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Saint Francis House Inc.

 39 Boylston Street
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (617) 542-4211
[F] (617) 542-4705
http://www.stfrancishouse.org
mburns@stfrancishouse.org
Maggie Burns
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INCORPORATED: 1984
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2519129

LAST UPDATED: 10/11/2016
Organization DBA St. Francis House
St. Francis House, Boston
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1984, St. Francis House is a nonsectarian, nonprofit daytime shelter providing basic and rehabilitation services designed to help homeless adults establish lives independent of shelters and institutions. Our goal is to provide our guests with everything they need to reclaim their dignity and rebuild their lives: nutritious meals, clothing, access to medical care, counseling, vocational rehabilitation, and housing. Vocational rehabilitation, in particular, is a strategic institutional goal, focused on helping our guests re-enter the workforce and positively engage with the world; strengthening themselves, their families, and the social and economic fabric of our communities.

Mission Statement

Founded in 1984, St. Francis House is a nonsectarian, nonprofit daytime shelter providing basic and rehabilitation services designed to help homeless adults establish lives independent of shelters and institutions. Our goal is to provide our guests with everything they need to reclaim their dignity and rebuild their lives: nutritious meals, clothing, access to medical care, counseling, vocational rehabilitation, and housing. Vocational rehabilitation, in particular, is a strategic institutional goal, focused on helping our guests re-enter the workforce and positively engage with the world; strengthening themselves, their families, and the social and economic fabric of our communities.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $9,750,696.00
Projected Expense $8,625,951.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Core Services
  • Core Services Cont'd
  • Rehabililation Programs: The Moving Ahead Program (MAP)
  • Rehabilitative Programs: Counseling & Mental Health
  • Supportive Housing: Next Step

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Founded in 1984, St. Francis House is a nonsectarian, nonprofit daytime shelter providing basic and rehabilitation services designed to help homeless adults establish lives independent of shelters and institutions. Our goal is to provide our guests with everything they need to reclaim their dignity and rebuild their lives: nutritious meals, clothing, access to medical care, counseling, vocational rehabilitation, and housing. Vocational rehabilitation, in particular, is a strategic institutional goal, focused on helping our guests re-enter the workforce and positively engage with the world; strengthening themselves, their families, and the social and economic fabric of our communities.

Background Statement

Founded in 1986, St. Francis House now serves more than 800 men and women each day and is the largest day shelter in New England. St. Francis House has an open access policy where no one is turned away. We are the only organization in Boston to have a full complement of services under one roof.
 
The services and programs at St. Francis House fall into three broad categories: core services, rehabilitative programs and housing.

 Core Services:

· Basic: food (breakfast, lunch, and take-away sandwiches); clothing; showers; email, telephones, ID cards; PO/mailbox; a gathering space.

· Extended: medical, mental health counseling, psychiatric, case management; legal aid, housing assistance, and advocacy services. Bilingual staff provides services in English and/or Spanish.

Rehabilitative Programs:

·  Vocational Rehabilitation -- MAP is a 14-week job and life-skills training program serving individuals with histories of homelessness, addiction, mental illness, and/or histories of incarceration.

Permanent Supportive Housing:

·  Next Step is a community of 56 units of permanent supported housing. The average stay is 18-24 months.


Impact Statement

Our past accomplishments include:
 
· Maintaining our effective, life-saving core services (food, clothing, access to medical care, and counseling), the foundation upon which all programs are built.
· Expanding our nationally recognized, award-winning Moving Ahead Program (MAP) to help our guests find meaningful employment and put homelessness behind them. (In 2013, we doubled our MAP enrollment from 100 to 200.)
· Creating 14 new units of supported housing bringing the total number of housing units available right here at St. Francis House – to 56.
 
Our accomplishments over the next year will be: to build on this programmatic success and secure our financial future so we can continue to remain open 365 days of the year and continue to never have to turn anyone away.

Needs Statement

1. Basic Services - Providing food, clothing, counseling and access to medical care helps us to provide a welcome respite to our guests, which not only alleviates immediate pain and suffering, but creates a foundation upon which one can move up and out of homelessness.
 
