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Organization DBA Conexion Inc.
Conexion - Advancing Latino Leadership
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

A leadership and executive mentoring program for mid career Latino professionals. One of the few leadership programs for Latinos of its kind in the country. Our goal is to transform mid career Latino professionals into strategic and innovative executives who lead organizations that can harness the positive impact of the expanding HispanicLatino demographic.  Create a national network of exceptional leaders who understand the impact of the nexus between the rising HispanicLatino
demographic, the sustainability of the US economy and our quality of life.   To engage with forward thinking organizations to provide an innovative approach to talent management, i.e. identifying, retaining talent and succession planning; to increase access to and visibility with the expanding HispanicLatino population.

Mission Statement

A leadership and executive mentoring program for mid career Latino professionals. One of the few leadership programs for Latinos of its kind in the country. Our goal is to transform mid career Latino professionals into strategic and innovative executives who lead organizations that can harness the positive impact of the expanding HispanicLatino demographic.  Create a national network of exceptional leaders who understand the impact of the nexus between the rising HispanicLatino
demographic, the sustainability of the US economy and our quality of life.   To engage with forward thinking organizations to provide an innovative approach to talent management, i.e. identifying, retaining talent and succession planning; to increase access to and visibility with the expanding HispanicLatino population.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $292,314.00
Projected Expense $226,003.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Leadership & Mentoring Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

A leadership and executive mentoring program for mid career Latino professionals. One of the few leadership programs for Latinos of its kind in the country. Our goal is to transform mid career Latino professionals into strategic and innovative executives who lead organizations that can harness the positive impact of the expanding HispanicLatino demographic.  Create a national network of exceptional leaders who understand the impact of the nexus between the rising HispanicLatino
demographic, the sustainability of the US economy and our quality of life.   To engage with forward thinking organizations to provide an innovative approach to talent management, i.e. identifying, retaining talent and succession planning; to increase access to and visibility with the expanding HispanicLatino population.

Background Statement

 In the fall of 2005 a group of Boston social entrepreneurs were discussing the nexus between the new demography and the economic complexities the country faces. That discussion lead to an initiative to create a channel to identify and fast-track Latino talent ready to accept the increasing responsibilities to ensure our communities, business, organizations and the country thrive and prosper in the future.  These  Latino leaders combine the best of mainstream leadership with Latino sensibilities qualities needed in an increasingly global environment. The work also creates a meaningful way for executives who mentor and companies who sponsor to engage with and gain deeper insight into this growing demographic. At the heart of any successful organization - whether for profit, non-profit, academia or government is talent. With the dramatic shift in the composition of the 21st century US workforce engaging with and retaining the best talent takes on a whole new meaning. The 2010 Census reflects this dramatic shift brought about by the aging out baby  boomer generation and declining white non-hispanic birthrate.  At the same time the growth in the US population has been largely fueled by the HispanicLatino population. Projecting out into the next twenty five years suggests that the work force of the forseeable future will increasingly be HispanicLatino. 


Impact Statement

  • Value - quote from a mentee "I have never had someone so candidly and directly support me in front of a room full of Senior Leadership members. I truly appreciate your kind, honest and again candid words. Seeing you state your commitment to my potential and the importance of supporting Latino Leadership has and will continue to inspire me to not only continue to challenge myself but also to challenge others to think of the importance of developing Latino Leaders.
  • "Reciprocal mentoring - expand our mentoring capacity through a growing network of executives and corporations/organizations. An increase in the number of “C-suite” mentors since beginning - most of whom are not Latino. They actively help recruit other senior executives, provide testimonials about the value of the program.
  • Increase and foster civic engagement of alumni i.e. serving as role models, mentors to younger Latinos, younger professionals and board participation through collaboration with existing mentoring programs and networking activities.
  • Launched our seventh Latino leadership and mentoring program for mid career HispanicLatino professionals
  • Go to source for information about HispanicLatinos, leadership, economy, mentoring on website, social media including blog, twitter (nearly 1,000 followers)
  • Held special events that drew capacity audiences on topics ranging from Rising HispanicLatino Demographics/ Managing and Leading an Inclusive organization/ Mentoring Across Cultures.
 
