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Research Institute for Learning and Development

 4 Militia Drive, Suite 20
 Lexington, MA 02421
[P] (781) 8613711 x 114
[F] (781) 8613701
www.researchild.org
[email protected]
Mimi Ballard
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INCORPORATED: 1991
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-3116794

LAST UPDATED: 05/27/2016
Organization DBA ResearchILD
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission at ResearchILD is to transform the lives of students with learning and attention difficulties by developing executive function and learning strategies that teach students to learn how to learn. We translate our research findings into practical teaching approaches that are student-friendly and can be easily implemented in schools and at home. Through our SMARTS Online Executive Function program, teacher trainings, conferences, and books, we promote strategic learning to ensure that all students find their unique pathways to academic and life success. To date, we have trained almost 7,000 teachers to reach more than 600,000 students.

Mission Statement

Our mission at ResearchILD is to transform the lives of students with learning and attention difficulties by developing executive function and learning strategies that teach students to learn how to learn. We translate our research findings into practical teaching approaches that are student-friendly and can be easily implemented in schools and at home. Through our SMARTS Online Executive Function program, teacher trainings, conferences, and books, we promote strategic learning to ensure that all students find their unique pathways to academic and life success. To date, we have trained almost 7,000 teachers to reach more than 600,000 students.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $584,413.00
Projected Expense $584,413.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • SMARTS Executive Function and Mentoring Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our mission at ResearchILD is to transform the lives of students with learning and attention difficulties by developing executive function and learning strategies that teach students to learn how to learn. We translate our research findings into practical teaching approaches that are student-friendly and can be easily implemented in schools and at home. Through our SMARTS Online Executive Function program, teacher trainings, conferences, and books, we promote strategic learning to ensure that all students find their unique pathways to academic and life success. To date, we have trained almost 7,000 teachers to reach more than 600,000 students.

Background Statement

“ResearchILD has been on the forefront of research-based executive function strategies for the past 20 years. They transform the lives of students who struggle.” -Suellen Inwood, Head of School, Easton Country Day School, CT

The Research Institute for Learning and Development (ResearchILD) is a not-for-profit educational and research organization in Lexington, MA, established in 1995 by Drs. Lynn Meltzer and Bethany Roditi, who have over 30 years of experience in the fields of psychology and education.

Lynn Meltzer, Ph.D., is the President and Director of Research at ResearchILD. She is an Associate in Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Fellow and Past-President of the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities. For 29 years, she was an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Child Development at Tufts University. Her 35 years of neuropsychological evaluations and clinical consultations with children, adolescents, and adults have emphasized the theory-to-practice cycle of knowledge. 

ResearchILD’s programs include local, national and international conferences, presentations, training workshops, community-based school programs, and books for teachers and parents. Conferences include the Learning Differences Conference, founded and chaired by Dr. Lynn Meltzer and currently in its 32nd year, focusing on cognitive and social-emotional needs of diverse learners, and the Executive Function Conference, offering hands-on workshops focused on key executive function processes. Dr. Meltzer’s eight books, written with ResearchILD colleagues and published by Guilford Press, include Executive Function in Education, Promoting Executive Function in the Classroom, The Power of Peers, and Executive Function in Education (2nd edition, in press). To date, we have trained almost 7,000 teachers to reach more than 600,000 students.

At the center of ResearchILD’s work is the SMARTS Executive Function and Mentoring program. Based upon Dr. Meltzer’s in-depth research on strategy use, motivation, and self-concept, SMARTS began in 2007. Small SMARTS pilot programs were implemented from 2008-2012 in four economically challenged high schools in Boston. Over the following years, Dr. Meltzer and her staff evaluated the impact of SMARTS in public, private, and charter schools across the US. An online version of SMARTS was launched in the fall of 2015, and, to date, is being used by more than 250 schools in seven countries.


