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International OCD Foundation Inc.

 18 Tremont Street, Suite 308
 Boston, MA 02108
[P] (617) 973-5801
[F] (617) 973-5801
www.iocdf.org
esteinert@iocdf.org
Eric Steinert
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INCORPORATED: 1987
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2894564

LAST UPDATED: 03/10/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names Obsessive Compulsive Foundation (2009)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the International OCD Foundation is to help everyone affected by obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders to live full and productive lives. The Foundation aims to improve outcomes for individuals with OCD and related disorders by:

  • Providing resources and support for those affected by OCD, including individuals with OCD and related disorders, their family members, friends, and loved ones.
  • Promoting awareness about OCD and related disorders to the OCD community and the general public.
  • Increasing access to effective treatment by:
-- Educating mental health professionals about evidence-based treatments
-- Providing a forum for professional collaboration and networking.  
-- Supporting research in the causes of and treatments for OCD and related disorders.

Mission Statement

The mission of the International OCD Foundation is to help everyone affected by obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders to live full and productive lives. The Foundation aims to improve outcomes for individuals with OCD and related disorders by:

  • Providing resources and support for those affected by OCD, including individuals with OCD and related disorders, their family members, friends, and loved ones.
  • Promoting awareness about OCD and related disorders to the OCD community and the general public.
  • Increasing access to effective treatment by:
-- Educating mental health professionals about evidence-based treatments
-- Providing a forum for professional collaboration and networking.  
-- Supporting research in the causes of and treatments for OCD and related disorders.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $2,075,681.00
Projected Expense $2,009,450.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1 Million Steps4OCD Walk
  • Annual OCD Conference
  • IOCDF Website
  • OCD Awareness Week
  • Training Institute

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the International OCD Foundation is to help everyone affected by obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders to live full and productive lives. The Foundation aims to improve outcomes for individuals with OCD and related disorders by:

  • Providing resources and support for those affected by OCD, including individuals with OCD and related disorders, their family members, friends, and loved ones.
  • Promoting awareness about OCD and related disorders to the OCD community and the general public.
  • Increasing access to effective treatment by:
-- Educating mental health professionals about evidence-based treatments
-- Providing a forum for professional collaboration and networking.  
-- Supporting research in the causes of and treatments for OCD and related disorders.

Background Statement

The International OCD Foundation's (IOCDF) is a Section 501 (C)(3) corporation, organized under the laws of the State of Massachusetts. The IOCDF was started in 1986 -- as the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation - by a group of individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Many of the founding members had participated in a drug trial for treating OCD conducted by members of the Yale Medical School Department of Psychiatry. The original goal of the group was to educate the public and the mental health profession about the diagnosis and treatment of OCD and to provide a source of treatment referrals for individuals with OCD. The original activities of the group included giving interviews to newspapers and magazines and appearing on television and radio talk shows to let people with OCD know what they were suffering from and to provide them with referrals to the 22 research sites around the United States that were testing medications to use to control OCD, which had not been approved yet by the FDA.

Since its founding 31 years ago, the IOCDF has grown to 8,000 members including people with OCD, their families, professionals, and other concerned individuals. IOCDF has 22 affiliates, is led by a board of directors and is supported by a 55 member Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) composed of some of the most widely published and respected researchers and therapists in the field of OCD and related disorders.


Impact Statement

We are the “go to” resource for individuals, families, care givers, and professionals in the OCD and related disorders (e.g., hoarding disorder, body dysmorphic disorder) community. Through our programs, we make a lasting impact, enhancing the lives of those living with OCD and related disorders. Year over year, more and more individuals in the OCD community turn to the International OCD Foundation as a trusted resource. We continue to expand our impact, increasing access to needed resources, programs and services to all those living with and affected by OCD and related disorders.

Additionally, we provide both research and training opportunities for professionals.

