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The Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association of Greater Lowell Inc.

 465 School Street
 Lowell, MA 01851
[P] (978) 454-6200
[F] (978) 454-6229
www.cmaalowell.org
spouv@cmaalowell.org
Sovanna Pouv
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INCORPORATED: 1984
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2553560

LAST UPDATED: 07/19/2016
Organization DBA The Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association of Greater Lowell, Inc.
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association is dedicated to improving the quality of life for Cambodian Americans and other minorities and economically disadvantaged persons in Lowell through educational, cultural, economic and social programs.

Mission Statement

The Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association is dedicated to improving the quality of life for Cambodian Americans and other minorities and economically disadvantaged persons in Lowell through educational, cultural, economic and social programs.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $345,871.00
Projected Expense $340,458.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • ESOL (English as Second Optional Language)
  • First Time Home Buyer Training
  • Monorom Family Support Program
  • Walk-in and Translation Services
  • Young Professionals Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association is dedicated to improving the quality of life for Cambodian Americans and other minorities and economically disadvantaged persons in Lowell through educational, cultural, economic and social programs.

Background Statement

The Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association of Greater Lowell (CMAA) was created in 1984 as a non-profit organization to address the needs of the growing Cambodian community. Our mission is to improve the quality of life for Cambodian-Americans and other newly arrived immigrants of all ages, by assisting and guiding them with their educational, cultural, social, community and economic development. To accomplish our mission, CMAA partners with local and state-based organizations to offer a variety of services, including English for Speakers of Other Languages classes,, a first time home buyer’s program and other courses in financial literacy, translation services in several languages for businesses and community members, a young professionals program for mentoring and guidance, Khmer literacy classes, citizenship assistance, and the Monorom program, an innovative and culturally sensitive program which provides support to families with developmentally disabled children. CMAA also hosts weekly local access television and radio shows.


Like many organizations, CMAA has undergone change as it has evolved over the years from an organization which primarily met the needs of recent immigrants, to one which now also helps more settled community members to thrive and succeed in Lowell. Going forward, in addition to our current services to the community, CMAA intends to focus on increasing civic engagement, access to healthcare and entrepreneurial opportunity, and vocational education and mentoring through leadership programs.


Impact Statement

In the past year, CMAA has experienced tremendous growth and greater recognition. Some of our accomplishments include:

  • Expanding walk-in service hours from 30 to 40 hours per week;

  • Instituting use of Apricot software to track points of service for clients and collect useful demographic information about the people we serve;

  • Completing strategic and fundraising plans with board and staff input;

  • Expanded staff positions: made one part-time staff full-time and added two part-time positions, and

  • Added two new programs which we have either fully funded from new funding sources, or secured funding for as a combination of in-kind services and grant awards.

Our goals for the current year include:

  • Expanding our services and providing more points of services for walk-in clients;

  • Continuing to secure funding from a combination of national, state and local foundations,

  • Producing and distributing our first annual report,

  • Developing and implementing our first direct mail campaign, and

  • Registering more voters and conducting more civic engagement activities, including hosting candidate forums at CMAA and interviewing candidates on our TV show


Needs Statement

  1. Our most pressing need is to obtain permanent, diverse funding from several sources for a full-time intake and program services coordinator. Currently, the position is staffed at only 20 hours per week. 

  2. Finishing construction of our second-floor and garage, which will aid CMAA’s fiscal security by providing reliable sources of rental income, and expanded space for current and future programs.

  3. Continuing to track information on our programs and clients, to demonstrate the variety of services we offer, log points of service and collect information on clients to illustrate who we serve at CMAA.

  4. Expanding civic engagement opportunities for CMAA clients, and provide more avenues toward political engagement, while remaining politically neutral.

