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Roca, Inc.

 101 Park Street
 Chelsea, MA 02150
[P] (617) 889-5210
[F] (617) 889-2145
www.rocainc.org
[email protected]
Allie Maynard
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INCORPORATED: 1988
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-3223641

LAST UPDATED: 09/06/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Roca’s mission is to disrupt the cycle of incarceration and poverty by helping young people transform their lives.

Mission Statement

Roca’s mission is to disrupt the cycle of incarceration and poverty by helping young people transform their lives.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $12,700,000.00
Projected Expense $12,700,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Roca's Intervention Model
  • Roca's Young Mothers Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Roca’s mission is to disrupt the cycle of incarceration and poverty by helping young people transform their lives.

Background Statement

Launched from a single grant from the Teen Challenge Fund of Massachusetts, a passionate group of young people and adults started Roca in 1988 to address teen pregnancy and violence in Chelsea, Massachusetts. Since then, Roca has helped over 20,000 young people make positive, profound changes in their lives.

With a mission to disrupt the cycle of incarceration and poverty by helping young people transform their lives, Roca’s first target population is very high-risk young men aged 17-24 who are substantially involved in the criminal justice system, have little education, and no employment history. Today, Roca's Intervention Model serves approximately 850 young men annually out of four hubs statewide - Chelsea, Lynn, Boston, and Springfield.

Roca’s Intervention Model (for high-risk young men) has been touted as a national best practice by many governments, advocates and services providers, and has been sought after nationally and internationally. In 2013, Roca was selected as one of the top 100 high impact nonprofits in the United States by the Social Impact Exchange for having an effective intervention serving large numbers of individuals in need, with proven results. In 2014, Roca began as the primary service provider in the Massachusetts Juvenile Justice Pay for Success (PFS) project to help reduce incarceration rates among the highest-risk young men. As result of the ongoing PFS project and significant matched funding from foundations such as the Davis Foundation, Roca has dramatically expanded services for high-risk young men in both Greater Boston and Hampden County.

Roca’s second target population is very high-risk young mothers ages 16-24 and their vulnerable children. These young mothers are out of work, out of school, and severely disconnected from services. They and their children are at extremely high risk for further exposure to violence, trauma, and instability.

In 2012, Roca launched the Young Mothers Program, a four-year, dual generation model that has been adapted to meet the needs of these very high-risk young mothers and their children. Today, Roca serves 200 high-risk young mothers from 9 Greater Boston communities (Chelsea, Revere, East Boston, Everett, Cambridge, Somerville, Medford, Malden, and Lynn) and is slated to serve 35 additional young mothers from Springfield in 2018 - Roca's first replication of this model in another region.

Impact Statement

Roca serves the highest-risk young people aged 16-24. Our young people qualify as high-risk by any existing assessment, and additionally, they appear not ready, willing, or able to change. Trapped in their “unreadiness” to change or work, they are failing in other programs and jobs: they don’t show up, they decline services, and they drop out of programming. Even if they were paid to participate in a program, they wouldn’t stay there long. Roca’s services are designed to achieve meaningful outcomes with this particular hard-to-serve group.

· Roca’s young men are substantially involved in the criminal justice system. They are at high-risk for future engagement in violence, both as victims and as perpetrators, and long-term incarceration.

· Roca’s young mothers are out of school and work and severely disconnected from services. They and their children are at high-risk for further exposure to violence, trauma, and instability.

Program Performance and Outcomes

In FY2017, Roca served 854 high-risk young men and retained 78% of them in the four-year model. The model’s intermediate outcomes – employment and rearrests measured during the last two years of the model – allow Roca to evaluate the program’s impact on young people:

· 76% of the young people who were ready to be placed in a job (having spent more than two years at Roca) were indeed placed, and 67% held a job for over six months.

· 88% of the young men who have completed the first two years of the model were not rearrested.

In additon, in FY2017 Roca served 200 young mothers and retained 80% of them in the four-year model. 80% of the young mothers who were ready to be placed in a job were indeed placed, and 93% held a job for six months or longer.



Needs Statement

Donor gifts
Corporate Relationships for partnerships and jobs for young people
Board Members 
Volunteers
In-kind donations of goods, supplies, etc.
 

