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Second Step, Inc.

 PO Box 600213
 Newtonville, MA 02460
[P] (617) 965-2393
[F] (617) 965-3354
http://www.thesecondstep.org
[email protected]
Matthew Swoveland
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INCORPORATED: 1992
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2868513

LAST UPDATED: 03/23/2018
Organization DBA The Second Step, Inc.
The Second Step
TSS
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Second Step (TSS) is a community of survivors, advocates, and volunteers who foster the safety, stability, and well-being of those who have experienced domestic violence. We provide comprehensive services, including safety planning, legal advocacy, counseling, peer support, transitional housing, and other essential services to adults, youth, and children in Greater Boston and MetroWest.

Mission Statement

The Second Step (TSS) is a community of survivors, advocates, and volunteers who foster the safety, stability, and well-being of those who have experienced domestic violence. We provide comprehensive services, including safety planning, legal advocacy, counseling, peer support, transitional housing, and other essential services to adults, youth, and children in Greater Boston and MetroWest.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,911,282.00
Projected Expense $1,935,038.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Programs
  • Residential Programs
  • Steps to Justice
  • Youth and Prevention Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Second Step (TSS) is a community of survivors, advocates, and volunteers who foster the safety, stability, and well-being of those who have experienced domestic violence. We provide comprehensive services, including safety planning, legal advocacy, counseling, peer support, transitional housing, and other essential services to adults, youth, and children in Greater Boston and MetroWest.


Background Statement

TSS was founded by four women who, as board members for an emergency women's shelter, saw that a short shelter stay alone was insufficient to help a woman break away from an abusive situation. They understood that the most essential support is longer-term housing and comprehensive services that will help families achieve safety, stability and well-being.

Our first residence opened in 1992, allowing 8 families fleeing abuse a long-term place to heal and receive comprehensive services. 
 
In 1996 we launched an innovative, unique therapeutic afterschool program on-site, where full-time teachers provide children traumatized by DV with academic enrichment, emotional support, and a chance to begin to heal.  
 
In 2002, we bought, renovated and opened a second residence, more than doubling our capacity to 17 families (58 beds). 
 
In 2006, we received a grant from the Office on Violence Against Women, which provided the seed money for our Community Programs, where we work extensively with survivors in the community. Each year, TSS provides services to over 300 adults and 500 children through our Community Programs, including safety planning, case management, access to health services, one-on-one mentorship, survivor peer groups, and children’s groups.
 
In 2011, we launched our Steps to Justice Program, which provides legal services to survivors, including assistance with restraining orders, child custody and support, guardianship, immigration, benefits, and housing. Our staff attorney provides direct representation, training of TSS legal and advocate staff, and expertise, supervision, and training to law students, legal interns, and attorneys. Each year, Steps to Justice serves over 200 clients and provides well over 1,000 hours of direct representation to clients.
 
In 2014 we launched our Youth and Prevention Programs, which include community outreach and education about DV and teen dating violence. Our partners include area high schools and middle schools, organizations such the Boys & Girls Club of Newton and the YMCA, and communities of faith. Our trained Youth Programs Facilitators lead weekly Young Men's and Women's groups, which target youth who have been exposed to DV and are at heightened risk of becoming involved in controlling or abusive relationships. Our youth serving staff also respond to the needs of these young men and women through a combination of therapeutic group sessions, physical and outdoor engagement activities, and one-on-one meetings. 

Impact Statement

Recognizing that the aftermath of abuse can be measured in years, not weeks or months, TSS has developed a unique approach to serving survivors of domestic violence. Because we know that one of the biggest roadblocks for survivors is the social and emotional isolation that stems from abuse, our model relies on relationships: between TSS and clients, TSS and the community, clients and their communities, and clients and one another. We are a stable and consistent part of a survivor’s network at a time when consistency is nowhere to be found, a touchstone of support at each stage of their journey when it feels like the rest of the world is looking the other way.

Needs Statement

TSS's most pressing needs are:
  • Revenue growth. While we are proud of the strong financial position we have attained in recent years, we recognize that we must continue to diversify our funding streams and build lasting relationships with funders and donors to ensure continuity and fidelity of programming.   
  • Housing options and opportunities for survivors. The demand for transitional housing in the Commonwealth is enormous, and the waitlist to enter our houses is over a year long. The dearth and high cost of housing in our area create a challenge, both in accommodating clients from emergency shelters and in transitioning clients to permanent housing.
  • Volunteers. From direct service to in-kind, volunteers have long been the lifeblood of the organization.
  • Trauma-responsive infrastructure. It is important to recognize that dedication in this field can bring a heightened risk of compassion fatigue, secondary trauma, and burnout. Our need is to balance high performance and staff retention with self-care.
  • Collaboration. We are always seeking new opportunities for collaboration around our mission. Meaningful access to resources is something we seek to promote for survivors and their families even after they've attained a safe place to live.