 The International OCD Foundation is committed to finding and promoting the most effective treatment methods for OCD and related disorders. Research is vital to our goals of better understanding OCD and related disorders and improving treatment. Our overarching goal is to promote research aimed at finding a cure. Through the support of our individual donors, we have been able to award over $3 million in grant funding supporting over 100 research projects. You can learn about individual grant awards on our web site (www.iocdf.org/professionals/research-grants).

We measure our impact by tracking the effectiveness of our programs and activities. We survey our conference and BTTI (Behavior Therapy Training Institute) attendees consistently and use this information to improve our programs. Regarding the latter, we have published data on the effectiveness of our BTTI and continue to actively collect data on this program. We have an on staff public health expert whose job, in part, is to develop and review the quality of all of our programs. We have seen concrete, increased engagement in the past 8 years including our Annual Conference attendance from 900 (in 2009) to over 1,600 in 2016; our Walk attendance from 175 in 2013 to 800 in 2016. From 2008 to 2016 our annual budget has doubled and our staff has tripled due to increased donor engagement and support. And we have launched multiple new initiatives including OCD Awareness Week, online training courses for professionals, and outreach into the pediatrician community.

 

 

Needs Statement

While our annual programs & activities are entirely supported through individual generosity, there simply isn't enough public awareness about those suffering from OCD and related disorders. It's our job to make individuals aware of the importance of acknowledging and treating OCD and related disorders in the same manner as any other medical condition. Our five most pressing needs include: 
 
Expanding the reach of our 1 Million Steps4OCD Walk                              Maintaining up to date education and treatment resources on our family of Websites                                     
 Expanding the reach of our Training Institute for professionals                  Increasing access to our Annual OCD Conference and Annual Hoarding Meeting                                                                    
Expanding local events linked with OCD Awareness Week by providing increased support to our 20+ affiliates around the United States               
 
 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

INTERNATIONAL
We serve a global audience with members and donors in all fifty states and also around the world. 

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Associations - Multipurpose
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

1 Million Steps4OCD Walk

 

  • Each year we partner with our regional affiliates to host the 1 Million Steps4OCD Walk. Walks are a great awareness building event for individuals to rally support and take action on a personal level. By uniting our community around a shared experience, we raise awareness and foster the most important work of building a community.

 

Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Disorders
Population Served US
Program Short-Term Success  By raising public awareness and support, we educate people about OCD and related disorders. By bringing on new walks, we build out our affiliate program and introduce new individuals to our work.
Program Long-Term Success   Our Walks bring together our community around a shared mission. We partner with our affiliates to grow the number of individuals and teams in our Walks.  We have started new walks with our regional affiliates, welcomed new participants, and also raised important funds to advance our mission.
Program Success Monitored By  Interviews with Regional sponsors, volunteers, and members. Tracking of Walk registrants involving teams and individuals.
Examples of Program Success  Each year, our walks build critical participation as well as raising charitable support.

Annual OCD Conference

  • At our Annual OCD Conference, people with OCD and their families meet and share their personal experiences and knowledge with each other, prominent OCD researchers introduce their latest theories and research findings, and experienced clinicians explain and demonstrate their successful treatment techniques. At our most recent conference, over 1,600 people attended. Our conference registration fees are some of the lowest in the industry. We are able to keep them low because use donations from programs like the Walk.
Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other
Population Served People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  The Annual OCD Conference annually rotates among three regions of the country, the East Coast, the Midwest, and the West Coast. We will continue to grow the conference by focusing on regional marketing and outreach.
Program Long-Term Success  Our annual conference has grown dramatically since first taking place in 1993. Last year, we welcomed over 1,600 people to Chicago. Our conference program, spread over three days, now includes over 100 presentations, pre-conference sessions, and our research symposium.
Program Success Monitored By  We measure our impact by tracking the effectiveness of our programs and activities.  We have an on staff public health expert whose job, in part, is to develop and review the quality of all of our programs. We have seen concrete, increased engagement in the past 8 years including our Annual Conference attendance from 900 (in 2009) to over 1,600 in 2016; our Walk attendance from 175 in 2013 to 800 in 2016. From 2008 to 2016 our annual budget has doubled and our staff has tripled due to increased donor engagement and support. And we have launched multiple new initiatives including OCD Awareness Week, online training courses for professionals, and outreach into the pediatrician community.
Examples of Program Success  We've quadrupled Conference attendance since 1993 and developed highly customized workshops to meet the current needs of the many diverse populations within the OCD community. The Annual OCD Conference is our largest program.

