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IBA - Inquilinos Boricuas en Acciόn Inc.

 405 Shawmut Avenue
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 535-1753
[F] (617) 536-5816
www.ibaboston.org
[email protected]
Alejandro Sutphen
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 2016
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7090081

LAST UPDATED: 09/11/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) engages and empowers individuals and families to improve their lives through high-quality affordable housing, education, and arts programs.

 

Mission Statement

Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) engages and empowers individuals and families to improve their lives through high-quality affordable housing, education, and arts programs.

 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $5,039,831.00
Projected Expense $5,039,831.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • IBA’s Preschool
  • IBA’s Resident Services Program
  • IBA’s Villa Victoria Center for the Arts
  • IBA’s Youth Programs
  • IBA's College and Financial Empowerment Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) engages and empowers individuals and families to improve their lives through high-quality affordable housing, education, and arts programs.

 

Background Statement

History

 

Established in 1968, Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) is a non-profit organization whose original mission focused on addressing displacement of low-income Latino families due to urban development in the South End neighborhood of Boston. Over the past half century, IBA has grown into a dynamic Community Development Corporation that cultivates and preserves culturally diverse affordable housing communities whose low-income residents have opportunities to reach their full potential through strong programmatic offerings.

Apart from developing and owning the Villa Victoria community in the South End, and securing 521 units of affordable housing, IBA administers six community empowerment programs: IBA’s Preschool, Afterschool & Summer Learning, Youth Development, College & Financial Empowerment, Resident Services, and the Arts Program. Annually, IBA serves approximately 825 low-income people through the educational programs and over 6,000 through the Arts Program. Our organization serves as a national model for the integration of affordable housing with community programming.
 

Program Description

 

IBA's Preschool Program provides a high quality bilingual early education that fosters the physical, socioemotional, linguistic, cognitive, and cultural development of children.

 

IBA's After School & Summer Learning Program provides a safe and enriching out-of-school program for ELLs that uses research-driven practices to increase English proficiency, boost social emotional development, improve attitudes toward reading, and reverse summer learning loss. With a strong focus on Common Core, ELA, and WIDA Standards, our arts-integrated program has proven to help students enhance their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Through our project-based curriculum, grounded in real-world applications, students acquire important social, emotional, and critical thinking skills through individual work, group work, and a supportive classroom with quality instructors.

 

IBA's Youth Development Program prepares teens, ages 13-19, for college and professional careers through an employment-based program that places them in rigorous courses centered around arts and civic engagement. Supported by our well-trained and culturally responsive staff, participants serve as peer leaders and decision makers who plan, develop, and participate in project based learning programming in areas that include: Academic Support, College and Job Readiness, Arts Education, Leadership, and Civic Engagement. Fostering positive long-term relationships, YDP participants think critically, grow socially and emotionally, excel in school, and improve their community. Also, the YDP administers IBA's One Hood Peace Basketball League in partnership with the Blackstone Community Center and the D4 Division of the Boston Police.

 

IBA's College and Workforce Development Program is an innovative education and workforce development partnership with Bunker Hill Community College. Serving as a mini-satellite campus of Bunker Hill, IBA offers a unique model of a college campus in the heart of an affordable housing community. The program offers: HiSET Prep (High School Equivalency), college classes, job readiness training, child care, and supportive case management.

 

IBA's Arts Program promotes and celebrates Latino Arts and create dynamic cross-cultural collaborations through concerts, gallery exhibitions, festivals, and special events.

 

IBA's Resident Service Program works to empower residents of the Villa Victoria affordable housing community, especially the community's senior population, to live more active and fulfilling lives.

 

Affordable Housing: IBA provides 521 units of high-quality affordable housing. In addition to Villa Victoria, IBA has successfully rehabilitated and preserved 44 units of rental housing for low-income seniors at the Robert Fortes House in Lower Roxbury and developed 30 units of affordable elderly housing in Mattapan. We have recently secured over 100 units of rental housing which neighbors our current properties in Villa Victoria.
 

Impact Statement

IBA’s recent honors and awards include: the 2016 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award, presented by former first-lady Michelle Obama, the 2016 Big Brother Big Sister Youth Serving Community Partner Award; 2016 MNN Finalist in Communication Category; Maven the 2015 Ad Club’s Marven Awards; and the 2011 Massachusetts Cultural Council’s Commonwealth Award. 


