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The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry, Inc.

 28 Emerson Avenue
 Gloucester, MA 01930
[P] (978) 283-6776
[F] (978) 282-9684
www.foodpantry.org
info@foodpantry.org
Julie LaFontaine
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INCORPORATED: 1978
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2513482

LAST UPDATED: 08/16/2018
Organization DBA The Open Door
Former Names The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry (1986)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.

Mission Statement

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $5,976,111.00
Projected Expense $5,973,834.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Distribution and Nutrition Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.


Background Statement

Away from the beaches and historic landmarks of Essex County, including the nation’s oldest working seaport, are the neighborhoods that show some of the highest concentrations of hunger in the commonwealth. In 40 years, The Open Door has gone from feeding a few to feeding a few thousand households.

The Open Door began in 1978 as an emergency food resource for families and individuals on Cape Ann. Originally named The Cape Ann Food Bank, it began as a collaboration between the First Congregational Church of Rockport, Cape Ann Interfaith Commission, Action Inc., and Cape Ann Project for Elderly and Handicapped with Reverend Forrest Clark as the coordinator.
 
In 1983, The Open Door, A Place of Hospitality, Inc. was started by Wellspring House, a community of faith, after it became evident that there was an unmet need for prepared meals and companionship in our community. The meals were organized in cooperation with the faith community, service agencies and community volunteers.
 
The two organizations merged in 1986 to become The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry, Inc.
 
Since that time, our programs have strategically grown to include: Two Food Pantries (Gloucester & Ipswich), Community Meals, Mobile Markets, SNAP Application Assistance and Advocacy, Summer Meals, Prescription Food Bag with Lahey Health, Farm to School, Senior Soup & Salad, Family Supper Night, Garden Project, Good Food Boxes, Nutrition Education and Counseling, On Your Mark--youth training, Thrift Store, and Holiday Baskets.
 
Using a prevention-based approach, grounded in nutrition education, public health, and community development, we provide those in-need with consistent, adequate access to nutrition in a socially acceptable environment. Our programs have been strategically placed in areas of the greatest need to directly improve the health and welfare of vulnerable and underserved populations.

Impact Statement

Highlights of Calendar Year 2017

  • The Open Door improved the lives and health of 7,747 people by distributing a record 1.8 million pounds of food, or 1.5 million meals to people who needed food assistance through our programs.
  • Fresh produce accounted for 34% of our overall distribution.
  • More than 1,000 volunteers contributed 26,494 hours of time, talent, and treasure to connect people to good food.
  • On Your Mark, a youth workforce development program for ages 16-21 was launched with 2 learning tracks--culinary and retail.
  • Mobile Market locations were added at North Shore Community College, Danvers Campus, in collaboration with Beverly Bootstraps and the Greater Boston Food Bank, and at Winthrop Elementary School in Ipswich.
  • A Registered Dietician joined our team to work on Food is Medicine.
Looking ahead to Calendar Year 2018
  • Major kitchen renovation planning commences
  • Best Practices Model modules under development
  • 40 years of service to the community is marked with a year of CELEBRATION
 

 

Needs Statement

The Open Door, a leader in the field, is seeking grants and contributions to help achieve our mission and goals through innovative and replicable program models designed to work with healthcare partners on social determinants of health to improve the lives of people in our community.
 
Client Need
Serving ten cities and towns in the northeast corner of Essex County, The Open Door’s 7,747 clients reflect the diversity of the region and culture.
  • 56% are women and girls and 44% are men and boys 60% of adults are women and 40% of adults are men
  • 30% are children under the age of 18
  • 25% are over 55; 15% are over 65
  • 38% of our families are single moms (44% of food pantry families are single moms)
  • 10% fishing or fishing industry-related families

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
With its main headquarters based in Gloucester and a satellite pantry in Ipswich, The Open Door serves ten cities and towns on the northeast corner of Essex County: Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester, Essex, and Ipswich. In 2016, the all volunteer-led food pantry in Ipswich merged with The Open Door and expanded our service area to include Rowley, Topsfield, Boxford, Hamilton and Wenham.

