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Somerville Community Corporation Inc.

 337 Somerville Avenue, 2nd Floor
 Somerville, MA 02143
[P] (617) 7765931 x 242
[F] (617) 7760724
www.somervillecdc.org
[email protected]
Meridith Levy
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INCORPORATED: 1969
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7293380

LAST UPDATED: 06/28/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

SCC is a non-profit membership organization that provides leadership for sustaining the city of Somerville as a vibrant, diverse and tolerant community. We develop and preserve affordable housing. We offer services and lead community organizing efforts that support low and moderate income Somerville residents to achieve economic and housing stability and to increase civic participation.

Mission Statement

SCC is a non-profit membership organization that provides leadership for sustaining the city of Somerville as a vibrant, diverse and tolerant community. We develop and preserve affordable housing. We offer services and lead community organizing efforts that support low and moderate income Somerville residents to achieve economic and housing stability and to increase civic participation.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,742,282.00
Projected Expense $1,686,714.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Asset Building; Community Organizing and Planning

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

SCC is a non-profit membership organization that provides leadership for sustaining the city of Somerville as a vibrant, diverse and tolerant community. We develop and preserve affordable housing. We offer services and lead community organizing efforts that support low and moderate income Somerville residents to achieve economic and housing stability and to increase civic participation.

Background Statement

Founded in 1969, Somerville Community Corporation (SCC) is a membership organization with a mission to develop and preserve affordable housing, offer services and programs, and build a collective voice through community organizing and planning in order to realize a stable, diverse, and affordable community.

 

In its 45-year history, SCC has completed over 20 affordable housing projects, resulting in more than 100 ownership units and 184 rental units, and 2 mixed-use properties (47 units) in TOD areas in the pipeline. Through Link Somerville, we have engaged over 1000 residents in its 5 year history, resulting in 11 Core Principles, a regularly evolving Action Plan, and the newly released Equity Standards Tool. We have organized  tenants to preserve affordable housing; mobilized over 100 people for various rallies and events to support new affordable housing through “Everyone’s Somerville”, led and won the CPA ballot initiative in Somerville (with over 70% margin) in 2012, and are leading the movement to promote local hiring in Somerville. We have also hosted numerous interactive design workshops to engage disenfranchised residents in land use planning. This year, our organizing work helped pass an increase to the Affordable Housing Linkage Fee, as well as to support City decision to submit a Home Rule petition for a Jobs Linkage Fee to the Legislature. Our work to promote local hiring paid off this year with City’s support of the launch of a First Source Program, and MassDOT/MBTA agreement to establish a local hiring model as part of the GLX construction.  

 

In 2013, SCC served over 350 people in our Somerville for Access to Financial Education (SAFE) programs in a mix of intensive financial education classes, Individual Development Account (IDA) programs, foreclosure prevention, and First Time Homebuyer classes. We also served 83 Somerville residents with individual financial literacy coaching. In 2014, we expect to serve over 450 individuals in SAFE alone. With The Career Place, and the City of Somerville, SCC has launched a workforce program using a First Source model to connect local workers with local jobs. Our Leadership Development Institute is in its 7th year, training 20 new community leaders annually, as well as reaching 25-50 additional people each year through supplementary training sessions. We conduct our sessions in 3-4 languages simultaneously, where everyone in the room wears a headset and can speak in their first language. 


Impact Statement

Our overarching goal as Somerville’s only Community Development Corporation, is to contribute to and influence land use transformation and redevelopment in Somerville so that the end result leaves intact Somerville’s socio-economically diverse population. SCC includes the following 5 goals in its Strategic Plan:

·      Goal #1: Increase the amount and stabilize the stock of affordable  rental and homeownership housing in Somerville.

·      Goal #2: Create and support initiatives that enhance the economic well-being of low and moderate income Somerville residents.

·      Goal #3: Magnify, sharpen, and expand SCC's impact on areas of the city most prone to change, to result in more equitable outcomes.

·      Goal #4: Expand our Membership Base and invest in the development of leaders in SCC and in the community.

·      Goal #5: Broaden and strengthen SCC's operations, internal policies and financial position in order to support and facilitate SCC's achievement of its intended impact.