IOCDF Website

  • IODCF Website: Nearly 2,000,000 people visit the IOCDF website each year. Our main website (www.iocdf.org) provides information on our programs, as well as information about OCD and related disorders. The website’s most popular feature is our revamped Resource Database, which helps connects patients and families with experienced OCD therapists in their local area. Three additional subsites include: www.helpforhoarding.org, www.helpforbdd.org and www.ocdinkids.org. Google rankings for all of our websites are at or near the top. Our ability to keep our websites up-to-date and accessible is due to donations from programs like the Walk.
Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Disorders
Population Served People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Our family of websites serve as a frontline resource of first resort. They are designed for ease of navigation, with regularly updated information and guidance. In the time since launching, we have tailored our resources to better serve all segments of the online audience.
Program Long-Term Success 
We work to expand access and build awareness for all individuals who need our services. We maintain a robust treatment resource directory made available across our family of web sites. We have seen a doubling of online traffic since launching. Additionally, all our online resources have been vetted in consultation with our Scientific and Clinical Advisory Board. 
 
Program Success Monitored By  We measure our impact by tracking the effectiveness of our programs and activities. Specifically, we use web site tracking tools to measure the effectiveness of our web site resources. We also benchmark ourselves against similar organizations, and seek to share best practices. 
Examples of Program Success  Please see above

OCD Awareness Week

  • The IOCDF, its affiliates, and partners work to educate their communities and the public about OCD and related disorders. We administer a grant program for affiliates to enable them to jump start or expand their local events during OCD Awareness Week. Grant money comes from donations received from programs like the Walk.
Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Disorders
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Each year, OCD Awareness Week builds increased awareness about OCD and related disorders. Through events, outreach and regional campaigns, we bring attention to help all of those suffering with OCD and related disorders to lead full and productive lives.
Program Long-Term Success  International OCD Awareness Week is an international effort to raise awareness and understanding about obsessive compulsive disorder and related disorders with the goal of helping more people to get timely access to appropriate and effective treatment. Launched in 2009 by the IOCDF, OCD Awareness Week is now celebrated by a number of organizations across the US and around the world with events such as OCD Screening Days, lectures, conferences, fundraisers, online Q&As, and more.
Program Success Monitored By  We regularly make adjustments to better serve our audiences.
Examples of Program Success  See above.

Training Institute

  • The BTTI was developed to address the shortage of therapists properly trained in the cognitive behavioral treatment of OCD. Since 1995, the BTTI faculty has trained hundreds of therapists in North America on how to provide the most up-to-date, effective treatments for OCD. We currently run five BTTIs per year, and have expanded our training opportunities with support from donations from programs like the Walk.
Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other
Population Served US& International
Program Short-Term Success  We have expanded our Behavior Therapy Training Institutes to meet demand.  Our Training Institute is tiered by skill level, and offered at multiple locations around the country throughout the year.
Program Long-Term Success  We measure our impact by tracking the effectiveness of our programs and activities. We survey our conference and BTTI attendees consistently and use this information to improve our programs. Regarding the latter, we have published data on the effectiveness of our BTTI and continue to actively collect data on this program. We have an on staff public health expert whose job, in part, is to develop and review the quality of all of our programs.  From 2008 to 2016 our annual budget has doubled and our staff has tripled due to increased donor engagement and support. And we have launched multiple new initiatives including OCD Awareness Week, online training courses for professionals, and outreach into the pediatrician community.
Program Success Monitored By  Please see above.
Examples of Program Success  Demand for our Behavior Therapy Training Institutes is very high. Mental health professionals seek out the additional training to further enhance their own education and experience.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Jeff Szymanski
CEO Term Start Sept 2008
CEO Email jszymanski@iocdf.org
CEO Experience

