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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Eagle Eye Institute's mission is to empower urban people from low-income communities, especially youth of color, to play an active role in caring for our environment.  

Mission Statement

Eagle Eye Institute's mission is to empower urban people from low-income communities, especially youth of color, to play an active role in caring for our environment.  

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $115,000.00
Projected Expense $114,925.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • EAGLE Club (Earth Advocates: Green Leaders for the Environment)
  • Learn About Forests, Learn About Water and Learn About Agriculture
  • Learn More About Forests, Learn More About Water and Learn More About Agriculture
  • Urban Stewardship Projects

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Eagle Eye Institute's mission is to empower urban people from low-income communities, especially youth of color, to play an active role in caring for our environment.  

Background Statement

            Eagle Eye was founded in 1991 on the belief that access to nature, developing wonder in the natural world and having scientific knowledge of the interconnectedness of all life are basic rights – rights that must be extended to urban youth of color. Co-founder Anthony Sanchez developed a connection to nature by chance; growing up as an underserved urban youth of color, Anthony was sent to reform school in rural upstate New York after he was caught stealing. If Anthony had never gotten into trouble, he would have never experienced the pleasures of walking through a forest, horseback riding or skating on a frozen pond. The curiosity and joy sparked by Anthony’s nature explorations led him to not only pursue further experiences in nature, but resulted in him following an environmental career path. Through Eagle Eye Institute, Anthony aims to ensure that youth experience nature through thoughtful design, not simply by chance. Eagle Eye Institute aspires to be part of the creation of a world in which all people, regardless of race, class and gender are at peace with themselves, others and nature; a world of healthy individuals living in healthy communities, where all people have access to nature and are engaged in the care and protection of Earth’s resources every day.

            Eagle Eye strives to diversify the conservation movement by raising awareness of stewardship, advocacy and career opportunities in the environment. We offer free learning explorations in nature and connect underserved urban youth to mentors in the fields of natural resources and science. Offering youth an array of learning opportunities, including one and multi-day nature immersions, camping trips, stewardship projects and afterschool, place-based explorations deepens knowledge and connections to nature. Eagle Eye believes that outdoor, hands-on science learning is vital for improving health, closing the achievement gap, and raising awareness of green career options amongst low-income communities of color.

Impact Statement

2012 Accomplishments:

  1. Developing and solidifying plans for EAGLE (Earth Advocates: Green Leaders for the Environment) curricula project
  2. Recruiting, training and engaging six university students as program interns
  3. Making three new organizational partners - Friends of the Middlesex Fells, Mystic River Watershed Association and Mystic Learning Center
  4. Holding six Learn About ForestTM programs, six Urban Stewardship Projects, two Learn More About ForestsTM programs and two afterschool EAGLE Clubs – engaging a total of 108 new youth
  5. Engaging youth in our first advocacy project – a letter-writing campaign to implement recycling in the Mystic Housing Project

2013 Goals:

  1. Expand our after school EAGLE Club program – start two new chapters in two new locations and recruit ten new volunteers
  2. Complete four place-based, science curriculum packages for use in our EAGLE Club program
  3. Complete formal evaluation of our Learn About ForestsTM program with Ponte & Chau Consulting, Inc. and begin evaluation of our EAGLE Club program
  4. Raise $45,000 from individual and corporate donors and secure $75,000 in grants to meet our annual budget
  5. Develop a communications and marketing strategy to foster mutually beneficial partnerships, deepen investment by donors and increase support for Eagle Eye’s mission among philanthropic foundations
  6. Deepen our partnership with Tufts University

Needs Statement

Eagle Eye’s top five most pressing needs are:

  1. Increase staffing capacity to expand our programming - $48,000 salary and benefits for one additional program staff person
  2. Secure donations and grant money to meet our annual budget this year - $75,000 needs to be raised
  3. Develop standardized science curricula for our place-based afterschool environmental club (EAGLE Club) - $10,000 for staff salary and benefits
  4. Recruit more natural resource professionals and scientists to volunteer regardless of their budget limitations
  5. Recruit, train and engage six university student interns for summer and afterschool programming

CEO Statement

Eagle Eye staff, volunteers, donors and partners know through experience that we are quite different from many organizations working on behalf of youth. We see ourselves as a relatively small, well-knit group of leaders working with a few, well-chosen partners to provide more urban under-served youth with access to nature and all that it has to offer and teach, which is appropriate as we are an institute of learning first and foremost. For over 20 years, our Foundation Team and other members of our board have been co-learning what works best in partnering with others to produce quality experiential learning in natural areas far away from, and within, city centers, all over Massachusetts and the nation.


