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Tenants' Development Corporation, Inc. (TDC)

 566 Columbus Avenue
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 247-3988
[F] (617) 247-3979
No website
[email protected]
Arnesse Brown
INCORPORATED: 1968
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7044492

LAST UPDATED: 07/14/2014
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Tenants Development Corporation (TDC) is to preserve and maintain safe and affordable housing for low to moderate income people of diverse backgrounds.

We achieve this through:
 
1. Property Management
 
2. Construction
 
3. Rehabilitation
 
4. Delivery of Services to TDC Residents
 
5. Community Activism

Mission Statement

The mission of Tenants Development Corporation (TDC) is to preserve and maintain safe and affordable housing for low to moderate income people of diverse backgrounds.

We achieve this through:
 
1. Property Management
 
2. Construction
 
3. Rehabilitation
 
4. Delivery of Services to TDC Residents
 
5. Community Activism

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2012 to Dec 31, 2012
Projected Income $170,925,800.00
Projected Expense $72,147,600.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Food Pantry
  • Peer Leaders Program
  • Resident Services Programs
  • Senior Home Repair and Improvement Program
  • Senior Services Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Tenants Development Corporation (TDC) is to preserve and maintain safe and affordable housing for low to moderate income people of diverse backgrounds.

We achieve this through:
 
1. Property Management
 
2. Construction
 
3. Rehabilitation
 
4. Delivery of Services to TDC Residents
 
5. Community Activism

Background Statement

Tenants Development Corporation, Inc. (TDC) prides itself on being one of the oldest grassroots, community-based organizations in the country dedicated to defending the right to quality, affordable housing for people of diverse races and cultures as well as promoting tenant empowerment through active tenant participation in leadership and management of TDC.
 
TDC has been operating for over 40 years, developing affordable housing in Boston’s historic South End neighborhood. TDC was established in 1968 as a tax-exempt public chari­table corporation under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  Since that time the organization has been active in housing rehabilita­tion and management. 

TDC was conceived and organized by low income renters, principally African-American tenants, who were distressed over the sub-standard and hazardous housing conditions to which they were subjected to live in many areas of the South End.
 

In 1968, Tenants'Development Corporationbecame the first community organization in the nation to be named developer of a housing development project holding mortgage insurance through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (H.U.D.) Section 236 Program of the National Housing Act. In an agreement with the Boston Redevelopment Authority (B.R.A.) outlined in a "Memorandum of Understanding", TDC was to acquire and rehabilitate twenty (20 sub-standard dwellings. The project, South End Tenant Housing I (SETH I), would provide one hundred (100) units of decent low cost housing.

Corporate membership consists of tenants residing in TDC properties; as well as other concerned tenants living in the community.  Each year the membership elects a Board of Directors.  The Board, comprised of tenants and community leaders, is charged with establishing corporate policy and overseeing the business of housing development and  management. In turn, the Board of Directors appoints an Executive Director who with staff members, carries out the day-to-day operations of the Corporation.

Upon successfully completing the first development, TDC embarked upon the second phase. This project, South End Tenant Houses II (SETH II), consisted of thirty-six (36) brownstone rowhouses, twenty-one (21) of which are scattered along Massachusetts Avenue. TDC acquired these properties from the Boston Redevelopment Authority and received mortgage insurance through the U.S.Department of Housing and Urban Development 236 limited dividend program.

TDC and another urban group, Continental Wingate, joined with limited partners, Income Equities, Incorporation to form a partnership, TDC and Associates. The joint venture, TDC and Associates. undertook a $3.8 million project. The rehabilitation construction provided 185 low to moderate unit for the residents of Boston. TDC still serves as the managing general partner and is responsible for the day-to-day operations.

After many years of negotiations with the City of Boston and other community groups, TDC embarked on yet another phase—TDC III. This project was a com­bination of new construction and rehabilitation of 59 units on Massachusetts Avenue.  At 400 Massachusetts Avenue (The Dawson-Longley Apartments) TDC built 45 apartments in an eight-story structure with ground floor commercial space; these units vary in size from 1 to 4 bedrooms at market and subsidized rental rates. 

