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Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center at Bridgewater State University (The Bridgewater State University Foundation)

 Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center, Bridgewater State University
 Bridgewater, MA 02325
[P] (508) 5311784
[F] (508) 5315784
http://www.MARCcenter.org
[email protected]
Elizabeth Englander
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INCORPORATED: 2004
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2678005

LAST UPDATED: 07/05/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC) is a Center devoted to violence prevention, housed on the main campus of Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts. It is directed by Dr. Elizabeth Englander, who founded the center in 2004. The mission of MARC is to offer free or low-cost bullying & cyberbullying prevention programs to K-12 schools, and to train University students (future educators) in bullying and cyberbullying prevention. MARC develops research-based programming and curricula for students, faculty, parents and communities; engages in cutting-edge research examining bullying and digital behaviors; and develops educational and professional materials for other stakeholders, such as pediatricians, social workers, and law enforcement.

Mission Statement

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC) is a Center devoted to violence prevention, housed on the main campus of Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts. It is directed by Dr. Elizabeth Englander, who founded the center in 2004. The mission of MARC is to offer free or low-cost bullying & cyberbullying prevention programs to K-12 schools, and to train University students (future educators) in bullying and cyberbullying prevention. MARC develops research-based programming and curricula for students, faculty, parents and communities; engages in cutting-edge research examining bullying and digital behaviors; and develops educational and professional materials for other stakeholders, such as pediatricians, social workers, and law enforcement.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $30,000.00
Projected Expense $60,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Bullying and cyberbullying prevention for K-12 Students
  • Bullying and Cyberbullying Professional Development for Educators

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC) is a Center devoted to violence prevention, housed on the main campus of Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts. It is directed by Dr. Elizabeth Englander, who founded the center in 2004. The mission of MARC is to offer free or low-cost bullying & cyberbullying prevention programs to K-12 schools, and to train University students (future educators) in bullying and cyberbullying prevention. MARC develops research-based programming and curricula for students, faculty, parents and communities; engages in cutting-edge research examining bullying and digital behaviors; and develops educational and professional materials for other stakeholders, such as pediatricians, social workers, and law enforcement.

Background Statement

In September 2003, I formed a group of concerned experts that was known as the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Partnership (MARP). The partners in this group were myself, other BSC faculty, experts in law and sociology, entertainers focusing on children’s aggression, and educational nonprofit groups. MARP hosted a Conference in January 2004, which was essentially the kickoff for the group, and clearly tapped into an area of great need. Its coverage by the Boston Globe and other local press drew a large response, and I was impressed by the degree of need that existed in the local community.

As a result, in March of 2004 I was awarded a Presidential Fellowship to spend a year transforming the Partnership into a new academic Center. The Center would address aggression, bullying and cyberbullying by utilizing the expertise of faculty and students to bring research and resources to K-12 Education. My objective was to create a new model for delivering social and emotional learning resources to education; instead of a network of independent non-profit agencies, some doing excellent work while others offered substandard programming, I believe that higher education offered both an emphasis on research- and evidence-based work and a mechanism for offering high quality programming at low or even no cost to schools.

Universities can train students to deliver programming to children as high status peer mentors, while University faculty can train teachers and administrators. MARC is a Center that both delivers high quality programs to schools while simultaneously offering important learning opportunities for University students in Education.

MARC now trains 60 undergraduates and 4-7 graduate students every year, and together we bring programs and services to 250-300 schools a year, impacting an estimated 125,000 to 150,000 children. Other faculty participate, and we have two office staff. An active research program informs our future programs and evaluates our current ones. We offer age-appropriate classroom curricula, in-school trainings for students and faculty, consultation services, educational downloads for parents, an online surveying service for schools, an online needs assessment guide, and many other resources – all entirely free of charge for K-12 schools.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments (past year):

1. MARC provided programming, services and resources to 248 schools in the US, impacting an estimated 125,000 children.

2. MARC mentored graduate students in research: they conducted, presented, and published research at multiple conferences.

3. MARC concluded the revision and evaluation of two of our three research-based curricula: the Middle School Bullying & Cyberbullying Advisory Curriculum, & the High School Cyberskills Curriculum.

4. Dr. Englander chaired the national Cyberbullying Workgroup for the ICDDM, including presenting at a Sackler Colloquium at the National Academy of Sciences.

5. Faculty at MARC trained 60 undergraduate students & 4 graduate students in the fields of Psychology, Education, Counselor Education, Criminal Justice, and Social Work in bullying and cyberbullying prevention skills.