Impact Statement

“Thanks to ResearchILD, we live executive function every day. It’s been four years now since the school set a goal to adopt executive function as a priority, and our success is evident in every single classroom.” (Marla Colarusso, Special Education Administrator, Dover Sherborn School District, Dover, MA)

Recent Accomplishments

  • Pilot tested SMARTS in nine middle and high schools nationwide representing public, private, charter, and homeschools.
  • Launched the SMARTS website, enrolling 400 educators from 32 states and 7 countries to date.
  • Hosted two annual conferences, the 31st Learning Differences Conference and the 6th Executive Function Conference, reaching 350 administrators, psychologists, general education teachers, and special education teachers.
  • Dr. Lynn Meltzer edited her 8th book, “The Power of Peers” (Guilford Press, 2015) highlighting evidence-based approaches to peer assisted learning.
  • Dr. Lynn Meltzer was invited to be the keynote speaker at a number of national and international conferences including the International Association for Cognitive Education conference, held in Cape Town, South Africa, in February 2016, and the Council for Learning Disabilities Conference in October, 2015, where she was awarded the J. L. Wiederholt Award and delivered the keynote address.

Goals

ResearchILD’s ultimate goal is to make executive function strategies a part of every teacher’s toolbox. Our current goals are to:
  • Further the growth of the SMARTS Executive Function Curriculum, enrolling 1,300 educators by 2017.
  • Collaborate with schools in the Boston area to develop and evaluate training for teachers and refine our school transformation model.
  • Expand SMARTS beyond the silo of special education and integrate executive function strategy use into the curriculum for entire schools and districts.
  • Develop an online community of educators from around the world, providing webinars, videos, and a forum for sharing questions and resources.

Needs Statement

“Many students just want to be told the answer and then spit it back on the test. It is really important for students to be more engaged with their own learning. That’s what SMARTS does.” -Mitch Abatessa, Learning Resource Teacher, Malden High School, MA

ResearchILD’s needs address our goal of empowering all students to learn HOW to learn. Our most pressing needs are detailed below:

Teacher Training and School Transformation: We are seeking partnerships with schools to develop programs that train teachers to integrate executive function strategies into their curricula.

Program Development: We will create differentiated approaches that reflect the needs and abilities of students with diverse levels of ability from elementary school to college.

Outreach: We must reach out to schools and organizations throughout our community and around the world via conferences, publications, training, and SMARTS licenses.

Evaluation and Research: We will evaluate SMARTS in a variety of settings to ensure that our programs are evidence-based.

Sustainability: Ongoing programs depend on the continued cultivation of diverse revenue streams, including fees from SMARTS, conferences, and royalties, and funds from public sources, private foundations and corporations.


CEO Statement

Well-developed executive function processes are essential for success in today’s fast-paced, high-stakes schools. As students progress through the grades, they are asked to organize and integrate rapidly changing information, write papers, conduct long-term projects, and study for multiple tests—all tasks that depend on students’ abilities to access executive function processes in order to plan, set goals, organize, shift approaches flexibly, monitor their progress, and reflect on their work.

As a result, it has become increasingly important for classroom teachers to teach strategies that help students access these processes. Students need to learn how to set goals, plan, and prioritize; how to organize their materials and information; how to remember and recall information; how to shift approaches; and how to monitor and check their work.

Currently, most schools do not teach executive function strategies. While educators recognize the importance of teaching these, they lack resources and training to ensure that they can teach these strategies systematically and can embed them in the classroom curriculum. ResearchILD’s SMARTS program is unique because it provides educators with research-based instructional resources and training in executive function strategies that allow them to help students understand how they learn and how to apply strategies. ResearchILD is distinctive in its mission to infuse executive function strategies into the curriculum and create a culture of executive function strategy use schoolwide.

 --Lynn Meltzer, Ph.D., President and Director of Research

Board Chair Statement

ResearchILD has been on the forefront of research-based executive function strategies for nearly 30 years. As a Board member and current Chairman of the Board of Directors, I have seen first-hand how ResearchILD transforms the lives of students who struggle with learning differences, providing them with the tools necessary to realize and maximize their own potential for academic and life success.

