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Friends Of Boston Homeless, Inc.

 12 Wise Street
 Boston, MA 02130
[P] (617) 942-8671
[F] --
www.fobh.org
[email protected]
Mariann Bucina Roca
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1987
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2866770

LAST UPDATED: 10/18/2017
Organization DBA Friends of Boston's Homeless
Former Names Friends of Boston's Long Island Shelter (1989)
Friends of Long Island Shelter (1987)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

We believe homelessness in Boston can be solved.
 
Friends of Boston’s Homeless supports innovative, solutions-oriented programs that help homeless individuals transition from the streets and shelters to lead stable independent lives. We focus on removing the final barriers of transition that often city and state programs don’t have the means to cover. The final transition steps out of homelessness are often the most crucial, and we help make them happen.
 
Friends supports a number of vital programs in the City of Boston that help end homelessness including Housing First, Rapid Rehousing, Front Door Triage, Vocational Training and Workforce Development, transitional and permanent affordable housing, and the emergency shelters, Woods Mullen Women's Shelter and Southampton Men's Shelter (formerly Long Island). Friends also owns and operates three Supportive Community Housing Programs: 12-14 Wise Street, Yetman Men's Housing Program, and Valentine Women's Housing Program. Combined, these programs and services help hundreds of people each year move beyond shelter to lead stable, independent lives in our community.
 
Like a PTA or “Friends of” group, Friends bridges the gap between public sector funding and the needs of the homeless by providing a vehicle for individuals, businesses, foundations and charitable organizations to be a part of the solution to homelessness.
 

Mission Statement

We believe homelessness in Boston can be solved.
 
Friends of Boston’s Homeless supports innovative, solutions-oriented programs that help homeless individuals transition from the streets and shelters to lead stable independent lives. We focus on removing the final barriers of transition that often city and state programs don’t have the means to cover. The final transition steps out of homelessness are often the most crucial, and we help make them happen.
 
Friends supports a number of vital programs in the City of Boston that help end homelessness including Housing First, Rapid Rehousing, Front Door Triage, Vocational Training and Workforce Development, transitional and permanent affordable housing, and the emergency shelters, Woods Mullen Women's Shelter and Southampton Men's Shelter (formerly Long Island). Friends also owns and operates three Supportive Community Housing Programs: 12-14 Wise Street, Yetman Men's Housing Program, and Valentine Women's Housing Program. Combined, these programs and services help hundreds of people each year move beyond shelter to lead stable, independent lives in our community.
 
Like a PTA or “Friends of” group, Friends bridges the gap between public sector funding and the needs of the homeless by providing a vehicle for individuals, businesses, foundations and charitable organizations to be a part of the solution to homelessness.
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $591,000.00
Projected Expense $266,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. Housing First Start-up Fund
  • 2. Serving Ourselves Workforce Development Program
  • 3. Serving Ourselves Career Center
  • 4. Valentine Women's Supportive Housing Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

We believe homelessness in Boston can be solved.
 
Friends of Boston’s Homeless supports innovative, solutions-oriented programs that help homeless individuals transition from the streets and shelters to lead stable independent lives. We focus on removing the final barriers of transition that often city and state programs don’t have the means to cover. The final transition steps out of homelessness are often the most crucial, and we help make them happen.
 
Friends supports a number of vital programs in the City of Boston that help end homelessness including Housing First, Rapid Rehousing, Front Door Triage, Vocational Training and Workforce Development, transitional and permanent affordable housing, and the emergency shelters, Woods Mullen Women's Shelter and Southampton Men's Shelter (formerly Long Island). Friends also owns and operates three Supportive Community Housing Programs: 12-14 Wise Street, Yetman Men's Housing Program, and Valentine Women's Housing Program. Combined, these programs and services help hundreds of people each year move beyond shelter to lead stable, independent lives in our community.
 
Like a PTA or “Friends of” group, Friends bridges the gap between public sector funding and the needs of the homeless by providing a vehicle for individuals, businesses, foundations and charitable organizations to be a part of the solution to homelessness.
 

