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AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts, Inc.

 75 Amory Street
 Boston, MA 02119
[P] (617) 437-6200
[F] (617) 450-6237
http://www.aac.org
jvanheugten@aac.org
Jacoba van Heugten
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INCORPORATED: 1983
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-2707246

LAST UPDATED: 04/01/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of AIDS Action Committee is to stop the AIDS epidemic and related health inequities by eliminating new infections, maximizing healthier outcomes of those infected and at risk, and attacking the root causes of HIV/AIDS.

To achieve this mission AAC provides services to the individual and addresses the root causes of the epidemic.

Mission Statement

The mission of AIDS Action Committee is to stop the AIDS epidemic and related health inequities by eliminating new infections, maximizing healthier outcomes of those infected and at risk, and attacking the root causes of HIV/AIDS.

To achieve this mission AAC provides services to the individual and addresses the root causes of the epidemic.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year May 01, 2012 to Apr 30, 2013
Projected Income $13,299,057.00
Projected Expense $13,438,121.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Client Services
  • Prevention

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of AIDS Action Committee is to stop the AIDS epidemic and related health inequities by eliminating new infections, maximizing healthier outcomes of those infected and at risk, and attacking the root causes of HIV/AIDS.

To achieve this mission AAC provides services to the individual and addresses the root causes of the epidemic.


Background Statement

Since its founding in 1983 at the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, AAC has been a leader in providing care to those impacted by HIV, and in advocating at the local, state, and national level for policy initiatives that will improve the health outcomes of those living with HIV.

In the last 30 years, AAC has partnered with the state and other AIDS service organizations to build a sophisticated model of care for HIV, one of the most complicated and expensive chronic diseases confronting the health care system today. As medical advances have changed HIV/AIDS from a primarily fatal disease to a chronic one, AAC has provided the low threshold support services necessary for people to get into and stay in care. These social supports, combined with ever-improving drug treatments, ensure better health outcomes today for those living with HIV than at any other point during the epidemic.

As a result of these efforts, the state has reduced new HIV diagnoses by 52% since 1999, which has saved approximately 6,000 people from infection and will save the state more than $2.4 billion in HIV-related health care costs over the course of a lifetime.

Despite these advances, the need for services continues to grow. Between 2000 and 2010, the number of people living with HIV/AIDS in Massachusetts increased 40%, placing substantial demands on existing programs. Though treatment can now reduce viral loads to undetectable levels, only 28% of those living with HIV reach this goal. As was the case 30 years ago, men who have sex with men, communities of color, and others marginalized by discrimination, poverty, and other social factors continue to be disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS.  

AAC provides no-cost HIV care and prevention services directly to more than 6,500 people living with or at high risk of HIV in Greater Boston and Essex County. Ninety percent of these clients live on an average household income of less than $9,800; 85% have experienced one or more episodes of homeless in their lifetimes; 67% of these clients are male, 29% are female, and 4% are transgender; 51% are white, 22% are African-American, 20% are Hispanic, and 7% are other or multiple races. HIV prevention services are also provided to 4,000 people at highest risk of HIV/AIDS.

The continuum of care provided by AAC that moves clients out of crisis into stability is poised to be a model for treating other chronic conditions as they intersect with health inequities. AAC’s latest initiative is to apply this proven approach to hepatitis C, which affects 50% of the individuals AAC serves.


Impact Statement

Key Accomplishments:

1. Providing seamless access to HIV medications and improving medical adherence through partnering with an on-site pharmacy: AAC partnered with a specialty pharmacy to offer home delivery options for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C medications, as well as on-site access to medications at AAC’s Boston drop-in center.

2. Improving mental health services: AAC expanded its mental health and substance use counseling to increase access to these services by individuals who have had challenges connecting with traditional mental health services. AAC has also become an approved provider under the Massachusetts Behavioral Health Plan.

3. Streamlining data management through Efforts to Outcomes: AAC implemented Efforts to Outcomes, a well-established case management and social services database which has enabled AAC to track and document health and self sufficiency outcomes.

4. Tackling Hepatitis C: AAC convened the Massachusetts Viral Hepatitis Coalition, a collaboration of organizations, providers, and consumers working to increase awareness of viral hepatitis and build support for programs addressing the needs of those living with or at risk of contracting viral hepatitis.

Goals:  

1. Improve health outcomes and self-sufficiency of people who are HIV positive, or at risk of contracting HIV, who are also out of care or sub-optimally engaged with care providers.

2. Explore partnerships to leverage the Affordable Care Act to sustain AAC’s community-based model of care and support.

3. Expand existing services for clients mono-infected with hepatitis C and co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C. These services include on-site testing, medical referrals, and dedicated support groups.