Future Goals:

6. Revise and update the MARC K-5 Bullying and Cyberbullying Prevention Curriculum. This research-based and evaluated Curriculum consists of ten lessons plans for each grade in Kindergarten through fifth grade, and is distributed free of charge.

2. To update, revise, and improve our research-based training programs that specifically target girls, their cyberbullying and relationship development.

3. Expand MARC’s capacity: our programs currently feature long waiting lists. Hiring & training more part time faculty would expand our outreach to local and other areas.

4. Increase MARC’s capacity to bring training and education to other stakeholders in children’s development (e.g., pediatricians, social workers, lawyers, and judges).

5. Help other Universities begin Centers that follow the involvement of future educators (University students) in bullying and cyberbullying prevention.

6. To update the MARC website, and to improve the online Request system used by schools asking for services and programs.


Needs Statement

Needs

Personnel needs are paramount:

Part time faculty hours @$40/hour:

         · supervise undergraduate and graduate students, meetings, field work supervision (700 hours, $28,000)

        · supervise students in research and program development (650 hours, $26,000)

Summer salaries for research and program development ($30,000)

3 Graduate student Assistantships @ $9,000 each ($27,000)

Clerical support ($18/hour for 960 hours a year) ($17,280)

Research Needs: incentives to subjects, $15/each=$7,500

Technology needs, laptops for data analysis, presentations, publications and program preparation (2 laptops, $5,000); also software needs, data gathering and outreach to email list ($700/month=$8,400)

Travel needs, to support outreach, travel to schools for program delivery, and sponsoring students to present research (3-4 conferences, $11,000).

Assisting other Universities in setting up academic Centers to assist K-12 education in bullying and cyberbullying prevention:

Travel (estimated 5 trips @$2,000 a trip =$10,000)

Grants to interested Universities (5 Universities @$10,000 each =$50,000)


CEO Statement

There are a thousand and one programs and agencies in the US addressing violence, bullying and cyberbullying prevention. Despite this plethora of resources, significant obstacles still prevent many schools from utilizing educational resources that could be important for their students’ emotional and academic growth. MARC was designed to address these obstacles – which are:

Cost. Most programming in violence prevention is done by non-profit agencies, which often rely on fees and charges to maintain viability. Yet, education funding has very little room for “extras,” and some schools have no such resources at all.

  • Programs at No Cost. Almost all of MARC’s programs and services are delivered to schools at no cost. This is accomplished by the Center’s use of salaried faculty members, students (most of whom represent no cost at all), the support of the University, and external grant funding. 

Quality & Effectiveness. A few agencies have research-based programs and curricula; many others have no such evidence of effectiveness. NGOs may lack the expertise to conduct such evaluative research, and K-12 Educators may lack the expertise to select programs with research foundations. Many Centers that conduct research have no fieldwork outreach programs; and many agencies that offer programs have no research team.

 

  • Quality programs. MARC’s programs are all evaluated in our research lab for effectiveness, and during 2014-2015, an independent Fulbright Fellow from an Institute in Europe spent a year evaluating our programs. Our ongoing research program also helps us identify new areas that may be important for future programs. Students work on research and learn the scientific method, while they also learn how knowledge progresses from the lab to the classroom where they are educating younger peers.

 

Relevance. To stay abreast of the rapidly changing field of digital technology, and how it is used by children and adolescents, continual access to children and adolescents is necessary. Most agencies employ only adults.

 

  • Increasing Relevance. Situated at a University, MARC has ready access to older adolescents and their social and technology challenges. This population has alerted us to several issues early on, most notably, the widespread use of digital technology late at night in lieu of sleep. In addition, MARC works every week with younger children and teenagers, and during our discussions with them, new perspectives and issues can rapidly come to light.

 

MARC is different precisely because it addresses these obstacles directly.


Board Chair Statement

At this time, MARC is overseen by the University administrators, in lieu of an Advisory Board.


Geographic Area Served

NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
STATEWIDE
MARC's primary geographic focus is the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, but we deliver programs and training to schools all over the United States and other countries.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  2. Education - Research Institutes & Public Policy Analysis
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Bullying and cyberbullying prevention for K-12 Students