Our leadership team members comprised of volunteers and staff, combine wisdom, experience, knowledge, and skills in the areas of youth and curriculum development, leadership training, fiscal management, natural resources, strategic planning, conservation, and collaborative partnerships. Beyond our regular board meetings and other events, we meet by phone every week and have been doing so for over five years.  We advance our organization together, staff and volunteers, working hand in hand. We keep our eye on the prize: getting more youth out in nature using after-school and summer programs. Being nimble, we can move quickly to embrace new opportunities and forge partnerships with institutions that are striving for the same outcomes, but may need a bridge to bring it all together.

We are that bridge for partners, often much larger and with much greater capacities than ourselves. We’ve served this role for the Trustees of Reservations and for Youth Build USA through our joint Green Industry Career Pathway Program (2004-2008). We’re now bridging  the capacities and commitment of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Middlesex County and that of Tufts University students and faculty to connect Somerville, Medford, Cambridge and Boston youth to meaningful experiences in nature.

By being small, by being nimble, by being consistent, we are respected sustainable change agents spreading a culture of equity for all, youth-centered community development, visionary earth stewardship, and conscious collaboration. We have resisted the call to grow unsustainably and have instead focused on new ways of breaking down the barriers between urban youth of color, forests, watersheds, and farms.  With the support of our large and growing community of donors (staff, volunteers, partners, youth, and giving families) we see nothing but cleaner skies ahead.

Board Chair Statement

We take so much for granted today. I remember in one of our first Learn About Forests programs John Green, a naturalist, was beginning his lesson on watersheds and asked the youth where their water came from and one young boy said “from the faucet.” 

We knew that urban youth didn’t have access to rural forests and were disconnected from nature but we had no idea how disconnected.  

Caring for the environment should be everyone’s concern but how can you be concerned for something you have never experienced? Young people will inherit the earth and be the next caretakers. They need to understand and experience the natural world so they can see their place and responsibility in it. In order to make that happen, we have to build a bridge between those who have the knowledge and resources and those who are disconnected. We must connect the disconnected. Today that is more important than ever.

We are committed to making these first time experiences in nature happen for urban youth. I have had to convince adults that a first-hand experience in nature for an urban young person has value, that it is transformative and makes a difference, that nature is a youth development tool, wide in its application, boundless in its inherent possibilities. 

There are many challenges on the path to realizing our vision. At a basic level there is a need for more leadership and resource support in order to realize the great potential for this promising line of work of making a difference in urban young peoples lives and our natural world.

Money is our biggest challenge. We have been smart in our approach. Partnering with others and using volunteers has effectively reduced our overhead and made the work more meaningful; by building a community of leaders, we extend the work. 

In years past, there were several foundation officers in Boston that I could talk with who saw value in what Eagle Eye accomplishes. Now sadly, many funders have changed their focus.  I come from a culture of face to face dialogue; now there is no time to talk– many foundations do not have the staff to meet with smaller community organizations who work differently then larger nonprofits. We have a big evolving story to tell and it is a challenge to convey that story with all its nuances; the smiles and laughter, the new insights, the lingering memories, the inner shifts that take place; seeing the world through new "Eagle" eyes. 

We have many individual donors that have continued to give even in difficult economic times. We continue to deepen our relationships with donors. We have an annual hike-a-thon and other donor events and opportunities for donors to interact with youth and adults in nature. Through our partnership with Tufts University, in 2013 we were part of a new effort to have a team of marketing and communication students working to assist nonprofits. They are helping us get our message out by using social media to raise the awareness about Eagle Eye, in general and on the Tufts campus which will help us get volunteers, student interns and money. They are also updating our website. 