Background Statement

Founded in 1987, Friends of Boston’s Homeless is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that develops and supports innovative, solution-oriented programs to help homeless people move beyond shelter to lead independent lives in our community.

Friends supports a number of vital programs in the City of Boston including Housing First, Rapid Rehousing, vocational training, workforce development, adult education, transitional and permanent affordable housing, and the emergency shelters Woods Mullen Women's Shelter and Southampton Men's Shelter (formerly Long Island) run by Boston Public Health Commission's Homeless Services. Friends also owns and operates three permanent affordable housing programs in Boston for formerly homeless men and women: 12-14 Wise Street, Yetman Men's Supportive Housing Program, and 9 Valentine Street Women's Supportive Housing Program. 

In addition, Friends provides technical assistance and expertise in developing new transitional programs and the on-going improvement of existing programs to ensure the current and changing needs of the homeless are met.

Like a Parent/Teachers Organization or a "Friends of the Public Library" group, Friends serves to bridge the gap between public sector funding and the current needs of the homeless by providing a vehicle for individuals, businesses, foundations and charitable organizations to be a part of the solution to homelessness.

Friends of Boston's Homeless has a proven track record of providing capital funding, (as well as start-up and on-going operating support) for Homeless Services programs, including renovations for the opening of Long Island Shelter in 1987, Yetman Men's Supportive Housing Program 1990, Safe Harbor Transitional Housing Program 1991, Serving Ourselves Job Training Program/Project Lighthouse 1995, Project SOAR Transitional Housing Program 1996, Valentine Women's Supportive Housing Program 2000, 12-14 Wise Street Permanent Affordable Housing Program 2002, Wyman Re-entry Program for ex-offenders 2006, Richard Weintraub Day Center at Woods Mullen Shelter 2009, Young Adults Program 2014, Woods Mullen Women’s Shelter 2015, five Housing First Programs (2010, 2011, 2012, 2015/16), Serving Ourselves Career Center 2016, Rapid Rehousing 2016 to present), Housing First Start-up Fund (2009 to present), and emergency response immediately after Boston’s Long Island bridge closure.
 

Impact Statement

Accomplishments for FY 2016 (ended 6/30/16)
1. Our Housing First Start up Fund exceeded its goal of 150 long-term homeless people housed in 2016 and helped 172 more long-term homeless people overcome the final barriers of housing to move off the street and our of shelter into homes of their own.

2. Expanded our Housing First Start-up Fund to include people identified through Boston's Rapid Rehousing Initiative; a strategy that prevents people from falling into chronic homelessness by focusing on rapidly rehousing people who are situationally homeless (loss of a job or life partner, traumatic health event/inadequate health insurance, fleeing domestic violence, etc.).

3. Implemented a social media and email marketing strategy to better raise awareness, and communicate better with current donors and potential new supporters that's resulted in nearly 2,000 Facebook followers, 11,000 Twitter followers, and raised an additional $100,000 in new funding for our Housing First Initiative from foundations, corporations, and nearly 100 new individual donors, including major gifts.
 
For more stories of impact, visit our YouTube channel.
 
Goals for Coming Year
1. Expand our Housing First Start-up to make a greater impact towards ending chronic homelessness in Boston by the end of 2018 in alliance with the City of Boston's Plan to End Veteran and Chronic Homelessness: https://www.boston.gov/departments/neighborhood-development/bostons-way-home
 
2. Continue to grow our Housing Start-up Fund to also include Rapid Rehousing: a strategy that works to ensure people experiencing "crisis homelessness" are quickly moved back into housing to prevent them from falling into chronic homelessness.

3. Continue to grow our Housing Start-up Fund to assist newly housed people on their paths to independence by covering one-time exam/certification fees and/or one-time fees to enroll in training or education programs in order to help them achieve housing and financial independence.

4. Continue to support new strategies in Boston including, Front Door Triage, Coordinated Access, and Rapid Rehousing that prevent newly homeless, vulnerable people from becoming chronically homeless.

5. Broaden and deepen our base of individual donors and improve donor engagement to support the goal of ending chronic homelessness in Boston by 2018 and prevent people from becoming chronically homeless going forward.

