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City Year Boston

 287 Columbus Avenue
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (617) 927-2500
[F] --
www.cityyear.org/boston
[email protected]
Kathleen Kemp
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INCORPORATED: 1988
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2882549

LAST UPDATED: 06/12/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

City Year is an education-focused nonprofit organization that partners with public schools to provide full-time targeted intervention for students most at risk of dropping out. City Year unites young individuals from diverse ethnic, educational, and socio-economic backgrounds to engage in a year of full-time service, leadership development and civic engagement through team-based service to the community. As tutors, mentors and role models, these diverse young leaders are deployed in teams to high-poverty urban schools to make a difference in the lives of underserved children and youth.

 
City Year Boston serves more than 11,000 students in 21 of Boston’s lowest-performing schools and strategically partners with Boston Public Schools to support the district’s Acceleration Agenda, an ambitious five-year strategic intervention plan which holds the district accountable for a multi-year set of aggressive targets focused on achieving high school graduation and college readiness for all.

Mission Statement

City Year is an education-focused nonprofit organization that partners with public schools to provide full-time targeted intervention for students most at risk of dropping out. City Year unites young individuals from diverse ethnic, educational, and socio-economic backgrounds to engage in a year of full-time service, leadership development and civic engagement through team-based service to the community. As tutors, mentors and role models, these diverse young leaders are deployed in teams to high-poverty urban schools to make a difference in the lives of underserved children and youth.

 
City Year Boston serves more than 11,000 students in 21 of Boston’s lowest-performing schools and strategically partners with Boston Public Schools to support the district’s Acceleration Agenda, an ambitious five-year strategic intervention plan which holds the district accountable for a multi-year set of aggressive targets focused on achieving high school graduation and college readiness for all.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $12,723,924.00
Projected Expense $12,342,206.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Whole School Whole Child

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

City Year is an education-focused nonprofit organization that partners with public schools to provide full-time targeted intervention for students most at risk of dropping out. City Year unites young individuals from diverse ethnic, educational, and socio-economic backgrounds to engage in a year of full-time service, leadership development and civic engagement through team-based service to the community. As tutors, mentors and role models, these diverse young leaders are deployed in teams to high-poverty urban schools to make a difference in the lives of underserved children and youth.

 
City Year Boston serves more than 11,000 students in 21 of Boston’s lowest-performing schools and strategically partners with Boston Public Schools to support the district’s Acceleration Agenda, an ambitious five-year strategic intervention plan which holds the district accountable for a multi-year set of aggressive targets focused on achieving high school graduation and college readiness for all.

Background Statement

City Year was founded in 1988 by Michael Brown and Alan Khazei who felt strongly that young people in service could be a powerful resource for addressing America's most pressing issues. They founded City Year with the conviction that one person can make a difference, and since its inception, City Year has promoted the vision of service as a common expectation – and a real opportunity – for citizens all around the world. City Year’s vision is that one day the most commonly asked question of a young person will be,“Where are you going to do your service year?” City Year has been a leader in the growing national service movement, leading to the establishment of AmeriCorps, the passage of the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act, and the creation of Voices for National Service. City Year applies the principles of national service to our work with students and, in doing so, builds awareness and support for national and international service initiatives.
 
City Year has grown from its beginnings as a Boston-based pilot program with 50 initial participants into an international organization engaging over 2,800 corps members in 24 U.S. cities as well as Johannesburg, South Africa and London, England each year. Over the past 25 years, more than 19,000 City Year corps members have dedicated more than 26 million hours of service to their communities, helping over two million children and engaging an additional one million citizens as volunteers.Since 2003, City Year has earned Charity Navigator’s highest rating, certifying the organization’s commitment to accountability, transparency and responsible fiscal management. Only 1% of charities have received this distinction for eight consecutive years, placing City Year among the most trustworthy charities in America.
 
Over the past six years, the organization has centered its focus on combating the national drop out crisis. City Year recruits, trains and deploys diverse young leaders to serve full time to help turn around the lowest performing schools in Boston. Our primary service model,Whole School Whole Child, ensures that the right students get the right interventions at the right time. City Year Boston corps members are trained to help improve student attendance, behavior, and course performance in 20 Boston schools where they now serve.