 

Our top 3-5 accomplishments from 2014 include: One, the completion and full tenanting Saint Polycarp Village Phase 3, adding 31 affordable apartments to Somerville; full funding commitments to develop 35 affordable apartments at 181 Washington Street; and acquisition and zoning approval to develop 11 mixed income condominiums at 163 Glen Street; Two, the launch and successful first year completion of a First Source Program connecting local workers with local jobs, serving over 200 residents with 80 placed into new jobs; three, inclusion of up to 20% Inclusionary Housing requirement in the City's proposed new zoning ordinance, as a result of SCC's advocacy work; Four, SCC's selection through the state-funded Mass. LEAP program to provide Asset Building services to public housing residents; Five, Public release of  The Dimensions of Displacement report with MAPC and the City of Somerville. 


Needs Statement

  1. Acquisition. $300,000/year in reserves plus loan pool; $160,000 per year for 2 additional project managers to build 42 new rental and ownership units per year as well as acquiring, rehabbing, and reselling 20 units per year in 2-4 family homes.
  2. First Source.  Additional $200K to expand staff capacity to meet growth demands for our First Source Program to do intake, case management, job matching, and organizing in order to reach a goal of placing 150 Somerville residents  per year in local jobs.
  3. Core programming. $600,000 to reach over 450 people annually through asset building classes and counseling, and over 300 people per year through leadership development, community planning and organizing.
  4. New Donor Development. Time from staff, board, and volunteers to raise $300K this year, largely by utilizing the $150K in  Community Investment Tax Credits allocated to SCC, increasing from the $130K raised in 2014.   
  5. Communications and Technology. $50,000 in communications resources for staff and consulting time towards branding, further developing our multi-lingual website, and expanding our reach to leaders, members, and donors. $25K for technology to help us build our interactive somerville website, create a database for First Source, and increase participation through technology.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

I am one of the lucky ones: escaping my abusive marriage had been a victory in and of itself. Now, my three year old daughter and I lived in a small, drafty, and illegal one-bedroom apartment in a dilapidated house near Porter Square in Somerville. All around me, my neighborhood, and indeed the city, was becoming more affluent. But I continued to struggle to make rent and pay for child care; I faced income ceilings that the rest of the city seemed to smash through. Still, I was lucky: my neighbors supported me. They watched my kid, periodically fed us, and took us along on excursions to beaches and museums. Together, we organized to take care of the park we all used so heavily and came together socially in weekly, park-based potlucks. At the same time, I was able to go back to school and get a better job. Not all single mothers have that opportunity or that level of support from their communities. I loved my new life and my city despite the income inequality and the financial pressure of gentrification, and I wanted to stay. Fortunately, I have been able to find stable housing in the city; I am one of the lucky ones. And I jumped at the opportunity to join the board of directors at the Somerville Community Corporation to acknowledge my luck and pay forward the myriad kindnesses that were showered on my daughter and me.

I was fortunate to have been recruited on to the very well-run the board of SCC. Our primary governance successes have been financial stabilization in the face of the 2008 financial downturn that significantly impacted our operations through reduced access to state funding for real estate development, our primary source of undesignated funds. The CEO, Finance Manager, and board leadership smartly guided the organization through this trying period. Of our challenges, one of our stated goals in our strategic plan has always been to recruit board members who represent the diversity of the city and of our target population. We want to do this for several reasons: 1) to be sure to guide the organization in a culturally-sensitive way, 2) to build leadership skills in individuals who should be recognized in our community, and 3) to directly include the voices of our membership in the leadership of our organization. Simultaneously, we seek board members with direct experience in both fund-raising and financial review and control, as both of those skill sets are critical to our ongoing stability and success. Historically, we have identified potential board recruits through the organization’s Leadership Development Institute and through other actions where individual members naturally rise to levels of leadership within an issue that shows their capabilities. Moving forward, we are hoping to establish a series of open houses to recruit new members and volunteers to the organization by introducing them to SCC’s activities and successes. Through this initial contact and a series of follow-ups by current board members, we hope to identify others with a passion for maintaining diversity and affordability within our city with both the diversity of perspective and the skill set we so desperately need.

Stephanie Toews-Moeling, President


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

City of Somerville
 
02145, 02144, 02143

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  2. Housing, Shelter -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Asset Building; Community Organizing and Planning

SCC’s work is structured into the program areas of real estate development; asset building; and community planning and organizing. Through our Organizing and Planning Department, we engage Somerville residents to become strong leaders, help shape and execute campaigns and community plans, and realize concrete results that address our larger equity agenda. We use popular education, info-graphics, interactive activities, and campaign strategy and action to involve residents in shaping land use and city policies. Campaign work focuses on our local jobs and affordable housing agenda. Committees made up of 10-15 active leaders shape and lead our campaigns. Each year we reach between 1000 and 1500 people through our organizing and community planning work. Our Asset Building Program provides case management, financial literacy and First Time Homebuyer classes, and job readiness work through our newly launched First Source Jobs program, engaging 1000 participants annually.

