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Boston Plan for Excellence (BPE)

 27-43 Wormwood Street, Suite 110
 Boston, MA 02210
[P] (617) 227-8055
[F] (617) 275-0775
http://www.bpe.org/
[email protected]
Melanie Winklosky
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INCORPORATED: 1984
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2667403

LAST UPDATED: 08/16/2017
Organization DBA BPE
Former Names The Boston Plan for Excellence in the Public Schools Foundation (2012)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

BPE's mission is to drive exceptional outcomes for all Boston students by developing great teachers and great schools.

For thirty years, BPE has devised solutions to the toughest challenges faced by Boston Public Schools (BPS) by interweaving expertise in teacher and school development. We have prepared over 600 teachers for BPS through the nationally recognized Boston Teacher Residency (BTR).

After decades of improving schools with teacher coaching and school improvement frameworks, we founded two Teaching Academies: autonomous schools within BPS that use alternative staffing and data-driven practices to advance student and teacher learning. Teaching Academies are in-district schools that provide a world class education for all students while preparing outstanding new teachers for the Boston Public Schools. We launched our elementary Teaching Academy, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Charter School, in 2012, and assumed operations of Dearborn STEM Academy (grades 6-12) in 2015.

Mission Statement

BPE's mission is to drive exceptional outcomes for all Boston students by developing great teachers and great schools.

For thirty years, BPE has devised solutions to the toughest challenges faced by Boston Public Schools (BPS) by interweaving expertise in teacher and school development. We have prepared over 600 teachers for BPS through the nationally recognized Boston Teacher Residency (BTR).

After decades of improving schools with teacher coaching and school improvement frameworks, we founded two Teaching Academies: autonomous schools within BPS that use alternative staffing and data-driven practices to advance student and teacher learning. Teaching Academies are in-district schools that provide a world class education for all students while preparing outstanding new teachers for the Boston Public Schools. We launched our elementary Teaching Academy, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Charter School, in 2012, and assumed operations of Dearborn STEM Academy (grades 6-12) in 2015.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $6,793,090.00
Projected Expense $6,793,090.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Boston Teacher Residency (BTR)
  • Dudley Promise Corps
  • Teaching Academies: Dudley Street School and Dearborn STEM Academy

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

BPE's mission is to drive exceptional outcomes for all Boston students by developing great teachers and great schools.

For thirty years, BPE has devised solutions to the toughest challenges faced by Boston Public Schools (BPS) by interweaving expertise in teacher and school development. We have prepared over 600 teachers for BPS through the nationally recognized Boston Teacher Residency (BTR).

After decades of improving schools with teacher coaching and school improvement frameworks, we founded two Teaching Academies: autonomous schools within BPS that use alternative staffing and data-driven practices to advance student and teacher learning. Teaching Academies are in-district schools that provide a world class education for all students while preparing outstanding new teachers for the Boston Public Schools. We launched our elementary Teaching Academy, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Charter School, in 2012, and assumed operations of Dearborn STEM Academy (grades 6-12) in 2015.


Background Statement

BPE was established in 1984 by corporate and philanthropic leaders, including the Boston Foundation, to reform Boston’s schools. For the first decade, BPE offered scholarships to students and mini-grants to teachers. In 1995, after an evaluation suggested more systemic change was needed, BPE brought on Executive Director Ellen Guiney. Ms. Guiney and Boston Public Schools (BPS) Superintendent Dr. Thomas Payzant collaborated to drive district level reforms. We established the BPS Essentials of Whole-School Improvement and the Collaborative Coaching and Learning model, and brought significant funding to BPS from the Annenberg Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to drive evidence based school improvement.

In 2003, Dr. Payzant was asked about his biggest challenge, and he said that the teacher pipeline did not match the district's needs for teachers of color and teachers of math, science, ESL, and special education. Additionally, new teachers had to be retrained to deliver on BPS's instructional agenda, and half of new teachers left within three years, costing an estimated $3M annually. BPS was losing teachers just as they were becoming effective, and student academic growth suffered. BPS recruited Jesse Solomon, who had founded a small practice-based teacher preparation program at City on a Hill Charter School, to establish the Boston Teacher Residency. The superintendent decided to house the new program at BPE, where it could innovate, grow, and adapt to the district's changing needs.

