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Bread of Life

 54 Eastern Avenue
 Malden, MA 02148
[P] (781) 397-0404
[F] --
www.breadoflifemalden.org
[email protected]
Gabriella Snyder Stelmack
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INCORPORATED: 1992
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-3199801

LAST UPDATED: 05/01/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

BOL is a faith-based ministry serving the communities north of Boston with a mission to feed the body and nurture the soul. We strive to feed the hungry, the homeless, the needy and the isolated; to offer spiritual nurture, support and hospitality; to promote greater peace and justice by addressing broader issues of hunger, poverty, and need; and to conduct our work in a spirit of respect and nonviolence.

Mission Statement

BOL is a faith-based ministry serving the communities north of Boston with a mission to feed the body and nurture the soul. We strive to feed the hungry, the homeless, the needy and the isolated; to offer spiritual nurture, support and hospitality; to promote greater peace and justice by addressing broader issues of hunger, poverty, and need; and to conduct our work in a spirit of respect and nonviolence.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $393,982.00
Projected Expense $393,602.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Advocacy & Referrals
  • Clothing & moving assistance
  • Food Access Project
  • Food Pantries
  • Homeless Families Motel Meals Outreach
  • Meals
  • Senior Nutrition Outreach

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

BOL is a faith-based ministry serving the communities north of Boston with a mission to feed the body and nurture the soul. We strive to feed the hungry, the homeless, the needy and the isolated; to offer spiritual nurture, support and hospitality; to promote greater peace and justice by addressing broader issues of hunger, poverty, and need; and to conduct our work in a spirit of respect and nonviolence.

Background Statement

Founded in 1980 and incorporated as a non-profit in 1992, Bread of Life is a charitable faith-based organization with a mission to feed the poor and hungry and empower those served. It has a long tradition of local outreach and community service. Based in Malden, BOL brings together over 500 volunteers from 45 partner churches, synagogues, high schools, businesses and community organizations to offer free food to hungry, homeless, and isolated people through dinners held four nights a week, food pantries in Malden and Everett, grocery delivery to senior citizens in public housing in Malden, Everett, Melrose, Medford and Wakefield, and food delivery to homeless families sheltered in local motels. Since 2001, BOL has been one of the top five purchasers and distributors of food in the Greater Boston Food Bank network and is one of the few programs that offers both food pantry and meal distribution services.  BOL takes pride in its ability to meet the increasing demand for services that have resulted from the economic challenges of the past decade: • 2002 - BOL received the Greater Boston Food Bank’s Special Recognition Award. • 2003 - BOL was awarded a Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition for “outstanding and invaluable service to the community” from U.S. Congressman Edward J. Markey. • 2006 - BOL received the Greater Boston Food Bank's 25th Anniversary Anthony Spinazzola Foundation Award.

Impact Statement

Our top goal for 2017:
To develop our office / food pantry site, 54 Eastern Avenue in Malden, which we purchased in 2013, as the permanent centralized location for all of our programs: evening meals, food pantry and office. As part of our building project, during which we will construct a commercial kitchen and dining hall, we are partnering with New England Communities Inc (NECI) to develop 14 affordable studio apartments at the site for low-income residents, which will be owned and operated by Metro North Housing Corp, another non-profit entity. Since our incorporation, BOL programs have grown continually, causing us to outgrow our previous rented location. Our evening meal program is hampered by the use of short-term rental space and donated church space, both of which need substantial repairs and kitchen upgrades. Our planned development has five goals: #1 Stable program space, allowing us to accept more donated food, expand meals program to more times per week, use dining area for other services, explore the possibility of micro-businesses, and serve more meals. #2 Accessible space for mobility-challenged guests, pantry patrons and volunteers. #3 Confidential, respectful registration/waiting area. #4 Increased efficiency and organizational and financial stability. #5 Clean, code-compliant space for the pantry and meals. 
 