Budget  $600,000
Category  Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 126 units produced
  • 50 units acquired for rehab
  • 100% of Expiring Use units preserved
  • 10 units set aside for homeless
  • Inclusionary Zoning Increase to >16%
  • Affordability requirement for public properties disposition
  • CPA funding secured to meet affordable housing needs
  • Jobs Linkage Fee
  • All new large developers and employers commit to local hiring goals
  • 240 job placements through First Source
  • 120 people improve financial stability
  • 1000 prepared for homeownership
  • 20 people access higher education with IDA
  • CBA signed in Union Square
  • 75% of SCC Development in Transitioning areas
  • At least 50% of SCC commercial tenants are local
  • >1500 participate in Asset Building programs
  • LDI: 50 graduates, 25 become active leaders
  • 105 new active members in campaigns; 45 new core leaders
  • 45 tenants participate in SCC activities; >10 become active
  • $900,000 accrued for working capital fund
  • $686,000 earned donations
  • $1,300,000 funded grants
  • Communications Strategy in place
  • Diversity Strategy in place
  • Criteria standards established
Program Long-Term Success 

Goal 1: Increase the amount and stabilize the stock of affordable rental and homeownership housing in Somerville.


Goal 2: Create and support initiatives that enhance the economic well-being of low and moderate income Somerville residents.

Goal 3: Execute vision to expand SCC's impact on transitioning areas of the city to result in more equitable outcomes.

Goal 4: Expand SCC’s membership base and invest in the development of leaders in SCC and in the community.

Goal 5: Broaden and strengthen SCC's operations, internal policies and financial position in order to support and facilitate SCC's achievement of its intended impact.

Program Success Monitored By 

We ask participants of every meeting to evaluate orally and in writing the effectiveness of the meeting. We track the numbers of people who participate, the diversity of participants, and the continued level of involvement of individual participants. We are attentive to which activities and methodologies are most effective in engaging participants. How many stakeholders from target audiences have publicly endorsed our work or helped to move our agenda forward? One measure of success will be whether or not our core campaigns lead to the desired victories. Are elected officials incorporating our positions into their own platforms? Can we also impact regional and state decisions on relevant policies? We will use the Equity Standards created by Link Somerville to help guide and track decisions, policies, and practices across various stakeholder groups. We will also utilize the 4 indicators established through the “Dimensions of Displacement” report to track affordability over time.

Examples of Program Success 

  • Completion of Saint Polycarp 3, 31 affordable rental units
  • Permit for 35 affordable units at 181 Washington
  • Acquisition of property for 12-20 home ownership units
  • Led the campaign to win CPA in 2012, with over 70% margin
  • Helped pass an increase to the Affordable Housing Linkage Fee
  • Won city approval and support of First Source Jobs program, launched in March, 2014
  • Organized to get MOU from MassDOT and MBTA for Local Jobs
  • Served over 350 people in our Somerville for Access to Financial Education in last year
  • Have engaged over 500 people in workshops, actions, and events in the last year
  • Have gotten front page coverage in local papers for CBA work in Union Square


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

SCC faces the challenge of working to preserve housing affordability, as well as the economic and ethnic diversity of our population, in one of the hottest real estate markets in the country.  We are blessed with an enormous amount of both public and private investment in Somerville, with the opportunities for jobs, transit access and the like that go along with it.  However, along with that investment comes the very real market pressure driving up the costs of land, as well as the cost of renting or buying homes.  The force of a market-based economy tends to create winners and losers.  When I moved to Somerville in 1977, Somerville was a loser in that game.  Today our city is very much a winner.  However, low and moderate income residents and small business people in Somerville may very well end up as losers, while Somerville as a whole thrives.

 It is SCC’s role to aggressively develop and implement a mix of programs and projects that can give a fighting chance to low and moderate income people to remain in Somerville and reap the benefits of all the new investment coming our way.  But that work is not easy.  Whether it’s trying to acquire property to develop, but finding other developers lining up; or trying to help a tenant whose landlord just realized that he can get $500 more per month for that tenant’s apartment; or working with a recent immigrant who’s working 2 out-of-town jobs land a decent paying job in Somerville – we find ourselves constantly with opportunities, but also with tremendous competition from better –heeled individuals and businesses vying for the same desirable space that Somerville now occupies. 