In addition to this construction, TDC has completed rehabilita­ting three historic townhouses--395, 397, and 588 Massachusetts Avenue--for a total of 14 more apartments. TDC is particularly proud to have restored the building at 397 Massachusetts Avenue where The Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr. lived during the early years of his doctoral studies at the Boston University's School of Theology. 

Both the city and the state provided additional financial support to ensure that TDC could rent most of the apartments to people who could not afford the full market rental rates which are now common in the South End. 

After successfully negotiating with the City of Boston and community groups, TDC rehabilitated the "Old Harry the Greek" block located on East Berkeley Street. This project--THE ROMEY MARC TYLER CONDOMINIUMS--is a mixed-income affordable housing development.


Impact Statement

TDC remains a leader in the housing field. TDC has received numerous awards of excellence and achievement for providing safe and affordable housing for its' residents.

TDC has developed into a more comprehensive property management organization.  Our primary goal is to increase the number of affordable housing available for low to moderate income individuals and families.

Our secondary goal is to expand TDC’s role in the community by increasing the number of programs, events and services offered to the TDC residents, neighbors and the community.
We believe that building a strong community that supports residents and neighbors must begin by improving the safety, living conditions, health, education, lifestyle and economic conditions of low to moderate income TDC residents and neighbors in Boston’s historic South End and Greater Boston.  
 
 

Needs Statement

Increased Funding for Program and Services Expansion
Seed  Funding for Property Aquisition
Strategic Planning
Board and Staff Development
Building Space
 

CEO Statement

TDC is a growing organization and has developed into a more comprehensive property management and development organization. TDC is and has always been committed to bringing together the assets of TDC residents, neighbors, community leaders and the organization to promote the well-being of underserved or at risk youth, adults, seniors and families by offering services and programs that inspire personal growth, empowerment and enrichment.

We believe that building a strong community that supports residents and neighbors must begin by improving the safety, living conditions, health, education, lifestyle and economic conditions of low to moderate income TDC residents and neighbors in Boston’s historic South End and Greater Boston.  

~ Donald Ward


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-South End Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
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Organization Categories

  1. Housing, Shelter - Low-Income & Subsidized Rental Housing
  2. Human Services - Neighborhood Centers
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Food Pantry

TDC owns and operates a food pantry, which is open to all Boston residents. The pantry opened its doors in 1988 and is part of the Greater Boston Food Bank. We serve 1,500 TDC residents and neighbors throughout the City of Boston. During this economic downturn, we saw a 35% increase in thenumber of individuals and families who visit the pantry on a regular basis; thefood pantry is vital and a much needed resource for the community.
 
Tenants Development Corporation’s food pantry’s mission is to provide healthy food to people in need. We provide services that assist families during difficult times in their lives. Our philosophy is to empower in ways that build community while respecting individual situations. TDC understands that everyone needs a helping hand sometimes and want to serve people in need in a dignified way.
 
Over 85% of our volunteers are youth from our Peer Leaders program, residents and board members also volunteer at the food pantry. 

Community residents should feel comfortable and welcomed to enjoy free choice of food items.   The food pantry provides supplemental food for low income TDC residents and neighbors. The pantry is stocked with dry and canned goods; as well as fresh fruits and vegetables and fresh and frozen meat.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Families Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
The ability to help a family or individual in need.
Program Long-Term Success 
We would like to continue to increase our services.
Program Success Monitored By 
Number of families and individuals served.
Examples of Program Success 
Families and individuals that received assistance from our food pantry were able to feed their families.

Peer Leaders Program

The Peer Leaders program is an after school enrichment and leadership program and it is designed to train young leaders and to inspire youth involvement in our community. The program provides various leadership development opportunities to TDC’s youth residents and youth from the South End and Lower Roxbury neighborhood and beyond. The youth are exposed to academic tutoring assistance, job skill training, art and culture and technology. It is important to empower young people to achieve social and academic excellence in their community. We are Building Future Leaders. We are Building Strong Leaders. We are Building Smart Leaders.