Needs Statement

IBA primarily serves Villa Victoria, a predominately Latino affordable housing community in Boston’s South End. While ambitious about improving their situation, residents often lack the skills and ability to create meaningful changes in their lives. This affects entire families, from children and youth that lack access to quality education, young adults who face impeding barriers, to elders who struggle to maneuver through the complicated process of securing/increasing income (accessing government benefits or entitlements). With 71% of residents (tenants) at extremely low income, IBA’s six community empowerment programs foster the community’s ability to reach their full potential by fostering social mobility, offering access to empowerment resources and quality education, and securing pathways to economic sustainability.

CEO Statement

IBA – Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción is a non-profit organization and a dynamic community development corporation that was founded in 1968 in Boston’s South End to halt the displacement of low-income Puerto Rican families due to urban renewal. For nearly 50 years IBA has been providing affordable housing buttressed by holistic education, workforce development, and arts programs.

 

IBA has produced more than 1,000 units of housing and owns a rental housing portfolio of 521 affordable units.

 

From the development of one of the first "new urbanist communities" in America to being one of the first low-income housing developments to wire its apartments for high-speed internet access to our ability to establish a college campus directly in the heart of Villa Victoria; IBA has been studied by: academics from Princeton University, MIT's Center for Reflexive Community Practice, visitors from foreign countries (Venezuela, Ireland, and France, among others); National Foundations (Ford Foundation's Arts and Community Development Initiative) and community development practitioners locally and nationally (National Association for Latino Community Asset Builders). They come to learn from IBA about what makes the community of Villa Victoria so unique and innovative and what are some of our best practices for the field ranging from community organizing to the intentional integration of arts into community building strategies to the development of partnerships (universities, museums and local community-based organizations) to build organizational capacity and have a greater impact on the communities we serve. On the local level, we have intentionally worked to mentor and support other community-anchored organizations.

Board Chair Statement

I have been a member of the IBA Board for two years, and have served as its President this year. Previously, I had been a member of ETC Development Corporation, IBA’s real estate subsidiary for several years. I am passionate about the history and mission of this organization, and how it is anchored in a beautiful and vibrant affordable housing community. Our Board includes a committed group of individuals that share this passion for community building work in the areas of affordable housing, education, workforce development, and arts programming.

 

The IBA Board is comprised on its majority by residents of Villa Victoria—an affordable housing community in Boston’s South End. The rest of the members are non-residents with expertise in several areas that include, among others, real estate, asset management, education, law, public relations, fundraising, and finance.

 

In 2010, the Board approved and adopted a five-year strategic plan, which among other things called for a consolidation between IBA and our real estate affiliate ETC Development Corporation. We accomplished this goal in 2013, and have ensured that our Board of Directors remains true to our founding principle and continues to be resident-controlled. IBA's Board of Directors is comprised of 17 individuals: nine community residents and eight non-residents. We identify and train residents to run for the Board. These residents are then elected by their peers, who are members of the corporation.

 

Similarly, we reached out to our networks to identify non-resident members with expertise in the areas mentioned above. We conduct training sessions to bring Board members up to speed with the scope of our work and to prepare for the work ahead.

Although we feel that we have a dynamic Board and have been successful in bringing talented individuals to our Board, I believe that the biggest challenge that our Board face at the moment is the need for more training and development in the areas of real estate, asset management, and governance (i.e., Board’s roles and responsibilities). We recognize that we must increase the capacity of our Board in those areas and are committed to seek out and dedicate resources to address the same.

 

Hector Cruz

President of the IBA Board


Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-South End Neighborhood

Our target population is Villa Victoria, a predominately Latino affordable housing community in Boston’s South End. Villa Victoria is an organized, proud and active community with strong Latina leadership amongst its residents. In 2004, the organization expanded to Lower Roxbury as a strategy to increase opportunities for at-risk and high-risk youth. IBA serve more than 6,000 Greater Boston residents through events hosted by the Villa Victoria Center for the Arts and IBA's Arts Progam. 