We have since prepared over 600 teachers for BPS through the nationally recognized and replicated Boston Teacher Residency program. We have also pioneered cutting edge data tools and whole school improvement strategies.

Today, we work to redesign schooling through our neighborhood-based Teaching Academies, which are autonomous in-district, PreK-12 schools. They provide a world-class education for students and prepare outstanding teachers for BPS. In 2012 we launched our first Teaching Academy, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Charter School, and we assumed operations of the Dearborn STEM Academy in 2015.

 


Impact Statement

GREAT SCHOOLS

When we launched the Dudley Street School in 2012, 29% of students entered reading on grade level. At the end of the 2015-16 school year, 68% of Dudley students were reading on grade level and 81% met or exceeded growth targets for reading, according to UChicago's STEP literacy assessment system. Year-end reading proficiency rates have increased from 52% in Year 1 to 61% in Year 2, to 66% in Year 3, to 68% in Year 4. In June 2016, over one-third of the school's students were reading above grade expectation. 70% of students scored proficient or advanced on internal end-of-unit writing assessments. In math, 66% percent of Dudley students in grades 1-4 met proficiency goals on BPS end-of-unit assessments.

Before BPE assumed operations of the Dearborn STEM Academy in July 2015, it was a “Turnaround” school at risk for state takeover. In our first year operating the school, its score on a measure of whole school improvement (Annual Progress & Performance Index) jumped from 55 to 88.

GREAT TEACHERS

Since founding the Boston Teacher Residency in 2003, we have prepared over 600 teachers who serve 18,000 BPS students. 92% of graduates are initially placed in BPS and 71% placed in BPS remain there through year 6. BTR graduates post higher retention rates than the district average (80% retained 3+ years; 6 year retention rate 20 percentage points higher). BTR graduates are twice as likely as other Massachusetts teachers to be rated Exemplary on the state’s System for Educator Evaluation.

GOALS

Our long term goals are to prepare all students for college and career success and create a strong pipeline of diverse student-centered teachers.

Our short term goals include:

1. Refine, and codify the Teaching Academy model and disseminate our learnings.

2. All students in Teaching Academies achieve academic proficiency and growth and cultivate the skills, knowledge, and experience for college and career success.

3. All BTR graduates teach effectively.

 


Needs Statement

With a world class teacher education program, an innovative model of schooling, and a plan for expansion, BPE is a local and national leader for urban school reform. Over the next five years, BPE will increase student achievement by further developing our PreK-12 pathway of innovative, neighborhood-based Teaching Academies, preparing outstanding BPS teachers to deliver ambitious instruction, and sharing our learnings to catalyze reform across the city and beyond.

We are proud to be part of a community that strives with great ingenuity and determination to ensure the promise of a high quality, public education for every child. Boston has made significant progress. But to achieve the dramatic improvements we seek, all of us – parents, schools, community organizations, and donors – must think and work together.

There are a variety of ways to support BPE, including:

*Donations and major gifts from individuals

*Foundation, corporate, and government grants

*Corporate sponsorships

*Bequests

*Gifts of stock

*In-kind support such as pro-bono professional services

*Internship opportunities for Dearborn STEM Academy students

*Reading volunteers at the Dudley Street School

Your support is critical to ensuring every child in Boston has an excellent education.

 


CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.

BPE serves students and families in the Dudley neighborhood of Roxbury through Teaching Academies. It also serves teachers across Boston's public schools through the Boston Teacher Residency.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Boston Teacher Residency (BTR)

Among the first teacher preparation programs to use a medical residency model, the Boston Teacher Residency (BTR) bridges the gap between theory and practice by placing teacher candidates called "residents" in K-12 classrooms for a year of intensive study and practice. Residents work with mentor teachers and their teams at Teaching Academies and complete a Master's degree program; through this residents acquire the theory, practical skills, and habits of continuous learning that help them to provide rigorous, engaging, and relevant instruction. BTR teachers engage students in the deep learning and critical thinking that workers rely on in today's complex world. Our design is grounded in what new teachers need to know and be able to do to impact student achievement in Boston.