Impact Statement

During the 2011-2012 school year, City Year Boston teams served in 14 of the city’s high-poverty schools, including 9 of the district’s 11 turnaround schools (designated 4% lowest-performing in the state), to reach 7,500+ students in grades 3-10. City Year Boston’s 177 diverse corps members each served 1,700+ hours in Boston schools, providing:
  • One-on-one and small group tutoring in English Language Arts (ELA) for 890+ students
  • One-on-one and small group tutoring in math for 290+ students
  • Attendance coaching to 1,600+ students
  • Mentoring to 480+ students
  • Afterschool programming to 1,000+ students
  • 40+ physical service projects in schools and community facilities throughout Boston
 
 City Year Boston saw the following impact on student achievement and attendance during the 2011-2012 school year:
  • 81% of elementary school students improved performance on literacy assessments
  • 40% reduction in the number of middle school students failing ELA
  • Recovered an average of 57 instructional hours for each attendance focus list student showing improvement
  • 86% of teachers agreed or strongly agreed that corps members improved the overall academic performance of students
  • 82% of teachers agreed or strongly agreed that corps members provided their students with academic support they would otherwise not receive
 
 During the 2012-2013 school year, City Year Boston has expanded its impact to serve 11,000+ students in 21 Boston schools, including all of the city’s turnaround schools. City Year Boston now reaches approximately 25% of Boston’s off-track students through the following interventions:
  • One-on-one and small group tutoring in ELA for 1,200+ students
  • One-on-one and small group tutoring in math for 600+ students
  • Attendance coaching for 1,900+ students
  • Mentoring for 700+ students
  • Afterschool programming for 1,200+ students

Needs Statement

More than a million students give up on school every year in America. High school dropouts make a million dollars less during their lifetime than college graduates, are eight times more likely to be incarcerated and are three times more likely to be in poor health and unemployed. With barely half of the country’s African American and Latino youth graduating from high school in four years, the nation’s education crisis is also a civil rights issue that threatens our values, weakens our democracy and harms our economic competitiveness.
 
Boston has made significant progress in recent years, yet the city’s graduation rate remains at just over 64%. Some of the district’s greatest challenges are its high concentration of low-income families and achievement disparities across class and race. BPS serves more than 55,000 students in 125 schools; recent data shows that 69.5% are from low-income families (compared with 35.2% state-wide) and that African American (34% of district) and Hispanic (43%) students are not meeting academic milestones at the same rate as their peers at both the district and state level.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City Year Boston serves in 20 schools throughout Boston, in neighborhoods such as Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, and the South End.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Whole School Whole Child

City Year's Whole School Whole Child (WSWC) service model supports students by improving academic achievement. Corps members serve from before the first bell until after the last student leaves school, with a focus on attendance, behavior and course performance – key Early Warning Indicators that a student is at risk of dropping out. By year end, corps members will each have served 1,700+ hours delivering the WSWC intervention model.
 
As part of the WSWC model, City Year provides:
  • Academic Support through whole class, one-on-one and small group tutoring in literacy/math
  • Attendance Coaching through morning greeting, daily calls home and positive incentives
  • Mentoring through one-on-one and small group sessions supporting positive behavior
  • Positive School Climate through school-wide programs promoting engagement
  • Afterschool Programming focused on homework completion and enrichment programming
  • Physical Service Projects in schools and community facilities throughout Boston
Budget  $12,040,329.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Over 80% of current City Year Boston corps members hold degrees from four-year colleges and all receive in-depth training (six weeks prior to service and ongoing throughout the year) to ensure significant impact on student success. In addition to trainings focused on BPS curriculum and intervention strategies, corps members undergo professional development alongside BPS teachers in the schools where they serve.
 
Recent results and impact include the following:
  • Expanded impact from 14 schools (7,500+ students) in 2011-2012 school year to 21 of Boston’s lowest-performing schools (11,000+ students) in 2012-2013 school year, including all of Boston’s turnaround schools
  • 81% of elementary school students receiving literacy tutoring improved performance on literacy assessments
  • 40% reduction in the number of middle school students failing English
  • 86% of teachers agreed or strongly agreed that corps members increased students’ time spent on learning tasks
Program Long-Term Success 
Students who reach 10th grade on time are four times more likely to graduate than those who fall behind. City Year’s long-term goal is to ensure that 80% of the students served by City Year reach 10th grade on track and on time, serving a majority of at-risk students at the sites it serves.
 
Research shows dropouts can be identified by 6th grade using key Early Warning Indicators: poor attendance, poor behavior and course failure in English/math. Students exhibiting even one indicator by 6th grade have a less than 25% likelihood of graduating on time. Through focused interventions, City Year provides the extra support these students need to succeed.
 
In partnership with Boston Public Schools and other school partners, City Year aims to reach a majority of Boston’s off-track students before they reach 10th grade. By fall 2015 City Year Boston plans to serve 25,000+ students in 37 schools to reach 5,700 off-track students, resulting in increased proficiency and a higher graduation rate.
Program Success Monitored By 
City Year has an internal evaluation department led by Vice President of Evaluation Dr. Gretchen Biesecker that ensures the Whole School Whole Child model continuously improves based on lessons learned in the field. The department tracks and analyzes student-level data using a variety of surveys, participant focus groups, an output-tracking database and performance-based metrics derived from existing school data.
 