2. The Moving Ahead Program (MAP), focuses on vocational rehabilitation--and prepares individuals with histories of homelessness, mental illness, substance abuse, and incarceration for employment. By providing comprehensive and holistic support services to participants while helping them gain the employment skills they need, individuals are better able to find and keep work, achieve greater self-sufficiency, and live more fulfilling and stable lives. 200 individuals participate in MAP each year.
 
3. The Carolyn Connors Women's Center -  The number of women seeking help at St. Francis House has more than doubled in recent years, making them one of the fastest-growing groups among the homeless. Homeless women are at especially high risk for violence and trauma.
 
 4. Clothing - We offer clean, new and used clothing for any guest who requests it. And, in order to help our guests retain their dignity and a sense of identity, we offer guests a wide selection of clothing from which to choose. Further, we provide two outfits of professional attire to MAP graduates as well as warm jackets/coasts, winter boots, hats and gloves to our guests. We distributed 8,695 changes of clothing to our guests in FY2015, a 37% increase over FY2014.
 
5. Operating Support - The staff at St. Francis House guide and support guests as they commit to changing the trajectory of their lives and our most critical services - mental health counseling, case management, and the Housing Resource Center are all located on the third floor of our ten-floor building.
 
 
 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- Harbor Islands
City of Boston- West Roxbury
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
As the largest homeless day shelter in New England, St. Francis House provides 800 meals per day, representing service to an estimated 500-600 unduplicated individuals each day. As of 5/31/2013, we have over 6,200 guests registered in our database, 2,500 of which have registered within the last 12 months. With our open door policy everyone is welcome, and we are open 365 days of the year. Our services and programs fall into three broad categories: basic services, rehabilitative programs and housing and we serve the following city/neighborhoods/near-by suburbs:

 

Allston
  • Back Bay
  • Beacon Hill
  • Brighton
  • Cambridge
  • Charlestown
  • Chelsea
  • Chinatown
  • Dorchester
  • Downtown Boston
  • East Boston
  • Everett
  • Fenway/Kenmore
  • Hyde Park
  • Jamaica Plain
  • North End
  • Roxbury
  • South Boston
  • South End
  • Waltham
  • West Roxbury
    • Organization Categories

      1. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers
      2. Housing, Shelter - Homeless Shelters
      3. Employment - Vocational Rehabilitation

      Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

      Yes

      Programs

      Core Services

      Delivering Basic Services alleviates immediate pain and suffering and creates a foundation upon which one can move up and out of homelessness.  
       
      Food– Each day St. Francis House provides guests with a nutritious breakfast, lunch and a take-away packet of two sandwiches.  
       
      Clothing– We offer clean, new and used clothing for any guest who requests it. And, in order to help our guests retain their dignity and a sense of identity, guests are offered a wide selection of clothing from which to choose. 
       
      Showers– For many guests our facilities are the only ones available to them.

      Mailboxes/Identification Cards
      – Living without a home means living without essential communication, as well as a loss of a “place” that helps define identity. Guests receive St. Francis House ID cards, which foster a sense of membership in our community and are needed to apply for jobs, search for housing, or apply for and keep essential public benefits.
      Budget  $6,800,000.00
      Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for the Homeless
      Population Served Homeless Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Adults
      Program Short-Term Success 
        
      Program Long-Term Success  This year St. Francis House: - Served 107,762 breakfasts, 166,083 lunches, and 18,720 take-away sandwiches: 292,565 meals in total - Outfitted guests with everyday and professional clothing and outerwear: 8,070 clothing appointments in total - Provided 6,704 showers - Treated guests during 8,989 appointments in our medical clinic - Counseled guests in 22,542 general and psychiatric counseling sessions to explore issues related to substance abuse, housing, work, legal status, and more - Graduated 82 students from our Moving Ahead Program (MAP), a 14-week job and life skills training course that serves homeless men and women whose substance abuse history has caused significant disruption in their housing and employment.
      Program Success Monitored By  --
      Examples of Program Success 
         

      Core Services Cont'd

      Medical Clinic– One of St. Francis House’s most successful partnerships is with Boston Health Care for the Homeless. We provide space at our facility while they provide expert medical staff and equipment that enables the specific health requirements of our guests to be properly addressed.
      Budget  $2,531,175.00
      Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for the Homeless
      Population Served Homeless Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
      Program Short-Term Success         
      Program Long-Term Success 
      Our goal is to provide all homeless adults with access to medical care. Through our partnership with Boston Health care for the Homeless, we offer primary care, episodic care, preventive health services, and foot care, which is a chronic yet often-overlooked need. We assess and treat common foot problems on-site and provide podiatry referrals when necessary.