All residents commit to teach in Boston for three years, and we support graduates over that period as they hone their practice. Many BTR graduates work in schools with other alumni, where they support each other to achieve better outcomes for students.

Budget  $2,700,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Teacher & Faculty
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Short-term outcomes include:

(a) 100% of residents who graduate will demonstrate the competencies to teach effectively by passing all performance assessments and meeting all expectations.

(b) 75% of BTR graduates teaching in their first year and 90% of graduates in their second year will be rated Proficient or Exemplary on the summative rating under the state’s educator evaluation system.

(c) 80% of BTR graduates will continue teaching in BPS for three years.

(d) Half of all BTR graduates in BPS are teachers of color.

Program Long-Term Success 

Our vision is that one day, all the children of Boston will attend schools where students are respected, inspired, and challenged as learners. One way we are achieving this mission is by ensuring a pipeline of high-quality teachers who are prepared to address the needs of Boston students and remain in teaching long enough to be highly effective. 8% of BPS teachers were prepared by BTR. Over time, we will build a critical mass of talented and diverse teachers capable of working together to advance school and district reform.

With our Teaching Academy model, we are redesigning the teacher training model around the needs of real students in real time. Our model runs counter to the dominant system of teacher training, which separates the college from the K-12 school. By embedding the BTR program within our Teaching Academies we have increased coherence between BTR and the schools and created a more positive and impactful pre-service experience.

Program Success Monitored By 

We are dogged about measuring progress, making adjustments, holding ourselves accountable, and sharing what we learn. Our Office of Data and Improvement, led by Dr. Edward Liu, collects data from BTR applications, student assessments, surveys, focus groups, classroom observations, BPS data sets, resident performance assessments, and course evaluations. We also commission external studies, including one comparing student outcomes for BTR graduates compared with their peers. Through both internal and external research, BPE studies the impact of BTR graduates on: (1) student achievement and engagement; (2) teacher retention and diversity; and (3) teaching practices.

Examples of Program Success 

BTR has prepared over 600 teachers and met all of its initial goals: more math and science teachers, 92% placement in BPS teaching jobs, increased teacher retention rates (80% retained 3+ years; 6-year retention rate 20 percentage points higher than BPS), and high principal satisfaction rates (100% on latest survey). One in twelve BPS teachers is a BTR graduate. It is one of the most diverse teacher preparation programs in the state, with half of all BTR graduates identifying as people of color. BTR graduates are more likely than other Massachusetts teachers with the same level of experience to be rated Exemplary according to the state’s System for Educator Evaluation. BTR is nationally recognized and has served as a model for replication in over 20 sites across the nation.


Dudley Promise Corps

In 2013, we leveraged the national service model to create the Dudley Promise Corps (DPC), a neighborhood-based AmeriCorps program that prepares Dudley students for academic, civic, and personal success and develops members as civic leaders and teachers committed to social justice.  Corps members serve full-time in our Teaching Academies leading extracurricular activities, giving classroom support, and providing additional academic support to individual students outside of the classroom. DPC is a public/private partnership that represents a collaboration between BPE, Governor Baker, Mayor Walsh, and the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative.


DPC members, recruited largely from the surrounding community, serve at one of our Teaching Academies every weekday for the entire expanded school day, making them part of the school community rather than drop-in support. The fact that DPC is school embedded allows members to have a firm understanding of students’ academic and non-academic needs, as members come to know students in and outside of the classroom.
Budget  $571,300.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

DPC is driven by goals in focus areas that include: academic support, student-mentor relationships, community engagement, and professional development.

Every student who participates in DPC’s academic support receives 2-3 hours of personalized tutoring every week during the extended school day. Members collaborate with teachers and use evidence-based curricula to boost students' performance and engagement in math and literacy. Members spend two to three class periods daily helping teachers to personalize learning for all students. After school, students choose from a variety of DPC-led, on-campus, weekly enrichment clubs that are centered on students' interests and hobbies. BPE measures the short-term success of this program by diligently tracking attendance and student achievement at both Teaching Academies.

DPC members strive to build authentic relationships with students, use knowledge of context and community to boost student engagement and school culture, help students navigate challenges, and fill students' academic skill gaps. These objectives support BPE’s overall efforts of developing: (1) student-centered, personalized education for youth in Dudley and (2) a pipeline of diverse civic leaders and educators in Boston.