CEO Statement

“We are dedicated to keeping high-risk young people alive and providing them with the support and professional training necessary for them to make important life changes."  -Molly Baldwin,  Founder and CEO

Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- West Roxbury
Roca currently serves 19 communities across Massachusetts, out of its four operating locations in Boston, Chelsea, Lynn and Springfield. This includes providing services in Boston, Cambridge, Charlestown, Chelsea, East Boston, Everett, Lynn, Malden, Medford, Revere, Somerville, Winthrop, Agawam, Chicopee, Holyoke, Ludlow, Springfield, West Springfield, and Westfield.

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement
  2. Human Services - Human Services
  3. Education - Educational Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Roca's Intervention Model

Roca’s multi-faceted work to help high-risk young men live out of harm’s way and learn the skills necessary to succeed in life, education, and the economy requires a range of customized programming and services that converge in our evidence-based, cognitive behavioral Intervention Model. The Model creates behavior change in young people over two years, with two additional years of supportive follow up. Roca provides intensive street outreach, case management, and stage-based programming in CBT, life skills, education and employment while working with the criminal justice system and a myriad of public institutions engaged in the lives of the young people Roca serves.
Budget  $8,483,247.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served At-Risk Populations College Aged (18-26 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
The following performance indicators and intermediate outcomes are utilized annually to evaluate the performance of Roca’s Intervention Model:

· 80% of participants enrolled for 2 or more months will have an average of at least 2 intentional contacts with their Youth Worker per week;

· 70% of eligible participants will be engaged in Transitional Employment within 6 months from enrollment;

· 80% of all participants will be engaged in CBT Life Skills Programming;

· 70% of all eligible participants will be placed in unsubsidized employment; and,

· 80% of participants enrolled 2 years or more will have no new arrests. 

Program Long-Term Success  The Intervention Model is designed to ensure that graduates will achieve the sustained outcomes of no re-incarcerations and employment retention, measured five years from enrollment. The performance indicators and intermediate outcomes listed under "Program Short-Term Success" are utilized annually to assess progress toward these long-term outcomes.
Program Success Monitored By 

Roca utilizes a range of outcomes focused on young people living out of harm’s way and moving towards economic self-sufficiency. ETO captures movement toward the out-of-harm’s-way outcome through tracking the development of the transformational relationship over time and through tracking the stages of change related to specific behavior change outcomes. Youth workers select appropriate outcomes to focus on with young people based on their individual issues and barriers to success.

Behavior change outcomes examine: substance abuse; educational engagement; employment engagement; unhealthy relationships; court compliance; and, street/gang involvement. Self-sufficiency measures include: program attendance; program retention; workforce readiness; academic skill gains; pre-vocational skill achievements; progress in transitional employment programming; job placement; and, job retention and advancement.

Examples of Program Success 

The impact of Roca’s Intervention Model has been clear and supported by data, with our historical outcomes showing a robust model that continues to produce positive results, year after year: Each year from 2014-2016, 87-93% of Roca’s young men averted new arrests or incarcerations after their 24th month of enrollment, and 89-92% retained 90 or more days of employment.

Roca graduates, like D’Quame, acknowledge that the relentlessness of Roca’s approach, while challenging in the beginning, eventually brought about a turning point:

“No matter how hard I would try to avoid Roca, they were right there for me. When I first joined the program, I was really annoyed by how they pushed us to do things we didn’t want to, or talk about things that may be uncomfortable. One thing they tell you upon entering the program is that it won’t be an easy change, but it will be worth it. And they were right. Everything I went through was worth it, and the man I am today is not the man I am last year.”


Roca's Young Mothers Program

Roca’s Young Mothers Program is a four-year, dual generation program that has been adapted for the very highest risk young mothers. Consistent with the organization’s overall focus on the highest-risk young people, Roca’s Young Mothers Program directs intensive services toward 16-24 year old mothers who present serious risk factors that put themselves and their children in harm’s way. These are high-risk young women who are out of work, out of school, and cannot participate in home visiting and other traditional young parenting programs – either for behavioral reasons (not being ready, willing, or able to participate in a program) or for lack of eligibility (being over the age of 20, having more than one child) or both. For these high-risk young mothers, Roca’s program is the program of last resort. 