      HIV testing and counseling are available once a week, and we make vision and dental care referrals.

      We also provide psychiatric care thanks to two local psychiatrists who partner with us. They, along with interns and residents from several local hospitals, help us meet this critical need.
      Program Success Monitored By        
      Examples of Program Success 
            

      Rehabililation Programs: The Moving Ahead Program (MAP)

      Our flagship rehabilitation program, the Moving Ahead Program (MAP) focuses on vocational rehabilitation--preparing individuals with histories of homelessness, mental illness, substance abuse, and incarceration for employment.  Since its first class in 1995, MAP has taken a comprehensive approach to serving individuals with multiple barriers to employment. The MAP model illustrates that by providing comprehensive and holistic support services to participants while helping them gain the employment skills they need, individuals are better able to find and keep work, achieve greater self-sufficiency, and live more fulfilling and stable lives. 
      Budget  $1,314,010.00
      Category  Employment, General/Other Vocational Rehabilitation
      Population Served Homeless Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
      Program Short-Term Success 
         
      Program Long-Term Success 
        
      Program Success Monitored By 
        
      Examples of Program Success 
        

      Rehabilitative Programs: Counseling & Mental Health

      Counseling & Mental Health– St. Francis House has a full complement of case managers, counselors, and licensed mental health clinicians on staff, who along with psychiatrists, lawyers, and other specialists address a variety of our guests’ needs. Counseling staff assist with finding housing, seeking employment, accessing essential benefits, gaining and maintaining sobriety, resolving legal matters, and providing general support and referrals. Clinical staff engage guests on a therapeutic level, and work closely with guests who struggle with mental illness. Both counseling and mental health services are available in English and Spanish.

       

      Budget  --
      Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for the Homeless
      Population Served Homeless Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
      Program Short-Term Success  (12,000 sessions are provided annually.)
      Program Long-Term Success 
        
      Program Success Monitored By 
        
      Examples of Program Success 
        

      Supportive Housing: Next Step

      Supportive Housing –Finding and securing safe, affordable housing is no easy feat for a homeless individual, particularly if he/she has a criminal history or has had housing difficulties in the past due to struggles with substance abuse or mental illness.  Located on the top four floors of our building, our Next Step Housing Program  provides a much needed niche in the affordable housing market, blending both rental housing and program supports to enable formerly homeless men and women to gain more stability in their livesNext Step offers 56 units of single-room, sober, permanent housing. Our guests benefit from the assistance of in-house professional case managers who provide individual support and aid in the development of the life skills required for community reintegration and independence. There is notime limit on how long a resident can live in Next Step. 
      Budget  $513,593.00
      Category  Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
      Population Served Homeless Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
      Program Short-Term Success 
        
      Program Long-Term Success 
        
      Program Success Monitored By 
        
      Examples of Program Success 
        

      CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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      Management


      CEO/Executive Director Ms. Karen LaFrazia
      CEO Term Start Apr 1990
      CEO Email lafrazia@stfrancishouse.org
      CEO Experience

      For more than 25 years, Karen LaFrazia, Executive Director of St. Francis House, has worked as a counselor, caseworker, advocate, community organizer, and program developer. She served St. Francis House as Deputy Director for six years prior to becoming the Executive Director in 2003.

      During her time at St. Francis House, Ms. LaFrazia has provided a guiding vision of growth for the agency and created a culture that fosters innovation and rewards creativity. Under her leadership, St. Francis House has become a model of integrated programs and services for poor and homeless men and women. She has inspired staff to undertake new ventures such as the Whole Health Care Clinic and the creation of LEAD – an agency-wide intake, assessment, and evaluation tool developed in partnership with the Harvard Medical School Division on Addictions and the Cambridge Health Alliance. She also spearheaded the expansion of Next Step, the agency’s permanent supported housing program, and the vocational rehabilitation Sullivan Family Moving Ahead Program.