Needs Statement

1. Housing Start-up Fund. Provide the "but for" funding for at least 175 homeless individuals through Boston's Housing First and Rapid Rehousing Initiatives to move immediately off the streets and out of shelters into dignified housing. $100,000/year.
 
2. Housing First Critical Program Staff Support. Provide support to Boston's Housing First Program staff crucial to this initiative (Housing Search staff and Case Managers who work closely with clients once housed to connect them to intensive stabilization services: health and mental health care providers, recovery support, and other community based services to ensure long-term stability). $75,000/year.

3. Workforce Development/Serving Ourselves Career Center. Prevent people from becoming chronically homeless by helping them gain marketable skills and work experience, and connect them to employment, education and mentoring opportunities as pathways out of homelessness. $130,000/year.

4. Supportive Community Housing. Support a case manager’s salary/benefits, and complete vital capital improvements/energy upgrades for Friends’ three community based housing programs for formerly homeless women and men to remain stably housed and not return to homelessness. $100,000.

5. Development/Fundraising. Broaden our base of individual donors, foundations, corporations, charitable and religious organizations and key volunteers to help reach the goal of ending chronic homelessness in Boston by the end of 2018 and prevent people from falling into chronic homelessness going forward.
 

CEO Statement

For over 30 years, Friends of Boston’s Homeless has worked to raise vital funds and awareness for Boston’s programs and services to address the needs of our community’s homeless women and men. 


From helping meet basic human needs for people at the emergency shelters to critical transitional programs like vocational training and work force development to help people move quickly from homelessness to independence and permanent supportive community housing to ensure people don’t return to the streets and shelters, since 1987 Friends has raised over $20 million to support this vital work and helped thousands of homeless individuals move beyond homelessness to lead dignified independent lives. 

As the non-profit that has supported these programs and services for so many years, Friends was also able work closely with Boston's Homeless Services staff to respond immediately to the critical needs of those affected by the closing of the Long Island Bridge, raising over $500,000 in emergency funds and in-kind donations and providing a safe, supportive haven for seven women from Project SOAR and Safe Harbor at our Valentine Women’s Supportive Housing Program in Roxbury.

The closing of Boston’s Long Island Bridge brought into sharp focus the need to increase efforts to provide effective, dignified solutions for people who’ve struggled for years on the streets and in shelters. Friends is an original member of the Task Force that designed Action Plan and for Fiscal Year 2017, Friends has committed another $520,000 to help achieve the following goals laid out in the plan.

Housing First/Housing Start-up Fund: $175,000 to support a critical Housing First staff position and to cover one-time start-up costs such as security deposits, first/last, initial rental gaps, furniture and other household necessities that aren't available through public funds.

Workforce Development/Serving Ourselves Career Center: $130,000 to prevent people from becoming chronically homeless by helping them gain marketable skills and work experience, and connect them to employment, education and mentoring opportunities as pathways out of homelessness.

Front Door Triage Funds: $50,000 for immediate critical needs and to cover costs for IDs, birth certificates, T-passes, etc. that help people quickly access housing, employment, and benefits to increase income and improve housing stability and recovery outcomes.

Community Supportive Housing: $140,000 to support a case manager’s salary/benefits, and continue to complete vital capital improvements and energy upgrades for Friends’ three community based transitional and permanent housing programs for formerly homeless women and men to remain stably housed and not return to homelessness.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Greater Boston

Organization Categories

  1. Housing, Shelter - Fund Raising & Fund Distribution
  2. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers
  3. Housing, Shelter - Homeless Shelters

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

1. Housing First Start-up Fund

Housing First is ending homelessness by providing immediate housing for people who’ve struggled for years on the streets and in shelters, and once housed, connecting them to the comprehensive support services they need to remain housed and rebuild their lives.

People experiencing long-term homelessness have a myriad of vulnerabilities. They suffer from complex health and mental health disabilities that are essentially impossible to address amidst the chaos of homelessness. Living primarily on the streets, they routinely use emergency and urgent care departments for all their health care needs, as well as for ‘secondary gains’ like warmth.