Accomplishments of 2016:
1) We provided nearly 1,056,000 meals for low-income neighbors in the north Boston area through our Malden and Everett food pantries, evening meals four nights per week, monthly grocery delivery to senior citizens in public housing in five cities, and weekly food delivery to homeless families sheltered in local motels. We are one of the top five distributors of food in the Greater Boston Food Bank network of food providers.
2) Our Homeless Families Motel Meals Outreach, begun in 2008, provides approximately 140 meals and 50 bags of easy-to-prepare groceries each week to homeless families sheltered in local motels. These motels offer little capacity to prepare and cook groceries, and transportation is by infrequent bus along a busy highway. We have partnered with a dozen restaurants and community groups to provide meals in addition to those prepared in our kitchens. BOL also provides new and used children's clothing, diapers, baby wipes, formula and baby food. 
3) Our Senior Nutrition Outreach outreach, which delivers groceries to low-income, nutritionally at-risk senior citizens who live in public housing, has expanded several times over the past few years. We now serve 776 seniors per month at 14 sites in Malden, Everett, Medford, Melrose and Wakefield.
4) Our Everett Food Pantry, funded by the City of Everett, serves about 1,300 low-income Everett residents, and our Malden Food Pantry serves almost 5,000 residents of Malden and 9 surrounding communities. Residents in need are able to receive a grocery order once a month, consisting of non-perishable foods, fresh fruits & vegetables, bakery products, dairy products, and meats/fish.  

Needs Statement

1) Raise funds for our building project. Our goal is $3 million and we have already received 1 million dollars in pledges from foundations and individuals 2) Grow our programs and staff capacity through acquiring new sources of program funding.
3) Increase our volunteer base through recruiting, training and retaining skilled volunteers to assist with aspects of fundraising, IT and marketing

CEO Statement

Having been intimately associated with Bread of Life the past nearly 30 years, I am prejudiced. I have been witness to and part of many changes, and when I look back I am always amazed at how much we have grown, the new programs that have we have forged, and the perseverance and dedication this has taken. What began as a simple once-weekly potluck dinner for church school families and other parishioners of St. Paul’s Episcopal Parish in 1980 now include the following programs:
* Meals – Tuesday – Thursday with special holiday celebration meals Easter, Thanksgiving & Christmas days.
* Food Pantry – Malden: begun in 1987. Distributed 579,035 meals in 2016 to 4,729 individuals.
* Food Pantry – Everett: begun in 2008. Distributed 100,129 meals in 2016 to 1,329 individuals.
* Senior Nutrition Outreach: begun in 2007. Distributed 275,160 meals in 2016 to 776 at-risk elders in five communities.
* Homeless Families/Motel Outreach: begun in 2008 (also 1995-8 & 2001-5). Distributed 52,856 meals to 250 individuals who are homeless families displaced into area motels. All-told, Bread of Life programs distributed nearly 1,056,000 meals in 2016. In 1995, Bread of Life was distributing 50,000 meals and equivalents. As the economy has ebbed and ebbed some more, the need for emergency food assistance has grown exponentially. Whenever we have learned that homeless families have been displaced into area motels, we have mobilized quickly to deliver cooked meals, other foods, clothing, diapers, toys and more to the families. Shortly after being asked by Mystic Valley Elder Services if we could take on monthly deliveries of emergency food orders, we began delivering to three senior building sites in two cities. We now deliver to 14 sites in five cities. And when we were asked to open a satellite pantry program in Everett, we began twice-monthly distributions within three months. With our roots in faith, Bread of Life takes on each challenge as an opportunity to do more with less. We have only three full-time paid staff, working with hundreds of dedicated volunteers. We are supported by donations from Stop & Shop, Trader Joe’s, John Accardi & Sons, BJ’s, Shaw’s and numerous local businesses. The Cities of Malden, Everett, Medford and Melrose provide funding support. Schools, churches, synagogues and civic groups sends crews of volunteers every month. Restaurants provide cooked meals to be delivered to the homeless families in local motels. What began in 1980 as a mustard seed has become a growing field of plants.

