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Weatoc Inc.

 1865 Columbus Avenue
 Roxbury, MA 02119
[P] (617) 820-5105
[F] (617) 532-0376
www.weatocinc.org
[email protected]
Claradine Cowell
INCORPORATED: 1994
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2554029

LAST UPDATED: 06/04/2015
Organization DBA We’re Educators - A Touch Of Class
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

WEATOC, Inc. is the Boston area’s first peer health education group. It is a state-certified minority agency.

WEATOC’s mission is to prevent damaging outcomes---teen pregnancy, violence, substance abuse, AIDS and other STD’s, racism, obesity, and suicide---that result when teens, especially inner-city teens, make shortsighted choices. As important as avoiding negatives is striving for positives:  self-esteem, career and educational goals, and community service.

To do this, we train and support youth peer educators, who create educational curricula and activities and then conduct outreach, performances, and workshops throughout the community. In 34 years, we have found that youth, more than adults, have the power to influence their peers.

Mission Statement

WEATOC, Inc. is the Boston area’s first peer health education group. It is a state-certified minority agency.

WEATOC’s mission is to prevent damaging outcomes---teen pregnancy, violence, substance abuse, AIDS and other STD’s, racism, obesity, and suicide---that result when teens, especially inner-city teens, make shortsighted choices. As important as avoiding negatives is striving for positives:  self-esteem, career and educational goals, and community service.

To do this, we train and support youth peer educators, who create educational curricula and activities and then conduct outreach, performances, and workshops throughout the community. In 34 years, we have found that youth, more than adults, have the power to influence their peers.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $129,162.00
Projected Expense $129,162.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. WEATOC On the Road
  • 2. Summer Peer Institute
  • 3. Peer and Adult Support Initiative
  • 4. Brother2Brother/Sister2Sister
  • 5. Training and Replication

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

WEATOC, Inc. is the Boston area’s first peer health education group. It is a state-certified minority agency.

WEATOC’s mission is to prevent damaging outcomes---teen pregnancy, violence, substance abuse, AIDS and other STD’s, racism, obesity, and suicide---that result when teens, especially inner-city teens, make shortsighted choices. As important as avoiding negatives is striving for positives:  self-esteem, career and educational goals, and community service.

To do this, we train and support youth peer educators, who create educational curricula and activities and then conduct outreach, performances, and workshops throughout the community. In 34 years, we have found that youth, more than adults, have the power to influence their peers.

Background Statement

History - WEATOC, Inc. is the Boston area's first peer health education group. It began in 1979 as a part of Harvard St. Neighborhood Health Center in Dorchester and became an independent tax-exempt agency in 1984.

WEATOC was started by two experienced health educators; one of them, Claradine Moore-Cowell, is currently CEO. After training youth of diverse ages in health and in peer education, participants were hungry to do more, so we helped them create their own theater and use it to educate their peers.

The Approach - WEATOC targets youth at risk of destructive or self-destructive behavior---teen pregnancy, violence, substance abuse, AIDS and other STDs, obesity, and suicide. We focus on African-American and Latino youth, because these communities are hurting and because youth of color are alienated from mainstream health education methods.

As important as avoiding negatives is striving for positives:  self-esteem, career and educational goals, racial harmony, and community service.

Peer Educators are at the heart of WEATOC!  We empower them to reach peers 'in their own language.' We have faith in the ability of youth to make good choices and have found that youth, more than adults, have the power to influence peers. We believe so strongly in youth that:

  • We make them paid staff members.
  • They don't just teach prevention, they create curricula.
  • They plan, stage, and produce events, including outreach, publicity, and budgeting.
  • With drama as a focus, we enable youth to create, to express themselves, and to have fun.
  • Many adult staff are WEATOC alumni, as are two board members.
  • Young people listen best to other youth. Through drama, role plays, and other techniques created by youth, young people learn in the most real and lasting way possible. These effects grow as we create and integrate curricula and theatrical material from new and old projects.

In 34 years, we have developed a versatile toolbox touching 3 dimensions:

Issues - Teen pregnancy, street violence, domestic violence, relationship violence, substance abuse, AIDS, diet and fitness, racism, health promotion, gender identity, educational and career goals, and others.