Housing First is ending this tragedy by placing people in housing first.

· Moves people directly from the streets/shelters into their own homes – immediately improving their quality of life.

· Once housed, individuals are connected with health care providers and case managers, engage in support groups, establish routines, build relationships with friends and family, and move on to more independent living; decreasing their need for services over time.

HOUSING FIRST WORKS

Friends supports four Housing First Programs in The City of Boston: HUES to Home (High Users of Emergency Services), Mission: Home (Homeless Veterans), Linking Treatment to Housing, and Home to Stay (long-term shelter stayers).

In six years, this successful Initiative placed over 700 long-term homeless individuals in dignified permanent housing. Today over 90% are maintaining their housing and have not returned to the streets or shelters.

Housing First also saves our community about $9,300/person per year in health care and public safety [January 2015 Massachusetts Housing & Shelter Alliance study] alone once someone is housed rather than living on the streets or in shelters – providing a dignified and cost-effective solution to homelessness. 

The most significant barrier to immediately housing people is Housing Start-up Expenses, which are not covered by public funds. Though participants are required to have a budget plan, their savings are usually non-existent. Because all are long-term homeless, none have furniture or other household items we all need to make a house a home.

Friends Housing First Start-up Fund immediately removes these very last barriers to ending homelessness for those who’ve spent years living on the streets and in shelters by covering these expenses and it's a great example of the public/private sector joining together to solve a social issue and dramatically improve the lives of some of our community's most vulnerable citizens.

Friends is committed to supporting and expanding Boston's Housing First Initiative as it directly aligns with our mission in two important ways: ends homelessness by supporting solution-oriented programs with proven track records that help individuals transition from the streets and shelters to lead stable independent lives, and fills a crucial gap in city/state funding.

Budget  $500,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing Support
Population Served Homeless Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Friends of Boston’s Homeless, in partnership with Boston's Housing First Initiative, has been tremendously successful at providing a permanent, dignified, and cost-effective solution to homelessness for people who spent years living on the streets and in shelters.

In five years, Boston’s Housing First programs have placed 608 long-term homeless individuals in housing: 403 went into Subsidized Permanent Supportive Housing and 205 only needed one-time funds to obtain housing and then were able to maintain housing without ongoing subsidies. Today, over 90% remain housed and have not returned to the streets or shelters.

Especially with the closing of Boston’s Long Island Bridge last October, displacing hundreds of homeless individuals from the emergency shelter and programs there, it’s essential we continue this work to provide permanent, dignified solutions for those in shelters and on the streets, and get them the support they need to live peaceful, independent lives in our community.

To achieve this, in FY15 (ended 6/30/15) Friends expanded its support of Boston’s Housing First Initiative; exceeding our goal of helping house 100 people and provided the support necessary to immediately help 133 more long-term homeless individuals move beyond homelessness into homes of their own (many of whom were on Long Island) – 63 since the bridge closed.

In the coming year, with the support of our private-sector partners, we hope to extend this effort even further, helping house 200+ people/year with the goal of ending chronic homelessness by 2018 (see City of Boston’s Action Plan below).

Program Long-Term Success 

The goal of Boston's Housing First Initiative is to end chronic homelessness by 2018.

The closing of Boston’s Long Island Bridge in October 2014 brought into focus the fragility of Boston’s shelter system, compelling the City to reevaluate the system, analyze ways improve it, and become more deliberate in efforts to move long-term homeless individuals into permanent housing. In December 2015, the City formed the Mayor’s Task Force on Individual Homelessness comprised of service providers, business leaders, clergy, philanthropy, and local, state and federal government officials (including Friends’ founder and president John Rosenthal). They also engaged experts from other cities like Houston that have taken bold steps to end homelessness and have done so with tremendous success. [Houston, which had one of the highest homeless populations in America, reduced chronic homelessness by 57% in two years, assembled $3 million in public funds for Housing First and is on track to raise $10 million in private funds by 2020.]

