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Organization DBA The Open Door
Former Names The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry (1986)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.

Mission Statement

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $3,158,070.00
Projected Expense $3,158,070.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Meals
  • Food Pantry
  • Mobile Market
  • The Good Food Project
  • Thrift Store (Second Glance)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.


Background Statement

Away from the beaches and historic landmarks of Essex County, including the nation’s oldest working seaport, are the neighborhoods that show some of the highest concentrations of hunger in the commonwealth. In 36 years, The Open Door has gone from feeding a few to feeding a few thousand households.

 

The Open Door began in 1978 as an emergency food resource for families and individuals on Cape Ann. Originally named The Cape Ann Food Bank, it began as a collaboration between the First Congregational Church of Rockport, Cape Ann Interfaith Commission, Action Inc., and Cape Ann Project for Elderly and Handicapped with Reverend Forrest Clark as the coordinator.

 

In 1983, The Open Door, A Place of Hospitality, Inc. was started by Wellspring House, a community of faith, after it became evident that there was an unmet need for prepared meals and companionship in our community. The meals were organized in cooperation with the faith community, service agencies and community volunteers.

 

The two organizations merged in 1986 to become The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry, Inc.

 

The Open Door began with traditional hunger-relief programs including the Food Pantry and Community Meals, and joined the Greater Boston Food Bank in 1985. Since then, we have thoughtfully expanded to meet identified needs with classic programs including the USDA funded Summer Meals for children (since in 2002), Holiday Meals (since 2002), Collaborative Meals (since 1985), SNAP (food stamp assistance since 2003) and Food Rescue (since 2004).

 

In 2005, we began our innovative nutrition-based programming including Mobile Market (expanded yearly since 2005), The Good Food Project (since 2010) and The Garden Project (since 2011)  Cooking Matters classes (since 2011) and added PowerSnack, an afterschool supper program (2012) .

We also offer extensive service learning and volunteer opportunities. In 2013 we hosted a full-time FoodCorps Massachusetts service member, 2 Firstjobs placements and 4 internships. Our volunteer service last year totaled 22,634 hours of time, talent and engagement.
 

In 1998, Second Glance, our thrift store, moved to its storefront location and continues to generate revenue to support our programs.

 

In 2010, The Open Door strengthened its long-term sustainability by purchasing its main facility at 28 Emerson Avenue in Gloucester.

Today we provide hunger-relief programs and more than 900,000 pounds of food and nutrition education to 5,784 people in need living in Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester, Essex and Ipswich.

Impact Statement

Accomplished:
1. Purchased building at 28 Emerson Avenue.
2. Placed a Mobile Market and Summer Meal site in each of Gloucester's four under-served Census tracts. (Two of which are considered Food Deserts) Two Mobile Market sites are placed at schools where 50% or more of the children are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.
3. Partnered with Northeast Health Systems to pilot Prescription Food Bags and Box Out Diabetes
4. Partnered with North Shore Health Project to pilot Good Food Box program to provide nutrition-specific food to immune compromised clients.
5. Built 12 raised bed gardens to grow food for clients and offered a series of six week cooking classes for low-income people.
Goals: 
1. Deepen nutritional impact of all programs.
  • Work with partners to place Supper and Breakfast programs in eligible schools and after-school locations.
  • Build programs that connect people to good food at the intersection of health and nutrition with Addison Gilbert Hospital and healthcare partners.
  • Offer a Fruits and Vegetable Campaign through the Food Pantry to provide a broad range of nutrient-dense foods.
2. Develop board to meet organizational growth and needs.
3. Strengthen distribution system. 
 

Needs Statement

1. Retire commercial mortgage $250,000
2. Raise funds for capital improvements including teaching kitchen, increased warehouse space, loading dock, and improved dry storage and freezer/refrigerator space. $1,000,000
3. Expand Mobile Market distribution model through the North Shore Hunger Network. 

CEO Statement

The Open Door combines the strength of its traditional hunger-relief programs, with new solutions, such as the Mobile Market, a free farmers’ market, to begin to address nutrition as a public health issue.

The Open Door uses a prevention-based approach, grounded in nutrition education, public health, and strong community development, to provide low-income households with consistent, adequate access to nutrition in a socially acceptable environment and to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community.

Board Chair Statement

My husband and I moved to Gloucester 17 years ago. When we contemplated living here, we rented a cottage in East Gloucester for a month, even though we were living less than 20 miles away.