      Ms. LaFrazia played an integral role in the oversight of two successful Capital Campaigns. She steered the planning and implementation of the $6 million construction and renovation of our 70,000+ square-foot building. She also led Under One Roof, a $15.9 million initiative to expand the capacity of the agency’s most successful programs. The Campaign, which concluded in December 2011, exceeded goal by $800,000 during the worst recession in decades.

      In 2008, Ms. LaFrazia was a recipient of the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women’s Unsung Heroine Award, and in 2009 she was honored by the Boston University Alumni Association for “Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Social Work.” In 2012, she was the first recipient of HomeStart’s Partner Award.

      At the invitation of Mayor Thomas Menino, Ms. LaFrazia also serves on the Leadership Council of the Boston Regional Network to End Homelessness. The Network looks for innovative ways to eliminate family and individual homelessness in Boston.

      Prior to joining the St. Francis House family, Ms. LaFrazia was a social worker and later the Director of Social Services with the Salvation Army in Massachusetts. She has also worked as a supervisor at a residential treatment facility for adolescents in Wakefield, MA, and was a founding member and president of the Somerville Homeless Coalition.

      Ms. LaFrazia has a Bachelor's degree in social work from Regis College and a Master's degree in social work from Boston University. She also is the recipient of a honorary doctorate from her alma mater, Regis College, in recognition of her commitment to social justice and service to ‘the dear neighbor’.

      Co-CEO --
      Co-CEO Term Start --
      Co-CEO Email --
      Co-CEO Experience
      NA

      Former CEOs and Terms

      Name Start End
      -- -- --

      Senior Staff

      Name Title Experience/Biography
      -- -- --

      Awards

      Award Awarding Organization Year
      -- -- --

      Affiliations

      Affiliation Year
      -- --
      Member of state association of nonprofits? No
      Name of state association --

      External Assessments and Accreditations

      External Assessment or Accreditation Year
      -- --

      Collaborations

      --

      CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

      --

      Foundation Comments

      --

      Staff Information

      Number of Full Time Staff 21
      Number of Part Time Staff 11
      Number of Volunteers 101
      Number of Contract Staff 0
      Staff Retention Rate % --

      Staff Demographics

      Ethnicity African American/Black: 27
      Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
      Caucasian: 47
      Hispanic/Latino: 12
      Native American/American Indian: 0
      Other: 0
      Other (if specified): 0
      Gender Female: 40
      Male: 46
      Not Specified 0

      Plans & Policies

      Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
      Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
      Years Strategic Plan Considers --
      Management Succession Plan --
      Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
      Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
      Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
      Whistle Blower Policy No
      Document Destruction Policy --
      Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
      State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
      State Registration --

      Risk Management Provisions

      --

      Reporting and Evaluations

      Management Reports to Board? Yes
      CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
      Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
      Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

      Governance


      Board Chair Mr. Timothy S. Egan Esq.
      Board Chair Company Affiliation PriceWaterhouseCoopers
      Board Chair Term Sept 2011 -
      Board Co-Chair --
      Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
      Board Co-Chair Term -

      Board Members

      Name Company Affiliations Status
      Mr. James F. Barry Esq. J.F. Curtis Development Corporation Voting
      Mr. Robert J. Bettachi WR Grace and Co. (Retired) Voting
      Mr. Stephen H. Brown UBS Voting
      Thomas E. Conway OFM, PhD St. Anthony's Shrine Voting
      Mr. David J. Coyle The Coyle Company Voting
      Mr. Quinton Dale MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education --
      Ms. Kimberly Dee Citizens Bank Voting
      Mr. Mark Doyle Natixis Asset management Voting
      Ms. Elizabeth Dugan MSW, LCSW Boston Medical Center Voting
      Mr. Timothy S. Egan Esq PriceWaterhouseCoopers Voting
      Mr. Richard Hughto Environmental Engineering Consultant Voting
      Father James F. Kelly OFM St. Anthony Shrine Voting
      Ms. Judith A. Malone Esq. Bentley University Voting
      Mr. Richard J. Meelia Covidien (Retired) Voting
      Mr. Stephen C. Neff Fidelity Investments Voting
      Ms. Jennifer A. Nodelman Manulife/John Hancock Voting
      Mr. Timothy Nolan Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Voting
      Mr. Thomas E. Reilly Jr. Birch Hill Investment Advisors Voting
      Ms. Maureen E. Rogers Technical Marketing Consultant Voting
      Ms. Susan L. Sgroi Fidelity Investments Voting
      Graham Shalgian Rasky Baerlin Strategic Communications --
      Mr. Richard B. Slifka Global Petroleum Corporation Voting
      Mr. James F. Sullivan Esq Sullivan Properties, Inc. Voting