In June 2015, the Task Force released its Action Plan to End Veterans and Chronic Homelessness by 2018 (plan link here: http://ow.ly/QkPyp).

We're very hopeful about this plan, especially its focus on Housing First for people who've struggled for years in shelters and on the streets. ["The Task Force recommends four key systemic changes to align our response system with a Housing First model."].

To accomplish this, the budget plan includes “the need for approximately $350,000 in private, flexible resources for a “whatever it takes” stabilization fund that covers one-time costs such as security, furniture or other necessities that can’t be paid for through public funds”. This is exactly what Friends Housing First Start-up Fund supports.

With 600 chronically homeless people in Boston ending chronic homelessness in our community is achievable and we plan to be a part of the solution over the next three years: eliminating street homelessness in Boston and dramatically reducing the number of people relying on emergency shelter for long-term housing by providing Housing Start-up support for 200+ people/year.

We believe initiatives like this affirm that putting together sound partnerships that combine nonprofits, the public sector and the private community do indeed work. As the nonprofit that supports the City of Boston’s Housing First Initiative, Friends is well positioned to play a much bigger role in ending chronic homelessness in our community.

Program Success Monitored By 

Housing First success is measured according to outcomes achieved, including number of people engaged for housing; number of people successfully housed; case management follow-up and housing retention over time; and successful connection to mainstream resources (SSI, Medicare, Veterans Benefits) and long-term supports in each person’s community. Clients and staff interviews provide feedback, programmatic concerns, recommendations and suggestions for program improvements. In addition, HUES To Home (one of the three Housing First programs Friends supports) partners with Mass Housing and Shelter Alliance’s ‘Home and Healthy For Good’ program for research purposes: the latter is incorporating data from HUES To Home in their well-known statewide research on the outcomes of Housing First interventions.

Examples of Program Success 

 Friends, in partnership with Boston's Housing First Programs, have been tremendously successful at providing a permanent, dignified solution to homelessness for people who spent years on the streets and in shelters. In five years, these programs have placed 608 long-term homeless individuals in housing. And the best news is, over 90% are maintaining their housing and have not returned to the streets or shelters.

Housing First also continues to demonstrate that providing housing to chronically homeless individuals first is a cost-effective solution to homelessness. For example, the Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance shows Boston’s HUES (high utilizers of emergency services) to Home Housing First Program alone has provided a $2.87 million savings in MassHealth costs and it is expected this savings will continue to increase long term.

Arley is just one beautiful example of the power of a home to transform lives. Homeless for nearly eight years, Arley was housed on 10/29/14 (three weeks after Long Island Bridge closed). Today, he's reunited with his children and studying at UMASS. Once he completes his studies, he'll help others gain their independence too.


2. Serving Ourselves Workforce Development Program

Serving Ourselves (SOS) Vocational Training & Workforce Development Program addresses the barriers to success homeless individuals face by combining paid vocational training and work experience with comprehensive social services including case management, education, health and mental health, and substance abuse counseling.

SOS teaches job-readiness skills in marketable trades that pay a living wage. While in the program, participants earn minimum wage, are eligible for health care benefits, and participate weekly in workshops held in the Serving Ourselves Career Center. SOS enables homeless men and women to gain stability and build the skills necessary to become self-sufficient and helps builds self-esteem and confidence, which are critical if an individual is to successfully make a permanent move to independence.

Serving Ourselves has served over 450 adults over the past 5 years. 266 (70%) graduated to gainful employment in the community,

Budget  $600,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Homeless Adults
Program Short-Term Success  Serving Ourselves will serve 75 individuals in 2013: 80% of participants will successfully complete the program and be placed in gainful employment and permanent housing in the community; 100% will increase their job readiness and income, and receive classroom training in literacy, math, computer, and job related skills while in the program.
Program Long-Term Success  The goal of the Serving Ourselves Program is to provide homeless individuals with work experience and job skills in marketable trades to obtain gainful employment, as well as help build self esteem and confidence necessary to make a permanent move beyond homelessness to independence in the community.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

Since its inception in 1995, Serving Ourselves continues to exceed its program goals and graduates over 80% of participants annually. 100% increase their job readiness and income, and receive classroom training in literacy, math, computer, and job related skills while in the program. Nearly 90% are placed in permanent competitive employment. Perhaps most significant, over 80% obtain permanent housing and are no longer homeless. The Department of Housing and Urban Development taut Serving Ourselves as one of the best programs in the country for providing marketable job skills and training to the homeless.