Jeff Szymanski, PhD, is the Executive Director of the International OCD Foundation and author of The Perfectionist’s Handbook. Dr. Szymanski, a clinical psychologist, previously worked at McLean Hospital’s Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute (OCDI), a residential facility for individuals with severe and refractory OCD. Dr. Szymanski also has a long track record of teaching and training. As a Clinical Instructor in Psychology at Harvard Medical School, he has supervised pre-doctoral psychology interns, psychiatry residents, and has run Cognitive Behavior Therapy seminars.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Patti Perkins Aug 2000 Aug 2008
Mr. James Broatch 1987 1997

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Meghan Buco Communications Manager --
Ms. Stephanie Cogan Director of Education and Training --
Ms. Pamela Layne Director of Operations --
Ms. Melissa Smith Events Manager --
Mr. Eric Steinert Development Mananger --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Mass General Hospital Psychiatry Academy
 
This collaboration will bring forth a curricula and pathway for mental health and medical professionals interested in studying and treating OCD and related disorders. The goal is to arm therapists and clinicians with best practices and to increase the overall number of providers who can effectively treat OCD. The program will provide a comprehensive spectrum of courses for professionals that will be offered online to educate both novices and experts within the OCD community. These training opportunities will broaden the reach to providers and bring new specialists to the field.
 
 
Below is a list of our Affiliates.
OCD SF Bay Area
OCD Sacramento
OCD Southern California
OCD Greater Denver
OCD Connecticut
OCD Jacksonville
OCD Central & South Florida
OCD Georgia
OCD Midwest
OCD Kansas
OCD MidAtlantic
OCD Massachusetts
OCD Twin Cities
OCD New Hampshire
OCD New Jersey
OCD New York
OCD North Carolina
OCD Oregon
OCD Western Pennsylvania
OCD Texas
OCD Utah
OCD MidAtlantic
OCD Washington
OCD Wisconsin
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 10
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 2
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 10
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 5
Not Specified 10

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Shannon Shy
Board Chair Company Affiliation President
Board Chair Term Feb 2016 - Feb 2018
Board Co-Chair Ms. Susan B. Dailey
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Vice-President
Board Co-Chair Term Feb 2016 - Feb 2018