We envision a Somerville of the future that offers secure housing, economic stability and opportunities for leadership and active engagement in community life to families and individuals from many different backgrounds and cultures.  We imagine a Somerville where the benefits of growth and development are shared, and where people of limited means are not threatened by the increased cost of living or the inability to find a nearby job. We foresee great opportunities in the planned subway expansion and the potential of jobs for Somerville residents as new development comes to our community.  But that growth and development are happening very quickly, and not everyone shares our vision.  Our central programmatic challenge is to mobilize all the resources we can, as quickly as we are able, so that SCC can act in the marketplace to realize our vision, before it is too late and the opportunity has been lost.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Somerville Community Corp Daniel LeBlanc
CEO Term Start Jan 2001
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Danny LeBlanc has worked as Chief Executive Officer of the Somerville Community Corporation since 2001. He has a BA in Political Science from UMass Amherst, and a MS in Public Affairs from the McCormack Institute at UMass Boston.  A lifelong Massachusetts resident, LeBlanc has lived in Somerville since 1977.  He has worked in community organizing, community development and managed several nonprofit organizations in eastern Massachusetts over the past 35 years, including Somerville United Neighborhoods, Mass. Fair Share, North Shore Community Action Programs and Merrimack Valley Project. LeBlanc has served on the Board of the Mass. Association of CDCs for the past 10 years, including 2 years as Board Chair, and also serves as Somerville representative to the Board of Advocates for the Tisch College of Public and Community Service at Tufts University.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Margaret Mainzer Nov 1998 Dec 2000
William Shelton June 1991 Nov 1998

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Alice Comack Director of Mediation Program At SCC since 1982, and has served as the only Director of Mediation Programs since 1990.
Scott Hayman Director of Real Estate Development Over 25 years experience in the fields of affordable housing advocacy and development, including nearly 10 years each as Executive Director of Central Mass. Housing Alliance and Housing Director for the City of Worcester.  Began at SCC October 2013.
Meridith Levy Deputy Director 20 years experience in the field.  Director of Community Organizing and Planning at SCC 2003-2012; Deputy Director since January 2013.
Rene Mardones Lead Organizer --
Mary Ann Sclafani Business Manager 30+ years as business manager; including at SCC since 2002.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

As a grassroots agency, SCC works closely with a base of over 1500 members, leaders and clients. We maintain strong working relationships with other organizations in the community, including: STEP, Groundwork Somerville and Friends of the Community Path for our Link Somerville program that puts forth an Equity Standards tool to connect our agendas with the City’s vision; The Welcome Project, SCALE, Homeless Coalition, and The Career Place to connect our participants of Asset Building and First Source with other allied providers in the community. We have been recently cultivating relationships with private sector developers, such as Cathartes Private Investment for mixed income development at 181 Washington Street, and Federal Realty Investment Trust for our First Source work, with the intention of establishing additional partnerships with private sector firms to have more impact on development. We also work closely with the City of Somerville. We have been working closely with the Housing Department and MAPC to produce the Dimensions of Displacement study, followed by a well attended series of 3 housing workshops. We work with other regional partners, including: ACTION for Regional Equity; MACDC; Conservation Law Foundation, and MassDOT in order to connect our local issues with a regional agenda.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

SCC has had the benefit of stability and longevity in key staff management positions:  SCC’s Chief Executive Officer, Danny LeBlanc, has served as CEO since 2001; SCC’s Deputy Director, Meridith Levy, while new to the Deputy position in 2013, has worked at SCC since 2003 as Director of Community Organizing and Planning; and SCC’s Business Manager, Mary Ann Sclafani, has been with SCC since 2002.

SCC’s Board of Directors has also benefited from both continuity and orderly turnover and transitions.  While only two current board members have served longer than 10 years, seven board members have served 5-10 years each, and the remaining eight board members have served 1-5 years each.  SCC’s Board Presidents have typically served for two years at a time, and most served previously as Vice President for two years as well.  There are currently three past presidents continuing to serve on the board of directors.

One area for planning in the next couple of years is for succession in the CEO position.  Having served as CEO for over 14 years, Danny LeBlanc turned 60 last year, and it’s reasonable for SCC to assume a transition  at some point in the next several years, so succession planning for the CEO is timely now.  