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development
  2. Education -
  3. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Cultural & Ethnic Awareness

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

IBA’s Preschool

IBA’s Preschool is a quality multicultural and bilingual preschool that Social Impact Research named one of Massachusetts’ top 21 school readiness programs in 2010. Preparing 68 children for preschool, our preschool is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and is licensed by the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (EEC). Our preschool provides an education that fosters the physical, social, emotional, linguistic, cultural, and cognitive development of children in a challenging but self-affirming environment. IBA’s curriculum directly empowers parents to be partners in the educational process.       
Budget  $880,488.00
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Hispanic, Latino Heritage Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
  1.  Enrolled children will be on track for Kindergarten.
  2.  25 children “graduating” our early childhood education program will be assessed as ready for Kindergarten.
  3. Children and youth have stable, nurturing relationships with caregivers, teachers, and other supportive adults that promote positive outcomes.
  4. Parents have the information and skills necessary to learn and succeed in school and graduate. 
  5. Children and youth have the experiences that promote school readiness and/or support academic achievement.
Program Long-Term Success 
 1. IBA's Preschool will move up to level 4 on Massachusetts Quality Rating Improvement System. We are currently assessed at Level 3.

 2.  Supporting the Boston Opportunity Agenda, by 2015, 75 percent of our preschool graduates will enter Boston Public Schools with age-appropriate literacy skills. 

 Our long-term goal is to offer a bilingual and multicultural education that fosters the physical, social, emotional, linguistic, cultural, and cognitive development of children in a challenging but self-affirming environment that is fun for young children, while empowering parents to participate in the educational process.

Program Success Monitored By 

We begin screenings at home with parents performing the Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ-3). This helps teacher to better understand the needs of their classroom. We assess children earlier, more frequently, and more accurately to ensure that our children overcome learning obstacles that may arise.

We encourage parent involvement and create a joint plan with them. We create portfolio for parents which include samples of children's work and photos documenting learning. If a child is facing learning or developmental challenges we work with parents to find the best supports and services. We use assessments to communicate with external services provides to help meet these needs.
 
In order to promote school readiness and/or academic support achievement, we use the best practice Teaching Strategies Gold Curriculum, which offers an effective means for longitudinal assessment in multiple areas of child development and learning.  
Examples of Program Success 

From a letter 2/8/12: "It’s been 5 months since my son began at [the preschool] and to it’s the best thing I ever did for him. The teachers are awesome! They are sensitive to every child’s needs. They are passionate for teaching. They take their time to let me know how my son’s day went and advise me on my child’s development. Isaiah had just finished Early Intervention Speech Therapy through Bay Cove due to mild speech-delay. He would mostly use body language instead of speech. Since [enrolling], my son is now able to say complete sentences. He is able to express his feelings and needs. In so little time, he has been able to develop learning skills, such as the ABC’s, count numbers past 10 and identify colors and shapes. Isaiah’s social skills have improved a lot as well as his motor skills. In general, he has become more independent and has learned a lot.  I would definitely recommend any parent with a new preschooler to [IBA' Preschool].  It just feels like home for my little one!" 


IBA’s Resident Services Program

IBA’s Resident Services Program empowers over 250 residents of the Villa Victoria affordable housing community to live healthier, more active, independent and fulfilling lives. IBA's innovative, caring, linguistically-appropriate and culturally targeted approach helps residents garner income maximization benefits, while offering holistic programming in the areas of health, arts, recreation and social services. A unique program characteristic is our integration of elders into the social fabric of the entire community and empowering them to shape the programming that they participate in.

 

Budget  $480,354.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Personal Social Services
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
  1.  RSP will advocate on behalf of 113 seniors to maintain or gain benefits/ and or entitlements and ensure household stabilization.
  2. We will help over 70 seniors stabilize homes and/or maintain benefits through our case management to the elders.
  3. We will provide social recreation through a variety of events including out weekly Bingo Nights, Coffee Hours and our special events.
  4. Provide health screenings to: assist in preventative care, support disease management and gain understanding of which elders need more acute care so that referrals can be made to appropriate medical personnel.
  5. Provide fitness/exercise classes to boost elders’ physical and mental health and help them lead more vibrant and fulfilling lives.
 