For two weeks we were on vacation and for two weeks we commuted to our jobs to determine what kind of impact the additional miles would have. During that time, I drove around discovering neighborhoods, coves, and shops and found my way to The Open Door.

I walked in and saw and felt a sense of community, a place that was bustling with activity. The thrift shop, that would later become the Second Glance we know today,  was then literally a closet stuffed with clothes and open for business only when a volunteer was able to staff it. I went home, came back the next day with some clothes, starting to volunteer and shortly after was asked to serve on the board and have been involved ever since.

We have been blessed with a continuous group of wonderful, committed board members who have dedicated themselves to supporting the growth and expansion of our programs and services in a conservative and fiscally responsible manner and are or have been active volunteers as well.

We have exercised a strong commitment to provide nutritious and wholesome food  that has resulted in the expansion of programs like the Summer Lunch and our Mobile Market – bringing a free farmer’s market experience to 8 different locations on Cape Ann, one year around.

Knowing that the economy was souring and the demand for food would most likely increase, thanks to community support, we were able to budget for this possibility and chose to give out more food more frequently at a time when many hunger relief organizations had little choice but to cut back.

This is an organization that cares – not just for its guests and their families, but its volunteers and contributors and anyone who shows up at 28 Emerson Ave, regardless of the reason.  It truly is an Open Door.

And I cannot go any further without a shout out to the staff. They are extraordinary - one and all. Each person is totally committed to their job and the organization. They learn from each other, support each other, collaborate on projects and pitch in wherever there is a need. They do so constantly and with great heart and humor.

I  have met so many wonderful people volunteering – young and old, rich and not so rich, teachers and students, those who come to do community service and others who come, at least initially, because they need to do community service.

I was going to tell a joke – it seemed like a good speaker thing to do, so I searched for jokes about hunger – but guess what – I couldn’t really find one. Hunger is not funny.

However I did find a quote that resonated with me:   Individually, we are one drop. Together, we are an ocean. 

I hope this rings as true to you as it does for me because I see evidence of this in the sea of people here today. Your contributions and interest in The Open Door are truly appreciated. Thank you for acknowledging that for anyone to go hungry is unacceptable and that together we can work successfully to change that outcome.

Remarks from Autumn Breakfast 2011

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
NORTHEAST REGION, MA

We are a Massachusetts organization serving residents of Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester, Essex, and Ipswich in Boston's North Shore.
 
We also support our sister organizations of the North Shore Hunger Network and make food deliveries to Acord Food Pantry, People to People in Danvers, and Ipswich Food Pantry along with other food pantries in the network.

Organization Categories

  1. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food Banks, Food Pantries
  2. Human Services - Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
  3. Public & Societal Benefit -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Community Meals

Community Meals are served Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 5 to 6 p.m. to guests needing food and companionship. Each meal includes a salad bar with fresh produce and a protein offering to support those who are managing their weight, high blood pressure, diabetes or other health-related concerns. A local company provides a handicap accessible van service for guests who are unable to drive to our site.

 

The goal is to connect people to good food and nutrition, and to reduce the barriers to access.

 

Our strategies include offering nutritious meals including a protein, grain, vegetable, fruit; offering a fresh salad bad for those managing their health including diabetes, heart disease, cholesterol and weight; continue nutrition analysis and recommendations to provide healthier meals; provide a van service 7 days a week to all meals sites and reduce the transportation barrier.

 
 
Budget  $110,305.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Hunger Action
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short-term, Community Meal guests have access to hot, nutritious, well-balanced meals to ensure that they do not go hungry, and varied salad bar so they are able to manage their dietary health conditions on a daily basis. Providing a bus 7 days a week means that anyone who needs a meal can come and get access to nutrition by reducing the transportation barrier.

 

Last year we served 16,239 hot meals to guests needing food and companionship.

Program Long-Term Success 

For many coming to The Open Door Community Meals program is the difference between eating and not eating. Families, seniors, and those struggling with life’s setbacks are all looking for nutritionally balanced and hot meals along with companionship in a welcoming environment.

Providing nutritionally balanced meals and a healthy salad bar reduces the impact of poor nutrition that leaves many in need vulnerable to devastating health consequences such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol‑-all medical conditions that many of our clients struggle with on a daily basis.

Free transportation 7 nights a week allows our clients to break away from the “feast or famine mentality”, and encourages them to eat healthfully every night of the week rather than carbohydrate-load for fear of where their next meal is coming from.