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 14
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 86%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 12
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Van Hardy
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Chair Term Feb 2017 - Jan 2019
Board Co-Chair Ezra Haber Glenn
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation community volunteer
Board Co-Chair Term Feb 2017 - Jan 2019

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Jeannette Amazeen-Thomas Community volunteer Voting
Michelle Apigian Community Volunteer --
Jacinta Arena Community Volunteer --
Cassie Arnaud Community Volunteer Voting
Fred Berman Community Volunteer Voting
Mary Jo Connelly Community Volunteer Voting
Silvana Dinke C --
Silvana Dinks Community Volunteer --
Ezra Haber Glenn Community Volunteer Voting
Laurie Goldman Community Volunteer --
Beatriz Gomez C --
Michelle Green Dorchester Bay EDC --
Van Hardy Community Volunteer Voting
Danielle Kinkel Community Volunteer --
Dana LeWinter Community Volunteer --
Kathy McGilvray Mass. Housing Investment Corporation Voting
Adam Rich Community Volunteer Voting
Natacha Theodore Community Volunteer --
Stephanie Toews-Moeling Community Volunteer Voting
Mulugeta Zegeye Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1 Albanian
Gender Female: 15
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 62%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 66%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Membership
  • Real Estate

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

SCC's Board of Directors is elected by its membership from the community. While SCC's board members have a range of professional affiliations and expertise, members are elected based on their involvement in SCC and in the community at large more so than for their professional affiliations.  While not in our bylaws, as a matter of practice, SCC seeks a diverse board of directors that is representative of the Somerville population that is both the target beneficiary of our work and who make up SCC's membership.

As a result of our method of forming our Board, and for identifying and electing Board members, SCC benefits from having a Board made up of members who are very active in the organization in a range of ways, and who carry a unique passion for the works SCC does.  However, there are two challenges we face and seek to make progress on:  (1) Somerville’s diversity is such that it is a consistent challenge to maintain a Board membership that truly reflects that diversity; for example, there is not one single ethnic minority group to be represented but, rather, three ethnicities/language groups of roughly equal size, as well as others, albeit in an overall majority white, native English-speaking community; and (2) our Board member mix does not result in a Board with strong financial capacity and connections that can be utilized to raise donor funds.  

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $2,451,808 $2,432,347 $1,944,987
Total Expenses $2,682,769 $2,349,812 $2,299,146

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $671,210 $468,761 $365,538
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $671,210 $468,761 $365,538
Individual Contributions $677,100 $409,385 $327,105
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $1,096,006 $1,445,545 $1,154,031
Investment Income, Net of Losses $319 $132 $76,897
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $7,173 $108,524 $21,416

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $2,389,992 $2,093,293 $2,020,890
Administration Expense $179,737 $187,215 $203,128
Fundraising Expense $113,040 $69,304 $75,128
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.91 1.04 0.85
Program Expense/Total Expenses 89% 89% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 8% 8% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $9,367,048 $11,440,460 $9,405,559
Current Assets $688,121 $638,045 $919,077
Long-Term Liabilities $7,462,571 $9,310,014 $7,800,199
Current Liabilities $671,099 $666,107 $223,556
Total Net Assets $1,233,378 $1,464,339 $1,381,804

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 0.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.03 0.96 4.11

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 80% 81% 83%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As part of SCC’s strategic plan, we have an aggressive financial strategy to allocate $300,000 per year in earned developers fees into a reserve fund, until a total reserve of $1.5 Million is realized.  SCC needs that reserve fund principally to give us the flexibility to act quickly in acquiring property and conducting feasibility and predevelopment work for real estate projects without waiting until we have funds in place from an intermediary organization in order to act – the real estate market in Somerville is so active that SCC will simply miss most opportunities if we are unable to act quickly with our own funds.  The goal is to utilize our reserve fund in a revolving manner, in most cases replacing the reserve funds with monies dedicated to the specific real estate project.

Additional financial challenges for SCC involve the importance of our work in Community Organizing and Planning, and in our Financial Asset Building work with low and moderate income households.  This work is critical to meeting SCC’s mission and intended impact, but is typically challenging to fund, stretching grant and donor dollars as far as we can.  We typically have little financial capacity to seed new, important efforts, even when we are convinced of both the merit and the long-term financial viability of such initiatives.  One current example is our First Source jobs matching program, which is an extraordinarily timely opportunity, but for which we are moving ahead with too few resources at the moment.  A more robust SCC reserve fund would enable the SCC Board to invest money in seeding our own programmatic initiatives under the right set of circumstances, such as with First Source.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
 
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

SCC has determined that preserving and enhancing the remaining economic, racial, and ethnic diversity of our population is the overarching intended impact that drives our work today. Our overarching goal is to make sure the City transformation that takes place in years ahead incorporates an equity agenda so that people of all backgrounds, particularly immigrants and low income residents, can live in Somerville and benefit from the changes. SCC strives to build community power and organizational resources so that low- and moderate-income people and new immigrants continue to have the opportunity to reside in, be full participants and become leaders in the Somerville community. Somerville has always been an immigrant city, and the trends in recent decades have brought waves of immigrants of color from all over the world to Somerville, richly diversifying our community, with 31% of its population non-white, compared to 25% regionally.