Board Chair Statement

Bread of Life has a noble mission: ending hunger in the communities north of Boston.The organization is very successful at serving this mission. Bread of Life was founded in Malden in 1980, and due to consistent growth, since 2005 it has been a top five distributor of food in the Greater Boston Food Bank Network. In 2014, Bread of Life distributed the equivalent of over 1,030,000 meals to individuals and families in need, at an operating cost of less than 50 cents per meal. This would not have been possible without Bread of Life’s highly motivated volunteers and well-developed strategy of outreach. Bread of Life maintains the traditional outreach of serving evening meals four nights per week, and it operates two food pantries in Malden and Everett where people can receive a balanced combination of groceries to take home. Bread of Life also delivers meals to those who are isolated and lack transportation. This is accomplished in two ways: by making monthly deliveries of groceries to the Medford Senior Center and thirteen senior citizen buildings in Malden, Everett, Melrose and Wakefield; and by delivering hot meals and groceries to three motels in Malden that serve as temporary housing to about 100 struggling families. Families also receive clothes, diapers and shoes as needed, and they are counseled by friendly volunteers about health, nutrition, and other programs that offer help. Bread of Life needs a permanent base of operations to maintain its highly successful model. Having a dependable, long-term location for offices, storage, food pantry, kitchen and dining area operations is Bread of Life’s greatest challenge. From 1991 to 2011 Bread of Life rented three small storefronts on Main Street, Malden to manage its operations. As the organization grew the space became restrictive and ultimately unsuitable. Therefore, finding a new location has been the central focus of the Board of Directors for several years. Following an exhaustive search, in December 2011 Bread of Life relocated to 54 Eastern Avenue in downtown Malden.The building is well-suited for Bread of Life’s continued operations, and central to where its services are needed most. In August 2013, Bread of Life purchased the building in partnership with another nonprofit organization, Tri City Community Action Program (“Tri-CAP”). In order to achieve this vital goal, Bread of Life must emphasize fundraising like never before. Bread of Life has been approved for a significant HUD loan through the Malden Redevelopment Authority, as well as grants from major donors and charitable foundations. A feasibility study completed in 2012 suggests that Bread of Life is highly likely to meet its goal, but there is a long road ahead. The staff, board and volunteers of the Bread of Life are optimistic, motivated and excited about the future. We welcome you to join us!

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Malden, Everett, Medford, Melrose, Stoneham, Saugus, Reading, North Reading, Wakefield, Winchester

Organization Categories

  1. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food Banks, Food Pantries
  2. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Soup Kitchens
  3. Human Services - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Advocacy & Referrals

Our programs provide an opportunity for us to refer patrons to other free and low-cost resources which will enable them to meet their fundamental needs, such as other food pantries, farmer's markets, WIC, SNAP, healthcare, job training, educational opportunities, low-cost housing, etc.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Information & Referral
Population Served Families Homeless Adults
Program Short-Term Success  Low-income or homeless families & individuals access needed free or low-cost services.
Program Long-Term Success  Families & individuals obtain financial supports enabling them to thrive while they pursue employment, education and other goals.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  Referrals to WIC, SNAP (formely "Food Stamps"), local medical clinics, local food pantries, school lunch/breakfast, legal aid, etc.

Clothing & moving assistance

BOL supplies used clothing, blankets, gloves, hats, coats, shoes, boots, new socks & underwear for low-income and homeless people attending our evening meals. We also use our vans and truck to pick up furniture for homeless clients as they transition into homes.
Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for the Homeless
Population Served Homeless General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  The short-term success is measured by the fact that we give away about 100 pieces of clothing per night at our evening meal to homeless and low-income people. Free clothing is a great boon to homeless individuals who can't easily do their laundry or carry much spare clothing around, and who continually lose their belongings due to rain, or having their bags thrown away when their "hiding place" is discovered. 
Program Long-Term Success 
The long term result of this program is to provide homeless individuals with adequate clothing and protection from the cold in order to reduce injury and fatalities for people living on the street.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  “Naomi,” a serious woman in her 50s, broke down crying at the evening meal at St. Paul’s. “I’m homeless”, she said, “and I’m too ashamed to tell my family.” She’d had a place to sleep and shower over the weekend because she’d gone to a family wedding and told her uncle she was too tired to drive home. The next night she told another family member that she was locked out of her house. But tonight, she was out of excuses and terrified at facing the night. “Naomi” is highly educated and worked many years, but illness and the economy seem to have put her out of the workforce for good. With not enough money and high housing costs, she fell behind in her rent and got evicted. BOL gave her a hot meal, food to take home, clothing, and  connected her with the Mobile Homeless Outreach team, run at the time by Tri-CAP, the local community action agency. The next time we saw her, “Naomi” was ready to go into a shelter and had begun applying for subsidized housing.