Budget  $0.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Other Named Groups
Program Short-Term Success   
Program Long-Term Success   
Program Success Monitored By   
Examples of Program Success   

Resident Services Programs

Through our resident services program, we offer residents a range of services, programs and events.   Our programs cover all age groups from school-aged youth to seniors, everyone is included to ensure that we are building strong relationships which = strong residents, strong families and strong communities.

We also own a community center, which TDC residents and neighbors can use for enrichment programs, community events, and family celebrations. The Center is used most heavily by youth and provides them with safe place to gather and to participate in the various enrichment programs and community events.

 

Each year, TDC directly serves approximately 1,500 TDC residents and neighbors through our programs and services activities.
 
Some of our programs include:
Community Events and Partnerships
National Night Out Celebration
Teen Summits
Mass College of Art and Design SPARC Partnership
Whittier Street Health Center Community Partnership

Youth Development
Peer Leaders Program
After-School Homework Tutoring
Computer Lab
Karate classes
Ballet classes

Adult
Finance and Consumer Education workshops
Women’s Day
Men’s Day
Tae Bo 

Senior
Dana Farber, Open Doors to Health program
Senior Trips
Retail and Grocery shopping

Budget  $0.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Families
Program Short-Term Success 
A program short-term goal is monitor the impact and keep track of residents who participate in the programs that we offer to see if what we are offering are helping our residents.
Program Long-Term Success 
Program long-term success is to continue growing and increasing the amount and types of services offered to our residents and neighbors.
Program Success Monitored By 
Repeat participation, increase in the number of residents that participate.
Examples of Program Success 
Seniors are more knowledgeable about health issues impacting them. Our youth residents are graduating from high school and continuing their education or securing full-time employment.

Senior Home Repair and Improvement Program

The Senior Home Repair and Improvement Program ensures that seniors are safe, can live independently, and remain in their homes in the neighborhoods and communities where they feel comfortable; as well as to maintain affordable housing stock for their tenants; most of whom are elderly and/or handicapped. 

 

The Senior Homeowners Services Program (SHS) whose primary goal is to offer compassionate and comprehensive services that assist seniors, ages 62+, and the disabled with:

-    Minor Repairs;
      which includes exterior, interior and security repairs. i.e. grab
      bars, stairs, and minor plumbing and electrical

-    Emergency Repairs;

-    Major Rehabilitation;

-    Handicapped Accessibility Renovations;

-    Affordable Housing Rental Unit repairs


Essential supportive services are also included in the program, this includes:

-     Financial Assistance with Heating Costs

-     Advocacy

-     Outreach and Marketing

-     Preventive Maintenance Services, that will prevent small problems 
      from escalating to larger repair project

-     Information and Referral Services

-     Utility Bills

-     Taxes (property and personal)

-     Water and Sewer Discounts

-     Food Stamps

-     Any Other Assistance Seniors May Need 
 
Many seniors live in homes that are severely deteriorated, images of homes without heating systems, roofs that are almost unrepairable, walls that that are falling apart, and finally electrical systems that are outdated and no longer up to code. 

 

Our staff is as diverse as our residents and neighbors and the program has the capacity to work with seniors who speak English; Spanish; Haitian Creole; Cape Verdean Creole; Portuguese; Mandarin and French. All staff are experienced and knowledgeable in a range of rehabilitation, modification, regulatory and management issues that impact low-income homeowners in Boston, especially seniors living on fixed incomes.

 

Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Home Repair Programs
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Elderly and/or Disabled Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
Seniors are able to get the help and resources to ensure their home is safe and livable.
Program Long-Term Success 
Seniors are able to age in their home, which will be a safe and familiar place.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
Increasing the number of seniors served and offering services that will improve their living conditions.

Senior Services Program

Tenants Development Corporation’ Senior Services Program offers programs and activities  that ensure that seniors are living active, healthy and engaging lives! We believe inclusion of the elderly population in community, cultural, and recreational activities builds a healthy spirit, mind and body for all.
 
Our goal is to expand programs, activities and to offer a more comprehensive health and wellness program to prevent chronic disease and to promote healthy aging and increase awareness of the benefits of physical activities for older adults.  The expansion of programming would include, delivering additional classes and a variety of activities: yoga, tai chi, weight training, stretching and strengthening programs, walking programs and a host of workshops that focus on healthy aging, arthritis, depression, diabetes prevention, fall prevention, memory, nutrition, osteoporosis, relaxation and stroke prevention.
 