We envision a Somerville of the future that offers secure housing, economic stability and opportunities for leadership and active engagement in community life to families and individuals from many different backgrounds and cultures. We imagine a Somerville where the benefits of growth and development are shared, and where people of limited means are not threatened by the increased cost of living or the inability to find a nearby job. We foresee great opportunities in the planned subway expansion and the potential of jobs for Somerville residents as new development comes to our community. We seek to embrace community change in a way that directly brings the benefits of change to those who may be at risk of losing their homes or their jobs in Somerville, given their economic circumstances, their education, or their lack of familiarity with the local economy. We aim to engage Somerville residents, particularly those of limited means and those who have recently come from other countries and cultures, in the process of planning for and being involved in a future Somerville in which quality of life is improved and equitable access to secure housing and economic opportunities are increased.

SCC’s 2014-2017 Strategic Plan includes the following goals:

Goal 1: Increase the amount and stabilize the stock of affordable rental and homeownership housing in Somerville; Goal 2: Create and support initiatives that enhance the economic well-being of low and moderate income Somerville residents; Goal 3: Expand our Membership Base and invest in the development of leaders in SCC and in the community; Goal 4: Execute vision to expand SCC's impact on areas of the city most prone to change, to result in more equitable outcomes; Goal 5: Broaden and strengthen SCC's operations, internal policies and financial position in order to support and facilitate SCC's achievement of its intended impact.

SCC aims to influence City Somerville to increase and strengthen its Inclusionary Zoning requirements to at least 15% City wide with higher requirements in TOD and high change areas, and explicit requirements for family sized housing. we will develop 90 units for rental housing, 36 units for mixed income ownership, and 50 small property units rehabbed and resold for affordable housing. We will organize to create a master Community Benefits Agreement in Union Square that includes provision for access to local jobs for a local workforce, affordable housing and protection for small businesses; influence legislative and local passage of a Jobs Linkage Fee of $1.40 per square foot; and work with community partners to reach 150 local workers per year to connect them with incoming jobs, including GLX jobs, through our newly launched First Source program, with at least 180 job placements. In realizing these goals, each year we will work with 35 core leaders, engage 75 active leaders, and involve over 500 additional members to participate in aspects of our organizing and land use planning agenda.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Strategies from 3 YR Strategic Plan:

  • Establish an aggressive strategy for SCC’s affordable housing production, and a clear pipeline of future affordable housing projects and mixed-use development, including large and small property acquisition, and work with private sector partners to expand our reach, with particular attention to TOD and areas most prone to change.
  • Prevent the loss of housing and strengthen existing housing that is affordable to low- and moderate-income Somerville individuals and families, both dedicated and informal
  • Increase resources for affordable housing development and preservation, and SCC’s other work.
  • Promote increased housing subsidies and resources for Extremely and Very Low-Income Somerville residents.
  • Make sure a significant percentage of new jobs in Somerville go to Somerville workers, particularly low-income people, new immigrants, and others with limited access to employment, with emphasis on good, living wage jobs with career growth opportunities.
  • Support Somerville residents who are at financial risk of displacement in increasing their financial stability.
  • Create effective avenues for active participation in all areas of our work to build a growing membership base, emphasizing low- and moderate-income residents, new immigrants, and others who are at highest risk of displacement.
  • Broaden the meaningful participation and decision making of members, clients, and tenants of SCC in other areas of the organization
  • Facilitate the active engagement and influence of community members through organizing and land use planning around specific sites in target areas.
  • Expand SCC's portfolio of tools and strategies to develop and leverage affordable housing and jobs in TOD walk-sheds and portions of the city undergoing change or slated for significant development.
  • Pursue opportunities to support or create commercial and economic development in areas prone to change.
  • Expand SCC’s public profile and visibility through effective communication.
  • Establish and implement protocols and practices to strengthen SCC’s role as a diverse, democratic, member-led, and culturally astute organization
  • Design and carry out a financial plan for both revenues and expenses that allows SCC to carry out these goals and objectives, and become a sustainable organization.
  • Update and review organizational operations, policies and procedures, including mechanism to review SCC’s progress towards meeting goals in Strategic Plan.