      Constituent Board Members

      Name Company Affiliations Status
      -- -- --

      Youth Board Members

      Name Company Affiliations Status
      -- -- --

      Advisory Board Members

      Name Company Affiliations Status
      -- -- --

      Board Demographics

      Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
      Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
      Caucasian: 20
      Hispanic/Latino: 0
      Native American/American Indian: 0
      Other: 0
      Other (if specified): 0
      Gender Female: 6
      Male: 14
      Not Specified 0

      Board Information

      Board Term Lengths 3
      Board Term Limits 2
      Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
      Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
      Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
      Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
      Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 50%
      Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

      Standing Committees

      • --
      • Audit
      • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
      • Executive
      • Finance
      • Nominating
      • Program / Program Planning
      • Technology

      CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

      --

      Foundation Comments

      --

      Financials


      Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

      Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

      Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

      Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

      Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
      Projected Income $9,750,696.00
      Projected Expense $8,625,951.00
      Form 990s

      2015 Form 990

      2014 Form 990

      2013 Form 990

      2012 Form 990

      2011 Form 990

      2010 Form 990

      Audit Documents

      2015 Audit

      2014 Audit

      2013 Audit

      2012 Audit

      2011 Audit

      IRS Letter of Exemption

      IRS Letter of Determination

      Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

      Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
      Total Revenue $9,133,904 $9,190,059 $7,064,156
      Total Expenses $8,006,777 $7,808,629 $7,671,018

      Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

      Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
      Foundation and
      Corporation Contributions
      -- -- --
      Government Contributions $2,166,563 $1,986,296 $1,946,669
          Federal -- -- --
          State -- -- --
          Local -- -- --
          Unspecified $2,166,563 $1,986,296 $1,946,669
      Individual Contributions $5,740,085 $6,099,927 $3,893,681
      Indirect Public Support -- -- --
      Earned Revenue $519,035 $523,073 $494,519
      Investment Income, Net of Losses $103,241 $55,682 $31,399
      Membership Dues -- -- --
      Special Events $568,269 $479,621 $466,306
      Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
      Other $36,711 $45,460 $231,582

      Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

      Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
      Program Expense $5,954,513 $5,802,850 $5,747,192
      Administration Expense $893,205 $890,510 $828,739
      Fundraising Expense $1,159,059 $1,115,269 $1,095,087
      Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
      Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.14 1.18 0.92
      Program Expense/Total Expenses 74% 74% 75%
      Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 14% 13% 17%

      Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

      Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
      Total Assets $18,034,850 $16,949,672 $15,507,658
      Current Assets $3,441,345 $3,521,523 $4,186,065
      Long-Term Liabilities -- -- $0
      Current Liabilities $2,459,563 $2,499,130 $2,434,689
      Total Net Assets $15,575,287 $14,450,542 $13,072,969

      Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

      Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
      1st (Source and Amount) -- --
      -- --
      -- --
      2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
      -- --
      -- --
      3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
      -- --
      -- --

      Financial Planning

      Endowment Value $119,083.00
      Spending Policy Income Only
      Percentage(If selected) --
      Credit Line Yes
      Reserve Fund Yes
      How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

      Capital Campaign

      Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
      Capital Campaign Purpose Under One Roof expanded the nationally recognized Moving Ahead program; maintained our life-saving core services; and created 14 new supported housing units.
      Campaign Goal $15,100,000.00
      Capital Campaign Dates Mar 2007 - Dec 2011
      Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $16,000,000.00
      Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

      Short Term Solvency

      Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
      Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.40 1.41 1.72

      Long Term Solvency

      Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
      Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

      CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

      St. Francis House believes that homelessness is an experience, not an identity. Our goal is to provide our guests with everything they need to reclaim their dignity and rebuild their lives: nutritious meals, clothing, access to medical care, counseling, vocational rehabilitation, and housing.  Vocational rehabilitation, in particular, is a strategic institutional goal, focused on helping our guests re-enter the workforce and positively engage with the world; strengthening themselves, their families, and the social and economic fabric of our communities. 