4. Advocate for increased state funding for hepatitis C prevention and treatment programs through continued leadership of the Massachusetts Viral Hepatitis Coalition.

5. Expand HIV, hepatitis C, and STI prevention services to youth and young adults most at risk of infection. 
 

Needs Statement

Since 2011, federal funding to Massachusetts to fight HIV/AIDS has been cut 25%. Since 2000 state funding for HIV/AIDS has decreased 38%. In that same period, thanks to advances in treatment that extend the lives of those living with HIV/AIDS, the number of people in need of HIV/AIDS-related services has increased 40%. AAC responded to these cuts by merging with other organizations to deliver services more efficiently. In 2010, AAC merged with Cambridge Cares About AIDS. In 2011, AAC merged with Strongest Link, Inc. AAC has also grown Boomerangs, its profitable chain of thrift stores, to help fund its work, and holds the annual AIDS Walk & 5K Run to raise much-needed funds and awareness.

These private efforts have not replaced the significant cuts in public funding. Meeting the increased demand for services for those at risk of HIV, who don’t qualify for certain sources of funding because they are not HIV+, is one of the biggest needs AAC faces.

AAC also seeks to its expand Learning Educating and Advocating with Peers model of care to include integrated client advocacy, peer support, and mental health counseling specifically for youth and young adults age 18-29 who are living with or at risk of HIV and/or hepatitis C.


CEO Statement

While we will continue to see people living with HIV for decades to come, we can end the transmission of new infections of HIV. We know how to medically treat HIV/AIDS. We know which behavioral interventions work. But the critical question we face today is whether we will muster the will to fund the work necessary to end the AIDS epidemic.

State HIV/AIDS funding has been on a consistent downward trajectory over the last decade from just under $52 million in 2000 to just over $32 million today. AAC has responded to this funding crisis by literally doing more with less by increasing program and operational efficiencies. Over the last three years, AAC successfully merged with two other AIDS service organizations in Massachusetts to streamline operations. In doing so, AAC has continued to serve its clients by providing them with the support they need to get into care—and stay there.

AAC has also maintained its advocacy efforts to ensure that policy makers, funders, and the public are educated on efficient and effective ways to  fight the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Massachusetts. That’s why AAC supported changes in state law that will make it easier to expand HIV testing in the Commonwealth by replacing the need for written consent before an HIV test can be administered with verbal consent. This new law, which took effect July 26, 2012, upholds current regulations relating to patient privacy.

All of this work is critical to eventually ending new cases of HIV. And with that end so close—we see less than 650 new HIV diagnoses annually in Massachusetts—now is not the time to pull back on the commitment to end AIDS. This is the work that’s making a difference in the state, and in the lives of our clients who continue to live with the disease. 


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Northeast Massachusetts Region

AAC provides no-cost services to people from all over Greater Boston and Essex County at five locations in Boston, Cambridge and Lynn, as well as in client's homes and community venues.

Organization Categories

  1. Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines - AIDS
  2. Health Care - Public Health
  3. Human Services - Human Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Client Services

AAC’s core client services programming is based on Learning Educating and Advocating with Peers (LEAP), a nationally recognized model for connecting economically and socially marginalized persons living with HIV/AIDS to high quality supportive services and health care. The result is a continuum of care designed to integrate client advocacy, mental health, legal, and peer support into one team to provide effective, culturally competent services. AAC’s client services specifically targets individuals who are newly diagnosed, out of care, sub-optimally engaged in care, and/or at risk of falling out of care. This includes clients with unaddressed mental health issues, active substance use, housing instability, lack of workforce readiness, and/or engagement in risky sexual behaviors. The goal of the program is to form trusting relationships with this population to help link and retain them in care and services that will improve their health and self-sufficiency outcomes.

Budget  $5,111,922.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other HIV/AIDS
Population Served People/Families of People with HIV/AIDS Minorities At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Client Services supports 2,700 clients living with HIV and hepatitis C. Integrated services under the LEAP model have led to measurable long term success in reducing new infections and overall savings in health care costs statewide. In the past year:

· Client Advocates devoted 8,000 hours to 1,200 clients by linking them with medical care, mental health, substance use services, benefits, transposition, housing search, placement, and stabilization. Over 100 homeless individuals were able to access housing;

- The Peer Support Program provided 80,000 hours of peer guidance, 10,000 hours of peer-led groups, and 2,500 hours of 1 on 1 support sessions to 939 clients.

- 383 clients received legal services for civil matters, including housing and rental disputes, public benefits, consumer protection, access to health care, unemployment, family law, and discrimination.  