CEO Statement

TSS was founded to fill a gap in services: survivors needed additional support to transition from emergency shelter to permanent, sustainable housing for themselves and their families. While the agency’s first 10 to 15 years focused on providing the operating and supportive services necessary to meet this goal - transitional housing, case management, and therapeutic after-school care for children - we recognized that our commitment to survivors over the long term necessitated additional services of a specific type: community-based, peer- and survivor-driven, responsive, and coordinated services centered on reaching survivors no matter what. What was once a focus on a gap in services for survivors grew organically into a striving to reach all underserved populations of survivors. This led to the founding of our Community Programs, our Steps to Justice Legal Services Program, and our broader Youth and Prevention Programs. Our programs are responsive, relational, and accessible. This continues to be a guiding force behind our growth, and we move into the next 25 years of commitment to safety, stability, and well-being in our communities.

Board Chair Statement

 

My involvement with the Second Step began as a Celebrating Success committee member eight years ago. The voices of survivors are being heard a little louder than they were then, but the same need for critical support services are more essential than ever to help survivors on their path to healing.

For 25 years, The Second Step has worked towards solutions—real and permanent solutions—to help survivors of domestic violence create lives free from future abuse and full of possibility as they move forward with their lives. We pride ourselves in our unique and innovative programs that enable survivors to heal from past trauma, to forge new relationships that create a community of support, to secure affordable housing, and to move toward financial security.

While the need for our services continues to rise, some longstanding public sources of funding have been cut for us and organizations like ours around the country. With the support of our community, we are committed to overcoming the challenges imposed by this new funding reality, and are determined not just to continue to provide our current level of support to survivors, but to deepen the work we do and offer ever more responsive and impactful services. We benefit from a strong and engaged board, a generous and committed donor base, and healthy operating and program reserves. We look forward to continuing the tradition that has set us apart for the past 25 years, and leading the organization into an exciting future.



Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
Predominantly eastern Massachusetts, including the Greater Boston Area and MetroWest. Our two residences are located in Newton, MA. 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Violence Shelters and Services
  2. Human Services - Victims' Services
  3. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community Programs

TSS’s Community Programs serve nearly 300 adult survivors each year. Each survivor partners with an advocate to assess critical needs and to help identify what interventions will be most effective. Services include safety planning, case management, access to legal resources, and survivor-driven support groups. TSS helps survivors plan ways to be safe from violence, including how to make a safe escape from an abuser. We connect survivors with local health providers and state and insurance benefits, teach self-care and stress management, and strategize with survivors about security and safety, employment and financial health, child and adult wellness, and responses to chronic physical and emotional issues.

 

Budget  301,648
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Homeless Victims Families
Program Short-Term Success 

We have found the following five outcomes to be critical to success for survivors of DV: (1) decrease social isolation and exclusion, a hallmark of a DV relationship; (2) increase and maintain safety; (3) increase and maintain housing, financial, and emotional stability; (4) increase empowerment and autonomy; and (5) increase meaningful access to mainstream resources.

Within our Community Programs, we work with survivors at all stages of response to DV. Short-term outcomes include improvements across the five domains, as we work with clients to safety plan, build supportive peer networks that foster lasting stability, educate about the chronic and often-misunderstood physical and psychological effects of DV, build networks of resources, and facilitate client-driven support and healing groups. Within our IMAGINE program, survivors recover through narrative and shared experience, and “pay it forward” by mentoring other survivors in their journey to safety, stability, and well-being.
Program Long-Term Success 

These same five outcomes are operative in the long term as well. Our Community Programs build from participation in the programming above, linking improvements across the five domains by creating supportive networks of survivors and mentors. Clients work with advocates to build plans for success that are focused on sustaining capacity through empowerment. Medial and distal outcomes include improved safety and stability, increased social connectedness, sustained financial and emotional well-being, and consistent access to quality children’s services. Because it is critical to our model that success be survivor-defined and not programmatic, our advocates stress each client’s own empowerment and work to ensure that our programs support our clients’ goals. Because our services are not time-limited, survivors’ goals and long-term outcomes can evolve and grow as their and their families needs change.