  5. Providing more learning service opportunities, and opportunities for youth to become leaders in their own communities, regardless of their chosen career path.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
The Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association of Greater Lowell, Inc. is based in the city of Lowell but serves people in the Greater Lowell area, including the following zip codes: 01824, 01826, 01850, 01851, 01852, 01854, 01876, 01879 and 01886 . CMAA's offices are located in the Highlands neighborhood, at a locale which is centered in one of Lowell's predominantly-Cambodian communities. 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

ESOL (English as Second Optional Language)

In partnership with Abisi Adult Education, this program provides opportunities for community members seeking to improve English language skills. Currently, four classes are offered through Abisi Adult Education at CMAA. Two classes are held in the morning, Tuesday through Thursday, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Two evening classes are held, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, and Thursday and Friday evenings, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. Classes meet from September through June. Enrollment is open and fluctuates: currently there are 73 students attending on a weekly basis; as of April 2015, 112 students have been enrolled since September 2014.
Budget  $11,500.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success  By the end of class session, at least 60% of program participants will demonstrate educational gain, as measured through pre-post testing utilizing the BEST Plus assessment. The Best Plus assessment is aligned to the National Reporting System and the Student Performance Level ESL functioning level descriptors. 
Program Long-Term Success  Cambodian-Americans have low rates of high school and college graduation, compared to other immigrant populations in America. With completion of this course, students' mastery of English will increase educational and workforce opportunities, resulting in a better quality of life for them and their families in the United States.
Program Success Monitored By 

Student progress is measured by teacher evaluation and by results of pre/post testing utilizing the BEST Plus.  

One hundred and twelve (112) students have been enrolled at CMAA since September 10th, 2014. One hundred and nine (109) of those students were pre-tested using the BEST Plus. To date, sixty-six (66), of these students have been post-tested using the BEST Plus. Fifty-nine (59) % of all enrolled students have been post-tested. Sixty (60) of the seventy-three (73) current students have been post-tested. Eighty-two (82) % of current students have been post-tested.

Examples of Program Success  Student progress is measured by teacher evaluation and by results of pre/post testing utilizing the BEST Plus. Student improvement is measured by an educational gain of thirty-three (33) points between pre and post BEST Plus scores. Forty-six (46) of the sixty-six (66) students post tested showed an educational gain. Seventy (70) % of post-tested students showed educational gain.

First Time Home Buyer Training

Offered in conjunction with the Merrimack Valley Housing Partnership (MVHP), First Time Home Buyer seminars are offered for residents who need more information on whether home ownership is right for them, and assistance with one of the most important financial decisions they will ever make. The MVHP provides accreditation, curriculum and instructors, while CMAA markets the program in the Khmer-speaking community, hosts the seminars and provides translation.
 
Because the MVHP holds a Seal of Approval from the Massachusetts Home Ownership collaborative, program participants are eligible for special mortgage products (through MASSHOUSING and the Massachusetts Housing Partnership) and down payment assistance programs (through City of Lowell's HOME program and the Lowell Development & Finance Corporation). The program  is offered two weekends every other month at CMAA, which hosts the only program of this kind for Khmer speakers in Lowell. 
Budget  $4,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Guidance & Counseling
Population Served Adults Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Families
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term success of the FTHB seminars is defined as increasing the number of participants who become educated on the advantages and possible pitfalls of home ownership. While one goal of the program is to increase home ownership, a further aim is to provide all participants with enough information to decide whether home ownership is right for them and their families. 
Program Long-Term Success  Long-term success for the FTHB program would mean an increase in the number of Cambodians in Lowell who own, rather than rent, their homes. Home ownership, over the long run, increases the net worth of a family, ensures that money spent on housing is recoverable in a way that paying rent doesn't, and adds to the stability of communities.  
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is determined by how many people enrolled ultimately complete the program, and how many purchase houses after program completion. Since 2008, CMAA and MVHP have co-produced 36 sets of seminars. These workshops are conducted in Khmer, and each set consists of 10 hours of instruction over two Saturdays. So far, 554 families have graduated from the program, and MVHP estimates that 200 have already purchased their first home. Approximately 80 families received down payment assistance


Examples of Program Success 

The following is a condensed report on a CMAA client from MVHP: 

Bora and Chanminea had been living in the U.S. for five years before they bought their first home. “The first time is tough,” says Bora, remembering when he and Chanminea first arrived from Cambodia. “Everything was new for me.”