3. Serving Ourselves Career Center

Lack of education and job skills are often significant barriers to a homeless individuals ability to find and maintain gainful employment and thus maintain housing. The Serving Ourselves Career Center works with all clients who are enrolled in the Vocational Training/Workforce Development programs as well as with newly housed through Housing First. The Career Centers provides education, job readiness, and independent living skills to homeless adults and assists them in defining and reaching their educational and employment goals. Classes and tutorials are provided in reading, writing, math, GED, pre-GED, and Computer Literacy.

The Career Center also provides student assessment, advising, and application assistance for financial aid and college entrance, and referrals to community adult education programs and colleges in the Boston area. In conjunction with the Workforce Development Programs, the Career Center also provides job readiness to participants. Students participate in an intensive program to better prepare them for employment in the community. Job Readiness classes include; resume writing, interviewing skills, job search techniques, and problem solving/conflict resolution in the workplace. Occupational counseling and a supervised job search are also part of the program. About 85% of students participating in GED classes obtain their GED and about 72% of job readiness clients go on to gainful employment.
 
Friends of Boston’s Homeless was recently awarded a $50,000 grant from City of Boston Neighborhood Jobs Trust Grant to expand this program to serve more individuals.

 

Budget  $130,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Homeless Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

The Career Center measures yearly success in the following manner:

To provide career development and employment assistance to homeless clients. The Career Center serves 250-300 homeless adults each year. Attendance records and monthly statistics measure successful completion.

 To refer clients to continuing education programs within the community. After extensive in-house classes, the Career Center refers clients each year to complete the GED exam and obtain their high school equivalency. Success is measured by adequate test scores and verified GED certificate. [The Career Center also assists with students with applications and financial assistance applications to community colleges, colleges, and universities in the Boston area.]
 
To prepare clients for job seeking and employment. The Career Center works with Work Rehabilitation components within the shelter system to prepare participants for community employment. Success is measured by effectively transmitting resumes and cover letters to potential employers and completion of on-line and traditional applications. Job status is measured upon graduation from the Work Rehabilitation components.
Program Long-Term Success  The Career Center was designed to assist program participants in defining and reaching their career goals. With an emphasis on individualized education and “meeting the learner where they are”, the Career Center measures success by determining if the learner has followed the path mutually decided upon at the onset of matriculation; measuring attendance, projects completed, and pre- and post-tests, if applicable. 
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

The Career Center works in conjunction with the Serving Ourselves Vocational Training Program, the Work Experience Programs, and individuals newly housed through Housing First to provide pre-vocational education to participants. Clients in these programs participate in education and employment readiness sessions as part of their paid workweek. Approximately 72% of job readiness clients go on to community employment (of those, 84 % retain their jobs for one year or more).

About 75% of students participating in GED/pre-GED prep classes obtain their GED. Upon completion of the GED many of these learners enroll in colleges and universities in the Boston area (UMASS, Bunker Hill, Quincy College and Roxbury Community College). Some of the educational opportunities graduates have pursued include, bachelor’s degrees in computer science, culinary arts, psychology and social work, and associates degrees in business administration, computer science, nursing and counseling.

4. Valentine Women's Supportive Housing Program

Valentine Street fills a gap in vital services in Boston by providing supportive housing to homeless women whose children are temporarily in the foster care system or residing with friends and family.

Located in a beautiful Mansard Victorian in Roxbury, Valentine provides 7 units of safe, supportive, affordable housing where women gain the skills, education, income, and stability needed to become self-sufficient, reunite with their children and lead independent lives.

A Case Manager works with residents to address the challenges facing formerly homeless women including domestic violence, addiction, mental health disabilities, insufficient education and lack of job skills and work experience.