Program Long-Term Success 

 

  1. Conduct outreach to connect residents to programming (workshops, screening and programs) that improves physical and mental health of older low-income residents
  2. Ensure that we meet the basic needs (health, housing, heat, food, language, etc.) of older residents of Villa Victoria through advocacy and case management;
  3. Keep residents active and connected to community by providing recreational, social and artistic programming; and
  4. Boost the health and wellness of elders by offering fitness/exercise classes, workshops and health screenings.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

Our program will use and implement a range of self-developed evaluation tools to gather data and measure results and/or progress. These include: IBA’s Salesforce-linked Intake/Application Form which allows us to gather basic information about our participants. In addition to our stored data on Salesforce, we also do attendance logs to get a sense of how many and who are coming to our events; Social Service Log which provides data about our case management and assistance services we have provided; finally we also have case notes which are used for anecdotal record form. In the future we would also like to provide informal interviews about our services and conduct surveys of our participants.

Examples of Program Success 

A 65-year-old resident of Villa Victoria, raising his three children, was facing a custody battle, a denial letter for food stamps, and a potential eviction due to unpaid rent. We helped him file an appeal for food stamps, which he received immediately, and apply for Welfare benefits. He had rent debts of over $500 and housekeeping issues that lead to a hearing. We helped him apply for rental assistances and set a meeting with the management company to talk about his housekeeping issues. He eventually had a meeting with the Management Company. He reminded them that he lived in a two-bedroom apartment with a family of four. He let them know that the bedrooms were too small and he had two teenagers sleeping in the living room. Management worked with him to get another apartment. HomeStart helped him to pay off his rent debts. With legal representation from Greater Boston Legal Services, he secured the custody of his grandchildren. His current financial situation is much better now.

 


IBA’s Villa Victoria Center for the Arts

Reaching over 10,000 people yearly, IBA’s Villa Victoria Center for the Arts, is a community arts center which promotes, preserves, and celebrates Latino arts and artists and to create dynamic cross cultural collaborations. The largest Latino Cultural Center in New England presents the broad diversity of Latino and Latin American cultural expressions in a variety of disciplines (music, dance, visual arts), while using arts and culture as tools for self-transformation and community building. We offer rich programming that includes: New England's longest running Latino performance series: The first New England gallery focused on art created by Latinos and those commenting on the Latin American Diaspora; Festival Betances, a three day celebration of Latin American music, dance, and culture; Special Events, including the Tito Puente Latin Music Series, Hispanic Heritage Month, African American History, Chinese New Year and Three Kings’ Day Celebrations.

 

Budget  $276,704.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Hispanic, Latino Heritage Families At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
  1. Create a space for celebration and preservation of Latino arts and culture, linking traditional and contemporary forms of expression.
    1. Host 100% of our planned activity for 2015.
    2. Host artists from all different genres, backgrounds, and interests
  2. Increase participation to community members across all of the South End and Boston
    1. Exceed 4,000 participants at IBA’s Art’s Programs for 2015.
    2. Collect at least one form of data (name, demographics, email, phone, zip code, or satisfaction) for at least 70% of people attending the 2015 events.
  3. Improve the quality of exhibits, performances, through rental revenue of the Villa Victoria Arts Center
    1. Rent the Facility out to community members and organizations
Program Long-Term Success 
  1. Solidify, strengthen and amplify our position as New England’s premier space for Latino arts;
  2. Grow and diversify our audience in terms of both program participants and event attendees;
  3. Create a sustainability plan helping IBA capitalize on our spaces, programs and impact;
  4. Increase access to the arts, both in terms of audience and participating artists, creating a vibrant artistic place;
  5. Increase arts education through events and programs (both existing and future pilots);
Program Success Monitored By  We measure success by the artistic and social quality of our presentations; the diversity of the works (eg., genre, style, countries represented); the artistic and educational quality of the matinees and the number of underserved Latino and African-American children reached; and the ability to provide programs to the residents of Villa Victoria. Each program is reviewed and critiqued by the staff to determine what worked and what needs to be improved upon. We conduct audience evaluations to assess participants' experiences and program’s impact. Community members and partners also are asked to gauge which programs they enjoyed and which they would like to see in the future. Additionally, as a recipient of Mass Cultural Council and New England Foundation for the Arts’ funds, we provide written evaluations. As part of our Strategic Plan 2015, we are refining our assessment systems and considering Urban Institute's Arts and Culture Indicators in Communities Project’s to measure our impact.
Examples of Program Success 