Strategies - Peer educator training and support, curriculum and video development, performances and workshops, partner staff and peer educator training and support, social networking, and Summer Peer Institute.

Locations and Partners - Health centers, schools, churches, community centers, street theater, online, and replication sites.

Impact Statement

2013 Accomplishments:

  • WEATOC recruited and trained 38 peer educators.  In the summer, almost all of our 26 peer educators were paid through three partner youth jobs agencies. During the school year, some peer educators were paid through the Boston Youth Fund and others through private funds.
  • Peer educators were ages 11-20 and diverse in ethnicity and neighborhood. About one-fourth were under Mass. Dept. of Children and Families (DCF) supervision (typically placed in foster or group homes).
  • Staff supported peer educators with roundtable discussions, community-building exercises, educational games, and support activities. The program went on day in and day out all year long, with the young people working together, forming tight bonds, and learning and receiving support from staff and each other in so many ways.
  • Summer peer educators spent days traveling around Boston mainly Roxbury/Dorchester and Downtown Boston) and performing on the streets and in the subways. They used guerrilla theater, where peer educators spark discussion among diverse groups by suddenly beginning highly dramatic, attention-grabbing short performances in public spaces.
  • The Peer Educator Corps held performances and workshops on diverse topics at various partner sites.

 Goals for the Coming Year:

  • Expand fundraising, donor relations, and marketing to various stakeholders and obtain more public and private grants.  All other goals depend on funding.
  • Build on our partnership with DCF to increase its referral of DCF-supervised youth, thereby expanding our impact on some of the community’s most troubled youth while expanding revenue from this source.
  • Train and engage more peer educators, more partners, and more performance and workshop participants.
  • Develop an interactive, high-impact website, a process we have already begun.
  • Implement our "New Era" plans to build capacity.
  • Build our capacity for replication in order to train and support teams of peer leaders at partner schools, health centers, youth centers, etc.

 


Needs Statement

In 34 years, we have established and refined our model, trained over 2,000 WEATOC peer educators, trained and supported thousands of peer educators and peer leaders at partner organizations, educated tens of thousands of youth, and replicated our peer education model at dozens of other area organizations.  We’ve also successfully managed three major federal grants, including two in the mid-2000’s.

Yet in recent years, due to several factors, our funding has declined and with it our program, evaluation, dissemination, and community leadership capacities.  We still have an effective model, reputation, and other assets on which we can build and develop what we are calling a New Era, more effective than ever.  (See Impact Statement.)

One area of organizational need is our partnership with DCF, the state’s child welfare agency.  WEATOC has a pioneering contract with DCF, paying WEATOC to serve high-risk DCF youth, but the contract does not guarantee a regular stream of referrals.  We are still working to establish relationships with DCF personnel in offices throughout Boston.

Finally, WEATOC needs to organize and digitize its large body of peer educator-created curricula and creative performance material and to use that to market its training and replication capacities.

CEO Statement

Thank you for taking the time to learn about WEATOC. Here are a few reflections.

Some WEATOC Achievements: 

  • In a recent year, we ran 31 varied performances and workshops, attended by 5,230 youth and adults at schools, health centers, youth centers, etc. Videotapes and cable reached thousands more.
  • Our federally-funded project organized and trained 120 Ambassadors at eight replication sites. Ambassador teams produced 8 presentations and 3 outreach activities that reached 1,140 youth!  Meanwhile, we developed and implemented an extensive evaluation.
  • We generated national exposure and networking for WEATOC through presentations at conferences and technical assistance to other projects.
  • Over a decade ago, Peer Educators recorded an AIDS rap for Salt 'n' Pepa's platinum album, Very Necessary, still heard around the world.