What keeps me motivated is that communities of color are still under represented in the environmental field, and that urban youth often don’t have access to nature to feel the peace and experience the magic. 

 

 



Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Eagle Eye currently serves the communities of Somerville, Cambridge, Medford and Boston's Chinatown.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Environmental Education
  2. Public & Societal Benefit - Citizen Participation
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Children's Rights

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

EAGLE Club (Earth Advocates: Green Leaders for the Environment)

EAGLE Club runs from September to June as an afterschool program for 12 to15 youth ages 8 to 13. Each EAGLE Club meets one hour weekly for eight consecutive weeks in the fall and then again in the spring. Youth explore nature in their communities, take field trips to natural sites around Boston and participate in campouts and local stewardship and advocacy projects. Every EAGLE Club session attends a weekend Learn About program. EAGLE Club is a place-based, exploratory program focused on improving science learning, access to nature and awareness of environmental careers. EAGLE curricula are specially developed to meet Massachusetts state science standards, as well as the unique needs of our youth participants. EAGLE Club is co-led by Eagle Eye staff, university interns and guest educators, free of charge to the youth.

Budget  $5000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  After EAGLE Club, youth will have a stronger knowledge and interest in science. Youth will want to interact with nature in both rural and urban settings, and seek out more opportunities to do so. EAGLE Club will empower youth to protect the environment and give them the confidence and skills so they believe they can make a difference. Youth development organizations, in seeing the success of EAGLE Club on their youth, will seek to establish or expand existing outdoor environmental programming at their sites. In addition, both Eagle Eye’s university interns and youth participants will be inspired to become environmental leaders in their communities.
Program Long-Term Success  EAGLE Club will rejuvenate the conservation movement by ensuring that people from all ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds care for and protect the natural environment. Youth participants will develop a deep love and appreciation for nature, and will continue to connect with nature for the rest of their lives. The increased exposure to nature will benefit participants’ long-term mental, physical and spiritual health. By providing opportunities that have been historically denied to them, youth of color will be empowered to become active in their communities as stewards and advocates. Some youth will be inspired to pursue environmental careers. In addition, EAGLE Club will help close the achievement gap by improving scientific literacy and test scores amongst underserved urban youth of color. EAGLE Club will ultimately result in the incorporation of outdoor environmental science and stewardship clubs in afterschool programs throughout Boston.
Program Success Monitored By  In the past, Eagle Eye collected data from youth participants, youth workers and volunteer instructors via surveys, debrief discussions, interviews and recorded observations. We synthesized this data using a system of indicators that determined, based on percentages, our programs success in various areas. Feedback and testimonials from past programs illustrate the power of Eagle Eye learning programs to transform young people’s attitude and relationship with nature. At the same time, we recognize the need for more systematic evaluation research to clearly identify the efficacy of our programs. As a result, Eagle Eye contracted Ponte and Chau Consulting Inc. in 2012 to assess both the short-term and long-term impact of our learning programs. The research should yield data about the EAGLE Club program to illustrate its effectiveness and the extent to which the program goals are reached. In addition, the evaluation should provide insights into how to improve this program.
Examples of Program Success  “I wish this was school. I would remember more if I could see, smell and touch what I’m learning.”

            – Boys and Girls Club of Middlesex County EAGLE Club youth participant, age 11

 

“There is a lot more trash around the school again. Can we please pick it up today?! It was so much fun picking up the trash and finding snails in the grass. It looked good too.”

            – Boys and Girls Club of Middlesex County EAGLE Club youth participant, age 9


Learn About Forests, Learn About Water and Learn About Agriculture

Learn About programs are full-day nature immersions that introduce youth to the beauty and peace of nature. The Learn About program is a transformational experience that brings 10 to 15 urban youth between the ages of 8 and 18, with little to no experience in nature, to a rural site for eight hours of field explorations, science lessons, team building activities and stewardship projects. Learn About programs take place in a variety of forest habitats, water ecosystems and farm settings. Content of each program is specifically tailored to the site visited, the needs of the youth and the instructors volunteering. All the programs accommodate multiple learning styles, expand environmental literacy and build bridges to careers in the environment. Eagle Eye has offered Learn About programs free of charge to youth since 1992.