Roca currently serves 175 young mothers from 9 Greater Boston communities out of our Chelsea headquarters and is slated to serve 35 young mothers out of our Springfield site in 2018.
Budget  $2,177,010.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family Services for Adolescent Parents
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

PERFORMANCE MEASURES/SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES (MEASURED IN YEARS 1 AND 2)

· 80% of mothers will be engaged and retained in relationships with a youth worker and have a minimum of 2 contacts per week

· 80% of mothers will be enrolled in appropriate bundled services within 9-12 months of enrollment

· 70% of enrolled young mothers will complete Roca’s life skills programming

· 70% of mothers will demonstrate educational gains and/or complete pre-vocational certifications

· 80% of mothers will delay subsequent pregnancies within 18 months of previous live birth

· 80% of children have Ages and Stages screening and assessments (ASQ & ASQ:SE)

· 80% of children in need of Early Intervention receive services through appropriate referrals

· 80% of the children of participants will receive regular well baby/well child care.

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOMES (MEASURED IN YEARS 3 AND 4)

  • 70% will demonstrate increased CBT skills and knowledge;
  • 70% will demonstrate increased emotional regulation and/or executive functioning;
  • 70% will demonstrate educational gains and/or increased rates of employment;
  • 70% will demonstrate improved parent/child interactions; and,
  • 70% of those engaged in the model will have no new pregnancies for 18 months from their last birth.
Program Long-Term Success 

Roca has established four long-term outcomes for the Young Mothers Program, each examined at 5 years from enrollment: 1) Delayed subsequent pregnancies until the age of 24; 2) Sustained engagement in education and employment and/or education and employment gains/advancements; 3) Sustained social support networks; 4) On-time attainment of infant/child social and emotional developmental goals.

The section titled "Program Short-Term Success includes a selection of performance indicators and short and intermediate outcomes Roca uses to measure progress towards our model’s long-term outcomes.

Program Success Monitored By 
Roca tracks participant outcomes through ETO software, a customizable data collection system, which allows Roca to track and measure components of its approach to engagement and youth participation in programming.

ETO captures behavior change through tracking the development of the transformational relationship over time and through tracking the stages of change related to specific behavior change outcomes. Roca utilizes a range of outcomes focused on young people living out of harm’s way and moving towards economic self-sufficiency. 

Behavior change outcomes examine: substance abuse; educational engagement; employment engagement; unhealthy relationships; pregnancy prevention; court compliance; and, street/gang involvement. Self-sufficiency measures include: program attendance; program retention; workforce readiness; academic skill gains; pre-vocational skill achievements; progress in transitional employment programming; job placement; and, job retention and advancement.

Examples of Program Success 

· Of 200 very high-risk young mothers served in FY 2017, Roca retained 80% in programming and case management, in spite of overwhelming risk factors such as trauma, criminal involvement, substance abuse, behavioral issues, lack of education and employment, and extreme housing instability.

· Seventy-six percent (76%) or 128 of 168 young mothers in the first two years of the model participated in intensive programming at Roca 

· Eighty-four percent (84%) or 37 out of 44 young mothers who were at 18-24 months of enrollment demonstrated educational and/or employment gains.

· Eighty-three percent (83%) or 48 of the 58 young mothers who had completed the first two intensive years of the program were successfully placed in unsubsidized employment.

· Ninety-three percent (93%) or 39 of a possible 43 of young mothers retained that employment for 6 months or more.



CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

At Roca, our focus will always be the young people and young parents that society fears, forgets and rejects. 

We pursue our mission by staying focused on our core values of truth, trust and transformation. We tell young people the truth, we teach them to trust and we give them the skills to transform their lives.

To do Roca’s work well, we must constantly improve as an organization. That is why, every year, Roca commits to an aggressive learning agenda and increases its use of performance-based management. We rigorously track young people’s progress, and closely monitor the work of our staff. This keeps us accountable for our actions. We have clean audits and are transparent about our finances. We invite feedback, and employ outside evaluators.