The two had been renting a home when a friend told Bora about the home buyer training classes. They took the class that the Merrimack Valley Housing Partnership does in cooperation with CMAA. Bora and Chanminea learned a lot about home buying in the U.S. After visiting almost twenty homes, the young couple found a perfect home in the new Rivers Edge development in which to raise their daughter, Monineat. They moved in on Christmas day of 2014.

Congratulations to the new homeowners, Bora and Chanminea.


Monorom Family Support Program

The Monorom Family Support Program (MFSP) is an innovative service offered by CMAA. Its Program Coordinator, Brian Chen, works with 35 developmentally disabled youths (ages 3-18) and their families to obtain needed diagnoses and assistance. Some of the conditions of program recipients include Down Syndrome, autism. learning disability, ADD and others which affect learning ability. The Program Coordinator provides support for families working with Department of Developmental Services (DDS) caseworkers, including interpretation and translation services, as well as transportation for appointments.
 
 Because the MFSP is composed of Cambodians serving Cambodians, deeper connections are possible between the MFSP staff and the families of disabled children who share the same language and history, and who thoroughly understand both the Cambodian culture and day-to-day life in Lowell.
 
Budget  $89,154.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Case Management
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage
Program Short-Term Success  Some short-term improvements of MFSP participants include a greater ability of participants to make their voices heard and issues understood, as well as increased social opportunities through CMAA's community events. MFSP participants also have greater access to health care through transportation provided by CMAA to appointments, which often take place outside of Lowell.  The MFSP provides opportunities for families of disabled children to exercise control and leadership when seeking support services at parent meetings and during their ongoing interactions with the MFSP, which encourage parents to gradually assume more leadership for seeking help from support agencies.
Program Long-Term Success  A long-term definition of success for the program participants and families is an increased ability to acquire the help they need: from neighbors and extended families, and especially from state agencies. It is also hoped that program participants can learn how to obtain assistance when family members are no longer eligible for the Monorom program due to age. CMAA works with the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services and their caseworkers to diagnose participants, and refer them to programs which receive state grants and provide services outside of CMAA's expertise to eligible program participants.
Program Success Monitored By  This program is funded by a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services, who monitor program success. CMAA is required to reapply for funding on a five-year cycle. The grant re-application contains several sections which must be completed that describe program participants, their successes and how the program could be improved to provide a better level of service for participants. We consider our programs successful when families have gained an increase in their ability to seek help on their own, although language barriers sometimes prevent this possibility. 
Examples of Program Success 
The MFSP has distributed a survey to document the satisfaction of families. As some of the families served by the MFSP are not literate in Khmer or English, the MFSP also seeks and responds to feedback from families at parent support meetings, during status calls to families, and during MFSP-sponsored activities. The following examples illustrate how the MFSP made procedural and program changes in response to feedback from families:
1: An application for SSI support that the MFSP made in a family’s behalf was denied. At the family’s request, the MFSP shepherded their application through a lengthy appeal process.As a result of the MFSP’s appeal efforts, the family’s SSI application denial was eventually overturned.
 
2: Attendees of parent meetings complained that the evening meeting time did not allow them adequate time for family after-school and evening activities. The MFSP honored their request to reschedule the parent meeting to occur during the day.

Walk-in and Translation Services

CMAA offers translation services in two distinct areas: one for businesses seeking services for their communications to customers and other businesses; the other for community members who come in for appointments where assistance with English-language documents and translation is provided. This latter service is also provided to community members on a drop-in basis, when staff are available.
 