Program Long-Term Success 

In the longer term, the educational and social services offered by DPC will result in a number of beneficial outcomes for students including strong high school completion and college enrollment rates, the development of positive social support networks, a greater sense of agency, stronger connections to and engagement in school, and a decrease in risky behaviors. Research demonstrates that these factors contribute to the long-term success of youth.

Through providing academic supports and extracurricular opportunities, DPC members come to know students as individuals, and engage with them as trusted mentors who can help them on the journey to short- and long- term academic, career, and personal success.

DPC helps advance BPE's overall mission of providing Dudley students with a high-quality, comprehensive education that develops them as well-rounded individuals prepared for full participation in the workforce and community. It also advances our larger goal of forming a pipeline of diverse civic leaders committed to social justice.

Program Success Monitored By 

BPE uses a variety of data to evaluate our progress. The objectives listed above are measured by surveys, attendance records, and student achievement data.

Examples of Program Success 

We analyzed data from the Dudley Street School which sheds light on the impact of DPC's use of the Reading Partners curriculum on student learning in literacy. A preliminary analysis of reading growth among students served by DPC and the Reading Partners curriculum suggests that the students served by this program experienced more growth in reading than other students at the school. 46% of students served by the program made more than expected growth on the STEP assessment, compared with 34% of students overall at the school. The program seems to have had the greatest impact in grades 2-3 so far.


Teaching Academies: Dudley Street School and Dearborn STEM Academy

Teaching Academies are autonomous in-district schools providing a world class education for all students while preparing outstanding new teachers for BPS through BTR. Teaching Academies are modeled after the best teaching hospitals, which provide exemplary care for patients and a premier training ground for new doctors. Our model reorganizes educators in service of student learning. By doing so, we are replacing the outdated, century-old school model, and we are redesigning the system of teaching to ensure that every student is prepared to succeed in the 21st century. A coherent instructional system aligns curriculum, instruction, assessment, professional development, scheduling, and more to ensure a seamless educational experience for students and residents. BTR residents learn essential professional skills while significantly contributing to student learning. 

Budget  $1,400,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Our objectives for the 2017-18 school year are as follows:

  1. Serve 600 students in Teaching Academies.

2. At the Dudley Street School:

- 60% of students are academically proficient in English and math.

- The school maintains an attendance rate of 95%.

At the Dearborn STEM Academy:

--The school will meet or exceed a target of 75 on the Annual Progress & Performance Index (indicating that we are on track to exit turnaround status.)

- The school maintains an attendance rate of 92%.

3. Create and codify the Teaching Academy model.

Program Long-Term Success 

BPE's Teaching Academies are committed to preparing the children of the Dudley neighborhood of Roxbury to successfully enter successfully the 21st century global workforce. Our PreK-12 educational pathway bridges rigorous and engaging academics with career readiness, and leverages Boston’s unique position in higher education and industry to provide students with access to authentic real world experiences, while cultivating critical thinking and communication skills.

In parallel, Teaching Academies strive to produce high quality, collaborative, and committed teachers to drive excellent student outcomes throughout Boston’s public schools.

Working in partnership with community organizations and other local schools, BPE Teaching Academies contribute to a stronger, more vibrant Dudley community and a stronger city as a whole.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

At our Teaching Academies we measure student achievement, attendance, mobility, and behavior, as well as school culture and staff performance. We measure achievement by both standardized and formative student assessments which are standards based and aligned to the Common Core. We also utilize student, parent, and teacher surveys and a variety of tracking tools. Each school has a Google site which hosts all relevant school data; staff can utilize the embedded data tools to understand students’ individual learning needs as well as patterns across groups of students.


BPE is data driven and reflective. We complement quantitative analysis with a qualitative approach to gain insight on patterns beneath the numbers. We analyze the data to help us learn, make evidence-based adjustments, create evaluation plans to measure progress towards goals, and hold ourselves accountable for results.