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Denis Asselin Secretary Voting
Ms. Diane Davey RN Community Volunteer Voting
Dr. Michael Jenike MD Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Joy Kant Emeritus NonVoting
Mr. Paul A. Muyeller Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Patricia Perkins JD Emeritus NonVoting
Mr. Ron Prevost Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Shannon Shy Esq. President Voting
Ms. Denise Egan Stack LMHC Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Michael J. Stack CFA Treasurer Voting
Ms. Christina Vertullo Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Jo-Ann Winston Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Jonathan S. Abramowitz PhD. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC --
Dr. Throstur Bjorgvinsson PhD. The Houston OCD Program --
Dr. James Claiborn PhD. South Portland, ME --
Dr. Darin Dougherty MD Mass General Hospital, OCD Institute, McLean Hospital --
Dr. Jamie Feusner MD University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA --
Dr. Edna B. Foa PhD. University of Pennsylviania, Philadelphia, PA --
Dr. Martin E. Franklin PhD. University of Pennsylviania, Philadelphia, PA --
Dr. Randy Frost PhD. Smith College, Northampton, MA --
Dr. Wayne K. Goodman MD Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY --
Dr. Jonathan Grayson PhD. The Grayson LA Treatment Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders Behavioral Treatment Program --
Dr. Benjamin Greenberg MD/PhD Butler Hospital, Providence, RI --
Dr. John H. Greist MD (Emeritus) University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health --
Dr. Jonathan Hoffman PhD., ABPP NeuroBehavioral Institute, Weston, FL --
Dr. Michael Jenike MD Mass General Hospital, OCD Institute, McLean Hospital Voting
Dr. Nancy Keuthen PhD. Mass General Hospital, Boston, MA --
Dr. Lorrin M. Koran MD Stanford Unversity Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA --
Dr. Adam B. Lewin PhD., ABPP University of South Florida OCD, Anxiety and Related Disorders Behavioral Treatment Program --
Dr. Charles S. Mansueto PhD. Behavior Therapy Center of Greater Washington, Silver Spring, MD --
Dr. Patrick McGrath PhD. Alexian Brothers Behavioral Health Hospital, Hoffman Estates, IL --
Dr. Dean McKay PhD. Fordham University, Bronx, NY --
Dr. E. Katia Moritz PhD., ABPP NeuroBehavioral Institute, Weston, FL --
Dr. Tanya K. Murphy MD University of South Florida, St Petersburg, FL --
Dr. Gerald Nestadt MD Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD --
Dr. Fugen Neziroglu PhD. Bio Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY --
Dr. Michele Pato MD University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA --
Dr. David Pauls PhD. (Emeritus) Harvard Medical School, Mass General Hospital --
Dr. Fred Penzel PhD. Western Suffolk Psychological Services, Huntington, NY --
Dr. Katharine A. Phillips MD Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI --
Dr. John Piacentine PhD., ABPP University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA --
Dr. Christopher Pittenger MD/PhD Yale University, New Haven, CT --
Dr. C. Alec Pollard PhD. St Louis Behavioral Medicine Institute, St. Louis, MO --
Dr. Steven J. Poskar MD Spectrum Neuroscience & Treatment Institute, New York, NY --
Dr. Judith L. Rapoport MD National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD --
Dr. Steven Rasmussen MD Butler Hospital, Providence, RI --
Dr. Scott L. Rauch MD (Emeritus) McLean Hospital --
Dr. Bradley C. Riemann PhD. Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, WI --
Dr. Sanjaya Saxena MD University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA --
Dr. H. Blair Simpson MD, PhD. Anxiety Disorders Clinic, Columbia University, New York, NY --
Dr. Gail Steketee PhD. School of Social Work, Boston University, Boston, MA --
Dr. S. Evelyn Stewart MD University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, Mass General Hospital, Boston, MA McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA --
Dr. Eric A. Storch PhD. University of South Florida, St Petersburg, FL --
Dr. Susan Swedo MD National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD --
Dr. Kiara R. Timpano PhD. University of Miami, FL --
Dr. Barbara L. Van Noppen PhD. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA --
Dr. Aureen P. Wagner PhD. The Anxiety Wellness Center, Cary, NC --
Dr. Allen Weg EdD. Stress & Anxiety Services of New Jersey, East Brunswick, NJ --
Dr. Sabine Wilhelm PhD. Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Voting
Dr. Monica T. Williams PhD. University of Louisville, Louisville, KY --
Dr. Robin Zasio PsyD, LCSW -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 66%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating
  • Pediatric

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The nature of our work is ongoing, so please visit our web site to learn additional details about the accomplishments mentioned below.
Our training and education programs serve an expanding audience of therapists and clinicians. Our public programs such as our annual Conference and Walk events draw an increasing number of participants year to year. We have built out our membership and implemented a tiered structure to better serve the needs of our community. Finally, we've funded some of the most dedicated and inspiring researchers in the field, providing nearly 3 Million dollars in grants to advance our understanding of OCD and related disorders.
We have just begun. We are excited about the future and look forward to the day when there is no stigma regarding issues of mental health. We can continue doing our work to improve access, provide resources, and fund research. We want to grow our capacity to train more professionals, reach more individuals, and help influence the public dialogue around OCD and related disorders. We're eager to engage with more individuals, and partner effectively to advance the mission of the International OCD Foundation.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $2,075,681.00
Projected Expense $2,009,450.00
Form 990s

2015 IRS 990

2014 IRS 990

2013 IRS 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financial Statement

2014 Audited Financial Statement

2013 Audited Financial Statement

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,851,797 $1,850,705 $1,495,911
Total Expenses $1,788,522 $1,774,482 $1,610,464