Leadership development is a driving force of our work, and is critical to our success as an organization attempting to prevent people from getting displaced from Somerville. We strive to be creative in our approach, and to implement a variety of strategies to inspire people to engage with our work. Our first step is to cross barriers and reach people who usually do not get involved. We do this through door knocking and personal one to one visits, making effort to match visits (staff, interns, and leaders) by language. We emphasize the importance of building relationships between members, and encourage people to share their personal stories. Our goal is to work with the people from our target population, i.e. those who are often most disenfranchised, to become leaders who shape and guide our equity agenda. This works particularly well with people who become active on our issues committees and campaigns (jobs, housing, Link Somerville, and land use planning). Leaders develop and practice new skills, such as making public testimony, turning out people to events, engaging in power analyses, analyzing relevant data, contacting public officials, and creating actions to move an agenda forward. As leaders become stronger, we count on them to take on organizational roles of leadership. 

SCC extends this participatory and relational model to a wide range of stakeholder groups. As an actively collaborative organization ourselves, SCC extends its impact by working closely with a wide range of local and regional partners.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

SCC’s greatest asset is its people: with a diverse and experienced staff, a dedicated and active Board of Directors, and a vibrant, active body of members and leaders. At its helm, SCC’s CEO, Danny LeBlanc brought 3 decades of experience in organizing, development and nonprofit management to become SCC's Chief Executive Officer in 2001. He has implemented and managed SCC's significant growth over the past 12 years. He serves on, and is a past Board Chair of MACDC, and he also serves on the Somerville Affordable Housing Trust Fund, the Board of Advocates of Tisch College at Tufts University, the LISC Local Advisory Board, and the Mass. Community and Bankers Council. Deputy Director, Meridith Levy joined SCC in 2003 as Organizing and Community Planning Director after several years leading organizing campaigns and community planning initiatives in Minnesota and Fitchburg, MA. She has an MS/MA from Tufts University UEP and AFE programs, and is dedicated to employing participatory and popular education methodologies as a means to inspire community action, which is an important component of SCC’s work and methodology. Scott Hayman, Director of Real Estate, has over 3 decades of experience in housing, including administering the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program in ten cities throughout the Commonwealth for the Massachusetts Housing Investment Corporation (MHIC), serving the Director of Housing for the City of Worcester’s Executive Office of Planning and Community Development where he advanced resident-driven planning and community development initiatives such as the 30-acre, neighborhood revitalization plan. His focus on neighborhood change and acquisition strategies helps shape SCC’s approach to preventing displacement. Thais DeMarco, Director of Asset Building, joined SCC in 2006, and has led the creation and development of the agency’s asset building programs, which now include Financial Education, First-Time Homebuyer Education, Career Development and Employment Services, Individual Development Accounts, and Foreclosure Prevention. Rene Mardones, Lead Organizer, brings over a decade of organizing experience, most recently at Alternatives for Community and Environment (ACE).

The SCC Board of Directors is a diverse group of 19 residents elected by the SCC Membership, all of whom are active in SCC’s work. Through our multiple channels for active membership participation, SCC has been able to sustain a strong group that comes to board membership following significant prior involvement in SCC.
As a grassroots agency, SCC works closely with a base of over 1500 members, leaders and clients. SCC is dedicated to inclusivity, often providing translation services in 3 languages. SCC has a reputation of being one of the only organizations in Somerville able to connect such a broad spectrum of residents in every facet of its work. SCC maintains strong working relationships with Somerville organizations including: STEP, Groundwork Somerville and Friends of the Community Path for our Link Somerville program that puts forth an Equity Standards tool to connect our agendas with the City’s vision; The Welcome Project, SCALE, Homeless Coalition, and The Career Place to connect our participants of Asset Building and First Source with other allied providers in the community. We have cultivated relationships with private sector developers, such as Cathartes Private Investment for mixed income development at 181 Washington Street, and Federal Realty Investment Trust for our First Source work, with the intention of establishing additional partnerships with private sector firms to have more impact on development. We also work closely with the City of Somerville and other regional partners, including: ACTION for Regional Equity; MACDC; Conservation Law Foundation, and MassDOT in order to connect our local issues with a regional agenda.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

While the success of our work will only be fully measurable in years ahead, we will continually track and evaluate the work every step of the way. We ask participants of every meeting to evaluate orally and in writing the effectiveness of the meeting, which gives us concrete ideas for improving our process. We track the numbers of people who participate, the diversity of participants, and the continued level of involvement of individual participants. How many participants go on to be core leaders, or move into other organizational leadership roles? As we continue to explore different means of engaging people and building leadership, we are attentive to which activities and methodologies are most effective. How many new stakeholders from new target audiences have publicly endorsed our work or helped to move our agenda forward?