MARC's bullying & cyberbullying prevention programs for K-12 students are unique in that most services are delivered by trained graduate & undergraduate students from the University, as high-status peers. MARC programs are offered to all K-12 schools. Our general principles:
  1. Bystander support of targets is key;
  2. Elementary students are often emotionally connected to, and learn best from, their primary teacher;
  3. Older students are best able to learn from high-status peers;
  4. Cyberbullying is a central form of bullying today;
  5. Ongoing programs are preferable to one-time programs such as assemblies;
  6. However, assemblies can be very useful for raising interest and for beginning or continuing interest in a campaign of behavior change.
Developmentally-appropriate student programming
* training student leadership teams whose purpose is to change school culture
* student assemblies for different age groups
* Several Curricula  
* student contests, a Youth Summit, and other positive proactive events
Budget  $35,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Increased understanding of bullying and cyberbullying principles and facts following MARC education of students
Program Long-Term Success 
  • Awareness of bullying and cyberbullying problems will be present in 90% of students in groups trained by MARC Students. 
  • 100% of schools that have MARC train Peer Leadership Groups will continue to have these groups function independently in school with a faculty supervisor. 
  • Awareness and education will result in reductions in bullying and cyberbullying incidents over 3-5 years, as measured by repeated anonymous student surveys in schools.  
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
After the MARC student programs, were students more enthusiastic about pursuing anti-bullying goals or programs?
48% - Yes, definitely
52% - Yes, somewhat
 
Now that your school has been through a Peer Leadership Training, do you believe that the process is more likely to produce long-term results when compared with an assembly?
75% - Yes, definitely
25% - Yes, somewhat
 
 65% of children in K-5 rated their level of interest in the MARC K-5 Bullying and Cyberbullying Curriculum as an 8, 9 or 10 (out of 10 possible points).
 
58% of teachers in K-5 rated their student's participation in the MARC K-5 Bullying and Cyberbullying Curriculum as an 8, 9 or 10 (out of 10 possible points). 
 

All questions below (100%) showed significantly higher mean scores after the MARC High School Curriculum, when compared to pre­‐test levels of knowledge.

• Friends have power over you online (t=3.483(99),p<.002).

• You cannot control what other people do with images or text online (t=3.483(99),p<.002).

• New users in Social Networking often make the mistake of constantly posting about every detail of their lives (t=1.970(99),p<.052).

• Geolocation apps (often used in social networking) can reveal your physical location to others (t=5.557(99),p<.000).

• How to report abuse to a website (t=6.486(99),p<.000).

 
All q

Bullying and Cyberbullying Professional Development for Educators

The philosophy at MARC is that K-12 educators should benefit from personal attention and, whenever possible, the help and presence of professionals from the Center. We generally emphasize personal help and assistance in implementing school change. Recognizing the burdens that K-12 educators struggle with in our society, we seek to make the program as little a burden as possible: our goal is to reduce workloads, not increase them.

Faculty trainings generally cover (among other topics):
  • Specific behaviors that educators need to look for;
  • How to respond, and when to report;
  • How cyber-behaviors impact in-school bullying and cyberbullying;
  • Developmental factors that affect bullying; and
  • Concrete areas for focus and talking points for use with students.
All observations and recommendations are grounded in research findings, which are always reviewed during the training.

Faculty training services are generally in-school and provided by the Center's Director or Program Coordinator. 

 
Budget  --
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adults K-12 (5-19 years) Other Named Groups
Program Short-Term Success 

The short term goal of this program is to improve the ability of educators to recognize gateway behaviors and respond to them, and to understand how to effectively educate youth about cyberbullying and social media.  By the end of the training, educators should be significantly more educated about bullying and cyberbullying prevention, as per outcomes research conducted on this program by Dr. Meghan McCoy.  

Program Long-Term Success 

This program trains educators to recognize and intervene when they see gateway behaviors – acts of open contempt – that occur between students. By addressing these behaviors (which students use to bully and fight with peers) adults can reduce these types of social conflict. When a school has a faculty that consistently intervenes in this way, the social climate of the school will improve, and students and faculty will begin to experience the school as a more pleasant and welcoming place.  Another long term is to fundamentally improve educators' understanding of cyberbullying and to provide a roadmap for preventative education.

Program Success Monitored By 

Surveys, interviews, and pre- and post-test within-subjects studies are used to assess the effectiveness of the educator professional development program. These tools have been used to examine both faculty in-services (programs training all faculty within a school) and the MARC Faculty Train the Trainer program. In 2014-15, Dr. Katalin Parti from the Institut of Criminologie in Budapest, Hungary was awarded a year-long Fulbright Fellowship to evaluate the Faculty Training programs in detail. She found that the programs were successful in increasing the participants’ knowledge about bullying and cyberbullying.