 Awarded four consecutive National Endowment for the Arts grants (2008-2011),Villa Victoria Center for the Arts has garnered numerous awards which include: the 2011 Commonwealth Award, Massachusetts’ top cultural honor; 2010 Berklee College of Music’s Urban Service Award, 2009 MetLife Award for Arts Access in Underserved Communities; the 2008Citizens Bank Champion in Action Award for the Arts; and the 2007 Boston Center for the Arts’ Champion Award. In 2005, we were 1 of 20 groups selected as National Finalists for Ford Foundation's Arts in a Changing America. We have extensive experience using the arts to explore complex questions of Latino cultural identity in shifting local, national and international contexts. Since 1988, our Latino Performance Series includes: performances, residencies, workshops, symposiums and matinees by socially significant and critically acclaimed artists, from 7-time Grammy Award winner Paquito de Rivera to Peru’s leading theater company Teatro Yuyachkani.

 


IBA’s Youth Programs

1. IBA’s After School and Summer Learning Program provides a safe and enriching out-of-school time program for ELLs that uses research-driven practices to increase English proficiency, boost social emotional development, improve attitudes towards reading, and reverse summer learning loss. Students acquire important social, emotional and critical thinking skills through individual work, group work, and a supportive classroom.

2. IBA’s Youth Development Program prepares youth ages 13-19 for college and career through an employment-based program that places youth in rigorous courses centered on arts and civic engagement. Youth serve as peer leaders who plan, develop and participate in project-based learning programming in areas that include: Academic Support, College and Job Readiness; Arts Education; Leadership and Civic Engagement. Fostering positive long-term relationships, IBA helps youth to think critically, grow socially and emotionally, excel in school and improve their community.


Budget  $590,279.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Goals within IASSL

1. 80% will show increased reading fluency and comprehension, as measured through DIBELS and TRC test scores;

2. 90% of ELL students will increase in their ELD levels by at least one level;

3. 80% will report feeling supported in the program;

4. 100% will create a portfolio of art work that shows their improved artistic skills

Goals within IYDP
 
1. We will employ 90 Peer Leaders with 80% completing their cycle.
 
2. 90% of youth will be promoted to the next grade level.
 
3. Youth will develop a wide variety of 21st century skills such as: critical thinking, problem solving, developing media literacy, and communication skills.  
 
4. Youth Advocate will work directly with 10 high/proven risk youth.
 
5. 48 youth will participate in the One Hood Peace Basketball League, a partnership with the Blackstone Community Center that works with high and proven risk youth to unite the community, reduce gang violence, and provide conflict resolution and trauma.  
Program Long-Term Success 

Our long-term goal is to empower low-income youth with the necessary resources, 21stcentury skills, and supports needed to succeed in school and in life.

Program Success Monitored By 

IASSL uses academic data (Dibels, ELD Levels, TRC scores) to inform needs, tailor curriculum, and measure improvement in English proficiency. We use The Survey of Afterschool Youth Outcomes (SAYO), a research-based and field-tested tool, to measure outcomes linked to long-term positive socio-emotional development. Children complete the pre and post-tests that measures their experiences in four areas: self-confidence, relationships, perseverance and leadership.

IYDP uses a comprehensive assessment portfolio to evaluate the success of our program. We use surveys, including the BYAEP (Boston Youth Arts Evaluation Project) and SAYO-Y (Survey of Afterschool Youth Outcomes-Youth), to assess critical thinking, leadership, and reasoning. We use portfolios to show progress. Our programs are evaluated by field-tested and research-based observation protocols, like the APT, that evaluate the quality of our program based on adult-student interactions, youth engagement and nature of activity.