Each year we offer different opportunities for seniors:
-     Partnership with Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Open Doors to 
       Health program
-      Mass College of Art and Design SPARC Partnership
-      Whittier Street Health Center Community Partnership
-      Food Pantry Services

-      Senior Field Trips; Grocery and Retail shopping trips

-      Enrichment classes are offered, including: health and 
       wellness classes, art and culture, computer literacy.
-      Intergenerational Activities.
-      Consumer Protection EducationWorkshops

-      Tax Preparation Services

Budget  $0.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 
Seniors will make healthier food choices and will become physically active.
Program Long-Term Success 
Increase the number of programs we offer seniors. Develop a comprehensive health and wellness program, that will include fitness component, cooking and eating healthy and health screenings. We also plan to implement a tracking system, that will include pre and post surveys to progress and benefits of the fitness component. 
Program Success Monitored By 
Surveys, # of attendees, participant feedback and implementing a small group of seniors that will act in the role of an advisory committee.
Examples of Program Success 
Class that has 80% participation rate
Seniors report they are healthier after participating
Seniors increase the number of health screenings

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Donald Ward
CEO Term Start Aug 2005
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mrs. Jeanetta Williams Senior Property Manager --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Award of Achievement MassHousing 2011
Award of Achievement MassHousing 2010
Award of Achievement MassHousing 2009
Award of Achievement MassHousing 2007
Award of Excellence MassHousing 2006
Award of Achievement MassHousing 2004
Award of Achievement MassHousing 2002
Award of Excellence MassHousing 2002
Outstanding MBE Performance Award MassHousing 1995
Certificate of Special Recognition and Outstanding Achievement Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency 1992
Celebrating 25 Years of Quality, Caring and Innovation and 25 Year Partnership Harvard Community Health Plan 1969

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Dana Farber Partnership, Open Doors to Health Program
 
Massachusetts College of Art and Design Partnership, SPARC program
 
Whittier Street Health Center Community Partnership
 
ABCD, SNAP
 
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 28
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 98%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 31
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 31

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Mary Clinkscales
Board Chair Company Affiliation Tenants Development Corporation
Board Chair Term June 2011 - June 2012
Board Co-Chair Mr. Charles Clark
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Tenants Development Corporation Resident
Board Co-Chair Term June 2011 - June 2012

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Karen Beckett Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Ms. Tameka Bowen Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Mr. Charles Clark Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Ms. Mary Clinkscales Tenants Development Corporation Voting
Ms. Elyra Creasy Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Mr. Michael Davis Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Ms. Geneva Evans Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Mr. Leroy Evans Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Ms. Deanna Jennings Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Mr. OJ Mathis Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Ms. Beverly Morse Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Ms. Sylvia Ray Tenants Development Corporation Staff and Resident Voting
Ms. Linda Roberts Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Mr. Stanley Wiggins Tenants Development Corporation Resident Voting
Ms. Jeanetta Williams Tenants Development Corporation NonVoting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Mel King Community Leader --
Mr. Byron Rushing Community Leader --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 16
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 12
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2012 to Dec 31, 2012
Projected Income $170,925,800.00
Projected Expense $72,147,600.00
Form 990s

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

2008 Form 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

2008 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $2,256,187 $1,937,921 $759,276
Total Expenses $1,326,780 $1,346,382 $597,536

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,208,725 $1,937,921 $759,276
Investment Income, Net of Losses $5,689 -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $41,773 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $1,169,758 $1,241,812 $559,839
Administration Expense $157,022 $104,570 $37,697
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.70 1.44 1.27
Program Expense/Total Expenses 88% 92% 94%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $22,535,444 $21,234,321 $19,272,970
Current Assets $8,933,980 $7,696,393 $6,804,193
Long-Term Liabilities $3,073,346 $2,700,019 $2,179,233
Current Liabilities $3,719 $426 $112,049
Total Net Assets $19,458,379 $18,533,876 $16,981,688

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2,402.25 18,066.65 60.73

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 14% 13% 11%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Previous fiscal period data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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