Examples of Program Success  When surveyed about the quality of the faculty training received, 80% of faculty reported that the training “improved the ability of adults in [their] school to react effectively to bullying." 92% of faculty said they found the training “interesting and engaging” as well as “useful and practical.” Knowledge gain was measured by a within-subjects, pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design. Data showed that knowledge of issues surrounding bullying and cyberbullying increased significantly after the intervention (the faculty training). Pre-test mean was 7.09, versus post test mean of 11.05 correct. The difference between the two mean scores was 3.95 and the 95% confidence interval is between 4.71 and 3.20. A paired t-test showed that the difference between conditions was significant (t = 10.89, df = 21, p < 0.0001, one tailed).

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Elizabeth Kandel Englander
CEO Term Start Sept 2004
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Elizabeth Englander is a professor of Psychology and the Director of the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center at Bridgewater State University, delivering anti-violence programs, resources, and research. She is a nationally recognized researcher and expert in the area of bullying and cyberbullying, childhood causes of violence, aggression and abuse, and child development. She has a particular expertise in technological aggression and how it interacts with aggression in general.
Dr. Englander was a Presidential Undergraduate Fellow at the Univ of California at Berkeley where she earned a BA in Psychology, graduating with High Honors, membership in Phi Beta Kappa, and Psi Chi. She was awarded an All‑University Predoctoral Merit Fellowship at the Univ of Southern California, where she completed her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. She was a National Institute of Mental Health Research Postdoctoral Fellow at the Univ of New Hampshire before beginning her academic career in the State University system in Massachusetts.

Dr. Englander is an Advisory Board member and the Chair of the Cyberbullying Workgroup at the Institute of Child Development and Digital Media, and has presented at the National Academy of Sciences to help shape the national research agenda.  She was the Special Editor for the Cyberbullying issues of the Journal of Social Sciences and the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry-CONNECT, and has authored dozens of articles in academic journals and books. She is also the author of two books: Bullying And Cyberbullying: What Every Educator Needs To Know, published in 2013 by Harvard Education Press, and Understanding Violence (Erlbaum). As Director of MARC, she has written curricula and educational handouts.

Reflecting her interest in educating laypeople as well, Dr. Englander has answered questions in a column for the New York Times (online), and she writes the column Bullying Bulletin Board, syndicated by Gatehouse Media in hundreds of newspapers nationwide. She has been cited on hundreds of occasions in the print media and appears regularly on both local and national television and radio across the country and in Canada.

Regarding staff, it is important to understand that the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center derives much of its staff from the University students who take the Center as a service-learning course, or who are funded through Graduate Assistantships. This model means that we do not have stable information about race or ethnicity, or even gender; furthermore, as a teacher I am not permitted to probe students for that kind of information. However, having students trained to deliver anti-bullying programs to their younger peers has significant advantages. When it comes to social challenges, children and particularly teens learn much better from high status peers (ie, University students) then they do from adults, who may be professionals but are often viewed as authority figures.

 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Dr. Meghan McCoy Program Coordinator

Meghan McCoy holds a Doctorate in Education from Northeastern University and a Master's of Education Counseling from Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts. After training as a Graduate Assistant in the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center for three years, she is now the Center's Program Coordinator. Meghan has trained hundreds of K-12 school faculty and worked with thousands of students throughout Massachusetts by delivering the K-12 programs in bullying and cyberbullying prevention that MARC offers. She also presents to community groups and parents and has co-authored several professional papers while working in the Center.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Guest Editor, Special Issue: Cyberbullying Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry -Connect 2015
Nominee, National Crime Victims’ Service Award National Institute of Justice 2015
Appointed Chair, National Cyberbullying WorkGroup Institute of Digital Media & Child Development, National Academy of Sciences 2014
Educator Of The Year Boston Red Sox 2013
Guest Editor, Special Edition: Cyberbullying Journal of Social Sciences 2011
Executive Committee Member, Mental Health Component, Safe Schools Initiative Office of Thomas P. Reilly, Attorney General 2007
Presidential Fellow Bridgewater State University 2004
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of New Hampshire National Institute of Mental Health 1992