In the long-term, the Community Meals program will reduce hunger in our community and ensure our clients will eat healthy, be able to better manage their health conditions, and have healthier outcomes. In addition, modeling healthy meals with many varied fresh fruit and vegetable options, and controlling portion size, means that guests know what it means to eat a healthy balanced meal.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Open Door continues to use both quantitative and qualitative methods to measure results.

 

Our Community Meals program is confidential and there is no registration for this program. We use a standard food pantry formula to calculate the number of guests served i.e. available seating x nights served = number of individuals. In addition, we track the number of meals served.

 

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends: We make base-line surveys and continue to track consumption, client satisfaction and other qualitative measures. Questions address the types and amount of food consumed as well as nutrition and lifestyle questions. Community Meals surveys have notified us of clients’ health concerns (which led to the planning and installation of the salad bar) and transportation issues (which led to the planning and implementation of a bus service).

Examples of Program Success 

For client Barbara, a grandmother, Community Meals isn’t just a place for good food when you need it, but like that famous Beantown TV sitcom where everyone knows your name, there’s always someone you know, a welcoming place for good food, good company where, says Barbara, “you see a smile on someone’s face that makes you feel good.”

A friend brought Barbara to her first Community Meals three or four years ago, after she moved back to Gloucester after an 18 month hiatus. On disability, Barbara acknowledged that she started coming to Community Meals when her daughter moved away, and “it saved on my food budget and helped with my isolation, and my health.” A pre-diabetic, Barbara said “it’s a more healthy and balanced meal than what I can do for myself.” Since coming to Community Meals, she’s been more able to control her health issues.

Before Community Meals, Barbara knew that “eating out of a box wasn’t healthy” and that she “had a false impression of what real food is.” Today, thanks to Community Meals, she is now more aware of the kind of food she eats, and has a sound interest in nutrition. Along with volunteering and helping to cook an occasional meal, she also joined The Open Door Nutrition Advisory Council that works to engage the community and advocate for healthy nutrition throughout programs of The Open Door.

“Helping gives me a purpose,” says Barbara. “When you’re on disability, it makes me have more self-esteem. I’m not an outcast because I’m different. I’m more confident.” It also helps her give back. “I don’t have a lot of money,” she says but I can give my time.”


Food Pantry

Food Pantry is open Monday through Friday with a variety of daytime and evening hours to accommodate those who work during the day. The pantry provides clients with a choice of free canned goods, fresh produce, meats, bread, dairy products, and eggs. Clients may come for food once every seven days.

Last year the Food Pantry helped improve the lives of 3,762 people representing 1,636 households with 529,094lbs of good food during 12,237 visits.
 

The goal is to connect families and individuals in need to good nutrition.

 

Our strategies include: launching a Fruits and Vegetable Campaign; collaborating with local growers, producers, markets and community organizations; connecting clients to federal nutrition programs including SNAP, Summer Lunch, and free and reduced-price school lunch; providing nutrition education to help make lasting change.

 
 
Budget  $1,191,453.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Hunger Action
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short-term, good healthy food will get onto the plates of those in need. Having access to meat, eggs, dairy, fresh fruits and vegetables will not only relieve hunger but make sure that our families are eating healthy and getting at least 50% of the nutritional daily recommended requirements of fresh fruits and vegetables.

 

Families will be connected to federally funded programs SNAP, Summer Lunch and free-and reduced-price school lunch.

 

Nutrition education programs will reinforce healthy food choices, provide taste-tests and recipes for good healthy food, cooking classes will show clients how to plan, shop and cook healthy meals on a budget along with food from the Food Pantry.

In 2011 the Food Pantry provided 444,121 pounds of free canned goods, fresh produce, meats, bread, dairy products and eggs to 1,487 households during 10,457 visits representing 3,593 people.
Program Long-Term Success 

Hunger-relief is not about making sure that people in need have any type of food; it’s about making sure they get the right kind of nutrient-dense food in a socially acceptable way. Nutrition education engages the whole family in healthy food choices to bring about change. Families, children, seniors and individuals will know what it means to eat healthy and have a healthy life-style.

Providing fresh produce and groceries for free along with nutrition education reduces the impact of poor nutrition that leaves many in need vulnerable to devastating health consequences such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.Our surveys revealed that 62% of clients were obese or overweight, and many struggled with these chronic health issues that have been shown to be managed by a healthy diet.