Budget  $1200.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served At-Risk Populations Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  After a Learn About program, a young person's perceptions of the natural world will be opened. Youth awareness, knowledge and enjoyment of nature will be improved, and youth will have a desire to connect with nature again. Youth and instructors will form profound memories and relationships, and some youth will be inspired to be environmental leaders. Volunteer instructors will be encouraged to work with diverse populations again.
Program Long-Term Success 

Learn About programs in the long-term will rejuvenate the conservation movement by ensuring that people from all ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds care for and protect the natural environment. Youth will be active in their communities as stewards and advocates of the environment, and some will pursue careers in the environment. Providing opportunities historically denied to youth of color will help advance the general state of urban communities. Youth participants will develop a love of nature exploration and continue to commune with nature for the rest of their lives. The increased exposure to nature will benefit participants’ long-term mental, physical and spiritual health.  

Program Success Monitored By  In the past, Eagle Eye collected data from youth participants, youth workers and volunteer instructors via surveys, debrief discussions, interviews and recorded observations. We synthesized this data using a system of indicators that determined, based on percentages, our programs success in various areas. Feedback and testimonials from past programs illustrate the power of Eagle Eye learning programs to transform young people’s attitude and relationship with nature. At the same time, we recognize the need for more systematic evaluation research to clearly identify the efficacy of our programs. As a result, Eagle Eye contracted Ponte and Chau Consulting Inc. in 2012 to assess both the short-term and long-term impact of our learning programs. The research should yield data about the Learn About programs to illustrate their effectiveness and the extent to which the program goals are reached. In addition, the evaluation should provide insights into how to improve these programs.
Examples of Program Success 

“[Eagle Eye] gave me more opportunities to be in nature and to learn more. Every [Learn About] experience, every time I went, was different. It was great to be able to share that experience with my friends when I was younger and now I want to share that experience with my family. I bring my sister, my nephews, my god kids and friends to the woods. Now, I go hiking all the time. I bring people with me camping and mountain biking, because I just love to share the peace and joy of it. If I didn’t have Eagle Eye in my life all this time, I wouldn’t share that; I wouldn’t be such an outdoors person; the way I think about life would have been different. [Eagle Eye] just kind of molded me.”   - Melinda Duffy, Eagle Eye alumnus (1992-1997)

         Melinda participated in a variety of Eagle Eye programming including Learn About ForestsTM, Learn More About ForestsTM and Urban Stewardship Projects. She has served as an Eagle Eye Institute volunteer since 2010.

Learn More About Forests, Learn More About Water and Learn More About Agriculture

The Learn More About programs are two to three day overnight camping experiences designed to deepen youth understanding and appreciation of nature after an initial Learn About program. Programs focus on science learning, leadership development and raising awareness of environmental careers. Youth between the ages of 8 and 18 are offered the opportunity to camp and learn in a variety of forest habitats, water ecosystems and farm settings. Youth are given a balance of structured learning time and space for reflection, exploration and fun. Instruction, food and camping equipment are all provided free of charge for the youth.
Budget  $2000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served At-Risk Populations Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  After a Learn More About program, a young person from the city will have a whole new sense of adventure and self-discovery. Youth knowledge and connection to nature will be deepened. Youth and instructors will form profound memories and relationships that will lead to further collaborations. Some youth will gain a new vision of their future and be inspired to be environmental leaders and pursue environmental careers. Youth will seek out more opportunities to engage in camping and other outdoor activities.
Program Long-Term Success 

Learn More About programs will rejuvenate the conservation movement by ensuring that people from all ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds care for and protect the natural environment. Youth participants will deepen their love of nature exploration and develop appreciation and respect for the variety of ways nature impacts their lives. Youth will continue to commune with nature for the rest of their lives and recommend that others join them in their adventures. The increased exposure to nature will benefit participants’ long-term mental, physical and spiritual health. By providing opportunities that have historically been denied to them, youth of color will be empowered to become active in their communities as stewards and advocates. Some youth will be inspired to pursue careers in the environmentally. 