Examples of Program Success 

Early data has been promising. At the end of the 2015-16 school year, 68% of Dudley students were reading on grade level and 81% met or exceeded growth targets for reading, according to UChicago's STEP literacy assessment system. Year-end reading proficiency rates have increased from 52% in Year 1 to 61% in Year 2, to 66% in Year 3, to 68% in Year 4. In June 2016, over one-third of the school's students were reading above grade level expectation. In writing, 70% of students scored proficient or advanced on internal end-of-unit assessments. In math, 66% percent of Dudley students in grades 1-4 met proficiency goals on BPS end-of-unit assessments.

In our first year operating the school, the Dearborn's score on a measure of whole school improvement (Annual Progress & Performance Index) jumped from 55 to 88. After a recent visit to the school, the Senior Associate Commissioner of Education in Massachusetts declared: "The walls are the same, but everything else looks different."

 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jesse Solomon
CEO Term Start June 2011
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Jesse Solomon founded the Boston Teacher Residency program in 2003, Previously, he taught middle and high school math for 10 years — at the King Open School in Cambridge, Brighton High School, and City on a Hill Public Charter School. He was a founding faculty member, lead teacher, and a member of the board of directors at City on a Hill, where he began and directed the Teachers' Institute, a school-based teacher preparation program. Mr. Solomon has been an instructor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and is a National Board-certified teacher. He holds a BS in Mathematics from MIT and an MEd from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The Barr Foundation named Mr. Solomon a Barr Foundation Fellow in 2009 for his leadership, and he is also a Pahara-Aspen Institute Education Fellow. He serves on the Board of Directors for Cambridge College, and is a member of Deans for Impact.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Ellen Guiney 1995 2011

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Mariel Gonzales Chief Finance and Administrative Officer Mariel Gonzales brings a broad range of nonprofit experience having served as among other things the Executive Director of the Bird Street Community Center in Dorchester, the Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Boston After School & Beyond, and - most recently - as the Chief Financial Officer of YouthBuild USA. Mariel has extensive expertise and experience working with public and private funding sources, working in Boston and nationally, and managing complex and rapidly changing organizations.
Mr. Edward Liu Director of Organizational Learning

As Director of Organizational Learning, Dr. Liu leads BPE's efforts to understand why certain teachers produce exceptional student learning gains and to embed these insights into our programs. Before joining BPE, Dr. Liu was Assistant Professor of Educational Administration at Rutgers University. He began his career as a high school history teacher and was a founding co-director of Summerbridge Portland, an academic program that puts low-income middle-school students on the path to college and exposes outstanding high school and college students to a career in teaching. Dr. Liu holds an EdD from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where he was an original member of the Project on the Next Generation of Teachers and co-authored Finders and Keepers: Helping New Teachers Survive and Thrive in Our Schools (AACTE Outstanding Book of 2005). Dr. Liu also holds an MBA and AM in Education from Stanford University, and a BA in History from Yale.

Ms. Melanie Winklosky Chief Advancement Officer As Chief Advancement Officer, Melanie Winklosky is responsible for public and private fundraising for BPE. Before joining BPE, she was the Vice President of Development and Operations at Mass Insight Education.  Before that, she spent 13 years at the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, including serving as the Chief of Staff to Commissioner David Driscoll. She holds a BA in psychology from Saint Vincent College and an MA in Human Development from Boston College. Ms. Winklosky currently serves on the boards of the Swampscott Education Foundation and the Clarke Elementary School PTA.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Grantee, AmeriCorps Governor & Mayor Initiative Corporation of National & Community Service / Massachusetts Service Alliance 2016
Horace Mann Charter School Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 2016
MA Techer of the Year (BTR Graduate) Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 2015
"A" Rating in Teacher Preparation National Council on Teacher Quality 2014
Grantee, Investing in Innovation program (i3) U.S. Department of Education 2014
Grantee, Teacher Quality Partnership Program U.S. Department of Education 2014
Priority Provider for Data Use and Teacher Preparation, Turnaround Schools Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 2014
Finalist for Innovations in American Government Award Ash Center, Harvard Kennedy School of Government 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 29
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 15
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 15
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): 1 is Middle Eastern
Gender Female: 26
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Charles K Gifford
Board Chair Company Affiliation Chairman Emeritus, Bank of America
Board Chair Term July 2017 - June 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Maura Banta IBM Corporation Voting
Ms. Tammy Battaglino The Parthenon Group Voting
Mr. Richard Burnes Charles River Ventures Voting
Dr. Tommy Chang Boston Public Schools Exofficio
Mr. Charles K. Gifford Bank of America Voting
Rev. Gregory Groover Charles Street AME Church Voting
Ms. Ellen Guiney BPE Voting
Mr. Bob Schwartz Harvard Graduate School of Education Voting
Mr. Jesse Solomon BPE Voting
Ms. Kerry H. Sullivan Bank of America Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 70%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $6,793,090.00
Projected Expense $6,793,090.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 BPE Audit