ResearchILD thrives on its ability to combine cutting-edge research in both education and psychology with tools and practices for students who struggle with their perceived limitations. These struggles can often lead to alienation, compromised self-image, poor grades, and feelings of inadequacy and self-doubt. Many students become the target of bullying or negative feedback from peers, teachers and frustrated parents. ResearchILD has emerged as a source of great inspiration and a wealth of resources for these students, and, over the years, has cultivated a reputation for promoting and implementing positive, strengths-based approaches to the assessment and teaching of students.

One of ResearchILD’s greatest challenges is the limited funding available to help more students with diagnosed learning differences. The number of students with ADHD, dyslexia, and other diagnosed difficulties has steadily increased in the last 30 years. The SMARTS program, with its affordable executive function lessons and teacher training tools, has the potential to reach every student in every classroom around the country. As a parent, I understand what a tremendous difference timely and proper support can make for a child and her family. Funding the SMARTS program can provide all children with the support and assistance needed to create positive and lasting impacts on their lives.

In the years since the SMARTS program began, ResearchILD has developed a robust budget, generating revenue from conferences, royalties, and licensing fees. However, financial support, research-based instructional resources, and teacher training tools are necessary to extend the impact of ResearchILD’s vital mission We appreciate the thoughtful consideration of community-minded individuals, foundations and corporations in partnering with ResearchILD to transform students’ lives.

 --Phil Lotane, Board Co-Chair

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)

We collaborate closely with public, private, and charter schools in the Greater Boston area and around the country. We work with partner schools in Arlington, Boston, Malden, and Newburyport. The SMARTS Online community represents a truly global cross section of educators, representing 32 states and seven countries. In addition, our conferences and workshops reach teachers across the U.S. and around the world.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Research Institutes & Public Policy Analysis
  2. Education - Special Education
  3. Youth Development -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

SMARTS Executive Function and Mentoring Program

“The more we can empower kids to develop strategies and to reflect on their learning, the more prepared they will be for the rapidly changing world they will face as adults.” —Cheryl Baressi, School Psychologist, Chickering School, Dover, MA

Designed for students in grades 4–12, SMARTS contains 30 research-based lessons to teach strategies for goal setting, organizing, planning, cognitive flexibility, and self-monitoring. For eight years, we have worked closely with schools to develop an adaptable and scalable program to promote the success of all students.

In the next phase of SMARTS, we will collaborate with selected schools to develop a SMARTS-Teacher Training Curriculum and Toolkit, which will provide a model for creating sustainable change.

Once we are successful, we will have developed the foundation for a SMARTS certification, training teachers in best practices for EF instruction. We will also have developed a school transformation plan to guide the creation of a school-wide culture of strategic and self-aware learning.

Budget  $360,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Special Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

ResearchILD defines short-term success in terms of teacher and student outcomes.

85% of teachers will demonstrate improved understanding and facility with executive function strategies, as evidenced by their ability to:

  • Integrate executive function strategies into their curriculum (e.g., math, science, language-arts).
  • Identify their own strengths and weaknesses in executive function areas.
  • Use strengths-based language in class discussions, parent teacher conferences, and on report cards.

75% of students will demonstrate strategic approaches to learning, as evidenced by their ability to:

  • Use strategies on academic tasks such as organizing materials, use of planners, and studying for tests.
  • Identify their unique strengths and challenges as well as explain how these affect their academic performance.
  • Improve, by one to two letter grades, on assignments with high executive function demands (e.g., essays, long-term projects).
Program Long-Term Success 

“SMARTS helps students learn how they learn, and that’s knowledge that they can carry into the next year and every year moving forward.” Michelle Bailey-Hocker, Middle School Teacher, Easton Country Day School, CT

As SMARTS continues to grow, we will transform the lives of more students, especially those with learning differences, by promoting self-confidence, persistence, effort, and access to EF processes—the gateways to academic and life success.