      As the largest homeless day shelter in New England, St. Francis House provides 800 meals per day, representing service to an estimated 500-600 unduplicated individuals each day. As of 5/31/2013, we have over 6,200 guests registered in our database, 2,500 of which have registered within the last 12 months. With our open door policy everyone is welcome, and we are open 365 days of the year. Our services and programs fall into three broad categories: basic services, rehabilitative programs and housing.

       

      Foundation Comments

      Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

      Documents


      Other Documents

      No Other Documents currently available.

      Impact

      The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


      1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

      Goal 1: St. Francis House works in concert with the night shelters in the Greater Boston area and fills a much needed niche in day services for homeless adults. Individuals who stay in a nighttime shelter must leave every morning so the facility can be cleaned and prepared for the next night. We open at 7:00 AM when night shelters are closing, and close at 3:00 PM when they are re-opening. Our Atrium, on the first floor, and the Day Center, one flight up, provide a safe, comfortable alternative to spending the day on the street. Here, guests can escape the elements, enjoy the company of friends, and watch the local news or a movie chosen by one of our discussion groups. In bitterly cold, windy and wet winter months, access to a warm and dry place is essential, just as much as an air conditioned environment provides relief to homeless adults during excessive heat - otherwise they are at risk of heat exhaustion, heatstroke and dehydration – all serious conditions. Indeed, the average age at death for homeless individuals living in Boston is 47 years of age. Goal 2: To alleviate the immediate pain and suffering of our guests by meeting basic needs – food, clothing, showers, access to medical care, and counseling. Goal 3: To help our guests move up and out of homelessness, toward self-sufficiency; employment; and permanent housing.

      2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

      We provide all of the programs and services our guests need, all under one roof. The ability to do this is our greatest organizational strength. For example, a guest may come to St. Francis House for a meal, but if a staff member observes a more severe problem – such as mental illness, the guest can be taken directly to a mental health counselor for help. This removes any potential barriers to guests receiving the help they need. (How can mentally ill homeless adults get to medical or mental health appointments, if those appointments are scheduled for other times/days at different locations? Especially, when they are alone without a caregiver and do not have access to calendars or watches?) Simply put, our guests receive
      the most extensive and complete spectrum of integrated services in the Greater Boston area. From basic services to rehabilitation services to housing, we work as a team to support individuals as they progress from the streets and shelters to self-sufficiency.

      3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

      In FY13 we: •Served 315,350 meals •Provided 9,387 showers •Distributed 6,985 changes of clothes •Provided more than 10,000 counseling sessions on mental health issues, substance abuse, housing, employment, legal matters, and other issues •Partnered with Boston Health Care for the Homeless to provide 9,135 medical appointments •Trained 99 people in our First Step Program •Graduated the 138th class from the Moving Ahead Program (MAP), our vocational rehabilitation program, whose alumni now number more than 1,500 •Provided 56 units of permanent housing in our Next Step Housing Program

      4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

      Our most obvious indicator of success comes from MAP, where we have a good track record of helping people get back on their feet and on a pathway to a successful career. The program has more than 1,500 alumni. Other programs help guests prepare for MAP and for lives free of institutions. Our Counseling and Mental Health Department, for example, provides individual and group counseling, as well as psychiatric care, for guests who want to become stable and sober. Small
      victories, such as gaining trust in a clinician, lead to larger victories over time as guests learn to deal with years of trauma and begin making positive changes. At times, the Counseling staff also advises family members who want to help an estranged loved one who is struggling with mental illness or addiction. Recently, one family contacted the department because they wanted to celebrate their daughter's birthday without initiating direct contact, which could trigger her psychosis.
      The staff suggested an anonymous gift that she and other guests could enjoy. As a result, the family provided ice cream – a rare treat in a homeless shelter – for all of our guests and our staff.

      5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

      In 2012, St. Francis House built out its fifth floor in order to add 3 new MAP classrooms. Our goal was to reduce the time students had to wait to enroll in MAP. Often, they waited 6 months or more, which prolonged their suffering and trauma. Although this expansion doubled our capacity from serving 100 to 200 students, demand for the Moving Ahead Program still exceeds our capacity. Students still have to wait to be enrolled, but the wait time has decreased to 1 to 3 months.