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Because the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center operates as part of Bridgewater State University, it is the University that establishes all of these policies and procedures for every entity and agency on campus. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Again, because the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center operates as part of Bridgewater State University, all of the non-discrimination policies, risk management policies, mandatory training policies, licenses and insurance are established and maintained by the University infrastructure.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 8
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Thomas Caron
Board Chair Company Affiliation Vice President of Business Development at North Easton Savings Bank
Board Chair Term Sept 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Thomas Caron Alumnus 1975 Voting
Mr. George Charbonneau Alumnus, 1966, 1970, Trustee Voting
Mr. Christopher Cooney Trustee Voting
Mr. John B. Cruz III Trustee Voting
Mr. Adam Cupples Alumnus 1997, Trustee Voting
Mr. Jeremy S. David Esq. Chair of BSUF Investment Committee Voting
Mr. David P. Deep Trustee Voting
Mr. Phil DeSilva Alumnus 1988, Trustee Voting
Mr. Eugene Durgin Alumnus Voting
Mr. John P. Hackett Alumnus 1955, 1960, Trustee Voting
Ms. Juliette Johnson Alumnus 1988 Voting
Mr. Alan Larson Esq. Trustee Voting
Mr. Benjamin Lombard 2017, Student Trustee Voting
Mr. F. Scott Longo Alumnus, 1989 Voting
Mr. Armand Marchand Alumnus 1966, 1970, Trustee Voting
Mr. David J. Messaline Alumnus 1965, Emeritus Trustee Voting
Ms. Marissa Parker Student 2017, Student Trustee Voting
Mr. David Rumrill Alumnus 1991, Trustee Voting
Dr. Francis T. Sherry Alumnus 1963, Trustee Voting
Mr. Paul D. Silvia Esq. Chair of BSUF Property Committee Voting
Mr. Joseph St.Laurent Alumnus 1988 Voting
Mr. Jason Stocker Alumnus 2004 Voting
Ms. Ann Ulett Alumnus 1992, Chair of BSUF Membership Committee Voting
Mr. Donald Vincent Alumnus 1962 Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Kyung-Shick Choi Bridgewater State University Voting
Dr. Charisse Nixon Pennsylvania State University at Behrend Voting
Dr. Katalin Parti Institut Criminology, Budapest, Hungary Voting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 21
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown (%)

No data available

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $30,000.00
Projected Expense $60,000.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 --
Total Revenue $248,210 $252,465 --
Total Expenses $260,221 $259,081 --

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 --
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$57,356 $56,756 --
Government Contributions $0 $0 --
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support $5,736 $5,676 --
Earned Revenue $25,000 $29,915 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $160,118 $160,118 --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 --
Program Expense $53,620 $53,080 --
Administration Expense $204,601 $204,001 --
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates $2,000 $2,000 --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.95 0.97 --
Program Expense/Total Expenses 21% 20% --
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% --

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 --
Total Assets $144,000 $150,000 --
Current Assets $144,000 $150,000 --
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 --
Current Liabilities $0 $0 --
Total Net Assets $144,000 $150,000 --

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 --
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 24.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 --
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 --
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our financials are complex.

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center has nonprofit status through the Bridgewater State University Foundation, but our budget and financials are separate from that Foundation.

Also, our costs and expenses are variable and flexible. We could reduce clerical and graduate student help, for example, but this would also reduce the number of schools and programs we would be able to service and produce.

Also, the University picks up some of our expenses. For example, they pay for one clerical staff and for two graduate assistantships. However, we depend upon external funding (either revenue through conferences and workshops, or grant funding) to pay for the second clerical worker, the Program Coordinator, and two additional graduate students.

One goal is also to expand our capacity to serve schools, which would entail new positions, notably another senior staff position (probably a part-time Assistant Director) and more graduate assistantships.

Foundation Comments

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center is an entity within Bridgewater State University and uses the Bridgewater State University Foundation's nonprofit status to accept donations and grants. As such, the Bridgewater State University Foundation's IRS Form 990s and audited financials are posted above. The data in the charts and graphs above reflects the Center. Additional historical data for the Center will be posted as it becomes available as it was included in the University wide data only.

Documents


Other Documents

Annual Report (2016)

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

At present, violence prevention is a fractured community.
 
University research centers conduct research and develop knowledge about violence prevention, but most programs are run and administered by independent non-profit agencies.  These agencies vary widely in the quality and cost of their prevention programs.  K-12 schools must evaluate, select and implement programs, as well as finding funding sources to support these efforts.
 
One of the most important goals of the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center is to improve this current state of affairs.  MARC is an academic Center that both conducts research and delivers a variety of research-based programming for K-12 education.  The academic nature of the Center ensures high quality programs and services, and the utilization of faculty and students from the University reduces costs, which permits MARC to offer most of these programs at no cost to schools.  Students in Education at the University are simultaneously trained in violence prevention as part of their pre-service training.  
 
Whenever possible, MARC assists schools with implementation efforts as well, offering training resources and in-school meetings and support.  Education for the community and for parents is also offered.   
 
The success of this model has made its replication in other states a major goal of MARC.  With bullying and cyberbullying being challenges felt everywhere, and with public higher education an established part of every state's infrastructure, we were like to help other states establish similar centers.   
 
 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

At present, MARC is seeking grant funding to support program development and support in other states.  
 
 
 
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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