Goals for coming year – In response to requests from alumni implement expanded Alumni series that builds on and accelerates advancement of our members and facilitates better access to board participation, requests for volunteers, business and marketing opportunities. Conduct a survey of all mentors to date regarding their experience with the program, i.e. change in perceptions re: HispanicLatinos, as leaders, as a source of talent as part of succession planning strategy Launch a chapter in NYC in 2013 and one other city TBD.

Needs Statement

 Interest in leadership and mentoring has increased dramatically necessitating a move to dedicated office space and staff to meet growing demand, support expansion. Costs include -      
Year one $250K – full time Executive Director; part time administrative assistant, social media / marketing manager and a program manager; office space. 
Expand outside Boston/MA – currently few programs focused on mid career HispanicLatino talent development and none with aformal executive mentoring componentexists in the United States.      
Year two $500K – set up, launch chapters in two other locations, i.e. New York City. Staffing includes local part time program manager. Target cities are locations with Conexión alumni who serve as connectors to local HispanicLatino leadership, civic leaders and are familiar with local cultural climate.      
Year three $1.5M – maintain and launch in two additional cities bringing total number of Conexión chapters to five+.  Support ongoing leadership growth, access to, amongst our alumni (mentees and mentors)        
Enhance alumni database –measure impact over time·       
Increase civic engagement, volunteerism, philanthropy
 
 
 

CEO Statement

As the daughter of Mexican immigrants I learned at a very young age what sacrifices my parents endured to come here and in the end make a
better life for themselves and their families. My parents also taught me importance of giving back and helping others too. Conexión is the vehicle

to help others make a contribution on a larger scale. One of the “big ideas” we
share with each new group of mentees and mentors is that we expect them to
think and act much bigger than their own careers, instead to go beyond
traditional stereotypes to push the boundaries of their thinking. Leadership is much more than you, your company. It starts there and collectively we can make a difference on a much larger scale if only we decide to do so. One of our mentees called her experience in Conexión“a call to action”. Another mentee said “At Conexión they don’t preach about cultural differences and being
Latino. On the contrary, we have healthy discussions about becoming better leaders, individual growth, and what it means to be a Latino professional in these times. The program really helped me to reflect and see myself and my leadership potential in a renewed light, and it inspired me to be surrounded by so many talented and humble individuals”.
  What a number of members have said of being part of Conexión“it is transformational!” There is a real need for inspired leadership. We believe that we are creating 21st leaders who understand the urgency and how their career choices do make a difference not only for themselves but for our country, for all of us.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.

Currently serving the greater Boston, MA metropolitan area, eastern MA., with plans to expand into NYC in 2013.
 

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Management & Technical Assistance
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Economic Development
  3. Public & Societal Benefit -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Leadership & Mentoring Program

Ten month executive education leadership and mentoring program for mid-career Latino professionals. Mid career is defined as ten or more years of professsional experiences, demonstrated leadership and community involvement.  The program consists of ten monthly group sessions and concurrently ten monthly one on one sessions with an Executive Mentor.
Budget  $75,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Hispanic, Latino Heritage Adults Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Short term achievement and improvement on which we focus
include success in a variety of ways such as promotions and salary increases.  Other measures are our mentees reconnecting with their dreams and aspirations.  For individuals who have left their country of origin the transition can be more difficult than expected, e.g. language, professional connections being a couple of stumbling blocks. Even for  individuals who may be born in the US the lack of role models contributes to significant limitations when considering what career options. Real success is seeing mentees exceed their own expectations. Other
measures of success include there is an increase in civic engagement, i.e.
volunteering, mentoring youth, and serving on boards.



 



The number of mentees who have launched businesses - they
attribute the program and the role of their mentor as being critical to helping
them navigate the ins and outs of starting a business . Things like helping them network and make the
right connections and opening doors for them. 