Some of the areas CMAA offers assistance in are: citizenship, employment authorization, fax and copy services, fuel assistance, general help, general translation, green card and housing applications, Massachusetts identifications, permits and licenses, MassHealth and other health insurance registrations, Safelink services, SNAP (food stamps), Social Security, unemployment, voter registration and welfare (TAFDC) registration.
Budget  $15,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Information & Referral
Population Served Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Other Economic Level
Program Short-Term Success  Immediate outcomes for our walk-in clients include the ability to sign up for health care, to interpret English-language forms, register to vote and obtaining health insurance. Interpreter services are also offered, in which CMAA staff, for example, will phone someone who works for the state of Massachusetts and relate the problem or issue that needs resolution for a client with limited English language skills, and act as the go-between between the individual and the state agency to resolve the issue at hand. For our business services, CMAA has provided interpretation and translation services for many satisfied clients, including Tufts Health Plan, Health Care For All, The City of Lowell, Mill City Grows and the Lowell Police Department.
Program Long-Term Success  CMAA's long-term concept of success would be our ability to continue to provide translation and interpreter services for walk-in community members free of charge, through generating enough income from the translation services we provide to businesses and other sources of funding. Given the language barriers which exist in our community, it is likely that such a need for translation and interpretation services will continue. For business translation services, CMAA intends to increase our outreach to more companies, NGOs and other government entities,  obtaining more lucrative projects and an expanded client base. By continuing to provide excellent and reliable service, CMAA hopes to become the trusted. "go-to" vendor of translation and interpreter services for South East Asian languages in Lowell.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored in two ways: feedback from the businesses and individuals who pay a fee to access our services, and responses from the community members who we offer translation services to free of charge. Feedback from our business clients has been uniformly positive, with referrals to other businesses who end up using our services. In the case of community member response service recipients let us know if they have been sufficiently aided by coming back in case of any issue, which our staff members work with them to solve. 
Examples of Program Success  CMAA's Translation Services program has helped numerous community members achieve things they may never have been able to do on their own. Examples include: signing up for health insurance and state benefits, responding to credit reports and making payments in a timely manner, and obtaining citizenship applications to begin the process of becoming American citizens. For our business clients, our services have enabled them to communicate crucial information to Khmer-speaking community members concerning how to obtain health services and health care, how to register to vote, how to get fresh fruits and vegetables and other important matters. For example, the Lowell Police Department has used CMAA to help them communicate about issues concerning law enforcement and the prevention of criminal activity in areas where English is not the primary language spoken.

Young Professionals Program

The Young Professionals Program serves junior and senior students currently enrolled in college. The goal of the program is to pair participants with professionals in the community who can act as mentors and advisors for participants' transition to the world of work. Curriculum covers resume and cover letter writing, interviewing techniques and proper behavior for the corporate realm, including networking skills, civic engagement, effective communication and dining etiquette. This mentorship culminates in a group community service project which encompasses fundraising for the YPP and CMAA. Mentees have the opportunity for guidance from mentors, and to build lasting relationships which will further their chances of professional success.
Budget  $10,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  In the short-term, by the time participants graduate from the YPP, they will have increased their ability to choose a career path and will have made connections which improve their chances of success in the labor market. Specifically, they will learn a wider variety of skills related to job performance and have the opportunity to practice and refine them with a mentor who can offer guidance. 
Program Long-Term Success  Program long-term success is defined as building new leaders who will positively impact their community through the skills learned and connections made. These new leaders will succeed in both the corporate and nonprofit realms, and the skills gained in the YPP will allow participants a greater choice in how they will proceed professionally. The YPP aims to create leaders who will become further involved in their communities, whether through volunteer work or in a professional capacity. Also, it is hoped that the relationships built through the program will increase not only the lives of participants, but empower them to assist others in their lives who may lack the opportunity for program participation.
Program Success Monitored By  As the YPP is a recent addition to CMAA, we don't have reliable data for what has worked and hasn't been effective.  In the future, pre- and post- assessments will be conducted to gauge which skills learned were most valuable to graduates, and the greatest asset to the development of their careers. In the future, CMAA will also collect feedback from the mentoring professionals to measure how effective they view different aspects of the program to have been. This information will be used to influence program activities going forward. We will also ask program graduates to complete a survey one year past their graduation date to highlight the skills they have learned, whether they are working and in what capacity, and whether there is a way the program could be improved.
Examples of Program Success 
One  example of long-term program success is that two recent program graduates have joined the workforce in corporate positions, and are board members of CMAA. These graduates are also involved in the ongoing development of the YPP. They are willing to serve as mentors for the next generation of program participants, who will be in a position to take advantage of the skills learned from the program and move on to greater professional opportunities as a result.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Sovanna Devin Pouv
CEO Term Start June 2014
CEO Email spouv@cmaalowell.org
CEO Experience
Mr. Pouv has over 13 years experience in the nonprofit sector. Prior to becoming Executive Director at the Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association of Greater Lowell (CMAA), Mr. Pouv spent 12 years at the United Teen Equality Center (UTEC) as a design consultant, and then spent two years as Director of Marketing at Meerkat Technology. However, the wish to continue to work in the nonprofit world and assist those in need brought him to CMAA, which had provided him the funding for his first year's experience at UTEC in 2001. A graduate of Lowell High School and Middlesex Community College, Mr. Pouv is currently enrolled at Boston University's Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership.  
 