Program Success Monitored By 

In the past, Eagle Eye collected data from youth participants, youth workers and volunteer instructors via surveys, debrief discussions, interviews and recorded observations. We synthesized this data using a system of indicators that determined, based on percentages, our programs success in various areas. Feedback and testimonials from past programs illustrate the power of Eagle Eye learning programs to transform young people’s attitude and relationship with nature. At the same time, we recognize the need for more systematic evaluation research to clearly identify the efficacy of our programs. As a result, Eagle Eye contracted Ponte and Chau Consulting Inc. in 2012 to assess both the short-term and long-term impact of our learning programs. The research should yield data about the Learn More About programs to illustrate their effectiveness and the extent to which the program goals are reached. In addition, the evaluation should provide insights into how to improve these programs.

Examples of Program Success 

“Eagle Eye made it possible for a group of 9 MLC youth, ages 8-13, to have an overnight expedition to the Rocky Hill Reservation in Medfield. Many of these youth had never gone camping before. On this trip, youth were encouraged to try new things, including building fires, calling owls, fashioning bird nests, and working as a team to complete various tasks. Throughout the trip youth were given opportunities to lead the group, taking charge of navigation, food preparation and decision making. We also had a chance to let loose, which made for some incredible memories – searching for constellations, telling ghost stories at the campfire, and hiking at sunrise were just a few that stand out. To complete this incredible adventure, our kids were enlisted to help plant blueberry bushes in a high-erosion zone, ensuring that their legacy of appreciation and service would be carried on for years to come.”

-          Heather McCormack, Mystic Learning Center Youth Worker


Urban Stewardship Projects

Urban Stewardship Projects are one-day service learning programs that focus on connecting urban youth to nature sites and environmental organizations within their local communities. Eagle Eye recommends youth partake in an Urban Stewardship Project after they have participated in a Learn About program. The purpose of an Urban Stewardship Project is to raise youth awareness of nature found within urban areas and to encourage youth to protect their local natural resources. Urban Stewardship Projects develop responsibility, cultivate leadership and teach conservation practices. Eagle Eye partners with many environmental organizations to offer a variety of meaningful projects for the youth. Projects include, but are not limited to invasive species removal, trail maintenance, garden work, litter removal and tree planting. Eagle Eye organizes these projects free of charge to youth participants.
Budget  $750.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental & Urban Beautification
Population Served At-Risk Populations Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  After participating in an Urban Stewardship Project youth will feel an overwhelming sense of pride in themselves, their work and their communities. Youth will desire to be involved in more hands-on, outdoor service projects. Youth will have an awareness and knowledge of local conservation measures and feel empowered to make a difference. Youth will develop skills in teamwork and physical labor. Youth and instructors will form relationships that lead to internships at instructors’ affiliated environmental organizations. Some youth will be inspired to be environmental leaders. Volunteer instructors will be encouraged to work with diverse populations again.
Program Long-Term Success 

Urban Stewardship Projects will rejuvenate the conservation movement by ensuring that people from all ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds care for and protect the natural environment. Youth will be committed community leaders and environmental stewards. For the rest of their lives, youth participants will value working in the outdoors and appreciate team-building projects. The increased exposure to nature will benefit participants’ long-term mental, physical and spiritual health. Some youth will pursue green careers. By connecting green industry professionals to a new work force, Urban Stewardship Projects will help strengthen the economy.