Program Long-Term Success 
Well established, influential and civic minded HispanicLatino middle class able to shoulder  the economic and leadership role necessary to sustain the US role as global leader.  As of 2011 HispanicLatino households net worth is 1/18th of white nonHispanic households.  Without a successful HispanicLatino population to generate
the appropriate tax revenues to support America’s needs, the country faces
greater uncertainty than its current woes.
Program Success Monitored By 

We surveyed the first three cohorts to obtain this feedback. We are writing case studies; have database to track changes in careers, business start ups. We track uptick in civic engagement, i.e. volunteering, mentoring youth; requests come in from nonprofit groups on a regular basis requesting help to recruit HispanicLatino midcareer professionals
for organizations that serve diverse population. They frequently report
difficulty in finding HispanicLatino professionals to serve as role models and mentors. We track the number of mentees who have launched
businesses. In both civic engagement and business ventures mentors and
involvement with Conexión are factors the mentees attribute to these
changes. 

Examples of Program Success 
Accelerate career and economic advancement - a mentee had
not received a desired promotion. He was good at what he did and did not understand what he was missing. His mentor had him interview three executives in his company to find out how they had progressed in their careers. Next she had him prepare his own rationale for his request. In the end he was successful in obtaining his promotion. Another challenge mentees have - overcome Transition from country of origin to the US, language and loss of her former professional network - this mentee from South America had been  in Quality Control. In Boston she was working in a nonprofit as a case manager. While in Conexión her mentor sent her on informational interviews to get feedback on how she came across. She worked with her mentor to incorporate the feedback. She is now happily completing her third anniversary as a quality control manager with a healthcare provider in the Boston. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Conexión program design in many ways is similar to many more mainstream leadership curriculums. Where it departs is the way in which we incorporate the new demography into the discussions. We foster and encourage new ways of thinking about leadership in light of these
dramatic changes. A future that is more diverse
racially, ethnically, by age, lifestyle and attitudes. We encourage reflection and provide, as one participant put it, “a safe place to ask questions you couldn’t ask elsewhere”. We foster peer to peer exchange of ideas and provide the group with relevant articles, assessments and content experts to push at their thinking. On the certificate of
completion that each mentee receives is this quote “Leadership can be thought of as a capacity to define oneself to others in a way that clarifies and expands a vision of the future.” from Edwin H. Friedman.  At Conexion we create the future.  
 
On the mentoring side of the program we have taken a great deal of care to lay a foundation for a successful mentoring relationship. First the process of selecting and matching mentees and mentors has to date proven very successful. Most of the matches have worked well. By that we mean the two parties connect, feel the mentoring is helpful and the mentors report a great deal of satisfaction as well as new insights into the HispanicLatino phenomenon. For many of our mentors, most of whom are not HispanicLatino this is their first real contact with a
HispanicLatino. It is a real learning experience for them too. This experience for many results in testing their own assumptions
and gaining new and valuable insights. Insights that is relevant for their own organizations as well. They come to see this group in a new light and recognize there is more potential than they may have been aware of before they became involved. We have a significant number of mentors who remain involved after their ten month mentoring commitment ends. Some have mentored again; others help us recruit executives from their own networks to be mentors as well.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Phyllis Barajas
CEO Term Start Oct 2005
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

In the fall of 2005, Phyllis Barajas foundedConexión, (www.conexion-all.org)a leadership and mentoring program for mid career HispanicLatino professionals (10+ yrs) dedicated to and engaged in an emergent process of defining and nurturing “Visionary Latino Leadership” that understands the implications of the nexus between the rising HispanicLatino demographic, socioeconomic factors and sustainability of the U.S. economy. 

In 1994, President Bill Clinton appointed her as a deputy assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Education offices of elementary, secondary and bilingual education
 
Before her appointment, she served as the first HispanicLatino assistant dean for human resources at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. 
 
After returning from Washington she was national director for human resources Houghton Mifflin Publishing.
 