In the long-term, the Food Pantry will reduce hunger in our community and ensure our clients will eat healthy and healthier have outcomes.
Program Success Monitored By 

The Open Door continues to use both quantitative and qualitative methods to measure results. We evaluate the success of the program by the number of people served, the numbers of pounds of food distributed and the number of deliveries per year. All food is accounted for using a formalized system of weights and measurement. 

Quantitatively we measure households, people and pounds served: Data is collected and entered into a custom database on an Access platform and tracked. We also identify participation patterns and demographic details.

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends: We make base-line surveys and continue to track consumption, client satisfaction and other qualitative measures. Questions address the types and amount of food consumed as well as nutrition and lifestyle questions. Cooking Class participants are surveyed at the end of each class. We also gather data with a retrospective survey. Every two years we conduct focus groups to measure changes in need and the levels of nutrition-knowledge.
Examples of Program Success 

Our Fruits and Vegetable Campaign will ensure that the 85% of clients that were only getting 2 or less servings of produce a day will have access to more healthy produce.

“No one feels good coming to use the Food Pantry,” said client Sue, but seeing all the fresh fruits and vegetables meant that it “felt like walking into a grocery store.” Being able to make healthy food choices allowed her family some consistency and normalcy. “Our health is still important to us despite struggling financially.”

After Cooking Classes, 78% of clients now think about healthy food choices, 100% use the “Nutrition Label”, 100% eat more whole grains, 100% improved their cooking skills, 80% eat more fruits and 60% eat more vegetables.

 Single parent Rob took cooking classes with his children and now plans more meals as a family. “We ate a few times a week together, but now it’s more like five times a week.” For Rob the most important impact is that the “kids are learning to like more healthy options.”


Mobile Market

Mobile Market is a free farmers' market that connects low-income people to fresh fruits and vegetables in a socially and culturally acceptable setting where they live and learn. It reduces the impact of poor nutrition that leaves many low-income households vulnerable to devastating health consequences such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease. It supports the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans to “ensure that all Americans have access to nutritious foods and opportunities for physical activity.”

 

The Open Door operates 10 Mobile Market sites: 4 public housing neighborhood sites run weekly, June through mid-November, 2 school-based sites run with the school calendar, 3 sites operate monthly at local senior centers, and a hotel for 100 homeless families and their children.  Participants choose an average of 20 pounds of fresh produce with each visit.

 

The goal is to connect low-income people to good food. Our strategies reduce the barriers to food access which include transportation, cost of food, nutrition education and social stigma.

Budget  $505,982.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Hunger Action
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short-term, families, children, elders and seniors engaged in Mobile Market will have access to fresh, nutrient-dense produce that will provide at least 50% of the USDA’s nutritional daily recommended requirements of fresh fruits and vegetables.

 

More than 1,46 households will be exposed to taste-tests, recipe exchanges and nutrition information during the 197 Mobile Market days offered during the year. In surveys, the majority of Mobile Market participants (53%) reported that their family eats together at the dinner table three to four times a week and 100% reported eating together at least once a week.

 

Last year we served 205,280 pounds of fresh produce and groceries to 1,146 households representing 2,794 people.

Program Long-Term Success 

Putting fresh produce onto the tables of those in need, providing hunger relief, improving nutrition knowledge and health of families, children, elders, and individuals are our primary goals and expected outcomes.

 

 

Hunger-relief is not about making sure that people in need have any type of food; it’s about making sure they get the right kind of nutrient-dense food in a socially acceptable way. Nutrition education engages the whole family in healthy food choices to bring about long term systemic change. Families, children, seniors and individuals will know what it means to eat healthy and have a healthy life-style.

 

Providing fresh produce and groceries for free along with nutrition education not only reduces hunger, but reduces the impact of poor nutrition that leaves many in need vulnerable to devastating health consequences such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

 Mobile Market connects low-income people to good food and reduces the barriers to food access that include transportation, cost of food,  nutrition education, and social stigma.

The unexpected long-term change that occurs at each site is the overwhelming strengthening of community where neighbors help neighbors and participants volunteer to help make Mobile Market a success. This community volunteerism reinforces pride of ownership, and adds to the sense of social acceptability for Mobile Market, a community-based hunger-relief program.