Food Access Project

The goal of this project, funded in mid-2015 by multi-year grants from BNY Mellon and the Cummings Foundation/OneWorld Boston, is to help increase access to our food programs by diverse immigrant populations and nutritionally underserved families and individuals. We have seen more and more families and senior citizens at our pantries and meals over the past several years as the diversity of our cities continues to grow. Malden, according to the 2010 US Census, was the second most diverse city in the Commonwealth, with 37% of its residents having been born outside of the USA. 

Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Families Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success  Our new Food Access Coordinator (P/T) has recruited a Food Access Committee representing speakers of Mandarin, Cantonese, Haitian Creole, French, Arabic and Spanish. Among their accomplishments to date: conducting a survey of BOL food pantry members to learn about their food wants and barriers to food access; translating BOL brochures and flyers; interpreting in various languages for BOL pantry members and volunteers; recruiting new volunteers with language interpreting skills.
Program Long-Term Success  Improved nutrition and health for low-income immigrant families and senior citizens through receiving regular free nutritious food, and resulting increased income available for other basic needs such as housing and medical costs.
Program Success Monitored By  Through surveys, and tracking pantry usage of immigrants in our pantry database.
Examples of Program Success 

As an example, 20 Cantonese or Mandarin speaking patrons (18 at the pantry, 2 at the evening meals) were interviewed and asked 1) how they found out about BOL 2) how long they have used BOL services 3) what types of food they like. General insights gained included: these patrons average 2-3 years usage of BOL, they value especially fresh vegetables, bread, meat, fish and eggs; they would like to see Chinese noodles offered; they do not like canned foods in general; they are interested in getting a larger quantity of food, and having less time waiting in line.


Food Pantries

Our Malden Food Pantry is located at 54 Eastern Avenue, Malden, and is open every Wednesday and Friday to low-income residents of Malden, Medford, Everett, Melrose, Stoneham, Saugus, Wakefield, Reading, North Reading and Winchester.Our Everett Food Pantry is located at Everett City Hall, 484 Broadway, Everett, and is open every 3rd and 4th Thursday of the month for residents of Everett only. Families may receive groceries once every four weeks. In 2015 our Malden Pantry served 24,000 people and our Everett Pantry servied 3,800 people (counting each person each time they received groceries.) Each household received an average of 4 bags of groceries each time. This amounted to about 558,000 meals for the year in Malden, and 76,000 meals for the year in Everett.
Budget  $176,968.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served General/Unspecified Families
Program Short-Term Success  As long as their are families and individuals in our community who are low-income and struggling to put food on the table, Bread of Life will make sure they are fed.
Program Long-Term Success  As long as their are families and individuals in our community who are low-income and struggling to put food on the table, Bread of Life will make sure they are fed.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  “Bill”is a disabled veteran who served in Iraq where he was severely wounded. He spent months in a hospital recovering and then learned he had cancer. Now sick and in pain with not enough income to pay for his basic needs, he came to the BOL pantry for life-saving groceries. Because of our donors and supporters, BOL is able to bridge the gap for “Bill” and many others like him.