 
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Boroeuth Chen --

Mr. Chen has been with CMAA for 17 years. During that time, he has worked primarily as the coordinator for the Monorom Family Support Program, which assists families with developmentally disabled children by providing case management, counseling, and recreational and educational opportunities. This program is funded by the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services. Mr. Chen also provides translation assistance and expertise with medical terminology when needed.

Ms. Sreypov Vary Colwell Program and Outreach Manager Ms. Colwell has fifteen years of experience working with children in a variety of different educational and child care settings, including five years' experience as an Educational Technician for the Monarch School of New England, where she implemented and tracked individual educational plans (IEPs) for a diverse student body ages 5-21. As CMAA's Program and Outreach Manager she supervises and implements the Rising Stars Sports and Leadership Program, the Young Professionals Program, and other after-school and out-of-school programming in development at CMAA.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Fred Abisi Adult Education, Merrimack Valley Housing Partnership, Lowell Community Health Center, Metta Health Center, City of Lowell, Entrepreneurship for All, Tzu Chi Foundation, Lowell Police Department, Project Citizenship.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 20
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 2
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Bopha Malone
Board Chair Company Affiliation Enterprise Bank
Board Chair Term Nov 2013 - Nov 2016
Board Co-Chair Mr. Virak Uy
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Boston Public Schools
Board Co-Chair Term Nov 2015 - Nov 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Yun-Ju Choi Coalition for a Better Acre Voting
Ms. Vichtcha Kong Washington Savings Bank Voting
Ms. Lada Lau University of Massachusetts, Lowell Voting
Ms. Sara Khun Leng Lowell Police Department Voting
Ms. Bopha Malone Enterprise Bank Voting
Mr. Shaun McCarthy Greater Lowell Workforce Investment Board Voting
Ms. Eileen Morrison Boston University School of Law Voting
Mr. William Samaras Retired Voting
Mr. Soeun Sok Bayon Jewelry Voting
Ms. Molyka Tieng Lowell Community Health Center Voting
Mr. Virak Uy The Chea Uy Trust Fund Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 8
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 7
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Marketing

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $345,871.00
Projected Expense $340,458.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Financial Review

2014 Financial Review

2013 Financial Review

2012 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $376,582 $404,090 $314,485
Total Expenses $343,872 $376,314 $465,077

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $89,429 $108,379 $197,100
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $89,429 $108,379 $197,100
Individual Contributions $200,129 $201,563 $41,979
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $49,213 $60,216 $51,564
Investment Income, Net of Losses $206 $445 $2,276
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $37,605 $33,487 $21,566
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $130,997 $119,829 $237,637
Administration Expense $212,875 $254,706 $224,459
Fundraising Expense -- $1,779 $2,981
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.10 1.07 0.68
Program Expense/Total Expenses 38% 32% 51%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 1% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,155,618 $1,123,081 $1,103,177
Current Assets $551,464 $540,810 $635,032
Long-Term Liabilities $184,111 $190,882 $197,389
Current Liabilities $12,306 $5,708 $7,073
Total Net Assets $959,201 $926,491 $898,715