- 200 clients received 1,600 hours of individual therapy through mental health and substance use counseling services.
Program Long-Term Success 

Since 1999, new HIV infections in Massachusetts have been reduced by 53%, saving 6,000 individuals from becoming HIV positive. These reductions in diagnoses will save more than $2 billion in health care costs. One of AAC’s roles in this success has been to connect low income and marginalized people living with HIV/AIDS to benefits enrollment and medical care, and to help ensure adherence to medication through supportive services provided through the LEAP model. This not only supports individuals to achieve improved health outcomes as measured by viral load and CD4 count and improved self-sufficiency, but helps to reduce the spread of HIV. Individuals with lower viral loads have been shown to be less likely to transmit HIV, which lowers the community viral load. As a result, fewer new cases arise, and more people living with HIV/AIDS maintain regular medical care and avoid using expensive emergency medical services. 

Program Success Monitored By 

AAC uses Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), a well-established case management and social services database, to measure individual and program-level outcomes. AAC has customized ETO to meet its unique needs and efficiently measure client outcomes. In ETO, comprehensive client files are stored and managed, including client assessments and progress notes. Client assessments help the program measure and document individual outcomes related to health and self-sufficiency. As such, ETO tracks indicators including housing and employment status, income, doctor visits, medication adherence, and health status as indicated by CD4 counts and viral load. Outcomes are measured through analysis of ETO data by the Program Evaluation Manager, a unique position focused specifically on measuring the outcomes and efficacy of our programs. Electronic client records have improved the efficiency of our services and communication between staff and programs regarding client care.

Examples of Program Success 

‘Joe’ is a 47 year old, HIV+, minority, gay male who came to AAC in April 2012 to re-engage with services after failing to engage in follow up care. He came in seeking support for substance use, mental health, employment, housing, and re-connection to HIV medical care.

Joe was enrolled in LEAP, and assigned to a Client Advocate, Peer Advocate and Mental Health Clinician who designed a treatment plan and provided comprehensive wrap around services and support. Through LEAP’s integrated services, Joe addressed his substance use, improved his mental health status, re-connected to MassHealth benefits, found permanent housing, started AAC’s Boomerangs job training program, and addressed immigration issues.

Joe is now regularly going to scheduled doctor appointments and adhering to medication. As of his most recent January 2013 HIV lab results, Joe has achieved a suppressed viral load.


Prevention

AAC operates an array of prevention programs that target specific populations at highest risk of HIV, hepatitis C, and sexually-transmitted infections. AAC’s prevention programming is based on the integration of peer support, client advocacy, and mental health services. Programs increase education; promote and reinforce risk reduction practices; build cultures of prevention; screen individuals for infection; connect newly diagnosed individuals with additional support services; and provide ongoing support to increase self-efficacy of clients both living with and at high risk of infection. AAC’s model demonstrates that care is prevention. Programs include Youth on Fire for homeless and street-involved youth and young adults; the MALE Center for men who have sex with men; the Needle Exchange for injection drug users; TransCEND for transgender women (male-to-female); the HIV Health Library, HIV and hepatitis C hotlines; and two educational websites.

Budget  $1,476,462.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other HIV/AIDS
Population Served At-Risk Populations Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

In the past year, AAC provided the following prevention services to populations at highest risk of infection:

- 500 youth visited the Youth on Fire drop-in center 6,797 times. 147 were connected with HIV testing and counseling services; 159 visited with a primary health care provider; 56 visited with a mental health clinician; and 387 risk reduction assessments were conducted.

- 773 men were tested for HIV at the MALE Center. Six tested positive and were linked to medical care providers. 

Needle Exchange distributed 175,649 clean syringes and collected 115,769 used syringes. 179 injection drug users were connected with health care services; 131 people were trained on the use of Narcan, an overdose reversal medication; and 34 overdose reversals were reported.

TransCEND hosted 775 drop-in visits, linked 105 clients with providers skilled in caring for transgender women, conducted 175 HIV tests, and educated more than 500 providers and advocates about the health care needs of trans women.

Program Long-Term Success 

Thanks to robust behavioral interventions, new HIV infections have been reduced statewide by 53% since 1999, saving 6,000 from infection. More than $2 billion in HIV-related health care costs will be saved over the course of the lifetimes of those who have not become HIV positive as a result of these efforts. In the same time frame, nationwide infection rates have largely seen no change. One of AAC’s roles in this success has been to provide a full array of age-appropriate and culturally sensitive health promotion, prevention, disease management, and advocacy services including: delivering medically accurate and accessible sexual health information to specific at risk populations, provision of risk reduction supplies, and providing safe-spaces and connections to HIV and STI screening for underserved populations. As a result of these programs, AAC’s clients are more likely to know their status, practice prevention, and be connected with medical care and supportive services. These successes are threatened by ongoing reductions in state and federal funding for HIV prevention services.