Program Success Monitored By 

We use a Participant Outcome Scale (POS) integrated into our data management system, which allows us to track client progress along a 5-point Likert Scale across the domains that contribute to these critical outcomes. Important measures we track include: safety from violence; autonomy/empowerment; financial stability; well-being (physical and emotional); access to healthcare services; employment; education; housing; transportation/ mobility; social connectedness; childcare; children's education; and parenting skills. Our database is seen as a model for peer DV agencies in the Greater Boston area, and has recently been the subject of national recognition by the NNEDV (National Network to End Domestic Violence). Using this database together with additional evaluation tools, such as surveys, client feedback, and third-party evaluation, we are able to respond dynamically based on what really works for survivors, as well as report on outputs and outcomes.

Examples of Program Success 

“Eight years later, my daughter and I are safe, healthy, and happy. I have my associate’s degree, and I am working toward a bachelor’s degree.”

“My case manager showed me how to open a bank account. She helped me establish credit by applying for a credit card, get my driver’s license, get a divorce. As time went by, I felt more confident. I am very proud to say I passed my citizenship test and am now an American citizen.”

“If you had to pick out the bursar of Pine Manor College from this crowd, would you pick me? If you had to pick out a former resident of TSS, would it be me? “

“TSS gave us safety. I learned about money and financial management. I learned how to have a better relationship with my child. I learned about nutrition. They helped me find an apartment. Now I am in a training program. I go to school 32 hours per week. I am also working 15 hours per week.”

“I saw my mother build her life with the skills she learned at TSS and she has passed that legacy of knowledge on to me.”

Residential Programs

TSS operates two transitional residences in Newton, housing a total of 17 families at any given time. Each year, this may reach as many as 21,000 total nights and days of safe and secure housing for survivors of DV. Client families may stay at our residences for up to two years. In addition to providing critical shelter for families, TSS works in partnership with community housing authorities, other nonprofits, and private landlords to secure permanent housing for each of our client families. Case management services within our residences include access to mental and physical health resources, legal resources, counseling, therapy, support groups, job development, and other needs. Children’s services include additional counseling, education, and enrichment activities. 

Budget  604,050
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for the Homeless
Population Served Victims Families Females
Program Short-Term Success 

We have found the following five outcomes to be critical to success for survivors of DV: (1) decrease social isolation and exclusion, a hallmark of a DV relationship; (2) increase and maintain safety; (3) increase and maintain housing, financial, and emotional stability; (4) increase empowerment and autonomy; and (5) meaningful access to mainstream resources.

Our theory of change describes how outcomes in each domain build upon the others, within a framework of increasing survivor empowerment. Within our Residential Program, the outcomes most critical for short-term success are increased safety and stability, since all client families in our transitional houses were previously subject to the instability of emergency shelter. While not all clients have children, safety and stability in housing are especially critical when children are involved, and play an important role in a child’s healthy social development and academic performance from early childhood through adolescence.
Program Long-Term Success 

These same five domains are operative in the long term as well. The emergency shelter system cannot bridge the gap between homelessness and self-sufficiency; as a result, survivors are often forced to choose between a stable place to live and sustained improvements in their journey away from abuse. At TSS, we work in partnership with survivors over the long term on independent living, education, and sustainable employment above the poverty level - all concrete measures of success that affect long-term outcomes. We know that the cycle of abuse can’t be broken until survivors can sustain their own stable housing and work environments, free from abuse and the threat of violence. Consequently, major long-term outcomes within and subsequent to our Residential Programs are increased stability, empowerment and autonomy, and meaningful access to mainstream resources.

Program Success Monitored By 

We use a Participant Outcome Scale (POS) integrated into our data management system, which allows us to track client progress along a 5-point Likert Scale across the domains that contribute to these critical outcomes. Important measures we track include: safety from violence; autonomy/empowerment; financial stability; well-being (physical and emotional); access to healthcare services; employment; education; housing; transportation/ mobility; social connectedness; childcare; children's education; and parenting skills. Our database is seen as a model for peer DV agencies in the Greater Boston area, and has recently been the subject of national recognition by the NNEDV (National Network to End Domestic Violence). Using this database together with additional evaluation tools, such as surveys, client feedback, and third-party evaluation, we are able to respond dynamically based on what really works for survivors, as well as report on outputs and outcomes.

Examples of Program Success 

“When I first got to TSS, the room was made up for us as if we were treasured guests. I was met by open arms and gentle and understanding hearts. Living in a communal setting challenged me greatly, but it also gave me a sisterhood of concern I will appreciate for the rest of my life. I learned to live with people of all ethnicities and cultures from many different walks of life. We had that common thread of experience that held us together as a community.”

