Share |

Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling Inc.

 190 High Street, Floor 5
 Boston, MA 02110
[P] (617) 426-4554
[F] (617) 426-4555
www.masscompulsivegambling.org
[email protected]
Marlene Warner
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1987
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2743890

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1983, the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling is a private, non-profit public health agency dedicated to providing leadership to reduce the social, financial, and emotional costs of problem gambling and to promote a continuum of prevention and intervention strategies including: information and public awareness, community education and professional training, advocacy, and helpline/referral services for problem gamblers, their loved ones and the greater community.

Mission Statement

Founded in 1983, the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling is a private, non-profit public health agency dedicated to providing leadership to reduce the social, financial, and emotional costs of problem gambling and to promote a continuum of prevention and intervention strategies including: information and public awareness, community education and professional training, advocacy, and helpline/referral services for problem gamblers, their loved ones and the greater community.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $1,133,160.00
Projected Expense $1,131,907.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Advocacy
  • Education, Technical Assistance, and Capacity Building
  • Helpline/Referral
  • Information and Public Awareness
  • Recovery Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Founded in 1983, the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling is a private, non-profit public health agency dedicated to providing leadership to reduce the social, financial, and emotional costs of problem gambling and to promote a continuum of prevention and intervention strategies including: information and public awareness, community education and professional training, advocacy, and helpline/referral services for problem gamblers, their loved ones and the greater community.

Background Statement

The Mass. Council on Compulsive Gambling was founded in 1983 by Thomas N. Cummings and a small group of others affected by gambling problems who identified a need for statewide problem-gambling services. Tom served as Executive Director until January of 1998. Due to Tom's leadership, vision, and perseverance, the Council has been helping compulsive gamblers and their families since 1987.
Today, due to the efforts of the Mass. Council, there is a greater awareness of problem gambling in Massachusetts. The Mass. Council is a leader in providing problem gambling education, trainings and events. There is also access to statewide Department of Public Health problem-gambling treatment facilities throughout Massachusetts.


Impact Statement

Prior to 1987, there were no funded problem gambling services in Massachusetts. Today, due largely to the Council, awareness has increased significantly, along with sources of help for those who need it.

We have provided problem gambling services in the Commonwealth through prevention, information and public awareness, education and training programs, advocacy efforts and operation of our Helpline/referral resources - serving individuals, families, human service professionals and communities with both compassion and expertise.

Here are just a few FY11 accomplishments:

  • Supported over 20,000 unique website visitors and Helpline callers with information, resources, and referrals to 12-step meetings and outpatient treatment
  • Educated nearly 150 older adults on gambling problems throughMaking the Most of Your Leisure Time, a prevention-model curriculum
  • Launched a social media campaign that resulted in 700 Facebook friends and monthly blog spots on current topics in the gambling addiction field
  • Advocated with legislative leaders and Governor for inclusion of best-practices responsible gambling language in expanded gambling legislation
  • Collaborated with Harvard Medical School’s Division on Addictions on an e-tool for high school and college students at risk for gambling disorders
  • Held 3-4 programs at each of the DPH/BSAS Recovery Centers and Recovery High Schools

In FY12 here are some of our top goals and expectations for success:

  • Facilitate Your First Step to Change Weekend for people struggling to be in recovery or in early recovery from a gambling disorder and their support person
  • Establish an interactive website for Teens as both a prevention and intervention tool
  • Engage people in recovery to use the Council through its new Recovery-Oriented Initiatives: resources room, all-recovery meetings, advisory board and related policies
  • Investigate a Social Enterprise Model to promote workforce development with people in recovery recently out of prison

Needs Statement

Programs for family members of people with gambling disorders

The Mass. Council would like to expand existing support and services for family members of problem gamblers.

 

Extensive outreach

Other populations that the Council has identified as being at risk for problem gambling and would like to provide programming to include veterans, women, Portuguese Americans, people leaving the corrections system, and those with mental health disorders.

 

Financial literacy

The Council would like to expand its financial literacy programs to those in recovery by offering workshops, training people in recovery to become trainers, providing ongoing support and hosting financial planning sessions.

 

Media campaigns and public opinion polls to increase the visibility of our Helplines and Websites

The Mass. Council sees a direct correlation between Helpline calls, program attendance, fundraising efforts and its media campaigns. However, it is rarely often able to afford to run advertisements or conduct public opinion polls to disseminate information and gain media attention.

 

Information Technology

The Mass. Council has very little technology infrastructure. We are currently in desperate need of a new phone system, photocopier/printer and a new server.


CEO Statement

--

Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

Massachusetts-All Regions
--

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Addictive Disorders NEC
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Advocacy

The Mass. Council is the single advocate in the Commonwealth for people experiencing problems with gambling, in their own lives or in their loved ones lives. We advocate for services, funding, responsible public policy and action related to gambling disorders. Here are some examples of our advocacy work:

·       Successfully secured funding for problem gambling services in 1987, and have maintained and increased that funding to present day;

·       Educated the Mass. State Legislature and Governor to appropriate and science-based problem gambling provisions and responsible gambling practices to be incorporated into any expanded gambling legislation put forth;

·       Established a representative group of casino, lottery and racetrack professionals concerned about problem gambling; and

·       Secured sponsors and support for legislation to end store credit to purchase Lottery products after pattern of problems reported via Helpline calls.

Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Education, Technical Assistance, and Capacity Building

We offer training opportunities to professionals in the fields of mental health, addictions treatment, education, legal and financial industries. Topics range dramatically, but all fit within the requirements of the Mass. Problem Gambling Specialist (MAPGS) Certificate that we administer. Our efforts have resulted in an annual conference, semi-annual statewide training calendars, and various on-site or regional trainings. We also offer non-traditional educational opportunities, such as online trainings, webinars, peer-to-peer trainings, and legislative forums. We build the capacity of individuals, organizations and businesses through regular follow-up and technical assistance, resources based on peer-reviewed science. In addition, the Council is committed to training people within many different priority populations including but not limited to: Asian American, African American, Latino American, Older Adults, Youth, and College-Age individuals.

Budget  .
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Helpline/Referral

The backbone of the Council is our 24-hour live confidential Helpline.  It was the first service that Tom Cummings, our founder, established while he helped people on the phone from his kitchen table.

 

On the phones, we serve individuals, families, human service professionals and communities in Massachusetts with both compassion and expertise. Most callers are relieved to talk to our trained, understanding and knowledgeable staff about an issue that they are too ashamed or embarrassed to discuss with anyone else. We connect them with outpatient treatment centers, 12-step self-help meetings in their communities, and helpful resources and information, such as how to self-exclude from a casino, good books to read, advocacy information, among many others. In addition to our general Helpline, we run Helplines for people who speak Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese), Vietnamese and Khmer. 

 

We manage quality assurance on our Helpline through call back surveys and follow-up phone calls.

Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Information & Referral
Population Served General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Information and Public Awareness

We disseminate information and raise the awareness of the general public and priority populations through our written materials, websites, social media and media relationships. This results in materials including brochures for youth and latino populations; program-specific materials, such asYour First Step to Change,a self-help workbook printed and designed for different populations in five different languages, our newsletters and e-newsletters; science-based fact sheets; and an active social media presence on sites including Blogspot, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. 

 

In addition to its robust and current website, the Council developed and maintains six additional linguistically and culturally appropriate websites directing information to the people searching for more services and data in the Latino, Chinese, Vietnamese, Cambodian communities, as well as websites for teenagers and parents of children recently graduated from high school.

Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Recovery Services

We work to serve not just people in crisis, but also people in recovery from very early on to decades free from a bet. We offer an all-recovery weekend where people free from a bet and people in recovery from other addictions come together to discuss their struggles and victories—an important prevention and intervention strategy. This year we designated a space in the office as a Recovery Room where individuals are welcome to read, use the computer, snack and talk with people who understand their addiction; we also host three types of 12-steps meetings in the space.

 

In addition, we hostedYour First Step to ChangeWeekend where people struggling to be in or stay in recovery, along with a support person, spent a weekend going to workshops, meeting with counselors, and connecting with one another. This was a huge success and the Council hopes to hold it annually. From that weekend, we started a Recovery Advisory Board and devised Recovery-Oriented Services Policies for the Council.

Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Personal Enrichment
Population Served General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Marlene Warner
CEO Term Start Mar 2011
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 3
Number of Contract Staff 20
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Rodney Hoffman
Board Chair Company Affiliation Deutsch, Williams, Brooks, DeRensis, Holland & Drachman
Board Chair Term Oct 2011 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Nancy Cummings Retired --
Mr. Kevin Donoghue Donoghue Financial Services Voting
Mr. Pierre Gabriel . Voting
Mr. Kevin M. Grant The Karol Group Voting
Mr. Rodney Hoffman Deutsch, Williams, Brooks, DeRensis, Holland & Drachman Voting
Mr. Steve Janssen . Voting
Ms. Jo-Anne Kane Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Richard McGowan Boston College, Carroll School of Management Voting
Mr. Haemoon Oh Department Head and Professor, Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts Voting
Mr. Ed Talbot AdCare Hospital, Worcester, former Chief of Staff, Bristol County Sheriff's Dept. Voting
Mr. Eric M. Turner Investor in private practice, former Director of Mass. State Lottery Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 30%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $1,133,160.00
Projected Expense $1,131,907.00
Form 990s

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financial Statements

2010 Audited Financial Statements

2009 Audited Financial Statements

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $1,380,318 $1,346,988 $1,454,151
Total Expenses $1,477,762 $1,390,414 $1,583,677

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,313,000 $1,203,000 $1,290,000
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,313,000 $1,203,000 $1,290,000
Individual Contributions $9,465 $31,532 $7,395
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $47,600 -- $54,900
Revenue In-Kind $2,160 $96,678 $90,000
Other $8,093 $15,778 $11,856

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $1,084,848 $1,110,338 $1,305,902
Administration Expense $392,914 $280,076 $277,775
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.93 0.97 0.92
Program Expense/Total Expenses 73% 80% 82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $511,134 $534,224 $467,526
Current Assets $401,336 $424,467 $371,472
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $2,171 $6,288
Current Liabilities $423,260 $346,735 $232,494
Total Net Assets $87,874 $185,318 $228,744

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) Government $1,290,000.00
Government $1,200,000.00
Government $1,310,000.00
2nd (Source and Amount) Industry Contribution $54,900.00
Industry Contribution $25,000.00
Industry Contribution $47,600.00
3rd (Source and Amount) Individual Contribution $7,400.00
Individual Contribution $6,500.00
Individual Contribution $9,400.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.95 1.22 1.60

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--