Women also receive family reunification assistance and help transitioning into appropriate housing with their children. Visitation with children and family is an integral part of the program.

In May 2016, Friends was awarded a $40,000 grant from Franklin Square House Foundation to complete vital capital improvements and energy upgrades to make this beautiful program an even more welcoming (and warmer) place for women to reunite with children, rebuild their lives, and move on to homes of their own and bright futures in our community

Budget  $75,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Transitional Housing
Population Served Adults Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
A Case Manager helps residents develop an individual service plan based on specific needs and goals, including a plan for long-term housing with their children. Because the goal of the program is to help women gain economic independence, participation in job training, work experience, adult education and literacy, and employment services programs is an integral part of the program. To achieve this, residents participate in the Homeless Services transitional programs and/or community-based training and education programs to help upgrade job skills, gain work experience, obtain or maintain employment, and/or further their education.
 

The on-going development of independent living skills is also an important goal of this program. The Case Manager assists in areas such as budgeting, meal planning, smart shopping, bill paying, completing housing/job/education applications, time management, goal setting, problem solving, and conflict resolution.

Program Long-Term Success  The goal of Nine Valentine Street Women's Housing Program is to provide the women with a safe, supportive, affordable living environment where they can gain the additional skills, education, income, and stability needed to become self-sufficient, reunite with their children, and lead independent lives.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
Since its inception in 2000, over 90% of the women participating in the program have successfully graduated into independent housing and self-sufficiency and reunited with their children and families.
 
You can watch Ursel's story here:

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Mariann Bucina Roca
CEO Term Start Apr 1997
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Mariann Bucina Roca has over 20 years’ fundraising and development experience with non-profit/non-governmental organizations in the U.S. and Latin America in the areas of human rights, neotropical conservation and sustainable development. She has worked for major international organizations including The Nature Conservancy and Audubon Society to develop and implement international fundraising strategies, and has served on the Board of Directors of several international non-profit organizations. She has degree in Bacteriology from University of Wisconsin, Madison. Ms. Bucina has worked with Friends of Boston's Homeless since 1997, and was promoted from Associate Director-Development to Executive Director in September 1999.  She resides in Jamaica Plain, MA with her husband.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Kathryn Matthews Laing May 1993 Nov 1997

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Jamie O'Neal O'Loughlin Event Manager/Development Assistant

Jamie O’Neal O’Loughlin has been with Friends of Boston’s Homeless since 2004. She serves as the Event Planner and also works in Development. Prior to joining Friends, Ms. O’Loughlin spent her career in banking in a variety of roles including Private Banking for Silicon Valley Bank, Vice President of Retail Banking for Sovereign Bank, Citizens Bank and Sterling Bank and was a Mortgage Officer for Stoneham Bank. Ms. O’Loughlin attended Northeastern University. She resides in Medfield, MA with her husband, daughter and golden retriever.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Women in Development 1997
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 1996
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 300
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Commercial General Liability
Computer Equipment and Software
Directors and Officers Policy
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Medical Health Insurance
Special Event Liability
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Workplace Violence

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. John E. Rosenthal
Board Chair Company Affiliation President, Meredith Management Corporation
Board Chair Term Jan 2013 - Jan 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Carole Collins Program Development Officer, MassHousing Voting
Mr. Manny Costa President & CEO, Costa Produce Voting
Mr. Ian Crawford Partner, Todd & Weld LLP (Retired) Voting
Mr. David Crowley Jr., Esq. Partner, Cummings & Crowley Voting
Mr. Bob Guillemin aka Sidewalk Sam (1939-2015) Artist & Community Activist Voting
Mr. Robert Haynes President, Haynes & Associates Voting
Ms. Fern Kaplan President, The Kaplan Company Voting
Ms. Marie Keutmann Vice President, MMA Financial (Retired) Voting
Ms. Tamar Kooy Investment Advisor, Weiss Asset Management Voting
Mr. James Kurland President, The Baker Boys Voting
Mr. Matthew Lindley Director, Brand Engagement and Innovation, SapientNitro Voting
Ms/ Jennifer Malboeuf Crampton Wells Fargo Voting
Mr. Paul Martini Senior Vice President, Principal & Director of Business Development, Commodore Builders Voting
Mr. Gary Matsko Esq. Attorney at Law, Davis, Malm & D’Agostine Voting
Mr. Austin O'Connor President, The Briar Group Voting
Mr. Michael Pascavage AIA, LEED AP Principal, Design & Development Solutions, LLC Voting
Ms. Katherine Provost Program Coordinator, Wayland Housing Authority Voting
Mr. John Rosenthal President, Meredith Management Corporation Voting
Mr. Josh Rosenthal Managing Principal, Hanover Strategies Voting
Ms. Martha Shults Managing Director/Portfolio Services, Tax Credit Asset Management Voting
Mr. Marc Truant President, Marc Truant & Associates Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 80%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 60%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Executive