Program Success Monitored By  In the past, Eagle Eye collected data from youth participants, youth workers and volunteer instructors via surveys, debrief discussions, interviews and recorded observations. We synthesized this data using a system of indicators that determined, based on percentages, our programs success in various areas. Feedback and testimonials from past programs illustrate the power of Eagle Eye learning programs to transform young people’s attitude and relationship with nature. At the same time, we recognize the need for more systematic evaluation research to clearly identify the efficacy of our programs. As a result, Eagle Eye contracted Ponte and Chau Consulting Inc. in 2012 to assess both the short-term and long-term impact of our learning programs. The research should yield data about the Urban Stewardship Project to illustrate its effectiveness and the extent to which the program’s goals are reached. In addition, the evaluation should provide insights into how to improve this program.
Examples of Program Success  “The [Middlesex County Boys and Girls Club] members who have participated in Eagle Eye programming have benefitted in countless ways as they step into new environments. These outdoor experiences have provided our members with opportunities to develop skills in the following areas: leadership, self-confidence and self-respect, trust, sense of responsibility for self, others, the community and the environment, critical thinking, teamwork, and decision-making, as well as, made them environmental stewards within their own community.”

-          Jennifer Pascual, Healey Club Director, Middlesex County Boys and Girls Club


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Anthony Sanchez
CEO Term Start Jan 1991
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
I co-founded Eagle Eye Institute in 1991 and was the volunteer Executive Director until 2003.  I developed the learning, stewardship and career bridging programs that have connected thousands of urban youth with the power of nature by providing them access to natural rural places while learning from natural resource professionals. 
 
I see myself as an individual who has a vision and a calling to do my part of make the world a better place and bring more peace into the world, peace with oneself, peace with others and peace with nature.  Growing up as a youth of color in New York City, I didn't have access to the benefits that nature provides.  At the age of 13, I got into trouble and was sent to a Catholic institution in upstate New York.  There for the first time, I experienced the things rural residents take for granted, like skating on a frozen pond and hiking through the woods.  The importance of my first experience with the outdoors was that it led me to say "yes" the next time.  So many young people of color today growing up in similar low income urban environments are also unengaged with nature and need that first experience that builds awareness of and connection to nature.
 
I have been able to grow an organization from vision to reality with the help of a strong foundation team who share my passion and commitment to doing what it takes to build the partnerships and collaborations necessary to engage more urban youth of color from low-income communities in the natural world. 
 
I see my role in all this is to make the connections between diverse people, build bridges, deepen cross cultural understanding, and build relationship as a small piece of a larger picture. 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience

Comments below explain that the Board Foundation team made of 4 members serves as the ED.

Anthony Sanchez– Co-Founder and Board President provides overall vision an strategic direction for the organization. More info under Executive Director Experience.

MaJa Kietzke– Eagle Eye Institute Co-Founder and Board Treasurer is the volunteer fiscal manager. MaJa is a former Peace Corps volunteer and owner of her own retail travel business. She founded The Travel Specialists in 1986 with a mission to create more peace in the world through travel.  MaJa promotes that “education is the key to making tourism a positive force for change. Every traveler can make a difference if they know how.” MaJa received the American Society of Travel Agents 2000 Environmental Achievement Award.

Bill Labich- As the Regional Conservationist at Highstead, Bill facilitates the development of state-wide and regional conservation partnerships and networks on behalf of the Wildlands and Woodlands Initiative. Bill has 25 years experience in the fields of forest management, land use planning, environmental education, and regional land conservation. He works with local, state and regional governments, non-profits, and private landowners One formative experience in Bill’s career involved working as an agroforestry extension agent with the Peace Corps in Haiti 1985 to 1987.

Chris Cato- Green Initiative Project Manager for YouthBuild USA. Chris assists with the development of a "green agenda" for Massachusetts YouthBuild Coalition, and has implemented demonstration projects that promote the building of affordable Green Homes. Chris has over 25 years of experience in youth and community development with a focus on environmental awareness and responsibility. Understanding that we all have an important role in relation to our environment, it has been Chris' mission to increase access to opportunities, build awareness and develop environmental leaders within low-income urban communities.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms Renee Toll-DuBois Sept 2007 Oct 2009

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Susan Ekstrom EAGLE Program Manager
Ms. Ekstrom received a Master's degree in education from the University of New Hampshire.  Ms. Ekstrom’s main responsibilities are to organize, facilitate and evaluate Eagle Eye’s educational programs, as well as to train and supervise interns and volunteers.
Susan is an accomplished educator with a demonstrated ability to teach, motivate, and direct children in a variety of settings.
Prior to joining Eagle Eye Institute in September 2012, Susan was a conservation ranger and educator with The Trustees of Reservation from 2009 -2011.  Susan's experience also includes leading groups of 10-12 students in environmental education activities for Nature's Classroom 2004-2008.
 