“The plan that I laid out with the staff wasn’t easy. We had house meetings, parenting, nutrition, and time management classes. I went to school full-time, and juggled homework, cooking, bathing and reading to my kids, and chores. Through all this, TSS helped me become self-sufficient, self-confident, and strong enough to rebuild my life.”

“I’m very excited to be moving into our own home next week. I’ve come a long way during this year. My long term goal is a nursing degree, job and financial security, and owning my own house."


Steps to Justice

DV survivors have complex legal needs, often with multiple issues such as restraining orders, child support, guardianship, immigration, benefits, and housing. Through our Steps to Justice Legal Services Program, we work with a network of community organizations and volunteer attorneys to provide representation for TSS clients regardless of the complexity of their needs. Our two staff attorneys ensure that services are properly coordinated, providing direct representation for survivors, easy access to community and legal resources, and training and supervision of TSS legal and advocate staff. Providing these services pro bono ensures that achieving justice and independence does not come at the cost of financial stability and the family’s well-being.

Budget  173,661
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served At-Risk Populations Females Victims
Program Short-Term Success 

We have found the following five outcomes to be critical to success for survivors of DV: (1) decrease social isolation and exclusion, a hallmark of a DV relationship; (2) increase and maintain safety; (3) increase and maintain housing, financial, and emotional stability; (4) increase empowerment and autonomy; and (5) increase meaningful access to mainstream resources.

Within Steps to Justice, the short-term impact is tremendous. We estimate that 70-80% of our clients would not have accessed legal services outside of TSS. This is significant in the context of short-term outcomes, where restraining orders and other emergency legal services are so critical to clients’ safety and stability. Because of the material improvements that result from these services, Steps to Justice is essential to creating a solid foundation from which survivors can build autonomy through empowerment. By minimizing tradeoffs between domains, we can help survivors create a solid foundation for sustained success.

Program Long-Term Success 

Steps to Justice has tremendous impact across the five domains over the long term. While some short-term successes mean that clients can move on to improvements on other measure of well-being, other legal issues often persist long after basic needs have been met. By being responsive to clients' changing lives and assisting with legal issues regardless of complexity, we help survivors ensure that the gains they have made in other areas of their lives are not compromised by abuse tactics that utilize the legal system, such as targeted misinformation, spurious cases, and coercive tactics in custody cases. Providing services pro bono means that achieving justice and independence does not come at the cost of financial stability and the family’s well-being, helping survivors to balance long-term outcomes across the domains. Long-term outcomes, therefore, build from survivors’ gains in safety and stability and focus on sustained empowerment and meaningful access to resources.
Program Success Monitored By 

We use a Participant Outcome Scale (POS) integrated into our data management system, which allows us to track client progress along a 5-point Likert Scale across the domains that contribute to these critical outcomes. Important measures we track include: safety from violence; autonomy/empowerment; financial stability; well-being (physical and emotional); access to healthcare services; employment; education; housing; transportation/ mobility; social connectedness; childcare; children's education; and parenting skills. Our database is seen as a model for peer DV agencies in the Greater Boston area, and has recently been the subject of national recognition by the NNEDV (National Network to End Domestic Violence). Using this database together with additional evaluation tools, such as surveys, client feedback, and third-party evaluation, we are able to respond dynamically based on what really works for survivors, as well as report on outputs and outcomes.

Examples of Program Success 

Each year, Steps to Justice serves over 200 clients and provides well over 1,000 hours of direct representation to clients. We estimate that 70-80% of these clients would not have received legal services otherwise, especially significant in cases of emergency legal services or housing-related advocacy.

“Olivia” came to TSS from another agency, and needed legal help with housing. Her abuser was incarcerated for attempted murder and had applied for parole. She and her child continued to live in the apartment where her abuser had tried to kill her. The housing authority opined that because the abuser was incarcerated and there was not a certain date when he was going to be released, she was not eligible for the emergency DV priority list. Our attorney took the case, provided the housing authority with more evidence and the law, and the housing authority reversed its position. Olivia and her son are now living in public housing.