 
Program Success Monitored By 

The Open Door continues to use both quantitative and qualitative methods to measure results. We evaluate the success of the program by the number of people served, the numbers of pounds of food distributed and the number of deliveries per year. All food is accounted for using a formalized system of weights and measurement. 

 

Quantitatively we measure households, people and pounds served: Data is collected and entered into a custom database on an Access platform and tracked. We also identify participation patterns and demographic details.

 

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends: We make base-line surveys and continue to track consumption, client satisfaction and other qualitative measures. Questions address the types and amount of food consumed as well as nutrition and lifestyle questions. We also gather data with a retrospective survey. Every two years we conduct focus groups to measure changes in need and the levels of nutrition-knowledge.

Examples of Program Success 

“Mobile Market helps me feed my family” says Kathie who lives at Willowood’s public housing neighborhood and comes every week to choose fresh food to feed her family. Her husband works in a warehouse while Jackie attends North Shore Community College to get a better education while raising their seven children. Despite being on food stamps, it is not enough.”Seven is a big family,” she says, and Mobile Market “helps a lot.”

 

 

Veterans' Elementary has struggled with how to engage parents of whom almost 70% are low-income with many non-English speakers. “Food is a huge priority for many of our families," says Principal Parker, who has been amazed that Mobile Market has become a platform for family-engagement that has strengthened their school while providing valuable nutrition. "Mobile Market pulls parents in, they become more involved, and they've become a part of our school," says Parker. Mobile Market “means that we're not only helping our children's health, but also their education."


The Good Food Project

The Good Food Project launched with key partners to reach our most vulnerable populations with targeted nutrition boxes or bags to help manage health conditions and diet.

 

The Open Door has intentionally moved away from providing an emergency response to hunger and has implemented a prevention based approach grounded in nutrition education, public health, and strong community development to tackle the food security issues in our community.

The goal is to connect people to good food.
 
Our strategies include:

Good Food Boxes filled with groceries and fresh nutrient-dense produce along with healthy recipes are delivered to low and limited income house-bound clients that have AIDS, HIV, Hep C, and cancer. 

Nutrient-specific Prescription Food Bags are distributed to patients of Northeast Health Systems that have been assessed as being at-risk of hunger or food insecure during Emergency Room screenings along with a “prescription” to visit The Open Door’s Food Pantry.
Budget  $13,060.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Hunger Action
Population Served At-Risk Populations People/Families of People with HIV/AIDS People/Families of People with Cancer
Program Short-Term Success 

In the short-term, good healthy food will get onto the plates of those in need that are undergoing chronic health conditions and are food insecure.

All Good Food Box clients reported that they were eating a healthier diet thanks to the boxes they received. While there is no qualitative data from the Prescription Food Bags, it is clear that The Open Door connected people in need to good food, engaged others (health care professionals) in the work of food security and advocated on behalf of those in need thereby fulfilling our organization’s mission.

In addition, by working with the hospital to include a food security question in their emergency room assessments, and giving information about our hunger-relief programs, more people now know about our services that alleviate the impact of hunger in our community.

 
Program Long-Term Success 

Low-income and medically compromised clients and their families will have good healthy food in their homes and on their tables allowing them to live longer and healthier lives. In addition, families will have less financial stress on their household budgets and know that food is coming into their home. For many receiving Good Food Boxes they no longer have to choose between paying for their medical care (not an option when you are already chronically ill), their housing or their heat. Families with healthy food and less stress-both financial and mental- will be able to take better care of their loved ones while they are sick.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Open Door continues to use both quantitative and qualitative methods to measure results. We evaluate the success of the program by the number of people served, the numbers of pounds of food distributed and the number of deliveries per year. All food is accounted for using a formalized system of weights and measurement.

 

Quantitatively we measure households, people and pounds served: Data is collected and entered into a custom database on an Access platform and tracked. Good Food Boxes and bags are weighed before distribution, and data collected. We also identify participation patterns and demographic details.To protect the HIPAA rights of all the clients, no names are tracked, but we do have access to general demographic information and qualitative questionnaires.Prescription Food Bags is a confidential program that cannot track patient information, however the number of bags distributed is calculated.

 

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends: We make base-line surveys and continue to track consumption, client satisfaction and other qualitative measures. Questions address the types and amount of food consumed as well as nutrition and lifestyle questions. We also gather data with a retrospective survey. Every two years we conduct focus groups to measure changes in need and the levels of nutrition-knowledge. Good Food Box clients participate in surveys that have allowed us to modify the Good Food Box program so that we could better serve our clients.

