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Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership Inc.

 128A Tremont Street, Suite 4F
 Boston, MA 02108
[P] (617) 3380005
[F] (617) 3380054
massafterschool.org
[email protected]
Patrick Stanton
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INCORPORATED: 2007
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 20-5116880

LAST UPDATED: 08/03/2016
Organization DBA MAP
Mass Afterschool Partnership
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership works to ensure every child in Massachusetts has equal access to high quality out-of-school time programming after school, before school, and during the summer months.

Mission Statement

The Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership works to ensure every child in Massachusetts has equal access to high quality out-of-school time programming after school, before school, and during the summer months.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $907,420.00
Projected Expense $606,835.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Afterschool Data Sharing Pilot Project
  • MTAC

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership works to ensure every child in Massachusetts has equal access to high quality out-of-school time programming after school, before school, and during the summer months.

Background Statement

Since its inception in 2005, the Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership has been the only dedicated statewide organization that works to ensure every child in Massachusetts has equal access to high quality out-of-school time programming after school, before school, and during the summer months.

Our strategy is rooted in five separate aspects. First, for lawmakers which we develop public policy anchored in relevant research that highlights the central role of afterschool and out of school time in the growth of the whole child. Second, for out-of-school time educators where we develop high quality professional development and technical assistance opportunities for out of school time educators grounded in research and implemented by experienced, successful trainers. Third, for families who we provide a wide array of network information regarding out of school time programming and opportunities in specific communities across Massachusetts. This information allows families to tailor their child’s out of school time experience to a child’s unique needs. Fourth, for communities who we provide access to local resources for out of school time stakeholders. MAP acts as the bridge that helps bring community resources to out of school time programs. 5th but most importantly, for students who we create a network of dedicated stakeholders devoted to building a system that provides students with multiple ways of learning rooted to high standards in collaboration with educational resources in a community.

MAP develops public policy that supports afterschool programming as an integral part of a child’s whole education. Our organization also develops partnerships among programs, schools, communities, and government to promote afterschool time learning as an essential support for the whole child. This is especially important as a tool to mitigate and eliminate the achievement gap.

Education does not contain a singular component – it must encompass many disciplines to work. The same can be said for afterschool which best supports children and families using a multi-faceted approach. Over our history, MAP has help build systems and support efforts to grow this communal approach to education. It has been shown to have far reaching affects such as crime reduction, college and career readiness, and family stability

Impact Statement

MAP's accomplishments have been in several different areas such as professional development, policy, and advocacy. MAP's strategy does not rest on one direction, rather, our organization employs several different strategies to best integrate afterschool programming into the educational system.
  1.  ASOST Line Item Increase - The afterschool and out-of-school time quality grant, line item 7061-9611, is the only dedicated funding stream for afterschool programming in Massachusetts. MAP successfully advocated for an increase to the line item - now at $1.71 million. 
  2. Successful Expansion of Zero Robotics - Zero Robotics (ZR) is an informal STEM curriculum that teaches middle school and high school students to code. In partnership with MIT, NASA, and the Department of Defense, MAP expanded the curriculum to 12 sites this year. Each site teaches the curriculum over the course of the summer, culminating in a finals competition, where all teams convene at MIT where there code is beamed to the International Space Station. Astronauts then upload the code into small satellites and the results are shown in real time to the teams back on earth. 
  3. ASOST Coordinating Council Moves Towards Recommendations - The Afterschool and Out-of-School Time Coordinating Council, a 15 member body including a Senator and  a Representative, are moving towards making valuable recommendations on afterschool to the legislature. 
Goals
  1. Further Increase to the ASOST line Item - funding is the still the largest impediment for access to quality afterschool programs. 
  2. Stronger Impact on the Afterschool Field - MAP expects to expand its direct service programs and advocacy to provide a better voice from the field. In turn this creates better policy. 
  3. Expanded Professional Development - Ask providers and programs what their biggest need is and you hear PD. MAP hopes to expanded its training and technical assistance int he coming year.  
 
 

Needs Statement

MAP is looking to expand its direct services programs in the coming years. As a research and policy organization, MAP is looking to be the leader in afterschool data collection and community outreach. 
 