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 44.81 94.75 89.78

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 16% 17% 18%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Ultimately, the goal of the CMAA is to create the conditions which will lead to parity for the Cambodian population in Lowell and the United States, and allow for Cambodians to excel in their careers, thrive in their families and become engaged leaders for themselves and their communities. CMAA’s goals for the next three years, as outlined in its strategic plan, are as follows:

1. Increase Cambodians’ civic engagement in city, state and national politics, while remaining politically neutral.

2. Continue to support all generations of Cambodians while concentrating on new initiatives to not only help Cambodians preserve and celebrate their culture, but also provide the tools to help Cambodians succeed in America.

3. Innovate and execute new leadership development opportunities for upcoming generations of Cambodian youth in Lowell.

These are ambitious goals for any organization, and long-term success might not be readily apparent for a number of years. However, CMAA will know that we have succeeded when more people who come to us for assistance are empowered to help themselves and others in their families and community. We will also see success in the increased political power of Cambodians in Lowell: not from supporting one candidate over another, but from making their voices heard around pertinent issues, and through greater representation in Lowell’s City Council, and even in state and national offices. In the short term, CMAA will track its success at providing services through using Apricot software, which is currently in use to collect data reflecting our clients’ demographics, and information on the services we provide. Finally, we will measure success through an increase in people we have been able to assist with citizenship and immigration hurdles, who can become fully engaged and invested in Lowell as American citizens.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

The following is information on each goal outlined in our strategic plan: 

 
Goal 1: Increase Cambodians’ civic engagement in city, state and national politics, while remaining politically neutral.

Continuing Activities:

  • Register people who come to CMAA for our other programs and services.

  • Civic engagement efforts by having summer youth workers canvass neighborhoods where turnout is low to register voters and remind them of where and when to vote;

  • Offer voter education by hosting events at CMAA and providing information through TV and radio shows.

  • Host state representative open office hours, regardless of officeholder.

  • Work with community partners to develop further strategies and activities intended to increase voter registration and turnout.

  • Host community events and candidate forums at CMAA and on CMAA’s TV show, to further engage potential voters and demystify the political process.

  • Other GOTV efforts on Election Day, including providing transportation to the polls and reminder calls to encourage registered voters to vote.

Expanding Activities:

  • Citizenship classes.

  • Providing up-to-date information about correct precincts and voting locations, including recent changes to polling locations.

New Activities:

  • Work to have staff members become certified by the Bureau of Immigration Affairs (BIA); such certification will allow CMAA to process citizenship forms for clients on the premises.


  • Conduct “town halls” for elected officials, with a particular focus on local elected, on a quarterly basis. (Except for during the period leading up to an election that such activities could be considered campaigning).


  • Themes for the town halls will be generated by the community, CMAA’s board, and other stakeholders. This new activity will have a specific two-fold goal: increasing civic participation/ having their voices heard and having elected officials understand and respond to the concerns of the community.


Goal 2: Continue to support all generations of Cambodians while concentrating on new initiatives to not only help Cambodians preserve and celebrate their culture, but also provide the tools to help Cambodians succeed in America.


Continuing Activities:

  • Offer ESOL and First Time Homebuyer classes, which improve Cambodians’ earning potential, decrease linguistic and cultural gaps and add to economic security.

  • Offer a computer lab at least once per week, with more emphasis on curriculum.

  • Host or co-host community events which preserve and celebrate Cambodian culture, such as Cambodian New Year.

Expanding Activities:

  • Expand the Monorom Family Services Program, which assists developmentally-disabled youth and their families in navigating complex educational and health-care systems and provides crucial transportation and other services.

New Activities:

  • Re-start Khmer classes on weekends for both adults and children.

  • Conduct needs assessment to thoughtfully plan future programs and activities (such as after-school tutoring for college prep and health care programs which specifically address health problems like depression and Hepatitis B that are prevalent in the Cambodian community)


Goal 3: Innovate and promote new leadership development opportunities for upcoming generations of Cambodian youth in Lowell.