Phyllis serves on the Boards of
- United Way Boston and Merrimac Valley,
- Jobs for the Future, a national foundation focused on education and workforce development
- Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Board of Overseers
- In 2012 she was appointed a Trustee of Eastern Bank – the first Latina trustee since the bank’s founding in 1818
 
She holds a BA in education from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a Master’s of Education from Boston University, with specialization in HR education
 
Phyllis is originally from Omaha, Nebraska, the daughter of Mexican immigrants.
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Phyllis Barajas executive director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Annual Excellence in Contribution to the Latino Community award Women of ALPFA Boston Chapter 2011
20 On the Move Boston Business Journal / El Planeta Media Group 2009
Special Recognition for their advancement of Latino leadership NSHMBA Boston Chapter 2009

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 59
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Ana Perez Camayd
Board Chair Company Affiliation Perez Camayd Associates
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 - Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Evelyn Barahona Gr Boston Chamber of Commerce, VP Membership Voting
Phyllis Barajas Conexion Inc. Voting
Ana Perez Camayd Perez Camayd Associates Voting
Susan Cann BI Worldwide / NE Region Voting
Philip Catchings Boston Consulting Group, Senior Partner (retired) Voting
Bob Edwards Edwards and Associates Voting
David R. Martinez MIT Lincoln Laboratory Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions --
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As we have grown and demand has increased the role of the board is has grown too. Our board is a working board and very committed to the mission and vision. All of our board members have served as mentors. We are currently in the process of adding three new board
members. We are expanding the role of the board to focus more on development to support organization as we grow. We have established a committee structure to make better use of individual board member
expertise and interests and better alignment with our mission.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $292,314.00
Projected Expense $226,003.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $0 $199,205 $152,886
Total Expenses $0 $199,349 $109,910

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- $83,958 $16,548
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- $115,247 $136,338
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense -- $180,000 $109,910
Administration Expense -- $19,349 --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses -- 1.00 1.39
Program Expense/Total Expenses 0% 90% 100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $51,951 $44,792 $44,936
Current Assets $51,951 $44,792 $44,936
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,971 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $49,980 $44,792 $44,936

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 26.36 -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

With the release of the 2010 Census Conexión could not be better positioned. The dramatic shift in the US population has brought HispanicLatino demographic to the forefront of the public arena. In addition to the usual negative stereotypes we at Conexión are finding growing interest in our target population – midcareer HispanicLatino professionals. More and more organizations across all sectors are becoming interested in accessing this group. Many of the companies with who we meet recognize this program as providing an effective tool for leadership development, retention and talent management.  Our mission is to address the need for a workforce that can support a robust economy in the 21stcentury. As the white nonHispanicLatino baby boomers age out, we will come to depend more and more on  this growing professional community. We thought long and hard how to go about making a real and dramatic difference. We recognized there is a need for better integration of this professional community within the more mainstream mindset. The mentoring component serves that purpose in two ways. One, it provides the midcareer professional with access to an established senior executive who exposes them to their professional networks, e.g. professional associations, business contacts. Secondly, the recipricoal mentoring occurs as the mentee, all accomplished professionals in their own right, share their perspectives and experiences with their mentors. The mentors report gaining new insights into this growing communities realities and implications for their organizations’ efforts to attract and retain the best and the brightest talent. In addition we receive frequent requests for help recruitingHispanicLatino individuals to serve on boards, as role models and youth mentors. We want to become the Boston regions and eventually the nation’s go to organization for innovative talent management and succession planning as well as be a resource to the nonprofit community and its needs for more diversity among its volunteers.
Our challenge is to accelerate the rate at which we can establish and launch chapters to meet this growing need. We want to support our growing alumni network of mentees and mentors. That takes funding which is what led us to pursue this October event. It will give us more visibility, access to a broader funding community and hopefully result in attracting additional resources.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s. FY 2012 & FY2013 program expenses have been adjusted to correlate to the total expenses.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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