Our current needs are:

  1. Funding to support the ASOST Coordinating Council - as a sitting member of the Council, MAP has invested time and resources in helping develop critical afterschool policies. In order to expand on our work, MAP is looking for state and private sources of funding to complete projects such as: school and CBO data sharing, state resource MAP, system improvements research, public information campaign.
  2.  Research Funding - MAP looks to build off of successes of communities around Massachusetts and develop comprehensive models to expand best practices.
  3. PD Funding - MAP looks to build our PD arm to incorporate all geographic areas of the state. PD is important to the success of afterschool programs everywhere. 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

STATEWIDE
MAP is a statewide organization. Despite this we also put emphasis on helping children in communities of need. Often times, policy and advocacy must be directed in specific locations to have a greater impact. 

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Secondary & High Schools
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Afterschool Data Sharing Pilot Project


The Afterschool Data Sharing project is the work of MAP and its partners on the Afterschool and Out-of-School Time Coordinating Council, a state run committee of dedicated afterschool programs, state agency staff, and research experts. The pilot project gives one district the opportunity to begin sharing data directly with community based organizations in its area. This allows for the free flow of support for children and youth whether in school or out.
Budget  $300,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  The most immediate impact would be student's academic success. Often times students may fall behind in school due to lack of interest or other factors outside of the school's control. Afterschool and summer programs offer critical non-academic and academic services that can supplement what a student learns in school, allowing them to achieve more. Other impacts include improving graduation rates, in-school participation and social and emotional well-being.
Program Long-Term Success  The pilot project hopes to solve several key problems in the afterschool world. There is often a disconnect between the school systems and the surrounding community based organizations. Students are flowing between the two without much information sharing by teachers or program directors. If more information were available to afterschool providers, they could tailor specific programming for their students, giving them another level of educational enrichment.

The pilot would hope to bring about an ideal state of data sharing in Massachusetts. There would be standardized methods for sharing and securing private data. Schools and afterschool providers could look to state guidance on how best to expand data sharing capabilities in their districts.
Program Success Monitored By  MAP will work with a broad range of partners to help ensure the continued quality of the project. The ASOST Coordinating Council will be in charge of identifying and selecting school districts and programs for the pilot project. MAP will utilize the expertise of the Data Quality Campaign - a nation wide organization dedicated to the responsible use of student data to improve the lives of children and youth. Furthermore, MAP will leverage the support of the Departments of Early Education and Care and Elementary and Secondary Education to ensure only quality afterschool and summer programs are involved in the pilot project.
Examples of Program Success  MAP worked with our legislative champions in the House and Senate to fund the pilot program for $300,000 over three years. While the pilot project amendment was included in the final FY2017 Massachusetts budget, it was unfortunately vetoed in final weeks of deliberation by the Governor. MAP is confident the support of the ASOST Council, legislature, and the departments will make this project a reality in the coming years.

MTAC

Massachusetts Technical Assistance Collaborative (MTAC) - MTAC is MAP's professional development and technical assistance program. MAP targets afterschool programs around Massachusetts in need of training. This can include newly developed and state certified curriculum for CEU credits.
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  MAP is building a small cohort of partners around the state that will continue to provide excellent training services. 
Program Long-Term Success  MAP's long term goal is to have a robust and sizable professional development system through out Massachusetts. This would allow for quality programming and curriculum throughout the state regardless of geographic location.
Program Success Monitored By  MAP's full time Director of Professional Development will be responsible for the program. Success is determined by number  of staff trained and number of curricula developed. 
Examples of Program Success  in March 2014, MAP hosted an all day conference in EPS region 5 at Bridgewater State University. The event drew over 100 hundred staff from around eastern Massachusetts. MAP offered training in 6 different courses each with CEU points available. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Ardith Wieworka
CEO Term Start June 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Ardith Wieworka was appointed as Chief Executive Officer of the Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership in 2014. Ms. Wieworka has a distinguished career in Massachusetts supporting and promoting programs benefitting children, youth, their families and communities. As CEO, Ms. Wieworka oversees a range of public policy and advocacy initiatives promoting the work of afterschool programs and expanded learning opportunities for children. In addition, Ms. Wieworka is expanding the professional development and training arm of MAP to support afterschool professionals in their development to become even greater educators in the afterschool field.