 Key WEATOC Features:

  • We are dealing with critical issues of health, violence, education, and aspiration that are literally destroying youth of color in inner-city Boston.
  • Our outreach and activities stress diversity and understanding and appreciation of all cultures.
  • Absolutely central to WEATOC is true youth empowerment and respect for youth’s views and abilities; using the arts (music, rap, drama, graphics) is also critical to our model.
  • The WEATOC model has been proven to have major impact on youth.  In the next 3 years, with appropriate funding, we plan to make our unique peer education model a Federally-recognized youth empowerment model, opening up new opportunities for expansion and replication.
  • Four years ago, WEATOC simultaneously lost two major federal grants. This sent the organization into a crisis from which we are just emerging and the budget figures show that we have gradually rebuilt and revitalized our funding and program.

What Peer Educators Get from WEATOC - Out of over 2,500 youth involved as peer educators in 34 years, to our knowledge, none abuses drugs, alcohol, or tobacco and none is a high school drop-out.

WEATOC veterans are an amazing group.  They include lawyers, teachers, and corporate executives.  Most are highly involved in their communities.  But wherever their paths have taken them, each has a positive self-image, in part due to their experiences at WEATOC, and they share that positive attitude with others.

Today, our community is weaker than ever, as the economy tumbles and crime, violence,  and substance abuse are again on the rise.  Yet the WEATOC model and the opportunities it provides to young people still have a huge impact in helping our peer educators to stay healthy, positive, and striving for a bright future!


Board Chair Statement

WEATOC is a truly exceptional organization that I have had the privilege to serve as Board Chair. If you get a chance to attend a WEATOC performance or workshop, you’ll see peer educators full of energy, participants paying intense attention, and profound and lasting learning taking place. And one more thing: you’ll see hopefulness.

By placing young people at the heart of creating and delivering education for peers, WEATOC consistently breaks through barriers to learning that often seem insurmountable. Consider what keeps young people from learning critical life lessons:

“Another drug and alcohol class?  I’ve had enough; I already know everything about it!” This common attitude indicates that teens dismiss most preventive education as irrelevant. Several barriers to teen health promotion underpin WEATOC’s program design:

 

  • Most health education stresses statistics and facts, which rarely affects attitudes or behavior. We must teach communication, refusal assertiveness, decision-making, and self-efficacy.
  • Teens rarely talk to each other, especially when it would do the most good. It is just ‘uncool.’
  • Feelings of invulnerability are natural among teens, despite the real threat of a disease or injury. This leads them to not use condoms or practice healthy nutrition.
  • Most health education is planned and run by adults and rarely engages teens in their own voices, using their own forms of expression.
  • Health education rarely targets ethnic minorities, enabling them to use authentic voices and ideas.
  • Rarer still is health education actually fun and exciting! The WEATOC model adds dramatic and other creative expression to more conventional forms of education.
  • Young people listen best to peers. Through drama, role plays, and other techniques created by youth, they learn in real and lasting ways.

 

I sincerely hope you will learn more about this powerful approach and support it with your time and/or money.


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)

WEATOC targets Greater Boston youth, parents, and professionals. Yet we focus on urban youth of color from Dorchester, Mattapan, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, and other neighborhoods. We especially target youth with disabilities and gay and lesbian youth.

Peer educators and participants vary in ethnicity, age, interests, abilities, and attitudes on school, sexuality, and risk factors. This appeals to diverse audiences, brings in diverse ideas and talents, and links us to diverse organizations.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Performing Arts

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

1. WEATOC On the Road

Placing peer educators at the heart of the program, WEATOC trains a Peer Educator Corps, supports it in creating curricula and performances, and enables it to go ‘on the road’ to educate peers at schools, health centers, youth centers, churches, and outdoor settings across the city and region.

2014-15 objectives are:

  1. To recruit 25-30 peer educator trainees, balanced in gender, ethnicity, and age (12-19).
  2. To provide 40 hours of initial training plus 4-6 hours a week of ongoing training and development.
  3. To guide the Corps to create varied curricula, including skits, plays, rap, dance, role play, and discussion, addressing substance abuse, sexuality, and violence as well as peer pressure, relationships, leadership, decision-making, resilience, and self-esteem.
  4. To help the Corps plan and conduct 15-18 workshops, performances, and outreach, reaching 1,000-1,200 youth at locations across Boston.
  5. To use our adult and youth staff to train and support 2-3 teams of peer leaders at partner sites.
Budget  $40,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

These describe and quantify the program's impact:

40 peer educators will improve skills, awareness, and self-esteem around critical issues.