Youth and Prevention Programs

TSS offers a wide range of youth-serving programs combining therapeutic interventions with violence prevention activities. In our Therapeutic After-school Program, children receive stage-appropriate education together with social and emotional support from trauma-informed educators, who follow responsive curriculum plans to augment each child’s individual learning needs. Through our Young Men's and Young Women’s Groups, we serve adolescents ages 9 to 20 who have been exposed to DV and are at heightened risk of becoming involved in abusive relationships. Our specially trained mentors respond to the needs of these young men and women through a combination of therapeutic group sessions and physical and outdoor engagement, spaces where they can build resiliency both as individuals and within a supportive community.

TSS has also strengthened its commitment to community outreach and education as part of a larger emphasis on prevention initiatives. We work with key community partners involved with young men and women to provide awareness and empowerment education about DV and teen dating violence. These partners include local public and private schools, community-based organizations, and communities of faith.

Budget  259,262
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Victims Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 

We have found the following five outcomes to be critical to success for survivors of DV: (1) decrease social isolation and exclusion, a hallmark of a DV relationship; (2) increase and maintain safety; (3) increase and maintain housing, financial, and emotional stability; (4) increase empowerment and autonomy; and (5) increase meaningful access to mainstream resources.

We know that a child’s well-being depends on co-regulation with a guardian. By working with each adult survivor toward long-term well-being across the domains, we also impact each young person and the well-being of the whole family. Youth survivors, however, need additional targeted interventions to directly support their developing selves.: each child in our Therapeutic Afterschool Program performs at grade level and advances to the next grade; children who need them will have appropriate IEPs in place; and children and youth will participate in summer camps or other engagement activities with staff and mentors.
Program Long-Term Success 

In order to track children’s successes over the long term, we have adapted our understanding of well-being to allow us to focus on children’s specific outcomes as well as those of their parents. We are able to see increased integration across the domains of well-being, especially in the areas of decreased social isolation and exclusion, increased empowerment, and meaningful access to resources. Building from short-term outcomes focused on promoting stability within a child’s life, we expect that adolescents will: show an improved willingness and ability to plan for their futures and access supports at TSS and within their educational network; demonstrate a greater sense of support, connectedness, and overall well-being; report a decrease in unhealthy coping behaviors and an improved ability to seek out supportive adults. Through these outcomes, youth will be better able to make healthy choices, plan for the future, and create the resiliency needed to thrive.
Program Success Monitored By 

We use a Participant Outcome Scale (POS) integrated into our data management system. It has been adapted to accommodate the different needs of child survivors of DV, and allows us to track progress along a 5-point Likert Scale across the domains that contribute to these critical outcomes. Important measures we track include: safety from violence; autonomy/empowerment; well-being (physical and emotional); access to school, extracurricular, and support services; education; social connectedness; and pro-social connections with peers and adults. Our database is seen as a model for peer DV agencies in the Greater Boston area, and has recently been the subject of national recognition by the NNEDV (National Network to End Domestic Violence). Using this database together with additional evaluation tools, such as surveys, client feedback, and third-party evaluation, we are able to respond dynamically based on what really works for survivors, as well as report on outputs and outcomes.

Examples of Program Success 

All of the children enrolled in our Therapeutic Afterschool Program in the most recent year have moved to the next grade level, and all have appropriate IEPs in place. The young men and boys in our groups have reported to staff as well as to third-party evaluators that they have experienced less isolation and exclusion, and can talk openly about taking an active role in their plans for the future.

 
“Logan," for instance, takes part in our Young Men’s Group, created to meet the needs of young men and boys exposed to DV. His mother reached out to TSS when Logan started expressing anger and distancing himself from family and school. He now meets regularly with young men from similar backgrounds, with whom he is able to talk openly about his challenges and what he has been through. He has become re-engaged with sports, physical activities, and school, and is on track for a successful high school graduation and is currently applying to colleges.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

TSS programs are designed to be relational and responsive. We seek to meet each individual where they are while remaining attuned to the impact of the broader economic, social, and political environment on those we serve. We aim to meet present-day challenges with realistic, innovative thinking that addresses the changing needs of survivors, builds on the unique strengths of our organization, and allows TSS to continue grow and change.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Matthew Swoveland
CEO Term Start Feb 2017
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Matthew is Executive Director at The Second Step. Prior to this role, he served as the Director of Youth and Prevention Programs, where he created and led innovative new programming to reach youth survivors of domestic abuse, build their resiliency, and create bright futures. He comes to this work after having served as a crisis counselor for the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center, where he was among the first men to take calls on their 24-hour hotline. Prior to The Second Step, Matthew worked with high risk and formerly incarcerated youth at Roca Inc., and oversaw the youth work team during the roll-out of the Massachusetts “Pay for Success” social innovation financing project. Matthew holds a BA from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and a Masters in Classics from Cornell University.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Roberta Rosenberg June 2008 Sept 2012
Sarah Perry June 2013 Feb

