costs. In 2010 and 2011, most of the expenses we allocated to administrative and/or fundraising costs should have been allocated to the cost of our programs, but were not. The 2012 financials most accurately reflect how we allocate our budgetary expenditures.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Further administrative and fundraising expense detail was obtained from the Form PC documents on file with the state of Massachusetts, for fiscal years 2012, 2011 & 2010.
 
Please note, the total revenue for FY 2012 reflects the total sum of the items in the revenue category for that fiscal year.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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