Continuing Activities:

  • Continue the Young Professionals Program and obtain feedback from participants.

  • Continue offering summer youth part-time jobs in civic engagement.

  • Continue to offer volunteer opportunities to Lowell youth and community members.

New Activities:

  • Offer Rising Stars Program with grant money and in-kind assistance from Lowell Public Schools and the City of Lowell.

  • Plan to develop other programs through working with statewide and community partners, like Lowell Votes, Nonprofit Vote and MassVote


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

The following are the re-stated goals of the current strategic plan, followed by the resource implications for each and CMAA's unique ability to accomplish the goal:
 
Goal 1: Increase Cambodians’ civic engagement in city, state and national politics, while remaining politically neutral.
 
In most instances, there are no new resource implications because services are continuing. However, resources will needed for the new activities and to implement evaluation methods to review measures. This includes staff time and additional resources for BIA certification and staff time to plan and implement town halls. While this is new, there is potential for this to be in held in tandem with other events. It could also be used to advertise for other CMAA events or vice versa, where those events will advertise the town halls.
 
As a trusted community entity unaligned with any major party, CMAA is well-positioned to lead this effort into the future as an organization dedicated to expanding civic engagement opportunities. 
 
 
Goal 2: Continue to support all generations of Cambodians while concentrating on new initiatives to not only help Cambodians preserve and celebrate their culture, but also provide the tools to help Cambodians succeed in America. 
 
Many of these activities are currently in place and, as such, there should be no new resource needs. However, a review of the age of the computers in the computer lab should be conducted, as new software versions or donated (newer) computers may be needed. While the Monorom Family Services Program is set to expand as part of a pilot program, funding (either from the Department of Developmental Services or from other sources) will need to be secured in the future if CMAA wishes to retain the part-time position. And, re-Starting the Khmer class will entail hiring a teacher and advertising the classes. (Since CMAA owns the space, the cost should be lower. However, since the space is not used on the weekends, the cost of heat/ AC, and other utilities may need to be considered.)
 
With its staff and board made up primarily of Cambodians, CMAA recognizes the issues and inherent difficulties that different generations of Cambodians experience in Lowell: while those in the older generations suffer from linguistic and cultural gaps, those in the younger generations experience a lack of education and career options and mentoring. Because CMAA serves those from all age groups, we are able to create unique opportunities for knowledge and culture to flow across age groups, so that each generation can both learn from and offer knowledge to others.  
 
 
Goal 3: Innovate and promote new leadership development opportunities for upcoming generations of Cambodian youth in Lowell. 
 
CMAA's program staff will continue to manage the Young Professional Program, with funding secured from Saab Family Foundation. The Rising Stars Program is funded through a Shannon grant and a UMass Lowell Giver Hawks grant already secured, and through in-kind services and facility space donated. United Way funding for SEGL programs like Rising Stars will also be applied for. Funding will be re-applied for to fund summer youth civic engagement contracting in 2016. Volunteer opportunities continue to be available; intention is to develop leadership and work-related skills and increased awareness of nonprofit work for participants.
 
CMAA is uniquely positioned for area Cambodian youth to develop new leadership skills and obtain mentoring for scholastic and vocational activities, as our Executive Director and staff are from Lowell and part of the social and ethnic group in need of such opportunities. 
 
 
 
 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Following are key indicators and measures which will be used for each strategic direction outlined in the plan:
 
Goal 1: Increase Cambodians’ civic engagement in city, state and national politics, while remaining politically neutral.
 
At least two CMAA staff members become certified by the Bureau of Immigration Affairs (BIA); such certification will allow CMAA to process citizenship forms for clients on the premises and add to CMAA’s revenue.

CMAA will conduct “town halls” for elected officials, with a particular focus on local elected, on a quarterly basis. (Except for during the period leading up to an election that such activities could be considered campaigning) Themes for the town halls will be generated by the community, CMAA’s board, and other stakeholders. This new activity will have a specific two-fold goal: increasing civic participation/ having their voices heard and having elected officials understand and respond to the concerns of the community.