Organization Categories

  1. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food Banks, Food Pantries
  2. Human Services - Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
  3. Public & Societal Benefit -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Distribution and Nutrition Programs

Using a prevention-based approach, grounded in nutrition education, public health, and community development, our goals are:

  • To provide consistent, adequate access to nutrition in a socially acceptable environment.
  • To connect people to good food where they live and learn.
  • To recognize food as medicine and a building block to long-term health and well-being.

Our innovative program models are “best practices” for local, regional and national partners. The Open Door is ranked as a tier-one agency with the Greater Boston Food Bank and is considered a Strategic Partner in Eastern Massachusetts.

  • Client-Choice Directed Food Pantries (Gloucester & Ipswich)
  • Community Meals and Family Supper Night
  • Mobile Markets (12 sites)
  • Summer Meals For Kids (11 sites)
  • Good Food Box and Prescription Food Bag
  • Farm to School
  • Holiday Baskets
  • SNAP Application Assistance and Advocacy
  • PowerSnack (Elementary Schools)
  • Senior Soup & Salad
  • Garden Project
  • Maridee’s Nutrition and Internship Programs
  • Nutrition Education/Workshops
  • On Your Mark youth Job Training
  • Food Rescue
  • Second Glance Thrift Store
Budget  --
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

Over the last five years, The Open Door has connected people to just over 6M pounds of food or 5M meals. In the short-term, hunger is being solved although food insecurity is still a factor. Our programs provide household stability for people who suffer from generational poverty or short-term poverty.

Program Long-Term Success 

Better overall health for the community.

Program Success Monitored By 

The Open Door uses both quantitative and qualitative methods to measure results.

Quantitatively we measure households, people and pounds or meals served: Data is collected and entered into a custom database on an Access platform and tracked. Clients may access the Food Pantry once every seven days. We also identify participation patterns, demographic details, number of site visits, number nutrition education activities per service and unit, Good Food Tastings, and classes attended. Summer Meals tracks meals distributed.

  • Goal: 35% of each distribution is fresh produce
  • Goal: 2M pounds of food distributed

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends: We make retrospective surveys and continue to track consumption, client satisfaction and other qualitative measures. We survey a representative group of clients to measure changes in need, level of nutrition-based knowledge, fruits and vegetable consumption, along with health conditions present that may include but are not limited to rates of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Our newly reconfigured food pantry allows surveys tracked on the Likert Scale to be presented at check-out. Summer interns perform retrospective Summer Meal surveys targeted to children participants.

Examples of Program Success 

Qualitative Goals:

  • 50% of Food Pantry families will report they are eating healthier food
  • 50% of Food Pantry families will report they are having more family meals at home
  • 50% of Food Pantry families will report they are choosing fruits and vegetables
  • 50% of Summer Meals children will report they ate fruit or vegetable with every lunch
  • 50% of Summer Meals children will report they tried new fruits and vegetables

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Julie LaFontaine
CEO Term Start Apr 2002
CEO Email julie@foodpantry.org
CEO Experience

Julie LaFontaine has been Executive Director of The Open Door for the past 17 years after first volunteering and serving on the board of directors for three and a half years. She has worked in the nonprofit sector for 25 years as a director, an instructor and an anti-hunger advocate.

LaFontaine assumed the leadership of The Open Door (TOD) in 2002. Under her vision and guidance, TOD’s food distribution has grown to nearly 1.3 million healthy meals annually through innovative distribution and nutrition programming. Today, TOD is a regionally recognized charitable business with model distribution and nutrition programs that improve the lives and health of nearly 7,000 people each year.  LaFontaine has grown the organization’s social enterprise, Second Glance Thrift Store, from a small start-up to a successful operation that provides nearly 40% of TOD’s cash revenues each year.