Christina Oliva Curriculum and Fundraising Developer Ms. Oliva moved from the full time position of EAGLE program manager in 2012 to a half time position in 2013 to spearhead the development of our EAGLE curriculum project and to assist with fundraising. Ms. Oliva has a teaching certificate in elementary education and a Master’s degree from Antioch University New England in environmental science with a concentration in environmental education. She has eight years of experience teaching, leading field excursions, and designing curricula.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Points of Light Award - Anthony Sanchez - Outstanding Volunteer State of Massachusetts and Mass Service Alliance 2003
Trees are My Friends National Public Service Announcement - Media Award National Arbor Day Foundation 2002

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Eagle Eye has experience collaborating with youth development organizations, conservation organizations, municipalities and natural resource professionals to implement program models. 

 

Currently, our main organizational collaborators include Tufts University, Middlesex County Boys and Girls Club, the Mystic Learning Center, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, The Trustees of Reservations, Friends of Holly Hill Farm, Mystic River Watershed Association and Friends of the Middlesex Fells Reservation. Tufts University’s Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service is a strong Eagle Eye partner, providing both a small budget and a pool of enthusiastic students to assist with our EAGLE Club programming. Eagle Eye is expanding university relationships and plans to collaborate with other local universities in the future.

 

Our 3 youth organization partners are invested in Eagle Eye facilitating more programs for their youth and want us to expand programs. Trustees of Reservations and Friends of Holly Hill Farm provide natural sites and professionals for our Learn About and Learn More About programs. Mystic River Watershed Assoc. and Friends of the Middlesex Fells Reservation collaborate on Urban Stewardship Projects and provide professional volunteers to enhance EAGLE Club.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

First decade, co-founder Board President Anthony Sanchez, served as volunteer Executive Director (ED). In 2004, Eagle Eye Board transitioned leadership to its first, paid, full-time ED. The process of hiring an ED required a new level of board engagement, fundraising and leadership. Four board members, Bill Labich, Chris Cato and MaJa Kietzke together with Anthony formed the Foundation Team (FT) in order to provide support to the new ED. As one measure of the FT’s effectiveness, within six months the members reached consensus that the ED was not a good fit. They then hired a second ED within a year’s time and worked with this person over the next five years. During this time, Eagle Eye had 4 full-time staff focused on advancing a successful green industry career pathway program in partnership with YouthBuild USA and the Trustees of Reservations, serving hundreds of urban, underserved young adults across the Commonwealth.

 

In 2009, Eagle Eye leadership transitioned once again. With the departure of key staff concurrent with the economic downturn, and a dwindling funding base—giving was down among foundations—the FT chose to explore a leaner, more efficient leadership and organizational model as they developed a new initiative that would have Eagle Eye re-investing in youth and communities closer to home: Somerville.

 

The FT members together form the ED equivalent. Members have weekly calls, additional FT meetings, and take on and coordinate staff supervisory responsibilities with new hires (e.g. mentoring, work planning and project management, cross-cultural sensitivity training, financial management). In 2010, the FT developed the beginnings of the EAGLE Initiative. The fall of 2010 instead of hiring a new ED, the FT chose to hire and supervise a Program Manager. The FT co-supervised this new hire, which in turn put the EAGLE program on the map in Somerville and helped initiate our partnership with Tufts U. Over the course of the next two years (2011-13), the FT would help one staff person move on and hire a Program Manager and a half time Curriculum and Development Specialist.