In three years, 2,000 teachers will have signed up for SMARTS and/or have attended a SMARTS workshop or conference.

80% of students who are taught SMARTS will demonstrate sustained improvement in the use of executive function strategies as well as self-confidence, and persistence, resulting in improved academic performance and higher grades.

70% of schools using SMARTS will have school transformation plans, laying out school-wide approaches for teaching executive function strategies.

Program Success Monitored By 

“SMARTS helps students prepare for life. Students need tools to handle the broad spectrum of academic subjects they’re asked to take on. Things only get more chaotic as they get older.” Ruth Schaller, Homeschool Co-op Teacher, VA

ResearchILD staff uses a range of quantitative and qualitative measures to evaluate the impact of SMARTS, including the research-based MetaCOG Student and Teacher Survey System developed by Dr. Lynn Meltzer in 2004 (Meltzer et. al., 2004). The MetaCOG, which has been used in multiple studies, is a criterion-referenced assessment system for ages 9-18 that compares students’ and teachers’ perceptions of students’ metacognitive awareness and strategy use. Evaluation also includes classroom observations, teacher and student interviews, samples of student work, and data from report cards and standardized tests. We administer MetaCOG surveys at the beginning and end of the school year and collect data throughout the year, modifying program components as needed.

Examples of Program Success 

“Teaching SMARTS is really exciting. Watching a student go from not turning their work in to someone who is raising their hand and engaging, is amazing.” –Travis Woodward, 7th grade Science teacher, Ottoson Middle School, Arlington, MA

Over the past eight years, SMARTS has transformed students, teachers, and schools in the Boston area. In 2014, Ottoson Middle School in Arlington requested guidance in implementing executive function instruction. With training and support, teams of special education and general education teachers taught SMARTS lessons.

Data analysis indicated that students in both special education and general education classes showed significant increases in effort, persistence, resilience, and their use of strategies. Students with diagnosed learning differences showed increased confidence and began to participate more frequently in their classes. Teachers reported that they were able to collaboratively develop ways to embed the SMARTS lessons into the curriculum.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

ResearchILD is about to initiate the next phase of the SMARTS Executive Function and Mentoring Program. Eight years of pilot programs in schools in and around Boston have shown us that there is a need for a replicable SMARTS model that is ideally suited for use in urban and suburban schools and community centers with diverse student populations. Executive function processes, which help students to plan, prioritize, organize, shift flexibly, and check their work, are crucial for success in 21st Century classrooms. Our discussions with school leaders and teachers in the Boston area have shown us that there is a real need for practical tools that promote self-awareness and strategic learning for ALL students. Working together with teachers, students, and administrators will allow us to create the SMARTS-T Teacher Training Toolkit, comprising training manual, handouts, surveys, webinars, ultimately allowing us to develop an adaptable model for school transformation, ensuring that we can help more schools include EF strategies in the curriculum.

The development of these training materials will be supported by SMARTS Online, an online platform offering teachers access to training and curricular materials. SMARTS Online represents a comprehensive online curriculum, representing years of learning and collaboration among teachers and other educational professionals across the country and around the world.

To accomplish our long term objectives, and truly realize the potential impact of the SMARTS program, we are seeking the support of community minded donors and organizations that share our values and care about helping all students achieve success in school and in life. Our ultimate goal is to make SMARTS an integrated part of diverse school communities, amplifying the transformative impact of strategy instruction and peer mentoring for underserved and struggling students everywhere.