As a result of pilot studies and site-based prototypes, City Year analyzes gains in literacy skills (grades 3-5), English Language Arts grades (6-10), average daily attendance (6-10), behavior (at prototype sites) and math grades (at prototype sites). City Year also bi-annually surveys all teachers, principals and administrators at schools served by corps members.
 
In November 2012 City Year and the Neighborhood House Charter School released a case study on an innovative three-year pilot that demonstrated the positive impact a trained City Year team has on student success.
Examples of Program Success 
City Year Boston is proud of its partnership with schools such as the Maurice J. Tobin K-8 School. During the 2011-2012 school year, City Year supported the following results at the Tobin:
  • 100% of elementary school students improved in their oral reading fluency. Two-thirds of those students began the year below grade benchmark and dramatically improved to end the year at/above benchmark.
  • 70% of 3rd-graders, 89% of 4th-graders and 72% of 5th-graders made more than one year’s worth of academic progress over the school year.
 
Additionally, in spring 2012 City Year Boston was approved as a Priority Partner for School Turnaround by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Priority Partners undergo a rigorous review process to confirm their proven track record of results and demonstrated effectiveness in accelerating school improvement.
 
To explore student and corps member stories of success, please visit the City Year Boston Blog.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sandra Lopez Burke
CEO Term Start Jan 2001
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO Mr. Michael Brown
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 1988
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 66
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 41
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 2
Other: 5
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 45
Male: 21
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Dianne Ledingham
Board Chair Company Affiliation Partner and Director, Bain & Company Inc.
Board Chair Term July 2013 - June 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Jim Atwood Merrill Lynch --
Anita Bekenstein Community Volunteer --
Barbara Burgess Community Volunteer --
David Cahill Shanley Fleming Boksanski & Cahill --
Diane Exter Bain Capital, LLC/Sankaty Advisors, LLC --
Corinne Ferguson Community Volunteer --
Michael Gilligan Heritage Partners --
Steve Hackley Comcast --
Dr. Adrian Haugabrook Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success and Chief Diversity Officer, Wheelock College --
Beth Jones Community Volunteer --
Michael Kineavy City of Boston --
Dianne Ledingham Bain & Company, Inc. --
Sandra Lopez Burke City Year Boston --
Fred Maynard HarbourVest --
Josh McCall Jack Morton Worldwide --
Will Muggia Westfield Capital Management --
Marion Mussafer Chair of Seven Generations Board Exofficio
Larry Neiterman Deloitte Consulting LLP --
Marcy Reed National Grid --
John Reilly MFS Investment Management® --
Samip Shah Community Volunteer --
Aaron von Staats PTC Business Units --
James Ward Senior Vice President and Director, Public Relations - MFS Investment Management --
Susan Weatherbie Community Volunteer --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 21
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1
Gender Female: 10
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 80%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $12,723,924.00
Projected Expense $12,342,206.00
Form 990s

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financial Statements

2012 Audited Financial Statements

2011 Audited Financial Statements

2010 Audited Financial Statements

2009 Audited Financial Statements

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $12,896,693 $9,861,902 $6,358,440
Total Expenses $11,362,296 $7,303,135 $5,278,579

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$4,850,248 $4,236,499 $2,568,748
Government Contributions $5,947,349 $3,462,143 $2,395,111
    Federal $3,348,924 $1,865,627 $1,745,111
    State -- -- --
    Local $2,598,425 $1,596,516 $650,000
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,947,195 $1,965,040 $1,270,622
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $138,505 $123,959
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $151,901 $59,715 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $9,203,460 $5,938,954 $4,170,077
Administration Expense $1,249,853 $735,092 $580,644
Fundraising Expense $908,984 $629,089 $527,858
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.14 1.35 1.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 81% 79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 7% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $20,820,428 $19,330,513 $11,461,191
Current Assets $9,933,157 $8,739,954 $1,565,592
Long-Term Liabilities $3,243,354 $3,330,000 $3,592,500
Current Liabilities $169,301 $475,012 $477,210
Total Net Assets $17,407,773 $15,525,501 $7,391,481

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $4,137,494.00
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose The In School & On Track campaign aims to raise funds to serve 25% of Boston’s off-track students in 21 schools (Phase I) and then 50% in 37 schools (Phase II).
Campaign Goal $9,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates May 2012 - June 2014
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $10,700,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 58.67 18.40 3.28

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 16% 17% 31%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

City Year Boston is a local chapter of a national nonprofit. The financial data provided in the charts and graphs for the previous three years reflects this organization's local operations, while the posted audits and 990s reflect the organization's national operations (headquarters based in Boston). Please contact the nonprofit for additional details.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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