One measure of success will be whether or not our core campaigns lead to the desired victories, such as winning Community Benefits Agreements, or setting local hiring goals with the Mayor, or increasing Inculsionary Zoning to 15%. Are we building enough momentum to persuade our public officials to support our proposals despite oppositional pressure? Are elected officials incorporating our positions into their own platforms? Can we also impact regional and state decisions on relevant policies?

SCC has 3 newly launched systems to help track progress towards our goals. First, SCC’s Link Somerville committee created an Equity Standards tool that puts forward a set of equity goals that are connected to the City’s SomerVision to help guide and track decisions, policies, and practices across various stakeholder groups. This tool was developed in partnership with a number of organizations to cover the principles established through our Community Corridor Planning Initiative: affordable housing, local businesses, good jobs, environmental justice, access to transportation, and diversity. Second, the Dimensions of Displacement report, developed and produced by SCC, MAPC and the City of Somerville, asserts 4 indicators and accompanying data points to measure and track change over time in the context of affordable housing and displacement. Finally, we have a newly created 3 Year Strategic Plan that establishes goals and metrics for our work in light of our intended impact of minimizing displacement, with emphasis on areas prone to change. This will both guide our work, and help us measure our effectiveness in reaching goals. Through ongoing dialogue between active members, board of directors, and staff we will evaluate our progress and tweak our approach to arriving at desired goals.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Over the last year we (a) completed and are in the process of tenanting the 31-unit third and final phase of St. Polycarp Village; (b) received final permit approval to redevelop 181 Washington Street into a new mixed use, transit-oriented development two blocks from the first new stop on the Green Line Extension, with 35 affordable units plus ground floor commercial; and (c) acquired a new property in East Somerville which we will develop into 20 mixed income ownership housing. We continue to lead Link Somerville (formerly CCP), which has engaged over 1000 residents in its 5 year history, resulting in 11 Core Principles, a regularly evolving Action Plan, and the newly released Equity Standards Tool. We have organized tenants to preserve affordable housing; mobilized over 100 people for various rallies and events to support new affordable housing through “Everyone’s Somerville”, led and won the CPA ballot initiative in Somerville (with over 70% margin) in 2012, and are leading the movement to promote local hiring in Somerville. Our work to promote local hiring paid off this year with City’s support of the launch of a First Source Program, and MassDOT/MBTA agreement to establish a local hiring model as part of the GLX construction. We have also hosted numerous interactive design workshops to engage disenfranchised residents in land use planning. This year, our organizing work helped pass an increase to the Affordable Housing Linkage Fee, as well as to support City decision to submit a Home Rule petition for a Jobs Linkage Fee to the Legislature. We also released the “Dimensions of Displacement” Study with MAPC and the City of Somerville.

In 2013, SCC served over 350 people in our Somerville for Access to Financial Education programs in a mix of intensive financial education classes, Individual Development Account (IDA) programs, foreclosure prevention, and First Time Homebuyer classes. In 2014, we expect to serve over 450 individuals in SAFE alone. With The Career Place, and the City of Somerville, SCC has launched a workforce program using a First Source model to connect local workers with local jobs. Our Leadership Development Institute is in its 7th year, training 20 new community leaders annually, as well as reaching 25-50 additional people each year through supplementary training sessions. Each year we have at least 8 nationalities represented in our cohort, and conduct our sessions in 3-4 languages simultaneously, where everyone in the room wears a headset and can speak in their first language.

While SCC can look over its shoulder to mark its progress, there is a long road ahead. As discussed in the “Dimensions of Displacement” report, to mitigate projected market growth changes along the GLX corridor will require up to 35% of new housing stock dedicated as affordable to low income residents. This will require a significant increase in affordable housing through acquisition and development, dedicating city resources, and creating policies and agreements that result in affordable housing. Similarly with SCC’s jobs agenda, the City’s SomerVision projects the creation of 30,000 new jobs in Somerville by year 2030. SCC is committed to making sure local workers have prioritized access to these jobs, but must work hard in these years to connect residents with appropriate training programs, earn the commitment from employers to hire locally, and help make sure the new jobs come with decent pay, benefits, and opportunities for career growth. Meanwhile, the pace of new development and concomitant market speculation presents the challenge of timing to SCC and its leaders and partners: will we be able to influence policy and development agreements in time to realize the kind of impact necessary to prevent displacement? SCC must overcome an organizational challenge of scale to keep up with the required workload to implement the vision and recommendations that have already been established.