These peer educators will improve their behavior and positive orientation on school, their futures, relationships, and preventing violence, as measured by the survey described below.

The Corps will develop a significant body of peer education curricula and materials around violence, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, and other issues.

At least 1,200 youth will take part in and learn from performances, workshops, and outreach.

The larger community of youth will be exposed to positive, preventive messages through media, our website, peer educator outreach, and viral buzz from performances and workshops.

Program Long-Term Success 

Peer educators will improve skills, awareness, and self-esteem around issues critical to their future.

Peer educators will improve their behavior and positive orientation on school, their futures, relationships, and preventing violence.

Performance, workshop, and outreach participants will increase prevention awareness and knowledge.

Peer educators will develop various measurable skills, including:

 

  • Responsibility, punctuality, and work habits.
  • Management, planning, and organizational skills.
  • Health and science knowledge.
  • Community and career awareness.
  • Teamwork.
  • Business and math (e.g. budgeting).
  • Creative and artistic capacities.
  • Reading and writing experience.
  • Psychology and counseling.
  • College orientation and application process.
  • Public speaking and other communications.
  • Teaching and training.
  • Diversity management.

 

Program Success Monitored By  We will use a previously designed survey (in most cases pre-and post-program) to over 70 participants:40 WEATOC peer educators and peer education trainees,25 partner organization peer leaders, and about 15 randomly selected workshop participants. The survey will measure, through self-assessment, these youth’s knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors related to key issues that the program will address, including violence prevention; avoidance of risky relationships; substance abuse; wellness behaviors; self-esteem; and education and career aspirations.
Examples of Program Success 

These are key findings of federally-funded pre- and post-involvement surveys:

We identified an increase in self-esteem.  Over 90% of the participants identified the importance of loving oneself and avoiding negative peer pressures to participate in risky substance use behaviors.

The number of participants using marijuana declined.

Participants increased knowledge of substance abuse, violence, HIV, and prevention practices by 45%.

Peer educator skills and behavior in communicating formally and informally with peers about substance abuse and violence prevention by increased 25%.

Peer educator attitudes toward specific low-risk behaviors, i.e. avoiding alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and party drugs and avoiding violence increased by 22%.

Peer Educators increased awareness and access to helping resources by 73%.

2. Summer Peer Institute

Each summer, WEATOC runs an 8-week training, production, and performance corps. We train inner-city peer educators. Then they plan and conduct lively performances in the community that reach 250-500 additional youth. We’ve recently expanded the Institute, using support from job programs (Boston Youth Fund & Black Ministerial Alliance/Citizens Bank). In 2013, our Corps included 26 peer educators.

The Peer Institute will run June 30-August 22. We will train and empower the Corps throughout July, focusing on relationships, HIV/AIDS, teen pregnancy, obesity, substance abuse, violence, and education.  The Corps will then perform 2-3 weeks of planning, curriculum development (yes, peer educators do this!), outreach, and, finally, performances. They will conduct 4-5 performances in the last three weeks of August, each at a different location. These performances are exciting for audiences and they have significant impact. You have to see one to grasp their power!
Budget  $20,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Peer educators will improve work habits and employability skills.

25-27 peer educators will improve skills, awareness, and self-esteem around critical issues.

The Peer Educator Corps will develop new peer education curricula and materials around violence, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, and other issues.

At least 500 youth will take part in and learn from performances and outreach.

Program Long-Term Success 

Peer educators will experience improved prevention knowledge and skills, health promotion knowledge and skills, and self-esteem.

Performance, workshop, and outreach participants will expand their awareness and specific knowledge of prevention and health promotion.

Program Success Monitored By 

We track progress on all objectives:  Peer educator recruitment, hiring, and training; creation of new materials; and planning and implementation of each performance and outreach activity.

Peer educators provide feedback and recommendations for improvement through brief written surveys and group feedback sessions.