2015 BPE Audit

2014 BPE Audit

2013 BPE Audit

2012 BPE Audit

2011 BPE Audit

2010 BPE Audit

2009 BPE Audit

2008 BPE Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $8,838,293 $9,448,760 $12,985,440
Total Expenses $9,714,406 $9,094,701 $8,872,723

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,359,232 $2,348,343 $7,712,846
Government Contributions $6,380,072 $6,919,464 $5,281,216
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $6,380,072 $6,919,464 $5,281,216
Individual Contributions $39,257 $55,000 --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- $-55,520
Investment Income, Net of Losses $1,088 $601 $872
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $58,644 $125,352 $46,026

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $7,967,314 $7,438,897 $7,608,308
Administration Expense $1,440,773 $1,282,443 $925,873
Fundraising Expense $306,319 $373,361 $338,542
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.91 1.04 1.46
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 82% 86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 4% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $7,923,216 $9,146,923 $8,717,977
Current Assets $7,372,435 $8,328,290 $8,491,014
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,308,941 $1,656,535 $1,581,648
Total Net Assets $6,614,275 $7,490,388 $7,136,329

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
U.S. Department of Education $2,395,081.00
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Barr Foundation $725,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Boston Public Schools $700,000.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.63 5.03 5.37

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, the IRS name change document (dated March 27, 2013) is also posted with the IRS Letter of Determination above. 

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

BPE is redesigning the urban school model to address two important and connected causes of inequity in Boston’s schools: significant variation in teaching quality, and an outdated, century-old school model, which was not built to guarantee quality teaching for every child. For every student to succeed, great teachers must work together in well-organized schools, under strong leadership, with a cohesive set of instructional practices, and in a culture of continuous improvement. Our approach calls for (1) a PreK-12 pathway of student centered schools called Teaching Academies in the Dudley neighborhood of Roxbury; (2) the preparation and support of outstanding teachers through the Boston Teacher Residency; and (3) codification and dissemination of the lessons we learn to catalyze reform across Boston and beyond.

Teaching Academies provide access to ambitious teaching, drive student achievement, and serve as a rich training ground for new teachers. Early evidence indicates that this new school model, which we are developing at BPE, is advancing these goals. In our Teaching Academies, a coherent instructional system aligns curriculum, instruction, assessment, professional development, scheduling, and more to ensure a seamless, engaging, and rigorous educational experience for students and aspiring teachers called “residents.” Modeled after the best teaching hospitals, Teaching Academies redesign how educators are organized in service of student learning. Teaching Academies are structured around teams of individuals with different expertise and experience levels who work together to ensure outstanding outcomes for all students. In our model, teacher preparation and school improvement are mutually beneficial and reinforcing. They run counter to the dominant system of teacher training, which separates the college from the K-12 school, separates theory and practice, and results in a pre-service system that can detract from student learning efforts at placement schools. Like medical residents in hospitals, BTR residents learn essential professional skills while holding specialized roles designed to significantly contribute to student learning. Residents from BTR are integrated into the life of the school from day one so that they make significant contributions to students. This critical mass has been helpful in bringing staff together around a common language, set of values, and framework for instruction.

The combination of the schools' alternative staffing model and an embedded, student-centered teacher preparation program makes our strategy unique. We intend to document our learnings and share them widely, as the results of our efforts could have broad ramifications for the field of teacher education. In effect, BPE’s Teaching Academies are acting as an R&D lab for urban teacher preparation. The late Ron Thorpe, who ran the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, inspired us to document and share what we are learning from Teaching Academies with this statement:

“The time has come for the teaching profession to demand a residency experience for new teachers. It should be as carefully engineered as the medical residency but built to meet the specific needs of the teaching profession. Initially, we should expect all new teachers to spend at least one year in a “residency school,” similar to teaching hospitals…No one thing can transform teaching into the profession it deserves to be. But there is nothing more important than developing robust residency schools where young educators go between their undergraduate preparation and their arrival as autonomous practitioners. The change won’t happen overnight, but eventually it will redefine the profession.”