Examples of Program Success 

100% of clients agreed that the Good Food Box helped them feed themselves and their families, with 83% agreeing that it was the “right amount of food.” All said their nutrition had improved since receiving the box with one client adding “the food I receive from your agency has saved me. I make $600/month to pay all my bills, rent, electric, gas and car. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.” Many reported they have $25-$35 a week to spend on groceries, and that they “live off” the box after paying bills.

In 2011 The Good Food Box served 14 house-bound low-income AIDS/HIV/Hep C clients. In total 459 boxes with 16,753.5 pounds of food provided a well balanced diet low in fat with whole grains, legumes and fresh produce to help patients stay healthy and strengthen their immune systems. In 2012 we added house-bound cancer patients undergoing at-home hospice care.

Prescription Food Bag program distributed 60 bags of food to ER patients assessed for being at-risk of hunger or food insecure.

Thrift Store (Second Glance)

Second Glance, The Thrift Store of The Open Door, sells low-cost clothing and household items to the community, honors referral requests from other agencies, recycles clothing, hosts FirstJobs youth, and Community Enterprise and STEP program participants for job training.

Second Glance raises revenues to support The Open Door's hunger-relief programs.
 
The goal is to connect people to good food.
 
Our strategies are simple; engaging the community in donating unwanted items, and shopping to support The Open Door's hunger relief programs.
 
 
Budget  $273,801.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
Last year Second Glance, The Thrift Store of The Open Door sold 295,695 reduced-cost clothing, furniture and household items to the community. We honored 260 referral requests from other agencies providing clothing, furniture and household items for clients in need.
 
We recycled textiles, appliances and metals, hosted Community Enterprise and STEP program participants for job training, and raised revenues to support our hunger-relief programs.
Program Long-Term Success 

In the long-term, Second Glance brings financial diversification and stability so that The Open Door can continue to connect people in need to good food. It also engages the community in our mission, resells unwanted items, and recycles textiles and metals for the betterment of our planet and landfills saving the community thousands of dollars every year in garbage collection fees. In addition, our job training and Community Enterprise programs turn people onto the path of employment and independence.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Open Door continues to use both quantitative and qualitative methods to measure results. We evaluate the success of the program by the number of people served, the numbers of pounds of food distributed and the number of deliveries per year.

At Second Glance, standard business practice tracks sales and the number of items sold or recycled. Volunteer hours, job training hours, and referral request are also collected. In-Kind donation is tracked and entered into a custom database on an Access platform.

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends, track consumption and client satisfaction.

Examples of Program Success 

The Open Door has grown steadily and strategically according to need. Since 2008, driven by the economic downturn, we have seen a 96 percent increase in the number of requests for food assistance. Last year we served 1 in 6 Gloucester residents plus our neighbors in need from our surrounding communities.

We were able to meet this need because we are a financially stable organization with diversified funding sources and thrift store revenues that are projected, with in-kind donations included, to provide 23 percent of our operating budget. It is, however, essential for us to find funding partners to provide the remaining 77 percent of the budget required to support the delivery of our hunger-relief programs.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Julie LaFontaine
CEO Term Start Apr 2002
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Julie LaFontaine has been Executive Director of The Open Door for the past 12 years after first volunteering and serving on the board of directors for three and a half years. She has worked in the nonprofit sector for 20 years as a director, an instructor and an anti-hunger advocate.

 

Under her leadership,The Open Door has created new programs including the innovative, nationally recognized Mobile Market. Julie’s background in nonprofit work has brought growth, stability and diverse funding to The Open Door, allowing our hunger-relief programs to reach those that need it the most in our community.
 

In addition to the thoughtful expansion of our programs, Julie’s keen business insight has grown Second Glance, our thrift store program, bringing further financial stability to our organization. Second Glance contributes significant services to the community in terms of low cost items as well as honoring referral requests from partner agencies, recycling goods and hosts a number of community job training programs.

 

Working with the community is important to Julie. She currently serves as Chair of the North Shore Community Health Network Steering Committee and as a leader in the North Shore Hunger Network.  She also sits on the Greater Boston Food Bank Member Advisory Council, and the Gloucester Pride Stride Committee. She has recently joined the Community Benefits Committee of Addison Gilbert Hospital and the Gloucester Female Charitable Association.  She is a proud member of the Gloucester Rotary Club, and an active member of the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce.