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,044,461 $1,165,939 $930,354
Indirect Public Support $38,305 $45,527 $48,207
Earned Revenue $533,376 $445,858 $334,830
Investment Income, Net of Losses $216 $164 $130
Membership Dues $235,439 $193,217 $182,390
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,309,179 $1,273,327 $1,140,641
Administration Expense $254,146 $345,459 $304,242
Fundraising Expense $225,197 $155,696 $165,581
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 1.04 0.93
Program Expense/Total Expenses 73% 72% 71%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 21% 13% 17%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,116,412 $1,073,688 $1,028,141
Current Assets $614,716 $563,572 $500,524
Long-Term Liabilities $17,151 $21,013 $22,498
Current Liabilities $180,657 $192,835 $211,636
Total Net Assets $918,604 $859,840 $794,007

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.40 2.92 2.37

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 2% 2% 2%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

False information and stigma keep many with OCD and related disorders from seeking the help, support and information they desperately need. 
 
1. Build public awareness about OCD and effective treatments for OCD through newsletters, brochure dissemination, media, our Speakers Bureau, and upgrades to our website.
a. We distribute 8,000 newsletters quarterly to individuals with OCD, their families and treatment providers'.
b. We regularly update, print and distribute psychoeducational brochures to individuals with OCD, their families, and mental health clinics.
c. We regularly update our psychoeducational material about OCD, related disorders and effective treatment on our website.

2. Improve access to properly trained treatment providers for individuals with OCD, their families and mental health professionals via upgrades to our website.
a. We maintain a database of 250 support groups around the country accessible on our website
b. We maintain a database of 1,150 treatment providers selfdescribed as OCD specialists which can be accessed on our website in the Resource Directory.
c. We maintain a database of program descriptions and contact information for 60+ Intensive OCD Treatment Programs around the country which can be accessed on our website.
d. We maintain a list of online support groups and other web based "links" accessible on our website.

3. Continue to educate medical and mental health providers to improve assessment and treatment options through education at our Annual Conference, and by offering state of the art trainings via our Behavior Therapy Training Institute.
a. Our three day, Annual Conference in Boston, MA in 2015 attracted 1,700 professionals, individuals with OCD, and their families who had 100 talks, presentations and workshops to choose from.
b. We train 30 mental health professionals at each of five Behavior Therapy Training Institutes each year (a total of 150), educating therapists about how to conduct effective assessment and therapy for those with OCD.
c. We are in the process of developing specialty Behavior Therapy Training Institutes in the areas of pediatrics and hoarding as well as a more advanced training for individuals who have completed the basic course.
4. Educate pediatric health and mental health providers along with school personnel to increase awareness and recognition of OCD to facilitate proper diagnosis and effective treatment for children and teens with OCD.
a. Members of our affiliates and volunteers conduct "OCD in the Classroom" presentations around the country each year.
b. Further develop a pilot pediatric outreach program to raise awareness and better educate pediatricians about pediatric