Examples of Program Success 

 

IASLP: During our last full program year (2014-15), 90% of our students increased at least one academic level, and 53% increased beyond the goal that their academic teacher had set for them. Nearly all (93%) of students reported developing positive relationships with adults at IBA, and all students reported making a new friends

IYDP: The 2014-15 IYDP Post Surveys show the impact our program has on young people. Our youth agreed or strongly agreed that: At IBA their opinions matter. (89%); “Because of this program, I can better express my ideas and feelings” (96%); and “I believe what I create and do at IBA positively impacts others” (93%). 90% of students reported that they gained artistic skills, 96% reported an increase in their ability to work with diverse groups, and 86% reported an increase in their desire to use feedback to improve their work. Finally, 100% of students reported trusting relationships with IBA’s staff—an important indicator of social and emotional support.


IBA's College and Financial Empowerment Program

IBA's College and Financial Empowerment Program focuses on supporting participants who want to pursue the completion of their high school education, while also accessing higher education opportunities. IBA serves as a mini-satellite campus of Bunker Hill, and offers a unique model of a college campus in the heart of an affordable housing community. The program offers: HiSET Prep (High School Equivalency), college classes, financial empowerment coaching, childcare, and supportive case management. 

Budget  $224,754.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served At-Risk Populations Adults College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  1. 100% of participants will receive case management.
  2. 20 young people will participate in our HiSet Program, 100% of these students will participate in life skills workshops, 30% will earn their high school degree, and 10% will pass at least 3 of the subject tests.
  3. 30 students will take pre-college and college classes. 70% of these students will pass the class and move take another class.
  4. 20 young people will complete job readiness training or one-on-ones with the Employment Specialist. 80% of participants will find a job within 3 months of completion of training.

Program Long-Term Success 
Our long term goals for the participants in ICWD are: 
1.  Youth will be on track for high school graduation or equivalency diploma; and youth will enroll on to college.
2.  Youth will gain job readiness and 21st century skills and secure employment.
Program Success Monitored By 

As a cohort member of the Hyams Foundation’s Teen Futures Initiative, we are evaluated by The Center for Youth and Communities, based at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University which is leading the evaluation of this initiative and has a strong track record in the field of youth development. The Center’s staff worked collaboratively with the groups to design an evaluation framework and surveys to collect youth data from both youth and case managers. To measure progress in our High School Equivalency Readiness Program, we utilize pre-test scores, quizzes, essays and Test Cycle forms. To measure progress in Basic ESL/Language Literacy, pre-college and college courses, we utilize the Bunker Hill's student database system (BISSI/Datatel). Our Success Coaches meet individually with students to track progress on educational, life and employment goals. Formal evaluations track change in knowledge, skills and workforce readiness in our Job Readiness course. Qualitative data is obtained through surveys, questionnaires and focus groups. 

Examples of Program Success 

The most notable recent success was the College graduation of a past High School Equivalency student, Alaila Warmsley. She graduated in May, 2015 from Bunker Hill Community College with her Associates degree in Business. She will continue on this fall pursuing her Bachelors in Organizational Leadership and Management at UMASS Boston. While studying at Bunker Hill she was very involved with other HiSET cycles. She sat on a panel with other HiSET alumnae describing her experience of what it was like studying with us here at IBA’s College and Workforce Development Program and she spoke to her experiences as a college student.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 With the conclusion of IBA’s Strategic Planning 2015, there are great opportunities lying ahead for us and for our community. We see this period as one of growth and renewal of our mission, vision and community development values. We are embarking on a new planning process that will support the next five years of our organization as we approach our 50th anniversary in 2018. But before we proceed, it is imperative to stop and reflect on the successes of the past five years of upcoming closing strategy. In 2013, we successfully and smoothly concluded the merger of IBA with its real estate subsidiary, ETC Development Corporation, one of the key strategic goals of IBA 2015. This merger has strengthened our programs and operations, while allowing us to position IBA as a strong and bona fide affordable housing developer in the City, and in the South End.

 

Another success that we achieved through our plan was to launch a new unifying brand for IBA, its program and affordable housing portfolio. We did this via refreshing our logo, rebranding our programs, redoing our website, and increasing our social media presence to let the world know about our great work.

 

Our new plan will provide a new roadmap with many opportunities. The strategic planning process will be participatory and inclusive of Board, staff, residents and key stakeholders. But with each opportunity, we see challenges looming ahead as well. We have seen the positive changes in our neighborhood, but those changes have come at a cost of displacement of middle-income families and small minority businesses. IBA is interested in preserving and developing additional affordable (low-income and middle-income) housing units and sustain the important programs that have been a catalyst for our community.