 

Julie is currently the chair of the Steering Committee of the North Shore Community Health Network, the Gloucester School Nutrition Committee, Community Benefits Committee of Addison Gilbert Hospital and the Member Advisory Council of the Greater Boston Food Bank.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Sarah Grow Director of Advocacy and Development --
Jennifer Perry Director of Distribution and Nutrition --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Paul Harris Distinquished Service Award Gloucester Rotary Club 2014
Community Health Activist Award North Shore Health Project 2012
Live United Leadership Award North Shore United Way 2012
Wellspring Leadership Award Wellspring House, Inc. 2012
Partner Agency of The Year Greater Boston Food Bank 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

Collaboration is vital in order to maintain The Open Door’s services.From scouts to young offenders, to faith-based organizations and corporations, schools and businesses, young and old are all drawn to our mission and reflect the diversity of our grassroots community support.

 

More than 30 different churches and synagogues,plus community groups provide food, resources, and volunteer to prepare hot meals.

Our food collaborators include Greater Boston Food Bank, grocery stores, farms, bakeries and caterers. Schools, businesses, and the National Letter Carriers Association host food drives.

 

We work with housing authorities, boards of health, and schools to provide Summer Lunch and Mobile Markets. We collaborate with SeniorCare and Gloucester, Rockport and Ipswich Councils on Aging to serve seniors healthy food. 

 

We offer team-building events for businesses, corporate service learning opportunities,  internships, job training and service projects for students. 

 

We provide SNAP (food stamp) application assistance and advocacy, and community service locations for Department of Transitional Assistance.

 

With the Backyard Growers and the Food Project,our families learn how to grow a vegetable garden. With the help of Cooking Matters, they learn to cook healthy meals on a budget.

We partner with Lahey Health and Addison Gilbert Hospital to provide food insecure patients with “prescription” food.

 

It is this rich blend of collaborators that provides 22,634 service hours (equivalent to 11 full-time staff) to connect people to good food all year round.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 27
Number of Volunteers 1,000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 26
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 28
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 20
Male: 8
Not Specified 28

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. David Sudbay
Board Chair Company Affiliation Sudbay Motors (owner)
Board Chair Term Apr 2014 - Mar 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dennis Acker VP, Sovereign Bank Voting
Chris Barker Caldwell Banker/JRM Barker Foundation Voting
Cynthia Donaldson VP Addison Gilbert Hospital Voting
Meredith Fine Attorney Voting
Lauren Johnson Commonwealth of Massachusetts Voting
Mark Landgren Nexxus Group Voting
Bill Loiancano Owner, Seaside Graphics Voting
Sue Lufkin Retired. Community Volunteer Voting
Eric Lustig New England Law Voting
Shelley Morgan Bard College Voting
John Morris Owner, Beauport Ambulance Voting
Beebe Nelson Working Forums Voting
Tom Queeney VP, Rockport National Bank Voting
David Sudbay Sudbay Motors Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 7
Not Specified 14

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Personnel
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $3,158,070.00
Projected Expense $3,158,070.00
Form 990s

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

2008 Form 990

Audit Documents

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

2008 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $2,556,178 $2,438,933 $1,949,575
Total Expenses $2,464,538 $2,291,365 $1,871,216

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$289,894 $285,818 $174,603
Government Contributions $37,134 $26,669 $29,235
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $37,134 $26,669 $29,235
Individual Contributions $169,632 $154,400 $130,148
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $675,150 $576,227 $444,042
Investment Income, Net of Losses $3,742 $3,277 $5,171
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $179,615 $177,313 $160,898
Revenue In-Kind $1,200,035 $1,215,229 $1,001,525
Other $976 -- $3,953

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $2,266,033 $2,132,138 $1,722,736
Administration Expense $186,341 $149,214 $138,850
Fundraising Expense $12,164 $10,013 $9,630
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 1.06 1.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses 92% 93% 92%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 2% 2% 2%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $1,224,303 $1,183,707 $967,645
Current Assets $360,329 $372,900 $216,883
Long-Term Liabilities $298,796 $331,223 $289,391
Current Liabilities $46,489 $65,106 $38,444
Total Net Assets $879,018 $787,378 $639,810