Ms. Wieworka has increased the visibility of the out of school time field by supporting the After School and Out of School Time grant program, and providing leadership on the legislatively created ASOST Coordinating Council. Ms. Wieworka continues her work on early education and school age issues in her additional role as Executive Vice-President of Child Development and Education, the largest family child care support organization in Massachusetts.

Prior to her leadership role at MAP, Ms. Wieworka served as the Commissioner of the Massachusetts Office of Child Care Services, one of the ten largest agencies in state government, overseeing the state licensing and child care subsidy administration system. As the longest serving Commissioner of this agency, Ms. Wieworka led the department in making policy, regulatory, and technology advances that changed the face of early education and school age programming in Massachusetts, and grew the agency’s budget to better support at risk children and families across the state.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Katie Magrane June 2009 May 2014
Gwyn Hughes Mar 2004 May 2009

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

   

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 80%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 2
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Berna Mann
Board Chair Company Affiliation Unite Here Health
Board Chair Term Dec 2014 - Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Jeffrey Hoffman Professor, MIT Voting
Berna Mann Unite Here Health Voting
Mary Pat Mesmer Cape Cod Child Development Voting
Khari Milner Cambridge Agenda for Children Voting
Mike Plansky Loyola Recovery Foundation Voting
Bill Restuccia Child Development and Education Voting
Dr. Mary Walsh City Connects Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $907,420.00
Projected Expense $606,835.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audit

2013 Review

2012 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $902,786 $490,169 $425,800
Total Expenses $606,835 $457,546 $427,952

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$623,234 $464,911 $360,760
Government Contributions $138,323 $25,031 $64,687
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $138,323 $25,031 $64,687
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $141,000 -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $229 $227 $353
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $542,385 $267,980 $235,333
Administration Expense $64,450 $189,566 $187,019
Fundraising Expense -- -- $5,600
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.49 1.07 0.99
Program Expense/Total Expenses 89% 59% 55%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $672,820 $399,500 $356,661
Current Assets $666,337 $395,140 $352,301
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $11,401 $34,032 $23,816
Total Net Assets $661,419 $365,468 $332,845

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 58.45 11.61 14.79

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

 MAP's goal is to ensure all school age children and youth have access to quality enrichment activities before school, afterschool, and during the summer months. 

MAP does this:
 
For Lawmakers: Through the development of public policy anchored in relevant research that highlights the central role of afterschool and out of school time in the growth of the whole child. For Out of School Time Educators: By developing high quality professional development and technical assistance opportunities for out of school time educators grounded in research and implemented by experienced, successful trainers.

For Families: By providing a wide array of network information regarding out of school time programming and opportunities in specific communities across Massachusetts. This information allows families to tailor their child’s out of school time experience to a child’s unique needs.

For Communities: By providing access to local resources for out of school time stakeholders. MAP acts as the bridge that helps bring community resources to out of school time programs.

For Students: By creating a network of dedicated stakeholders devoted to building a system that provides students with multiple ways of learning rooted to high standards in collaboration with educational resources in a community.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Over its 10 years of existence MAP has employed a multitude of strategies to accomplish its goals. Each strategy is defined by thorough research as well as a input from the afterschool field and other stake holders through out Massachusetts. Additionally, MAP's strategies have evolved through the years, incorporating ideas that work and shedding those that do not.
 
Our strategies include:
  1. Advocacy - Public understanding of key afterschool issues is a valuable aspect of any quality system. State funding is critical to many programs in Massachusetts, as such MAP has host an "advocacy season". Over a period of of months, MAP brings together providers, experts, and law makes for a series of invents that bring to light the benefits of afterschool. 

  2. Research - There have been major strides in research over the last 5 years. New data suggest afterschool enrichment is incredibly important to the growth of children and youth. This data is pertinent to the field and to the legislature. At MAP, research is a primary component of every strategy, but extends beyond as MAP staff are constantly looking for and evaluating new research. 