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $591,000.00
Projected Expense $266,000.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,153,198 $781,145 $833,054
Total Expenses $905,850 $775,625 $835,056

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $660,693 $389,803 $306,537
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $10,377 $9,378 $13,330
Investment Income, Net of Losses $96 $98 $104
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $159,457 $154,587 $217,485
Revenue In-Kind $322,575 $227,279 $295,598
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $767,012 $635,908 $692,201
Administration Expense $78,550 $80,934 $80,601
Fundraising Expense $60,288 $58,783 $62,254
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.27 1.01 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 82% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 11% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $493,494 $254,531 $251,444
Current Assets $479,507 $232,551 $239,902
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $24,835 $33,220 $35,653
Total Net Assets $468,659 $221,311 $215,791

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 8.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 19.31 7.00 6.73

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

100% of funds raised through program/project specific grants are allocated directly for the program/project: Friends takes no percentage for administrative/overhead. Funds for on-going operational/administrative costs are raised through special events, annual giving campaigns, holiday card sales, and from foundations that provide Friends general operating support. These funds cover staff salaries, fundraising/development expenses, and Friends other office/administrative expenses.

Friends also raises a significant amount in in-kind donations of essential emergency goods and services, including furniture/household items for Housing First programs, clothing and toiletries, as well as goods, equipment, and services for the transitional programs. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012 the value of these in-kind donations was $673,775. The value of in-kind donations is determined using resources like www.independentsector.org and Goodwill and Salvation Army’s donation valuation guides.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, per the audited financials: "Friends of Boston's Homeless, Inc. ... is a non-profit corporation organized to provide financial support and volunteer assistance to the City of Boston's Homeless Services, a public health program of the Boston Public Health Commission to support the operations of programs that provide assistance to homeless and formerly homeless persons and their families, and to develop and manage affordable housing for homeless and formerly homeless persons and their families." As such, the Special Event expense amount, designed to meet the programmatic objectives of Friends of Boston's Homeless, Inc., has been included (for each fiscal year above) in the Program functional expense category. Please refer to the audits for further detail.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

1. End chronic homelessness by 2018 through Housing First strategies, and subsequently supporting the services that stabilize people once housed so they don't return to homelessness.
 
2. House the 80 homeless individuals (identified through Mass Health data reports and by referrals from partnering hospitals) who use Boston hospital emergency rooms as a regular shelter option and health care provider through the High Utilizers of Emergency Services (HUES) Housing First Program by 2017.
 
3. Support programs to reduce reliance on shelter and prevent new people from becoming chronically homeless including Front Door Triage, Coordinated Access, Workforce Development and Rapid Rehousing. Data show the majority of homeless individuals are not chronically homeless but instead experience “crisis homelessness”. Many of those individuals will resolve their own homeless episode with little to no intervention, but others will need some assistance in order to regain stability. Rapid rehousing is an important tool to move people back to housing and prevent non-chronically homeless individuals from falling into chronic homelessness.
 
4. Build a broad base of public, private, and non-profit partners to support this work in the City of Boston.
 
5. Collaborate with other private organizations, city and state agencies, shelters, and foundations to support strategies to address homeless trends including a focus on the young adult homeless population (18-24). 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--