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

• Annual Conference: At our annual conference, people with OCD and their families meet and share their personal experiences and knowledge with each other, prominent OCD researchers introduce their latest theories and research findings, and experienced clinicians explain and demonstrate their successful treatment techniques. This past year (2015) 1714 individuals attended this conference, making it the largest on record.
• Behavior Therapy Training Institute (BTTI): The BTTI was developed to address the shortage of therapists properly trained in the cognitive behavioral treatment of OCD. Since 1995, the BTI faculty has trained numerous therapists around the country how to provide the most up-to-date, effective treatments for OCD.
• OCD in the Classroom: A conservative estimate is that as many as 1 in 200 kids and teens have OCD. Sadly, many of these individuals struggle academically and socially as they are rarely diagnosed accurately and even less frequently accommodated by school personnel. Without an alternate explanation, many children come to believe that they are "crazy" or that they must keep their worries and behaviors an embarrassing secret. Our OCD in the Classroom Program seeks to increase awareness and recognition of OCD within school systems in order to facilitate proper diagnosis and promote effective treatment.
• Newsletter: IOCDF members receive our newsletter four times a year to update them about the latest in research, resources and recovery in OCD.
• Speakers Bureau: All of our speakers are trained to provide informative presentations on OCD to a variety of audiences. The IOCDF Speakers Bureau includes people with OCD as well as renowned medical and research experts who have treated people with OCD and/or engaged in cutting edge research to understand the causes of the disorder and to find more effective treatments.
• IOCDF Website: We have completed a redesign of the IOCDF main website (www.iocdf.org) that includes a re-build of the IOCDF Resource Directory, which is a vital source of information about treatment providers in your area, descriptions of Intensive Treatment Programs (ITPs) across the country, as well as a list of support groups and IOCDF affiliates. Thanks to generous support, we were able to recently complete the redesign and upgrade of the OCDinkids.org website, a vital resource for kids, teens and families. We launched the new website dedicated to Body Dysmorphic Disorder (www.helpforbdd.org). We are in the process of redesigning the IOCDF website for Hoarding Disorder (www.helpforhoarding.org). The IOCDF websites also provide educational material about OCD and related disorders, updates on treatment strategies and research findings, and a downloadable version of our quarterly newsletter.
• Our Pediatric Outreach Program aims to reach not only kids and teens affected by OCD, but also their families, friends, fellow students, teachers, mental health professionals and pediatricians. The Pediatric Outreach Program has two primary components: 1. Raising awareness and providing general education about OCD to families, school personnel, and the general public. 2. Training professionals to effectively diagnose and treat pediatric OCD and related disorders.
• Research: Since 1994, we have given out 3 million dollars in research awards to investigators involved in research into the nature, etiology and treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and related disorders.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

We have just celebrated our 30th anniversary and we are led by a dedicated and passionate Board of Directors. Additionally, we have attracted the leaders in the field of OCD and related disorders to participate on our Scientific and Clinical Advisory Board. We are independent, supported by individual donations. We continue to generate engagement and participation from all corners of our community through our local affiliates, ambassador program and OCDvocate program.

Our experience, Board involvement, and loyal donors provide the solid foundation to advance our mission: helping all individuals affected by Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and related disorders to lead full and productive lives.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

We measure our impact by tracking the effectiveness of our programs and activities. We survey our conference and BTTI attendees consistently and use this information to improve our programs. Regarding the latter, we have published data on the effectiveness of our BTTI and continue to actively collect data on this program. We have an on staff public health expert whose job, in part, is to develop and review the quality of all of our programs. We have seen concrete, increased engagement in the past 8 years including our Annual Conference attendance from 900 (in 2009) to over 1,600 in 2016; our Walk attendance from 175 in 2013 to 800 in 2016. From 2008 to 2016 our annual budget has doubled and our staff has tripled due to increased donor engagement and support. And we have launched multiple new initiatives including OCD Awareness Week, online training courses for professionals, and outreach into the pediatrician community.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

We are proud of past accomplishments and eager to embrace the future. We have accomplished key milestones through our Annual OCD Conference, the Behavior Therapy Training Institute and the Research Grant Program, but also know our work is far from done. 

Improving access to effective treatment for OCD and related disorders has been at the heart of the Foundation’s mission from day one. We are always looking to improve and expand our professional training opportunities. These programs serve an expanding audience of therapists and clinicians.

Building out our International outreach is also fundamental to serving the needs of all those suffering with OCD and related disorders. OCD is universal, and is estimated to effect 1-2 percent of the global population across all demographics.

Launched at the 2015 conference, the OCDvocate program aims to harness the power of the amazing IOCDF community to spread awareness and advocate for those with OCD and related disorder. Challenges are issued regularly by our four spokespeople via the IOCDF blog, social media, and emails with fun, engaging ways to OCDvocates to join and work together to make a big impact as advocates for OCD and related disorders.

Please visit our web site to learn additional details about the accomplishments mentioned above!