-- Lynn Meltzer, Ph.D., President and Director of Research

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Lynn J. Meltzer Ph.D.
CEO Term Start Oct 1991
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Lynn Meltzer, Ph.D., is the President and Director of Research at ResearchILD and Director of Assessment at the Institute for Learning and Development (ILD) in Lexington, MA. She is also an Associate in Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Fellow and Past-President of the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities. For 29 years, she was an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Child Development at Tufts University. Dr. Meltzer is the Founder and Chair of the international Learning Differences Conference, now in its 32nd year at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her 35 years of neuropsychological evaluations and clinical consultations with children, adolescents, and adults have emphasized the theory-to-practice cycle of knowledge. Her recent work, together with her ResearchILD colleagues, has centered on the development of SMARTS Online, a research-based executive function and peer mentoring/coaching curriculum for middle and high school students. Her extensive publications include eight books and over sixty articles in peer-reviewed journals. Her most recent books include: Executive Function in Education: From Theory to Practice (2007); Promoting Executive Function in the Classroom (2010); The Power of Peers in the Classroom: Enhancing Learning and Social Skills (2015), co-edited with Karen Harris; and Executive Function in Education, 2nd edition (in preparation). Dr. Meltzer has been an invited speaker at numerous national and international conferences, most recently as the keynote speaker at the International Association for Cognitive Education conference in South Africa in January 2015. She has also been honored with a number of awards for her outstanding contributions to the field including the Council for Learning Disabilities Outstanding Research award in October 2015.

Co-CEO Dr. Bethany Roditi Ph.D.
Co-CEO Term Start Oct 1991
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience

Bethany N. Roditi, Ph.D. is Co-founder and Vice President of ResearchILD in Lexington, MA. She provides assessment, educational therapy, and consultation to children, adolescents, and adults with learning difficulties. She also consults extensively to public and private schools throughout the United States and Canada. She has conducted numerous workshops for special education and math teachers, most recently for the Math in the Middle project in New York City, and the Annual Learning Differences Conference at Harvard Graduate School of Education. Dr. Roditi’s research, publications, teacher-training, and school outreach has focused on assessment, strategy instruction, and prevention of learning problems, in general, and in particular in the area of mathematics. Previously, she was the Assistant Director of the Learning Laboratory at the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) and she was a psycho-educational diagnostician at The Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA. Dr. Roditi received her Ph.D. in Applied Child Development from the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study at Tufts University. She has authored chapters on mathematics instruction in books entitled Strategy Assessment and Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities: From Theory to Practice (Meltzer, 1993) and Strategies for Success: Classroom Teaching Techniques for Students with Learning Problems(Pro-Ed,1996, 2006). Dr. Roditi, along with the ResearchILD research team, developed educational software; Brain Cogs: The Test-Taking Survival Kit, Your Personal Interactive Coach for Learning and Studying and Essay Express (Fablevision, 2006). Her most recent publication co-authored with Joan Steinberg, M.Ed. is The Strategic Math Classroom: Executive Function Processes and Mathematics Learning in Executive Function in Education (The Guilford Press, 2007).

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mimi Ballard M.B.A. Executive Director --
Jamie Cutler M.S. Director of Marketing and Communications --
Virginia Diez Ph.D. Evaluation Specialist --
Michael Greschler M.Ed. SMARTS Program Coordinator --
Donna Kincaid M.Ed. Director of Outreach and Training --
Dr. Ranjini Reddy Methodologist --
Kelly Robinson Ph.D. ResearchILD Associate --
Elizabeth Ross M.A. SMARTS Media Manager --
Julie Sayer M.A., C.A.G.S. SMARTS School Program Coordinator, Licensed School Psychologist --
Elana Snow M.Ed. SMARTS Curriculum Coordinator --
Wendy Stacey M.S. Teacher Traininng Coordinator --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

ResearchILD’s collaborates with public, private, and charter schools in the Greater Boston area and around the country to develop and evaluate our resources, ensuring that SMARTS is a useful, holistic tool that can be easily implemented in diverse learning environments. Current school partners in our community include Malden High School (Malden, MA), Ottoson Middle School (Arlington, MA), and Rupert A. Nock Middle School (Newburyport, MA). We are also in the process of partnering with additional schools throughout our community to further develop and refine our programming.