Program Success Monitored By 

AAC uses Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), a well-established case management and social services database, to measure individual and program-level outcomes. AAC has customized ETO to meet its unique needs and efficiently measure client outcomes. In ETO, comprehensive client files are stored and managed, including client assessments and progress notes. Client assessments, which are a crucial part of a client's ETO record and assess clients' unique needs, help the program assess and document individual outcomes related to health and self-sufficiency. Outcomes are measured through analysis of ETO data by the Program Evaluation Manager, a unique position focused specifically on measuring the outcomes and efficacy of our programs. Electronic client records have improved the efficiency of our services and communication between staff and programs regarding client care. ETO is in the process of being rolled out across all AAC prevention programs.

 

Examples of Program Success 

‘B’ is a 24 year old Latina transgender woman fleeing a domestic violence situation. She learned she was HIV positive shortly after coming out as transgender. She had few resources to cope with issues related to her health or her gender identity. A friend directed her to TransCEND. Staff helped her find a transgender-friendly domestic violence program. Once her personal safety had been assured on a longer-term basis, B was connected with MassHealth, and transgender-specific medical care and HIV treatment at the Transgender Medical Clinic at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program. “This was the first time that I felt actually cared for by a nurse or doctor. It made me want to come back. It made me want to care more for myself,” says B. Six months later her viral load remains undetectable. She has kept all of her medical appointments, attends TransCEND peer support and community events, and is continuing with her transition and healing process. B has aspirations of becoming a nurse.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The programmatic work of AAC has contributed to the state’s success in reducing new HIV diagnoses by 52 percent since 1999. This has resulted in sparing approximately 6,000 people a diagnosis of HIV. It will also result in HIV-related health care cost savings of more than $2.4 billion over a lifetime. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Carl Sciortino
CEO Term Start Apr 2014
CEO Email csciortino@aac.org
CEO Experience


Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Larry Kessler 1983 Apr
Michael Duffy -- May

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Jorge Abellas CIO --
Mary Hull Vice President of Development --
Susan Kelley Vice President of Operations --
Denise McWilliams Esq. General Counsel --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Hannaford Health Hero Hannaford Supermarkets 2012
Wainwright Social Justice Award Eastern Bank 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

AIDS United 
National AIDS Strategy
Massachusetts Health Council
Codman Square Health Center
Mass General Hospital (MGH)
Multicultural AIDS Coalition (MAC)
PACT/Partners in Health
Dimock Community Medical Center
Victory Programs
Boston Living Centre (BLC)
ACLU
GLAD
JRI Health
AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod
AIDS Project Worcester
Tapestry Health Project
ABLE
Fenway Community Health Center
MOAR (Mass. Organization of Addiction Recovery)
ABH (Association of Behavioral Health)
MCAS (Mass. Coalition of Addiction Services)
DAAHR (Disability Advocates Advancing our Healthcare Rights)
MPHA (Mass. Public Health Association)
Massachusetts Department of Public Health
Mass. Patient Advocacy Alliance
NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts
Health Care For All
Mass. Law Reform Institute
Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General
Mass. Coalition for the Homeless
Mass. Housing and Shelter Alliance
Mass Trangender Legal Coalition

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

State HIV/AIDS funding has been on a consistent downward trajectory over the last decade from just under $52 million in 2000 to just over $32 million today. AAC has responded to this funding crisis by literally doing more with less by increasing program and operational efficiencies. Over the last three years, AAC successfully merged with two other AIDS service organizations in Massachusetts to streamline operations. In doing so, AAC has continued to serve its clients by providing them with the support they need to get into care—and stay there.

 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 103
Number of Part Time Staff 96
Number of Volunteers 400
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 70%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 31
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 101
Hispanic/Latino: 26
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 37
Other (if specified): Not disclosed/Two or more
Gender Female: 121
Male: 77
Not Specified 1