Homeless Families Motel Meals Outreach

Since 2008, BOL has responded to the increasing number of homeless families sheltered in motels by delivering to them groceries and cooked meals. We now deliver an average of 250 meals and 90 bags of groceries each week to 100 families at three motels. These families have no cooking facilities, no place for the children to play, and transportation is by bus along a busy highway. A number of caterers, restaurants and groups donate meals for this effort, including Anthony's of Malden, Bobby C's of Melrose, Cheverus School of Malden, Community Cooks of Somerville, Food For Free of Cambridge, St. Mary's School of Melrose, and the Melrose Knights of Columbus #128. BOL also provides children's clothing, diapers, baby supplies, children's books and holiday gifts. BOL helps families get connected with housing, education and social services. The Motel Meals Outreach was funded by Federal stimulus funds for 2010, but we have needed to seek private funds since then. We provided about 66,000 meals to homeless families in 2015.
Budget  --
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Homeless Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  We are working in the trenches with these families in crisis, providing them with nutrition, advocacy and referrals while they search for permanent housing and the income or employment sufficient for them to maintain a home.
Program Long-Term Success  Placing homeless families in motels is a last-ditch effort on the part of the Commonwealth to prevent these families from landing on the streets. Families are placed in motels only if all family shelters are full. The motel provides the rudiments of shelter - heat, toilet, running water, beds - but what is needed is permanent housing.  The change desired is that our society - at the federal, state and local levels - will decide to make good quality, affordable, sustainable housing available for all.
Program Success Monitored By  We record the number of meals, bags of groceries and diapers each week. We talk with the families each week during the food distribution about their other needs for supplies, services or advocacy. We have surveyed the families with a written survey to ascertain their food preferences and special needs so we can tailor the foods we deliver and timing to them.
Examples of Program Success  Kelly rushed across the room, a huge grin on her face. Did you hear our good news? We got a place to live! She and Pete and their two children, a baby girl and 4-year-old boy, had been sheltered in a local motel for about 14 months. Although they were grateful for shelter, life at the motel had been a daily struggle. The had lived all in one room with two beds, end tables, a small table and chairs, TV, dorm-size fridge, bureau and bathroom. No cooking was allowed in the rooms. One microwave was available in the lobby for use by 90 homeless families and other motel guests. There was no place for the children to play but a parking lot where tractor trailers parked. Their transportation was by bus along a busy highway. Our outreach team had come every week bringing hot meals, groceries, diapers and baby supplies, with books when school started, and gifts at the holidays. Kelly and Pete were ecstatic. "Thank you so much for everything you did to help us. We'll never forget it."

Meals

More than a meal - it's a way for neighbor to help neighbor. BOL provides free evening meals within a community of sharing and caring, with 500 volunteers – from grade school students to retirees - serving about 52,000 evening meals, lunches and snack meals each year to local working families, seniors, people with disabilities and homeless individuals. We provide volunteer opportunities for many of those who take part in the community meals, as well as the food pantry. Evening meals are served at two Malden dining sites, bringing together a broad spectrum of races and ethnicities, and are open to all, regardless of residence. They provide an ideal time for BOL to link people to additional resources such as healthcare and fuel assistance. BOL provides special dinners for Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas, with the latter two each serving about 800 meals, including meals delivered to homeless families in motels and shut-in elderly residents.
Budget  $19,932.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Homeless Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
1) Homeless individuals will be able to eat a nutritious evening meal four nights per week, which will help them maintain their physical and mental health in order to pursue goals of stabilizing their income and obtaining housing.
2) People who live in rooming houses without cooking facilities will be able to eat without the expense of restaurants or fast-food meals every day.
3) People on fixed incomes, such as the unemployed, disabled or elderly, will be able to stretch their incomes further by taking advantage of the free evening meals. This will give them more funds to spend on housing, utility, medical and other costs of living.
 
Program Long-Term Success  As long as there are people in our community who are poor and hungry, they will be fed.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  “Naomi,” a serious woman in her 50s, broke down crying at the evening meal at St. Paul’s. “I’m homeless”, she said, “and I’m too ashamed to tell my family.” She’d had a place to sleep and shower over the weekend because she’d gone to a family wedding and told her uncle she was too tired to drive home. The next night she told another family member that she was locked out of her house. But tonight, she was out of excuses and terrified at facing the night. “Naomi” is highly educated and worked many years, but illness and the economy seem to have put her out of the workforce for good. With not enough money and high housing costs, she fell behind in her rent and got evicted. BOL gave her a hot meal, food to take home, clothing, and, most importantly, referred her to the Mobile Homeless Outreach team at Tri-City Community Action Program. The next time we saw her, “Naomi” was ready to go into a shelter and had begun applying for subsidized housing.

Senior Nutrition Outreach

This critical collaborative project is run in partnership with Mystic Valley Elder Services (MVES). We deliver groceries every month to 776 senior citizens at the Medford Senior Center and 13 housing developments in Malden, Everett, Melrose and Wakefield. These senior citizens are clients of MVES who are not able to access food pantries due to health issues such as arthritis, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. We provided nearly 278,000 meals to senior citizens in 2015 through our deliveries.
Budget  --
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success     
Program Long-Term Success     
Program Success Monitored By     
Examples of Program Success     

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Thomas J. Feagley
CEO Term Start Jan 1985
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
C.V. of Thomas James Feagley, Executive Director, Bread of Life
Home Address: 49 Lincoln Street, 2nd Floor, Malden, MA 02148
Mobile: 781-475-9050
 
WORK EXPERIENCE:
Bread of Life, Malden – Executive Director of community organization which offers free meals, emergency pantry, outreach and advocacy to low-income and homeless individuals and families. 1987-present. Assistant to Coordinator, 1985-87.
 