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Sheila Hovasapian Finance and Business Manager --
Deborah Maini Director of Development --
Susan Ross Director, Steps to Justice --
Ashley Shoares Senior Manager, Residential Programs --
Carole Thompson Director, Community Programs --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Mass Coalition for the Homeless --
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence --
National Coalition for the Homeless --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

 

TSS contributes to a strong network of agencies and service providers, including: Jane Doe Inc., the statewide coalition against sexual assault and domestic violence; the DV Collaboratives for several regions including Greater Boston and Metro West; and the Relationship Violence Action Committee (RVAC), co-chaired by our Community Program Director. We have strong ties with Newton City Hall, the Newton Police Department, and Newton Public Schools that allow us to effectively respond to emerging situations and to engage students and community members in outreach and prevention efforts. We collaborate with local community-based organizations such as the YMCA and the Boys & Girls Club to provide dynamic and engaging programming for youth. We have a long-standing partnership with Lasell College, which provides space for meetings of Community Program participants, as well as student volunteers who have gone through extensive training to serve as mentors to the children of participants in our IMAGINE program. We also partner with research faculty at Pine Manor College on program evaluation to complement our own outcomes tracking and performance management system.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 230
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 86%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 17
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Alexandra Simes
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteers
Board Chair Term Mar 2018 - Mar 2020
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term Mar 2014 - Mar 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Paula Berg Law Office of Paula Berg Voting
Cherise Bransfield Community Volunteer Voting
Heidi Gardner Harvard Law School Voting
Claudia Henderson State Street Voting
Mary Herlihy Beth Israel Voting
Anne Kaplan CPA / Financial Planner Voting
Krista McCabe Cruz Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Ruth Nagle BlackRock Voting
Andrew Parvey Merrill Lynch Voting
Joel Ristuccia Lesley University Voting
Domenica Rizza Community Volunteer Voting
Alexandra Simes Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Anita Adelson None NonVoting
Lynn Dayton None NonVoting
Angela Falchuk None NonVoting
Doug Gage None NonVoting
Lisa Giudice None NonVoting
Lisa Goodman -- --
Liz Hammer None NonVoting
Liz Hiser None NonVoting
Marianne Karmel None NonVoting
Sherry Katz None NonVoting
Liz Kirsch None NonVoting
Joyce Kulhawik -- NonVoting
Susan McMurry -- NonVoting
Lisa Monahan None NonVoting
Eileen Morrison -- --
Sarah Newton None NonVoting
Roberta Rosenberg None NonVoting
Joan Sapir None NonVoting
Marjorie Stanzler None NonVoting
Clare Villari None NonVoting
Sarah Winnay -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 10
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 90%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,911,282.00
Projected Expense $1,935,038.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents

2017 Audited Financials

2016 Audited Financials

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $1,672,456 $1,539,399 $2,209,352
Total Expenses $1,750,085 $1,783,028 $1,809,086

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $676,526 $670,177 $748,856
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $676,526 $670,177 $748,856
Individual Contributions $545,287 $479,858 $995,153
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $11,306 $10,437 $8,274
Investment Income, Net of Losses $6,557 $-2,220 $1,828
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $432,780 $380,824 $433,914
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $323 $21,327

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $1,258,581 $1,347,674 $1,308,952
Administration Expense $171,554 $195,438 $208,869
Fundraising Expense $319,950 $239,916 $291,265
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.96 0.86 1.22
Program Expense/Total Expenses 72% 76% 72%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 19% 16% 13%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $3,300,758 $3,409,880 $3,617,759
Current Assets $1,485,117 $1,738,872 $1,886,822
Long-Term Liabilities $1,301,850 $1,301,850 $1,301,850
Current Liabilities $82,673 $114,166 $78,416
Total Net Assets $1,916,235 $1,993,864 $2,237,493

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 17.96 15.23 24.06

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 39% 38% 36%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Second Step has worked hard to nurture a dedicated corps of donors and community stakeholders. In recent years, we have focused on deepening relationships, extending commitments, and generating more revenue from our major events. In addition, The Second Step has sustained and increased several hundred thousand dollars in multi-year commitments for FY18 through FY20. We are excited to have embarked on a new three-year Strategic Plan, and are pursuing ambitious new collaborations with area agencies and state and local funders.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

   

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

   

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

    

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

    

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?