ResearchILD local and global reach is reflected in our relationships with various education organizations, including Boston Public Schools and the Massachusetts Department of Education as well as Teach for America and the New Teacher Center. Moving forward we will continue to share our work with these organizations and find other opportunities for collaboration.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 2
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Phil Lotane J.D.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Venture Advisors Legal
Board Chair Term Sept 2013 - Aug 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
David Chaffin J.D. White and WIlliams, LLP Voting
David Chaffin J.D. White and Williams, LLP Voting
Carolyn Cowen M.Ed. Literate Nation Voting
Tim Donohue M.S. International Human Resources Development Corporation (IHRDC) Voting
Richard Fentin M.B.A. Fidelity Investments Voting
Lynn Grush M.D. Private Practice, Child Psychiatrist Voting
Peter Henderson M.B.A. BostonCIO Voting
Jonathan Keller Ph.D. Senior Associate Commissioner of research, Planning and IT for MA Voting
Phil Lotane J.D. Venture Advisors Legal Voting
Lynn Meltzer Ph.D. ResearchILD and ILD Voting
Earl Oremus Ph.D. Lexia Voting
Christopher Ranjitkar M.S. TJX Companies, Inc. Voting
Nancy Reierson M.D. Anesthesioloy, Healthsouth Hospital, Miami, FL Voting
Bethany Roditi Ph.D. ILD and ResearchILD Voting
Lou Salza Ph.D. Lawrence School Voting
Donald Wertlieb Ph.D. Partnership for Early Childhood Development and Disability Rights Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Anthony Bashir Emerson College NonVoting
Loring Brinckerhoff Ph.D. -- --
Dr. Robert Brooks Harvard Medical School NonVoting
David Caruso Coastal Capital Group, LLC Voting
Carolyn Cowen Innovative Educational Solutions Voting
Julie Dunstan-Brewer Bermuda Reading Clinic Voting
Jay Kaufman MA State Representative NonVoting
Julie Kukenberger Ph.D. Haverhill Public Schools Voting
Andrea Masterman Ph.D. Needham Psychotherapy Associates Voting
Harold Rossman Ph.D. Dearborn Academy Voting
Joel Rustuccia Ph.D. Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative Voting
Bonnie Singer Ph.D. Architects for Learning Voting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 69%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 15%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $592,885 $678,781 $483,295
Total Expenses $602,322 $545,454 $524,460

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $190,000
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $354,717 $420,932 $29,313
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $162,293 $198,159 $173,984
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $146 $30
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $75,875 $59,544 $89,968
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $602,322 $545,454 $490,105
Administration Expense $0 -- --
Fundraising Expense $0 -- $34,355
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 1.24 0.92
Program Expense/Total Expenses 100% 100% 93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $386,697 $372,093 $358,760
Current Assets $386,697 $372,093 $358,760
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $76,690 $52,649 $172,643
Total Net Assets $310,007 $319,444 $186,117

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.04 7.07 2.08

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

ResearchILD has experienced tremendous growth in the past five years. Our annual revenues have increased five-fold which has allowed us to expand our ResearchILD programs. The continued success of our conferences, workshops, and publications, as well as the exponential growth of the SMARTS Online program, have allowed us to reach more students, teachers, parents and educational professionals. However, in order to expand further and to create programs that leave a lasting impact on our community and communities around the world, we need to develop sustainable sources of financial support.

Currently ResearchILD has developed diverse financial resources including our annual benefit; contributions from the Board of Directors; grants from foundations, corporations and government sources; fees from our conferences, revenues from our publications, and licensing fees from SMARTS Online.

ResearchILD is constantly looking for new avenues for funding that promote our research-based strategies that transform the lives of students with learning and attention differences by helping them to find their own pathways to success.

Mimi Ballard, M.B.A. Executive Director

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990 for fiscal years 2014 and 2013, and per the reviewed financials for fiscal year 2012. Contributions from Foundations & Corporations are listed under Individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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