Examples of Program Success 

 

Last summer, we employed, trained, and paid 26 peer educators. All were trained in human anatomy, substance abuse, nutrition and fitness, sexuality, violence prevention, disease prevention, education and career goals, and life skills. In each area, knowledge increased overall at least 20%.

Each peer educator became a specialists in at least one skit or poem (most mastered more) and wrote at least one original curriculum piece.

Peer educators performed on streets and in subways around the city. They used guerrilla theater, sparking discussion through sudden, dramatic, short performances in public spaces (e.g. a loud and heated ‘argument’ between two friends over the way one girl’s boyfriend treats her).

In 20 performance hours, we reached about 500 people and entered into discussion with 70-80 of them.

Besides learning about critical issues, peer educators received theater training, social support, counseling as needed, and teamwork training.

 


3. Peer and Adult Support Initiative

PASI integrates two comprehensive programs:  the existing WEATOC peer education program and family-oriented clinical services. PASI youth are integrated into our Peer Educator Corps, giving them positive, skill-building activities; outlets for creativity and recognition; and a peer-led milieu rewarding pro-social behavior. 2014-15 PASI objectives are:

  1. To build our working relationship with the Mass. Dept. of Children & Families (DCF) to generate a steady stream of referrals and coordination.
  2. To build our caseload of DCF youth to 10-12 youth.
  3. To integrate DCF youth into the Corps, increasing prevention awareness and skills; mobilizing peer support, mentoring, and behavioral expectations; and providing opportunities for creativity and hard work.
  4. To provide case management, clinical services, family support, and transportation to PASI participants.
  5. To achieve sustainability from DCF fee-for-service income in 2-3 years as PASI achieves equilibrium and cost-effectiveness.
Budget  $30,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

PASI youth will attend and participate regularly in the after-school program.

PASI youth will engage in counseling and case management with the PASI Social Worker.

PASI youth will improve performance at home and in school, with parents and teachers reporting reduced incidences of conflict and misbehavior.

Program Long-Term Success 

PASI youth will experience improved social skills and self-esteem and will get along within their families, schools, and communities.

DCF personnel will express satisfaction with the program and will maintain a solid level of DCF referrals to the program.

Program Success Monitored By 

We will track implementation, delivery, and participation for each program and clinical activity.

We will track, analyze, and report numbers and types (e.g. age, ethnicity, risk factors, etc.) of youth served.

We will track the needs and status of each participant in family functioning, school involvement, WEATOC involvement, etc.

The Coordinator will hold focus groups with PASI participants to find whether and how the project has affected them, satisfaction with project activities, and suggestions for improvement.

We will survey peer educators and tabulate results for just PASI participants.  The survey covers participant data; knowledge, attitudes, and behavior on teen issues; and awareness and use of helping resources.

Examples of Program Success 

Jamie, 12, had a troubled childhood, including abuse and abandonment, and he exhibits anger and self-destructive behavior. He resisted participation, swearing, breaking rules, and irritating peers. But he eventually got involved due to peer pressure and the realization that he would not be paid without doing work. When he received an ovation after performing a skit, he became an enthusiastic Corps member.

Our Social Worker counseled Jamie around his participation in the program, in school, and at home. She also counseled his foster mother, overcoming her reluctance to send Jamie to WEATOC due to safety concerns.

Raney, 16, is a Haitian girl from Burke High who was in foster care because her mother couldn’t handle her. She was at WEATOC in the school year and summer. She loves WEATOC!  She’s made friends and learned how to get along with peers and to be a leader. She is more sociable, more patient, and more trusting. She’s also gotten help with homework and feels better about school.

4. Brother2Brother/Sister2Sister

Our Sister2Sister (S2S) and Brother2Brother (B2B) initiatives help peer educators learn and teach peers about healthy gender identity, violence prevention, and sisterhood and brotherhood.

The goal of S2S is to educate young women about their bodies, inform them on critical issues, empower them to make healthy choices, and help them improve self-esteem. Ignorance clouds many issues young women face---especially inner-city young women. Yet few prevention efforts target this population; none we know of uses a peer approach.