 


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Teaching Academies aim to:

(1) provide a world-class education for all students, preparing them for long-term academic success and responsible civic engagement,

(2) prepare outstanding new teachers who will drive excellent student outcomes throughout BPS, and

(3) catalyze improvement of all schools in Boston.

The schools are organized around an instructional system designed to enable ambitious instruction in every classroom—instruction that consistently engages all students in rigorous content. The intentional coherence between Directors of Instruction, lead teachers, teachers, residents, data analysts, volunteers, parents, and students, along with the systems and tools to support their work, make rapid progress both possible and sustainable.

Teaching Academies have an alternative staffing model that, together with regular progress monitoring of every student, allows for students to be matched with the right instruction at the right time. We personalize instruction for all students. Students at both schools benefit from the high number and strategic use of adults, as students are taught and mentored by teachers, residents, special education instructors, and volunteers, who work together in a coordinated fashion. With coaching and regular feedback from the Directors of Instruction, teams of educators based on grade level collaboratively analyze data and plan instruction, differentiating both instruction and staffing to ensure students get what they need each day. Within this environment, residents learn not just from one mentor teacher but from a system of teaching organized around student learning.

All BTR residents are trained within our Teaching Academies for their practicum and practice-aligned coursework, allowing us to completely align the work of the residency to the work of the schools in which it functions. Embedding the residency program within our Teaching Academies creates coherence between BTR and the schools by focusing a high quality residency experience on the learning of real students in real time. BTR courses support the learning needs of students and residents simultaneously as residents take on authentic assignments aligned to the school's needs, merging theory and practice. The increased coherence between BTR and the school contributes to a more positive and impactful residency experience. BTR’s Early Career Teacher Network helps graduates to continue improving their teaching through their careers as educators in BPS.

Key programmatic elements in Teaching Academies include: rigorous coursework and out of school learning experiences in STEM; extended learning time; flexible staffing and student grouping that ensure that students are matched with the right instruction at the right time; progress monitoring of every student, done in a shared context of expectations for students and adults, including regular feedback to teachers and staff; strong socio-emotional supports; Pre-Kindergarten classes to ensure students begin Kindergarten on grade level; partnerships to support an embedded workplace readiness strategy, including internships, career pathway programs, dual enrollment in college courses, and mentorships; active Family Council and strong parent engagement; and low student-to-adult ratio, utilizing trained volunteers from BPE’s Dudley Promise Corps.

 


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

BPE's greatest assets are its personnel and partnerships.

BPE's Executive Director Jesse Solomon, and Principals Dawn Lewis (Dudley Street School) and Lisa Gilbert-Smith (Dearborn) lead our Teaching Academies. All three are experienced teachers, teacher educators, and leaders, and all have experience launching autonomous schools in urban districts. They are supported at BPE by experts in instruction, operations, research and data, fundraising, and finance. Together, BPE staff have worked for thirty years exclusively in and for the BPS. BPE's employees have developed unparalleled expertise in quality instruction, urban teacher education, school data use, and whole school improvement. Importantly, BPE's employees put context first, starting from the strengths and needs present in each school community and in each neighborhood. We have learned a tremendous amount about how to achieve success in public education, and continue to feed learnings back into our work through evaluation and continuous improvement efforts. Staff biographies are available at bpe.org.

We have worked diligently to earn the trust of neighborhood residents, students' families, and students themselves, along with teachers and administrators across the school system. Families demonstrate their trust through a lower than average student mobility rate at the Dudley Street School, high engagement rates, a 95% attendance rate for students, high family conference attendance rates, and unanimous agreement (100%) on a survey that "This school is a good place to learn."