  3. Professional Development - Over the past decade, MAP has consistently implemented quality professional development and technical assistance to providers in Massachusetts. The growing need for increase PD, however, has MAP growing this aspect of the organization. PD and TA are no longer embedded in the framework of our policy and advocacy initiatives. Now, the Massachusetts Technical Assistance Collaborative (MTAC) occupies a much greater role within MAP. MAP hired a full time dedicated staff member to expand and grow the program. Additionally, a fleet of trainers and coaches will be available to service school age providers with quality curriculum training.

    MAP plans on expanding services by 25% and then some. Professional development is a key aspect of a healthy afterschool system and as such must be expanded to accompany the need. Expanding MTAC increases MAP’s ability to connect with the field and grow valuable partnerships, which will be leveraged come advocacy season. Furthermore there are increasing in participation throughout the state, leading to wide spread acknowledgment of the benefits of afterschool programming.

  4. Communications - In order to facilitate comprehensive outreach to the afterschool field MAP has utilized communication strategies to relay information. Through MAP's website anyone can contact the staff directly, as well as access news and research.

    MAP's most successful communication tool is the Weekly Information for Networks (WIN) newsletter. The newsletter is sent to numerous stake holders every week containing the latest information on afterschool. The newsletter has 25% higher open rate than industry standards. 

  5. Policy Development - Many of MAP's initiatives over it's life span have been policy related. MAP's occupies a special niche in the atfteschool realm, using our expertise and knowledge to help craft local and state policy. 

    Additionally, MAP sits on the Afterschool and Out-of-School Time (ASOST) Coordinating Council. This 15 member body is responsible for holding public testimony, gathering research, and making recommendations to both the Governor and Legislature. 
 
 
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

MAP has a coalition of partners throughout Massachusetts that make our work possible. Additionally, MAP employs qualified and passionate staff who come from a wide range of backgrounds. These two factors enable MAP to accomplish goals and objectives that other organizations our size can't.

Strong Network - MAP has a  strong network of partners all over Massachusetts. We engage with research organizations to provide supplemental analysis and data. Providers and programs are critical allies come advocacy season. 

MAP's influence carries into the State House where we are regularly working with staff of a Senator and Representative. MAP has provided research and expertise to their offices for over 7 years.
 
Qualified Staff - Currently MAP employs 8 staff, 5 of whom are full time. Each staff member, regardless of time spent with the organization, is highly qualified in various subject matters. Being a policy organization, each employee is well versed in local, state, and national politics as well as the intricate minutiae of education policy which is so critical to success.
 
MAP staff is also qualified in communications, research, professional development, and advocacy.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

MAP's goal is access quality afterschool programs for all children and youth. This can be measured many different ways. MAP has chosen a qualitative method (i.e. input from the field, surveys, communications) as well as quantitative (i.e. state funding, newsletter analytics, event attendance).
 
When measuring either method MAP takes into account both the history of afterschool in Massachusetts as well as comparative measures of other states and systems. This allows our organization to see where are in real time pertaining to the success of the above stated goal.
 
Take for example the only dedicated state line item for afterschool - the Afterschool and Out-of-School Time (ASOST) Quality Grant. It is a major part of MAP's advocacy every year. Despite a recession and state and national budget gaps, MAP has successfully advocated for increases to the grant every year for 4 years.
 
Our long term goal of the grant would be a continually increasing money pool for programs. Our intermediate goal we break up into one year increments based on research and data. This allows MAP to go to the legislature and governor and have an "ask" grounded in reality.  

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Of our long term goal, MAP has accomplished much already.
 
This includes:
  • Continual increases to the ASOST Quality Grant (line item 7061-9611) enabling thousands of children and youth access to quality afterschool enrichment.
  • Passage of the ASOST Coordinating Council. This 15 member body is designed to make recommendations to the legislature in regards to expanded learning opportunities. MAP sits on the Council and is heavily invested in its success.
  • Expansion of professional development services to programs across Massachusetts has allowed afterschool instructors implement quality CEU certified curriculum.