 

The FT is committed to Eagle Eye’s success. They recognize that in order to expand programs to meet growing demand, the ED position will need to be filled to provide more direct on-site supervision. First priority is an additional program staff person to enable us to increase the number of youth served. Strengthening our organizational muscle will enable us to better drum up foundation and donor support for our efforts in bringing more nature programs to more youth.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

Commercial General Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Medical Health Insurance

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr Anthony Sanchez
Board Chair Company Affiliation Eagle Eye Institute Co-Founder
Board Chair Term Jan 1991 -
Board Co-Chair MaJa Kietzke
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation The Travel Collaborative
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 1991 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Chris Cato YouthBuild USA Green Initiative Voting
Kenneth Gooch MA Dept of Conservation & Recreation Voting
MaJa Kietzke The Travel Collaborative Voting
William Labich Highstead Regional Conservation Voting
Lola Widmine Remy Legal Advocacy & Resource Center Voting
David Russell Russell Tutoring Voting
Anthony Sanchez Eagle Eye Institute Co-Founder Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Cleo Hirsch Tech Int'l Charter School Bronx NY NonVoting
Kira Jewett Hampshire Regional High School NonVoting
Shirley Mark Tufts University Lincoln Filene Center NonVoting
Mark Niedergang City of Somerville School Board Committee NonVoting
Josh Revolorio Technology Consultant NonVoting
Melinda Stockmann City of San Francisco Parks & Recreation NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 5
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 76%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 86%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $115,000.00
Projected Expense $114,925.00
Form 990s

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $88,849 $77,970 $69,964
Total Expenses $107,505 $90,572 $98,835

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $15,950
Government Contributions $0 $0 $5,000
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- $5,000
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $66,378 $60,083 $32,284
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $5,400 -- $2,430
Investment Income, Net of Losses $17,071 $12,059 $14,816
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- $-516
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $5,828 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $95,468 $78,937 $52,784
Administration Expense $10,300 $9,600 $43,189
Fundraising Expense $1,737 $2,035 $2,862
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.83 0.86 0.71
Program Expense/Total Expenses 89% 87% 53%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 3% 5%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $478,727 $456,231 $450,311
Current Assets $463,385 $447,265 $444,316
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $2,821 $2,412 $2,475
Total Net Assets $475,906 $453,819 $447,836

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 75.0%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 10.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 164.26 185.43 179.52

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Eagle Eye’ s sound financial management practices have allowed Eagle Eye to continue to provide programming for youth from local youth development organizations at no cost.

Eagle Eye Institute has had a loyal corps of donors over its history. Our current committed foundation supporters for the E.A.G.L.E. program in 2013 are Clipper Ship Foundation (5K) Roy A. Hunt Foundation (4K), Massachusetts Cultural Council (5K),) and Living Springs (1K). Some of the other foundations that we are applying to are Green Leaf Foundation, Amelia Peabody Foundation, Cahn Family, and the National Grid Foundations.

Eagle Eye has a history of receiving and successfully managing $150K multi year grants from the USDA Forest Service, The Barr Foundation and Jane’s Trust. These multi year grants have helped both to leverage additional small family foundation grants as well as develop a 3 year initiative into a successful program model.

Individual and corporate donations currently provide 40% of our annual budget. Our board and staff members continually work to inspire and engage individual donors through an annual summer program kick-off event and our annual fall hike a thon.  Summer student interns help to plan both events in an effort to engage more Tufts University students in our fundraising success.

Eagle Eye continues to further develop effective working relationships with key partners to leverage additional resources, which include shared grant opportunities, joint marketing and fundraising events, and resource sharing and exchange.It is our intention that as we work with Tufts University we will be able to secure additional resources, volunteers, and interns to sustain this work of offering free programs to urban youth development organizations. Through this initiative Eagle Eye plans to establish a working relationship with a Tufts University professor and course of study that will give credit to students who champion Eagle Eye’s learning and stewardship programs.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, further detail pertaining to the administrative and fundraising expenses for fiscal years 2013, 2012 and 2011 was obtained from the Form PC on file with the state of Massachusetts.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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