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose Our Capital Campaign is a one-time funding request to help us strengthen our food distribution system and build nutritional capacity in our programs. Last year The Open Door helped improve the lives of 5,784 unduplicated low-income people living on Cape Ann and Ipswich, including 1 in 6 Gloucester residents by providing 933, 762 pounds of good food. Since 2008 we have had a 96% increase in the number of requests for food assistance. Our Capital Campaign will fund a brand new 2,000 square foot addition, double our warehouse, walk-in cooler and freezer space, increase parking, create a Volunteer Center and Service Learning space, upgrade handicapped accessibility, reconfigure and expand food pantry, and retire our existing mortgage. We anticipate that this expansion will increase our ability to receive and distribute an additional 240,000 pounds of food annually resulting in an estimated 5.2 million pounds of good food to improve the health and welfare of vulnerable and underserved populations over the next five years.
Campaign Goal $1,250,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates May 2013 - Dec 2014
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $1,100,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.75 5.73 5.64

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 24% 28% 30%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The goals of The Open Door directly reflect the key language in our mission to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community.

We connect people to good food.

We advocate on behalf of those in need.

We engage others in the work of building food security.

Throughout our 15 programs and services we provide good healthy food, nutrition education and advocacy to help improve the lives of the underserved who are at the most risk of devastating health consequences due to poor nutrition.

We are a Community Food Resource center committed to ensuring that the most vulnerable amongst us have access to good, nutrient dense food because we know that Good Food = Good Health.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Using a prevention-based approach, grounded in nutrition education, public health, and community development, we provide those in-need with consistent, adequate access to nutrition in a socially acceptable environment. Our programs have been strategically placed in areas of the greatest need to directly improve the health and welfare of vulnerable and underserved populations.

We have taken a leadership role in the North Shore Hunger Network to help sister food pantries replicate our successful programs and provide alternative food solutions in their communities.

Multidisciplinary collaboration is vital if we are to help people and communities find their own local solutions to ending hunger. Our partnerships from across the region are varied from scouts to young offenders, faith-based organizations and corporations, schools and businesses, government agencies and hospitals, young and old who together provide the collective muscle to connect those in need with good food all year round.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Strong Leadership and team: Staff come from a variety of socioeconomic and educational backgrounds and are all committed to alleviating the impact of hunger. The Open Door has also taken on a leadership role in the North Shore Hunger Network to support the work of sister food pantries in the region, to share lessons learned, and replicate successful models.

Financially sound and stable organization: The Open Door has strategically diverse grassroots support. We incorporate a rich blend of groups, corporations, individuals, foundations, government agencies along with fundraising events, appeals and our entrepreneurial thrift store so that our programs do not depend upon one source for funding,

Thoughtful growth and expansion: We place programs strategically in areas of the greatest need in low-income and poverty tracts, food deserts, and medically underserved areas. Expansion is deliberate according to need and resources.

Innovative approaches to food security: We have moved beyond traditional hunger-relief programs and implemented point of service nutrition education, increased access to healthier foods, and advocacy.

Community Collaborator: More than 22,634 volunteer hours are clocked every year (11 full time equivalents) to connect people to good food and provide financial and In-Kind support. Leveraging our partnership with the Greater Boston Food Bank, our robust Food Rescue program engages local grocers, farmers, seafood vendors and caterers that allowed us to distribute more than 900,000 pounds of food last year.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Quantitatively we measure registered households, people and pounds served and data is collected throughout our programs and tracked on a custom database. All food is accounted for using a formalized system of weights and measurement.

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends: We make retrospective surveys with a representative group of clients to measure changes in need, level of nutrition-based knowledge, fruits and vegetable consumption, client satisfaction, level of food security, along with their health conditions and the impact of our programs on their lives. All program numbers, data and indicators are reported annually.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Last year The Open Door helped improve the lives of 5,784 unduplicated low and limited-income people including 1 in 6 Gloucester residents plus our neighbors in need by providing 933,762 pounds of good food, nutrition education and advocacy. Since 2008 we have seen a 96 percent jump in the number of requests for food assistance. During that time, we have not only met that need, but increased the amount of healthy food offerings and added nutrition education at each point of service.

The completion of our warehouse expansion in December 2014 will allow us to strengthen our food distribution system and build nutritional capacity in our programs. It will position us to collect and distribute an additional 240,000 pounds of food every year, double the amount of healthy protein and produce distributed, strengthen the North Shore Hunger Network by allowing us to distribute an additional 20,000 pounds of protein and produce to them every year, and expand our nutrition education and service learning opportunities so that we are “feeding people, changing lives.”