S2S intensively trains a team of young women and forms them into a tightly-bonded team. Then they conduct outreach, performances, workshops, and training for other young women across the city. S2S has received a Marshall’s Domestic Peace Prize for its work.

B2B is newer. Many of its methods mirror S2S, but the issues our young men---especially young men of color---face today are simply not mirror-images of what young women face, so B2B has its own methods and identity.

Budget  $15,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

S2S and B2B teams will develop a significant body of peer education curricula and materials around violence, teen pregnancy, relationships, and other issues.

Over 1,000 young people will take part in S2S and B2B performances, workshops, or outreach activities, enhancing their awareness.

Program Long-Term Success 

Young women and young men will improve their skills, awareness, and self-esteem around issues critical to their future.

Participants will improve their behavior and positive orientation on school, their futures, and relationships with peers of the same sex (sisterhood and brotherhood) and opposite sex.

Program Success Monitored By 

Staff will document the number, categories (e.g. age, ethnicity, gender, risk status), level of involvement, and status (vis-a-vis school, peer relations, problem behaviors) of S2S and B2B peer educators, peer leaders of partner organizations, and performance and workshop participants.

We will conduct year-end surveys of peer educators and a sample of other participants to determine perceptions of and satisfaction with the program and their perception of changes in skills, awareness, and self-esteem.

Examples of Program Success 

A participant’s take on a S2S training:

We learned facts, shared feelings, and formed bonds. We maintained an honest, open environment and shared personal stories. We dissected questions like, “What makes men batter?,” “Why do women stay in abusive relationships?,” “What are the effects of battering on children and other family members?,” “What health issues do women face and why do they often practice unhealthy behaviors?,” and “Why do women often have low self-esteem?”

Training was intense and emotional! It immersed us in issues and in the team. We analyzed questions, visited women’s shelters, spoke with battered women, and became sensitized to violence against women. We covered: battering and family violence; date rape; sexual harassment; incest; teen pregnancy and prevention; male vs. female images of women; how violence affects teen women; the media and violence against women; prevention and intervention counseling; peer education; building self-esteem; and decision-making skills.


5. Training and Replication

Training - We can reach more youth than ever and generate more income for WEATOC through videos, print and online manuals, workshops, and widespread marketing and distribution of these channels. Many of these materials and events are produced by peer educators, further expressing their issues and experiences. WEATOC has solid experience in training staff and youth and in providing follow-up technical assistance.

Replication Sites - Under our federal grant, we replicated our model at six community organizations. This enabled us to reach more youth than ever. It resulted in deep learning for 10-12 youth per site, since they do peer education, instead of just attending a performance or workshop. And it led each organization to focus more on a youth development approach. Starting in 2014-15, staff and peer educators will train and provide ongoing support for groups of peer leaders at two organizations, tentatively Dimock Community Health Center and the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club.

Budget  $15,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Numerous organizations that take part in training and/or replication will expand their capacity to use an asset-based empowerment model of youth development.

Large numbers of inner-city youth will benefit from replication site projects, either directly (as peer educators or peer leaders) or indirectly (as performance, workshop, or outreach participants).

WEATOC will modestly expand organizational income as a result of training fees.

Program Long-Term Success 

Both training and replication will increase organizations’ long-term capacity to train and support teams of peer educators and peer leaders.

Participation in training and replication will enable WEATOC peer educators to acquire more career and prevention skills.

Program Success Monitored By 

Staff will document numbers of individuals and organizations participating in training or as a replication site.

We will obtain feedback (through surveys and focus groups) from adult and youth receiving training through either of these initiatives.

A sample of replication site participants will be surveyed around behavior change.

We will obtain feedback from organizations taking part in training or serving as a replication site about changes in their organizations related to youth-serving capacity.