LaFontaine currently serves as a director at BankGloucester and the Greater Boston Food Bank. She is actively involved in her community as a member of the Essex Bicentennial Committee, the Gloucester Pride Stride Committee, the Community Benefits Committee of Addison Gilbert Hospital, and the Gloucester Female Charitable Association. She is an engaged member of the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce and an active Gloucester Rotarian.

Julie’s leadership has been recognized with the following awards:

  • SeniorCare Rosemary F. Kerry Service Award, 2018
  • North Shore Chamber of Commerce Distinguished Leader Award in 2015
  • Paul Harris Fellow for Distinguished Service 2014
  • North Shore United Way Live United Leadership Award in 2012
  • Community Health Advocate by the North Shore Health Project in 2012
  • Wellspring House Women Honoring Women 2012
  • NSUW Unsung Hero Award 2010
  • American Red Cross Community Hero 2008
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Sarah Grow Director of Advocacy and Development --
Marcia Hubbard Business/Finance Manager --
Jennifer Perry Director of Operations --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Rosemary f. Kerry Service Award SeniorCare, Inc. 2018
Unsung Hero Summer Meals DESE, Project Bread, CNOP 2016
Distinguished Leader Award North Shore Chamber of Commerce 2015
Paul Harris Distinquished Service Award Gloucester Rotary Club 2014
Community Health Activist Award North Shore Health Project 2012
Live United Leadership Award North Shore United Way 2012
Wellspring Leadership Award Wellspring House, Inc. 2012
Partner Agency of The Year Greater Boston Food Bank 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Collaboration is vital in order to maintain The Open Door’s services.From scouts to young offenders, to faith-based organizations and corporations, schools and businesses, young and old are all drawn to our mission and reflect the diversity of our grassroots community support.

 

More than 30 different churches and synagogues,plus community groups provide food, resources, and volunteer to prepare hot meals.

Our food collaborators include Greater Boston Food Bank, grocery stores, farms, bakeries and caterers. Schools, businesses, and the National Letter Carriers Association host food drives.

 

We work with housing authorities, boards of health, and schools to provide Summer Lunch and Mobile Markets. We collaborate with SeniorCare and Gloucester, Rockport and Ipswich Councils on Aging to serve seniors healthy food. 

 

We offer team-building events for businesses, corporate service learning opportunities,  internships, job training and service projects for students. 

 

We provide SNAP (food stamp) application assistance and advocacy, and community service locations for Department of Transitional Assistance.

 

With the Backyard Growers and the Food Project,our families learn how to grow a vegetable garden. With the help of Cooking Matters, they learn to cook healthy meals on a budget.

We partner with Lahey Health and Addison Gilbert Hospital to provide food insecure patients with “prescription” food.

 

It is this rich blend of collaborators that provides 22,634 service hours (equivalent to 11 full-time staff) to connect people to good food all year round.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 27
Number of Volunteers 1,000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 42
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 30
Male: 15
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Kersten Lanes
Board Chair Company Affiliation FCLTGlobal
Board Chair Term Mar 2018 - Mar 2021
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Chris Barker Caldwell Banker/JRM Barker Foundation Voting
Shelly Dews Chigier Community Volunteer Voting
Cynthia Donaldson VP Addison Gilbert Hospital Voting
Irene Josephson Joset Corporation Voting
Mark Landgren Nexxus Group Voting
Kersten Lanes FCLTGlobal Voting
Bill Loiancano Owner, Seaside Graphics Voting
Sue Lufkin Retired. Community Volunteer Voting
David Sudbay Sudbay Motors Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Total Revenue $5,057,985 $4,003,860 $4,304,451
Total Expenses $5,085,289 $3,810,763 $3,402,707