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 2
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Thomas P. Webber
Board Chair Company Affiliation Proctor & Gamble/Gillette (retired)
Board Chair Term Sept 2011 - Aug 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms Cheryl Bartlett R.N. MA Department of Public Health Voting
Mr. Kevin Batt Anderson Kreiger LLC Voting
Mr. Kevin Bernier Gilead Sciences, Inc. Voting
Dr. David Bor M.D. Cambridge Hospital Voting
Ms. Juliet Carey Nonprofit Organization Consultant Voting
Mr. Louis K. Eaton Grand Circle Travel Voting
Ms. Celia Grant Associated Industries of Massachusetts Voting
Ms. Rebecca Haag AAC Voting
Mr. Joseph Ianelli Paratners Health Care Voting
Ms. Wendy John Fidelity Investments Voting
Mr. Peter Konrad Idearc (Retired) --
Mr. Richard Larkin People's United Bank/Ocean Bank Voting
Mr. Raul Medina Hispanic News Press, El Planeta Voting
Dr. Bisola Ojikutu MD Harvard Medical School Division of AIDS Voting
Mr. Jay Philomena Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Kevin Powers IBM Voting
Ms. Louise Rice RN Cambridge Health Alliance Voting
Mr. Thomas P. Webber Proctor & Gamble, Gilette division, retired Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

AAC staff works collaboratively with clients and the larger community to improve the lives of those impacted by HIV/AIDS. We have an active and engaged Consumer Advisory Board  that provides valuable input about services, and consumers/clients hold leadership positions as volunteers and peer advocates. AAC also has Steering Committees of program clients and members that participate in program planning and hiring. AAC is also an active and engaged member of numerous health advocacy coalitions consisting of health-, legal-, and policy-focused organizations around the state. 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year May 01, 2012 to Apr 30, 2013
Projected Income $13,299,057.00
Projected Expense $13,438,121.00
Form 990s

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

2008 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $13,374,367 $10,733,781 $8,446,010
Total Expenses $14,354,240 $11,034,494 $8,338,975

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,203,693 $0 $0
Government Contributions $6,687,184 $6,123,252 $4,310,401
    Federal -- $0 $389,509
    State -- $0 $2,263,813
    Local -- $0 $1,462,458
    Unspecified $6,687,184 $6,123,252 $194,621
Individual Contributions $2,221,861 $628,671 $787,200
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $301,312 $780,927 $718,604
Investment Income, Net of Losses $8,228 $7,748 $787,200
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events -- $1,361,350 $1,312,530
Revenue In-Kind $584,554 $606,512 $933,433
Other $2,717,113 $1,225,321 $370,328

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $8,418,264 $7,711,110 $5,511,779
Administration Expense $1,885,630 $1,615,500 $1,379,396
Fundraising Expense $4,050,346 $1,707,884 $1,447,800
Payments to Affiliates -- $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.93 0.97 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 59% 70% 66%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 40% 21% 23%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $4,275,037 $4,275,037 $3,925,439
Current Assets $3,338,548 $3,338,548 $3,085,247
Long-Term Liabilities $247,194 $270,972 $264,119
Current Liabilities $1,494,453 $904,287 $719,840
Total Net Assets $2,656,628 $3,099,778 $2,941,480

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
MA Dept of Public Health $2,263,813.00
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Boston Public Health Commission $1,050,538.00
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Boston Dept of Neighborhood Development $411,920.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.23 3.69 4.29

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 6% 6% 7%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The efficacy and efficiency of non-profit organizations are often judged on benchmarks such as the percentage of monies spent on administrative and fundraising costs. One common rule of thumb is that no more than 25 percent of an organization’s expenditures should go toward administrative and fundraising costs. Such benchmarks are meaningful only if the organizations being compared are of similar size, age, focus of activity, and location. Additionally, such benchmarks should take organizational impact into consideration.

AAC is well above the “25 percent” benchmark for administrative and fundraising costs. There is one significant reason for this. AAC has taken an innovative and entrepreneurial approach to its funding needs by expanding its low-cost,high-yield thrift shops in the Boomerangs chain. (This innovative approach to nonprofit fundraising was highlighted in a front-page Boston Business Journal article published October 28, 2011 and in a MassNonProfit.org case study published March 15, 2012.) Operating four thrift stores is labor-intensive and the expenses are significantly higher than those incurred via more traditional fundraising campaigns, such as direct mail appeals. There is simply no way that AAC can keep its administrative and fundraising costs below the 25 percent threshold while running a chain of thrift stores.

It should be noted that Boomerangs not only raises money for AAC’s work, but also raises awareness about HIV/AIDS among those who shop at Boomerangs. It should be further noted that the administrative and fundraising expenses that go toward all of AAC’s fundraising activities significantly advance AAC’s work by raising awareness of HIV/AIDS. Indeed, the annual AIDS Walk & 5K Run is the single largest HIV education and awareness event in New England. AAC reaches hundreds of thousands, if not millions, with HIV awareness messaging with this event.

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financials.  The retail store is presented in revenue as net store revenue for fiscal years 2010 and 2011.  For fiscal year 2012, revenue from special events is included in the other category.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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