Over the past year in particular, we have focused on a singular mission: making Roca’s Intervention Model a real solution for addressing violence and poverty in this country. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Molly Baldwin
CEO Term Start Jan 1988
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Molly Baldwin is the CEO and was also a Founder of Roca, Inc. from 1988 – Present.  Prior to her work at Roca, she worked at Just-A-Start as a Counselor from 1984-88 and was responsible for facilitating youth development and employment opportunities as well as development and implementation of curriculum.  

 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience


Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Molly Baldwin Executive Director --
Scott Blackman Chief Financial Officer --
Anisha Chablani-Medley Chief Knowledge Officer --
Lili Elkins Chief Strategy and Development Officer --
Jake Jacobs Chief Advancement Officer --
Scott Scharffenberg Chief Operating Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 93
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 5
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 25
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 6
Caucasian: 37
Hispanic/Latino: 27
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 2
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 55
Male: 43
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Stewart Chapin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Bennett Family Foundation
Board Chair Term Oct 2016 - Oct 2017
Board Co-Chair Mr. Brian Fitzgerald
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Fitzgerald Company, Inc.
Board Co-Chair Term Oct 2016 - Oct 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Molly Baldwin Roca NonVoting
Jim Bildner Harvard --
Kevin Burke Professor, Endicott College Voting
Stewart Chapin Bennett Family Foundation Voting
Matthew Feinberg Feinberg & Kamholtz --
Brian Fitzgerald Community Volunteer --
Eliza Greenberg New Profit Voting
Mark Haggerty President Fidelity Capital Market Services Voting
Christine Kendall Smarter Give Voting
Candace Kidston Former VP Finance, Au Bon Pain Voting
Dwight Robson Mentor Network --
John Shue Harvard Management Company, Inc. Voting
Greg Torres Mass Inc. --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $12,700,000.00
Projected Expense $12,700,000.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $11,409,454 $10,373,807 $8,906,402
Total Expenses $10,215,709 $9,160,588 $7,412,145

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $6,453,773 $5,485,822 $3,862,455
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $6,453,773 $5,485,822 $3,862,455
Individual Contributions $3,526,177 $3,501,530 $3,343,500
Indirect Public Support $235,014 $246,000 $197,969
Earned Revenue $304,736 $282,972 $935,837
Investment Income, Net of Losses $321,408 $331,344 $242,318
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $564,566 $523,598 $320,210
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $3,780 $2,541 $4,113

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $8,274,709 $7,427,993 $5,827,898
Administration Expense $1,395,839 $1,247,493 $1,075,809
Fundraising Expense $545,161 $485,102 $508,438
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.12 1.13 1.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 81% 79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 5% 5% 7%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $14,303,005 $13,363,199 $12,033,276
Current Assets $5,879,578 $4,791,213 $4,913,574
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 --
Current Liabilities $790,839 $809,810 $496,913
Total Net Assets $13,512,166 $12,553,389 $11,536,363

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $5,600,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.43 5.92 9.89

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Roca's Intervention Model is based on a simple, but powerful theory: when young people are reengaged through positive and intensive relationships they can gain competencies in life skills, education and employment and move toward economic independence and stay out of jail. Roca's Intervention Model currently focuses on 17 to 24 year old males in crisis, particularly those involved with the criminal justice system, because it is this group that is responsible for the majority of violence and criminal activity in our cities, and as a result, drives corrections spending at unsustainable levels. The Intervention Model is designed for young people who have dropped out of school, who are involved in drugs and gangs, have criminal records, and/or are on probation. To the best of our knowledge, Roca’s Intervention Model for very high-risk young people is the only full-time, long-term, behavioral change intervention delivered on the street, for this population, by a non-mandating authority.

Each component of Roca’s Intervention Model is designed to drive toward measurable, positive outcomes. The process starts with intensive outreach and follow-up, offers programming, operates basic and advanced transitional employment, creates jobs, and works with municipalities, several criminal justice partners, and other organizations. Based on a framework for change used in medical and mental health fields, the Intervention Model has four core components: 1) relentless outreach, on-going and aggressive outreach and follow-up designed to meet young people where they are and build trust; 2) transformational relationships, an intensive case management model; 3) stage-based programming designed to increase young people ability to move toward economic independence through life skills, educational and pre-vocational, and employment programming; and, 4) work with engaged institutions, a partnership model with criminal justice, health, education, and other institutions to increase systemic capacity for intervention with very high risk young people and provision of needed supports.