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $110,134 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $110,134 -- --
Individual Contributions $3,535,385 $2,837,127 $3,184,345
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $1,114,621 $968,311 $903,435
Investment Income, Net of Losses $5,286 $4,023 $4,595
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $292,559 $194,399 $212,076
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Program Expense $4,664,149 $3,500,233 $3,112,402
Administration Expense $287,119 $260,945 $248,353
Fundraising Expense $134,021 $49,585 $41,952
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.99 1.05 1.27
Program Expense/Total Expenses 92% 92% 91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 2% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Total Assets $2,684,367 $2,820,313 $2,682,444
Current Assets $1,011,966 $1,116,952 $1,653,098
Long-Term Liabilities $9,887 $212,467 $244,017
Current Liabilities $102,835 $82,474 $106,152
Total Net Assets $2,571,645 $2,525,372 $2,332,275

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 9.84 13.54 15.57

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 8% 9%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Please note: In FY16 the organization moved from a calendar fiscal year to a July 1-June 30 fiscal year. FY16 990 and Audited statements reflect 6 months rather than 12 months. The FY17 990 and Audited statements compare 12 months in FY17 to 6 months in FY16.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. 
 
Please note, this organization changed its fiscal year in 2016 from a Jan. 1 - Dec. 31 fiscal year to a July 1 - June 30 fiscal year. As such, the IRS Form 990 and audit files posted above for FY16 reflect a 6 mo. period (Jan. 1, 2016 - June 30, 2016) and the data is not included in the charts and graphs. 

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Using a prevention-based approach, grounded in nutrition education, public health, and community development, we provide those in-need with consistent, adequate access to nutrition in a socially acceptable environment. Our programs have been strategically placed in areas of the greatest need to directly improve the health and welfare of vulnerable and underserved populations.

We have taken a leadership role in the North Shore Hunger Network to help sister food pantries replicate our successful programs and provide alternative food solutions in their communities.

Multidisciplinary collaboration is vital if we are to help people and communities find their own local solutions to ending hunger. Our partnerships from across the region are varied from scouts to young offenders, faith-based organizations and corporations, schools and businesses, government agencies and hospitals, young and old who together provide the collective muscle to connect those in need with good food all year round.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Strong Leadership and team: Staff come from a variety of socioeconomic and educational backgrounds and are all committed to alleviating the impact of hunger. The Open Door has also taken on a leadership role in the North Shore Hunger Network to support the work of sister food pantries in the region, to share lessons learned, and replicate successful models.

Financially sound and stable organization: The Open Door has strategically diverse grassroots support. We incorporate a rich blend of groups, corporations, individuals, foundations, government agencies along with fundraising events, appeals and our entrepreneurial thrift store so that our programs do not depend upon one source for funding,

Thoughtful growth and expansion: We place programs strategically in areas of the greatest need in low-income and poverty tracts, food deserts, and medically underserved areas. Expansion is deliberate according to need and resources.

Innovative approaches to food security: We have moved beyond traditional hunger-relief programs and implemented point of service nutrition education, increased access to healthier foods, and advocacy.

Community Collaborator: More than 22,634 volunteer hours are clocked every year (11 full time equivalents) to connect people to good food and provide financial and In-Kind support. Leveraging our partnership with the Greater Boston Food Bank, our robust Food Rescue program engages local grocers, farmers, seafood vendors and caterers that allowed us to distribute more than 900,000 pounds of food last year.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Quantitatively we measure registered households, people and pounds served and data is collected throughout our programs and tracked on a custom database. All food is accounted for using a formalized system of weights and measurement.

Qualitatively we measure benchmarks and trends: We make retrospective surveys with a representative group of clients to measure changes in need, level of nutrition-based knowledge, fruits and vegetable consumption, client satisfaction, level of food security, along with their health conditions and the impact of our programs on their lives. All program numbers, data and indicators are reported annually.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?


The completion of our warehouse expansion in December 2014 will allow us to strengthen our food distribution system and build nutritional capacity in our programs. It will position us to collect and distribute an additional 240,000 pounds of food every year, double the amount of healthy protein and produce distributed, strengthen the North Shore Hunger Network by allowing us to distribute an additional 20,000 pounds of protein and produce to them every year, and expand our nutrition education and service learning opportunities so that we are “feeding people, changing lives.”