Tri-City Community Mental Health Center, Malden – Gathering Place psychiatric social club/drop-in offering milieux therapy. Director of two day-programs, 1985-1986. Coordinator, 1981-1985.
 
Self-employed as artist and carpenter, 1979-1981.
 
Eastern Middlesex Opportunities Council, Malden – volunteer counselor with CAP agency. Board of Directors, 5 years. President 2 years. Director of Personnel Committee, 3 years. 1972-1977.
 
Division of Employment Security, Malden, MA – Employment Counselor, 1969-1979.
 
EDUCATION:
 
Gestalt Institute of Boston – completed 260-hour/9-month advanced therapist training, 1977-1978.
 
Boston State College – 39 graduate credits, MEd, Counseling; 3.95 gpa, 1975.
 
Boston University – 10 graduate credits in psychology.
 
Keene State College, NH – 6 graduate credits in psychology.
 
University of New Hampshire, Durham – Bachelor of Science in Social Service, minor in Art, 1969.
 
Completed numerous workshops in psychology, spiritual healing, therapy.
 
OTHER:
 
Published poet; painter; private painting instructor.
 
1995 Mitch Snyder Award - recognized for work with homeless.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Gabriella Snyder Stelmack Special Projects Coordinator

EXPERIENCE:

Bread of Life, Malden, MA, Special Projects & Volunteer Coordinator, 1993-present.

Recruit & supervise volunteers; work with Board to coordinate fundraising; produce newsletter; maintain contact database; liaison with accountant, auditor; handle personnel, payroll; coordinate facilities maintenance; write grant proposals; do public speaking, media interviews.

Local Action Committee, Malden, MA, Volunteer, 1999-2008.

Volunteered with grassroots community organization to advocate for affordable housing at the municipal & state level. Researched housing issues; participated at public hearings; met with elected officials; spoke with press; helped produce and distribute literature.

Tri-City Community Action Program, Malden, MA, President of the Board of Directors, 2009-2012, Board Member, 1995-present, Outreach Advocate, 1988-1992.

Worked for multi-service anti-poverty agency serving Malden, Medford & Everett, MA and surrounding communities. Advocated for homeless individuals to receive housing and benefits; organized trainings on benefits; trained/supervised volunteers; advocated on statewide benefits and housing initiatives.

LOVE INC of North Suburban Boston, Malden, MA, President, 1988-1994.

Organized, drafted bylaws, helped incorporate non-profit organization coordinating 18 churches to work with agencies in meeting neighborhood needs through church volunteers; recruited & trained Board members, volunteers; supervised Clearinghouse Coordinator & phone volunteers; made public presentations for recruitment & fundraising; organized fundraisers; researched/wrote grants. 

Pine Street Inn, Women's Unit, Boston, MA, Fill-In Day Counselor, 1987-1988.

Helped maintain basic operations & supplies on the floor of 50-bed women's shelter; counseled, made referrals, advocated for homeless women with mental health, domestic violence & drug abuse issues.

Harvard University, Division of Applied Science, Cambridge, MA, Research Assistant, 1985-1988.

Maintained operation of marine laboratory; ordered supplies & equipment; supervised students; carried out research; co-authored publication in The Journal of Biological Chemistry (1989).

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, Research Assistant, 1983-1985.

Organized ordering & shipping for 21-day scientific cruise off California coast; carried out research; co-authored publication in Biological Bulletin (1989).

EDUCATION:

State University of New York at Binghamton

B.S., with Honors, Double Major in Music and Biochemistry, 1982.