Examples of Program Success  In the last few years, we have trained peer leaders and peer educators for partner organizations such as the Boston Public Health Commission, Dimock Community Health Center, Dorchester High School, Edward Kennedy Health Careers Academy, Franklin Hill Housing Development, Jeremiah Burke High School, Martin Luther King Middle School, Orchard Gardens Housing Development, and Roxbury Boys & Girls Club, among others.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs Claradine Cowell
CEO Term Start Sept 1980
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Claradine Moore-Cowell, M.Ed., co-founder of WEATOC, provides vision, financial management, development, interagency relations, community linkages, board relations, and publicity. After 34 years at WEATOC, she is a well-known community leader, which aids in maintaining linkages with local funders, community groups, providers, and state and city agencies (e.g. Massachusetts Dept. of Public Health, Boston Public Health Commission, and Boston Public Schools). Creating and implementing health education methods for adolescents and parents, she developed the powerful model that has become the basis for WEATOC.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms Christine Bond Sept 1980 Jan 1993

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Marshall's Domestic Peace Prize Marshall's 1995

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

WEATOC has many, many partnerships with schools, health centers, community agencies, housing developments, youth centers, and churches. They are spread out across the city of Boston and parts of Greater Boston. They host performances and workshops, engage their own peer education groups with the WEATOC Corps, and conduct joint outreach. They also participate in peer education/peer leadership training offered by WEATOC, which will expand in 2014 (see Programs).

The Mass. Dept. of Children and Families has become a major partner and funder, as we are under contract with DCF for our Peer and Adult Support Initiative program (see Programs).

In our federally-funded project, we worked with six replication sites: Dorchester High, Thompson and King Middle Schools, Orchard Gardens Center, Roxbury Boys & Girls Club, and Franklin Hill Housing. We will work with some of these and others in future replication projects.

Recent collaborations include: Boston Public Library Dudley Branch, Mass. Dept. of Children & Families (for the Peer and Adult Support Initiative), and various nutrition and fitness resources and adolescent obesity experts (for our obesity prevention program).

See WEATOC Partners under Other Documents for more on partners.  Also see last part of Training & Replication program.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 6
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? No
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Tri-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Mukiya Baker-Gomez
Board Chair Company Affiliation Mass. State Government
Board Chair Term Sept 2013 - Sept 2015
Board Co-Chair Ms. Mary Tuitt
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Mass. State Legislature
Board Co-Chair Term Sept 2013 - Sept 2015

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Mukiya Baker-Gomez Commonwealth of Mass. Voting
Ms. Claradine Cowell WEATOC, Inc Voting
Ms. Terry Haywood Northeastern University School of Education Voting
Ms. Michelle Jackson-Vargas Private corporate organization Voting
Ms. Palestine McKinnis Bank of America Voting
Ms. Mary Tuitt Mass. State Legislature Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 91%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 80%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our biggest challenge is funding for organizational capacity building.  We are addressing this issue by fundraising, event planning, fees for peer presentations, fees for services and private and community donations.  One potential source of increased revenue is the Mass. Dept. of Children and Families (DCF), for which we are an approved state provider.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $28,460 $115,892 $55,685
Total Expenses $35,758 $126,143 $64,373

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $28,460 $115,892 --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- $55,685
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $35,758 $112,229 $50,414
Administration Expense -- $13,914 $13,959
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.80 0.92 0.87
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 89% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets -- $5,632 $27,705
Current Assets -- $5,632 $27,705
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $30,563 $30,468 $1,648
Total Net Assets $-30,563 $-24,836 $26,058

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.00 0.18 16.81

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

A few years ago, we absorbed sharp budget reductions and had to curtail staff and programming. Yet we have survived and, with a lot of community support, we gradually rebuilt our funding and re-expanded programming---not (yet) to the level we were once at, but to a stable level. And we have solid plans to continue to rebuild and diversify our programming, in both established and new directions.

Even though our budget is small and we currently lack reserves, WEATOC is carefully managed and does not run at a deficit.

Foundation Comments

Per the fiscal year 2011 review, this nonprofit restated their financial statements for prior periods due to first recording a line of credit with an outstanding amount of $14,900 on 8/27/2010 which was originally a $15,000 line of credit negotiated with Sovereign Bank dated May 28, 2008, but it was recorded as a donation by the organization.  The line of credit is not referenced in the 990 for fiscal year 2011, dated 4/26/2012, thus we have listed this note.  
 
Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

   

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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