BPE has an excellent track record in fundraising which, together with an endowment, ensures financial sustainability. In late 2014, BPE was awarded two highly competitive federal grants which, along with support from private donors, will enable us to carry out our strategy. A five year Teacher Quality Partnership grant will help BPE to continue strengthening BTR as a pipeline of diverse, high quality, and forward thinking teachers for BPS. A three year Investing in Innovation grant has helped us to redesign Boston schools into a neighborhood-based, PreK-12 pathway of Teaching Academies.

 


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Our long term goals are for all students at our Teaching Academies to reach proficiency in English, math, and science, for all students to make at least one year of growth every year, and for all students to develop the habits of mind necessary to be successful in college and career in the 21st century. We aim to develop critical thinkers, community leaders, and creative problem solvers. Simultaneously, the schools will raise the bar for teaching quality in the district, both by preparing a cohort of new teachers every year and by demonstrating models of coherent instructional systems which other schools can replicate.

Our goals for our Teaching Academies for the 2017-18 school year are as follows:

1. Serve 600 students in Teaching Academies.

2. At the Dudley Street School: 60% of students achieve proficiency or more in English and math; the school maintains an attendance rate of 95%.

3. At the Dearborn STEM Academy: the school maintains an attendance rate of 92%. The school meets or exceeds a target of 75 on the Annual Progress & Performance Index (indicating that we are on track to exit turnaround status.)

4. Recruit and prepare a diverse cohort of residents; ensure each resident is ready to teach effectively upon graduation. Support a strong network of BTR graduates teaching in BPS to ensure teacher retention and effectiveness.

5. Refine and codify the Teaching Academy model and disseminate our learnings.

 


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

At the Dudley Street School, we have significantly improved academic performance and the school's culture. However, we have not yet reached our goal of 100% proficiency. At the end of the 2015-16 school year, 68% of Dudley students were reading on grade level and 81% met or exceeded growth targets for reading, according to UChicago's STEP literacy assessment system. Since our first year (2012), year-end reading proficiency rates have increased from 52% in Year 1 to 61% in Year 2, to 66% in Year 3, to 68% in Year 4. In June 2016, over one-third of the school's students - distributed fairly evenly across grade levels - were reading at least one level above their grade expectation. In writing, 70% of students scored proficient or advanced on internal end-of-unit assessments. In math, 66% percent of Dudley students in grades 1-4 met proficiency goals on the final BPS end-of-unit assessments. We will not be satisfied with our results until every student is performing at or above grade level at both of our Teaching Academies. We knew we had a tremendous challenge on our hands five years ago when our first class of first graders walked into our classrooms having been underserved elsewhere. Nearly every first grader arrived performing below grade level in reading and math. We set an ambitious target, chose an ambitious set of assessments, and have worked intently on achieving our goals, learning a tremendous amount in the process.

Before BPE assumed operations, the Dearborn STEM Academy had been a state designated

“Turnaround” school for six years and was at risk for state takeover due to its inability to improve performance sufficiently. In 2015, before BPE was named operator, just 22% of Dearborn students in grades 6-8 scored Proficient/Advanced on the English language arts PARCC test, compared with 60% statewide. More alarming for a STEM school, just 13% were proficient in math on PARCC and not a single student achieved proficiency on the state science test (compared with 52% statewide in math and 42% statewide in science). In our first year operating the school, the Dearborn's score on a measure of whole school improvement (Annual Progress & Performance Index) jumped from 55 to 88, indicating we are on track to exit turnaround status. After visiting the Dearborn to evaluate BPE’s efforts, the Senior Associate Commissioner of Education in Massachusetts declared: "The walls are the same, but everything else looks different." However, we have a long way to go to build the world-class STEM school and Teaching Academy we envision. We know that we will have to continue investing great energy, attention, and resources in the academic and social culture of the school. Our goal is not just to turn the school around but to build a great STEM school that will last for generations of children and families.

We know we have much work to do on fully developing our school model. In the coming years, we will continue to build, operate, improve, and document our Teaching Academy model. We will uphold a coherent instructional system and refine it through continuous evaluation, documentation, and improvement. We will continue to shift the design of BTR to meet the needs of students in our schools. We are embedding lessons learned so far in our plans moving forward and will continue to build with the goal of codifying a replicable model that delivers improved student achievement and school-based teacher preparation.