This rigorous commitment to results requires Roca to use intensive data collection and analysis to determine participant progress, and staff performance, and ultimately determine the effectiveness of the model as a whole.

Today, our PBM system guides both daily operations and long-term organizational strategy. The system employs web-based data entry, managed through Efforts Toward Outcomes software, (known as ETO). Youth Workers and Program staff enter outcomes data on a daily basis, and management staff conduct weekly, quarterly and yearly evaluations and issue reports to help guide tactical and strategic decisions about service delivery. Our ongoing goals are to help young people 1) find and retain long-term employment and 2) stay out of jail.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Over the next five years, Roca has one primary goal and three secondary goals.

Primary Goal 1: Demonstrate impact to the standard of Proven Effectiveness[1] and scale programming for very high-risk young men to avert future incarcerations and get young people to work.

· Objective 1: Implement the High-risk Young Men’s Model in Massachusetts to demonstrate a high level of evidence for the model, specifically detailing the elevated risk level of the young people served and the amount of services required to create and sustain long-term behavior change.

· Objective 2: Replicate in another state to demonstrate further the efficacy of the model and document the steps to replication.

· Objective 3: Work with external partners to document, define, and further explain the elevated risk of some young people both within and outside of Roca and Massachusetts, allowing for an increased understanding of effective intervention strategies.

Secondary Goal 1: Expand the high-risk young mothers program and provide evidence that meets the standard of Demonstrated Effectiveness1.

· Objective 1: Expand programming through a Springfield pilot for high-risk young mothers, increasing the number of young mothers served at any given time by 120 over the next five years (shifting from 235 young mothers served in FY18 to 355 young mothers served in FY22.)

· Objective 2: Increase dual generation programming and demonstrate improved outcomes for babies based on enhanced parenting programming to mothers.

· Objective 3: Develop based on demonstrated effectiveness a long-term strategy for further evaluation, impact and growth.

Secondary Goal 2: Demonstrate the effectiveness of a para-professional led Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) model that combines specific curriculum with an approach to youth work, supervision, and operations.

· Objective 1: Finalize comprehensive training, supervision and competency development model for use by staff and supervisors.

· Objective 2: Over the next few years, demonstrate greater evidence of effectiveness of the CBT model at Roca and in other settings working with high-risk young people.

· Objective 3: Develop and implement a technology-based tool to further support the widespread adoption of Roca’s CBT Model.

Secondary Goal 3: Strengthen the organization through operational capacity and an effective economic model for long-term sustainability.

· Objective 1: Continuously improve overall organizational capacity to serve young people and achieve the strategic plan, i.e. staff, executive leadership, infrastructure, and funding and financing models.

· Objective 2: Strengthen capacity of the Board of Directors and high level, group or topic specific advisory committees to support growth and impact.



3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Roca is committed to being a high-performing and adaptive organization that uses real-time data for continuous improvement and evaluating impact. Roca tracks participant outcomes through ETO software, which allows Roca to measure components of its approach to engagement and youth participation in programming. Roca utilizes the ETO database to collect ongoing programmatic data using a variety of tools, including: a Central Intake Assessment; a Quarterly Assessment; a Workforce Readiness Assessment; Daily Effort Tracking; a Daily TEP Assessment; and, an Annual “Out-of-Harm’s-Way” Assessment. All information recorded initially on paper files are transferred into the ETO database.

Youth workers select appropriate outcomes to focus on with young people based on their individual issues and barriers to success. Behavior change outcomes examine: substance abuse; educational engagement; employment engagement; unhealthy relationships; pregnancy prevention; court compliance; and, street/gang Involvement. Self-sufficiency measures include: program attendance; program retention; workforce readiness; academic skill gains; pre-vocational skill achievements; progress in transitional employment programming; job placement; and, job retention and advancement.