OTHER:

Composer; voice teacher; soprano soloist; music competition judge; Corresponding Secretary, Program Chair of Melrose Beethoven Society; co-director of Jacob's Ladder Coffeehouse, Malden, MA; VP of Falmouth Music Association (1984-1985); Producer for Malden Access TV; Board of Directors of Tri-City Community Action Program, Malden, MA since 1995; Chair of Mission Committee, St. Paul's Parish, Malden, MA (1998-2002).

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 500
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Andrew McNeilly
Board Chair Company Affiliation New Life Community Group, Medford
Board Chair Term Feb 2017 - Feb 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Jeanne Benincasa Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Andrea Bezemes Brookline Bank Voting
Mr. Michael Cherone St. Joseph's Church, Malden Voting
Mrs. Zoila Corricelli Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Mark Golub Retired Voting
Mr. David Hart Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Mary Beth Leon Community Volunteer Voting
Mrs. Kathleen McKenna Sacred Hearts Parish, Malden Voting
Mr. Andrew McNeilly New Life Community and Green Street Baptist Church, Melrose Voting
Mr. Daniel Perry Forestdale Community Church, Malden, MA Voting
Mrs. Cynthia Robillard Good Shepherd United Methodist Church Voting
Mr. Sean Twomey Delta Dental Plan of Massachusetts Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 90%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Capital Campaign
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Personnel
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $393,982.00
Projected Expense $393,602.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Review

2009 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $662,585 $678,884 $842,186
Total Expenses $659,968 $636,323 $684,248

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$187,803 $158,137 $265,104
Government Contributions $35,052 $39,375 $61,001
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $35,052 $39,375 $61,001
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $125 $150 $63
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $178,617 $220,999 $252,443
Revenue In-Kind $259,781 $259,344 $262,619
Other $1,207 $879 $956

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $597,189 $550,345 $586,050
Administration Expense $40,003 $32,139 $28,075
Fundraising Expense $22,776 $53,839 $70,123
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.07 1.23
Program Expense/Total Expenses 90% 86% 86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 13% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,091,729 $343,269 $308,390
Current Assets $336,944 $290,491 $221,048
Long-Term Liabilities $850,000 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $6,079 $1,778 $9,460
Total Net Assets $235,650 $341,491 $298,930

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose We began our capital campaign for the development of 54 Eastern Avenue in Malden in Jan. 2013, contracting with Rick Blain & Associates (RBBA) as our consultant. In 2012, we hired RBBA to conduct a capital campaign feasibility study, which concluded we had the capacity to raise $1 million. The total cost of our project is just under $3 million. During this "quiet" phase of the campaign, we have obtained nearly $1 million in pledges from three foundations and other donors. We are seeking additional major pledges to reach $2 million in commitments before launching the public phase of our campaign. The chair of our Capital Campaign Steering Committee is David Hart. We also have a Capital Campaign Cabinet: the people who help identify major gift prospects and ask for gifts to the campaign.
Campaign Goal $3,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Jan 2013 - Dec 2021
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $1,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 55.43 163.38 23.37

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 78% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited and reviewed financials.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

To eliminate hunger in the metro North Boston area, and to help families transition from poverty to self-reliance.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

1) operate programs that alleviate hunger
2) empower impoverished individuals and families by offering them the opportunity to volunteer with BOL and give back to the community, while developing skills useful for future employment and goals. 
3) work with community partners to connect people using our services with job training, educational opportunities, low-cost housing, and other subsidized services which will enable them to have their fundamental needs for food, housing, clothing and healthcare met. 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

We have a proven track record since our inception in 1980 of recruiting volunteers and donations, and working with community partners, such as local human services agencies, city services, churches and businesses. We are a sub-contractor on grants with Mystic Valley Elder Services, and the Cities of Everett, Malden and Medford. We have 37 community partner organizations who help provide one of our evening meals each month. We have another 9 organizations and restaurants that partner with us to supply food for the homeless families in the motels. We have partnered with community groups to register our pantry recipients to vote, to receive SNAP benefits, to have their taxes done, to participate in nutritional surveys, to seek housing, and more. 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

We document the use of our programs in a database, tracking family composition, frequency of use, income sources, etc.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

We have accomplished the continued growth of our free food programs since our inception. We have not yet accomplished our goal of constructing a new kitchen, dining hall and expanded food pantry at 54 Eastern Avenue in Malden. This is our main goal through 2018 projected construction date.