CMAA will work with other Lowell and state-based organizations to increase the percent of voter turnout in underrepresented communities of Lowell by 3 percent in 2016; 5 percent in 2017 and 7 percent in 2019.

Precinct-level data will be used. Since there are years that, in general, have greater voter turnout than others the review will be based on similar election years (i.e. 2016 will be compared to 2008 and 2012, etc.)

CMAA will increase community awareness of a) who represents them at all levels of government, with a particular focus at the local level and b) how to contact elected individuals regarding a concern.

Quick surveys will be provided to individuals at events on an annual basis so data can be compared

Regular attendance of at least 50 people at Town Halls.

 Goal 2: Continue to support all generations of Cambodians while concentrating on new initiatives to not only help Cambodians preserve and celebrate their culture, but also provide the tools to help Cambodians succeed in America. 
 
Program data from ESOL and First Time Home Buyer classes will be obtained to indicate increase or decrease in program attendance.

Community assessment will be conducted by UMass Lowell by August 2016, to inform CMAA on the needs of diverse age groups in the Cambodian community.

Khmer classes will be re-started by July 2016 (as of April 2016 CMAA has at least 10 prospective students).
 
Goal 3: Innovate and promote new leadership development opportunities for upcoming generations of Cambodian youth in Lowell.
 
Data from Young Professionals Program and Rising Stars Program to be collected and reported to show impact to funders and community.

Summer youth will collect information on at least 50 registered voters and send to Nonprofit Vote in order to track voting rate among CMAA-registered voters.

Volunteer opportunities will continue to be available; intention is to develop leadership and work-related skills and increased awareness of nonprofit work for participants. (Volunteer time will continue to be tracked in Apricot and reported as part of annual report and other CMAA communications, to indicate a total of at least 1,000 volunteer hours per fiscal year.)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Recent progress toward CMAA’s long-term goals is evident in many ways. For example, in March 2016 the Cambodian community came out in force at a Lowell City Council meeting to express their opinions on the planned visit of Hun Manet, a controversial figure who, as the son of Cambodia’s leader Hun Sen, remains politically divisive to Cambodian communities across the united States. CMAA did not take sides on the issue of Hun Manet’s visit, but was proud to see the political engagement of so many Cambodians.

 
We can also also see the improvement in language skills from the people in our ESOL classes, the increase in ability to own houses and secure greater financial stability among our First Time Home Buyer (FTHB) students, and increased ability to obtain crucial assistance through our translation services. From using Apricot to track services rendered to walk-in clients, we can examine any person in our system and provide a report on how many times they have been helped, the type of assistance sought and obtained, etc.

As proud as CMAA is to have been able to advance as far as we have in the last few years, we remain aware that we have not gone as far as we’d like to in repairing the divisiveness that still exists in Lowell’s Cambodian community, particularly concerning political matters in Cambodia. CMAA has, however, learned that being politically neutral is the only way we can continue to build the trust that Lowell’s Cambodian community has in our organization. This remains a potential obstacle, as CMAA in the past has, unfortunately, been regarded as politically aligned with one of Cambodia’s two major political parties. The fact that this is no longer the case is both an indication of progress, and a cautionary tale for remaining politically neutral, in order to honestly serve all who come to us regardless of affiliation.

CMAA has also learned that, as needy as the population we serve is, we cannot offer as many types of help we would like to while remaining focused and sustainable. We have written our new strategic plan in accordance with this new reality; as difficult as it was to scale back programs and services a few years ago, this reduction and refocusing was absolutely necessary. We are now in a place that reflects expressed feedback from the community, which, at meetings in 2013 and 2014, let CMAA know we were still needed, and that we should focus more on providing exclusive services (translation and interpretation) which were unavailable anywhere else in Massachusetts. In addition to our legacy programs like ESOL and FTHB classes, we have expanded both the hours per week for these services, and the hours of dedicated personnel to solving the issues of our walk-in clients. CMAA will continue to develop new programming in the future while balancing both the expressed needs of the community we serve, and the organization’s capacity for taking on new initiatives.