The way in which Roca uses this data, collected on a daily, weekly, quarterly or annual basis, is both tactical (using the data as a tool to inform weekly operations) and strategic (using the data to inform programmatic/model adjustments when necessary). This adherence to performance based management and continual use of data has given way to an extensive staff coaching system, which provides structure to a complex and nuanced intervention process. Additionally, Roca works with several external evaluators and researchers, such as Abt Associates and David Hunter, to assess the effectiveness of our work with very high-risk young people.

The aforementioned speaks to our internal tools, but we also recognize the importance of external partners. Roca operates with the understanding that in order to effectively help high-risk young people change their lives, we need to promote collaboration and alignment between all of the organizations and systems that touch their lives. Through dialogue and action, Roca continues to impact systemic change in how our communities address the needs of young people and reduce crime and incarceration. Roca also works closely with local area employers to develop relationships and create employment opportunities for the young men we serve. This coordinated work has resulted in a statewide task force on transitional employment, a shift in area gang intervention practices, and unprecedented partnerships with police departments, state and municipal government branches and agencies, the courts, community-based agencies, private businesses and foundations.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Roca’s Intervention Model is designed to ensure that graduates will achieve the sustained outcomes of no re-incarcerations and employment retention, measured five years from enrollment. The following performance indicators and intermediate outcomes will be utilized to evaluate the performance of Roca’s Intervention Model in the coming fiscal year ('18):

· At least 850 high-risk young men will be engaged annually in our Intervention Model statewide;

· 80% of participants enrolled for 2 or more months will have an average of at least 2 intentional contacts with their Youth Worker per week;

· 70% of eligible participants will be engaged in Transitional Employment within 6 months from enrollment;

· 80% of all participants will be engaged in CBT Life Skills Programming;

· 70% of all eligible participants will be placed in unsubsidized employment; and,

· 80% of participants enrolled 2 years or more will have no new arrests.

Roca has also established four long-term outcomes for the Young Mothers Program, each examined at 5 years from enrollment: 1) Delayed subsequent pregnancies until the age of 24; 2) Sustained engagement in education and employment and/or education and employment gains/advancements; 3) Sustained social support networks; 4) On-time attainment of infant/child social and emotional developmental goals.

The following are a selection of performance indicators and short and intermediate outcomes Roca uses to measure progress towards our model’s long-term outcomes.

 

PERFORMANCE MEASURES/SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES (MEASURED IN YEARS 1 AND 2)

 

· 80% of mothers will be engaged and retained in relationships with a youth worker and have a minimum of 2 contacts per week

· 80% of mothers will be enrolled in appropriate bundled services within 9-12 months of enrollment

· 70% of enrolled young mothers will complete Roca’s life skills programming

· 70% of mothers will demonstrate educational gains and/or complete pre-vocational certifications

· 80% of mothers will delay subsequent pregnancies within 18 months of previous live birth

· 80% of children have Ages and Stages screening and assessments (ASQ & ASQ:SE)

· 80% of children in need of Early Intervention receive services through appropriate referrals

· 80% of the children of participants will receive regular well baby/well child care.

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOMES (MEASURED IN YEARS 3 AND 4)

  • 70% will demonstrate increased CBT skills and knowledge;
  • 70% will demonstrate increased emotional regulation and/or executive functioning;
  • 70% will demonstrate educational gains and/or increased rates of employment;
  • 70% will demonstrate improved parent/child interactions; and,
  • 70% of those engaged in the model will have no new pregnancies for 18 months from their last birth.
How do we know if we are making progress with the Intervention Model or the Young Mothers Program? We rigorously track data and continuously evaluate our strategies and outcomes. Weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annually, Roca tracks and evaluates data regarding participant progress and staff performance, using this data to affect continuous improvement. At Roca, we know that good intentions don’t always produce good results. If we are not helping young people stay out of jail and get jobs, then we might as well close our doors. So we’ve spent the better part of the last decade developing an Intervention Model that focuses on results first.
 
 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

The impact of Roca’s Intervention Model has been clear and supported by data, with our historical outcomes showing a robust model that continues to produce positive results, year after year: Each year from 2014-2016, 87-93% of Roca’s young men averted new arrests or incarcerations after their 24th month of enrollment, and 89-92% retained 90 or more days of employment.