 

Another challenge that will be tackled in this next round is finalizing our need to track outcomes by establishing a rigorous program evaluation system through our Salesforce database.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Vanessa Calderón-Rosado Ph.D.
CEO Term Start Apr 2003
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Vanessa Calderón-Rosado, Ph. D. has served as IBA's CEO since 2004. With a doctorate in Public Policy and a wide-range of community development experience, Dr. Calderón-Rosado has lead IBA through a large-scale capacity building initiative that has improved programming, increased organizational effectiveness, and fundraising. During this period, IBA has more than double its budget from $2.2 million to $4.8 million, while ensuring five straight years of organizational surpluses. Under her leadership, IBA has expanded a joint venture with Bunker Hill Community College that created a satellite campus in Villa Victoria (IBA’s affordable housing community); has grown its youth development programs; has increased arts and culture programs to anchor it as New England’s premier Latino arts hub; and has merged with its real estate development affiliate to create more efficient mission-driven synergies and develop more affordable housing.

 
In 2010, Governor Patrick selected her to serve on the Board of the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. She was also named a Barr Foundation Fellow in 2009, and has received numerous recognitions for her community work, leadership and activism.

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Karla Jaramillo Chief Financial Officer


Karla Jaramillo


 


Born and raised in Guayaquil – Ecuador, she arrived to the United States as a high school student with her family.  After attending Chelsea High School, she received her Bachelors of Science Degree in Accounting from Bentley University and her Masters Degree from Suffolk University’s Executive MBA Program.


 


Miss Jaramillo has been involved in a number of organizations in the Boston area, including the Museum of Fine Arts Boston (MFA) - Catalyst, a diverse group of MFA members and volunteers committed to engaging a wide range of people from greater Boston in the museum, its collections, programming and legacy. She was a member of the Latino Professional Network and in 2008 she was selected as the profile of the month by El Mundo Newspaper.


 


She was also a board member of ZUMIX – a youth arts organization in East Boston, which empowers youth thru music and the arts. Also a Boston Coordinator for Las Comadres, a nationally known Latina organization empowering women to be actively engaged in the growing Latino communities through on line and face to face networks.  She is very passionate about the importance of education and for a year went to Chicago as an Americorp literacy volunteer. 


 


Miss Jaramillo’s work experience began in public accounting and then moved to the private sector. She is currently the Chief Financial Officer for IBA, a non-profit organization in the South End of Boston that empowers individuals through education, workforce development and arts programs. Other recent roles include Director of Finance for Nuestra CDC, a non-profit that is devoted to building the wealth and enhancing the physical, economic, and social well-being of Roxbury and other underserved populations in greater Boston. She was also the Vice President of Finance and Administration at HouseWorks, a provider of in-home care services for seniors across metro Boston and the Manager of Accounting and Financial Reporting for Canaccord Genuity, an investment banking firm in Boston.


Rafael Medina Senior Program Director

Rafael Medina, M.S. has worked as IBA's Senior Program Director since 2012. With a Master in Science of Environmental Management on Planning, and a wide-range of program analysis, development and implementation experience in New England and Puerto Rico, Rafael has been key in interconnecting IBA’s program offerings, data outcome initiatives and measurements; to increase organizational effectiveness and program sustainability. During this period, IBA has step-in stronger into data base use, logic model development, and tighter outcome measurements aligned with the organization mission – vision.

Mayra Negron-Rivera Chief Operating Officer

Mayra I. Negrón-Rivera, is the Chief Operating Officer of IBA-Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción, a Boston-based community building nonprofit organization founded in 1968 to empowers individuals though education, workforce development and arts programs and creates vibrant affordable housing communities.

She joined IBA in 2000. Since 2013, Ms. Negron-Rivera is the Chief Operating Officer overseeing all administrative functions of the organization including Property Management, Real Estate Development and Asset Management. She provides vision, direction, coaching, support and guidelines to all senior staff and employees across the agency in all aspects of administration and services related matters.

Prior to that she was Chief of Finance and Administration and in that role improved accounting and financial control systems to effectively meet all fiscal standards.

In the summer of 2009, Ms. Negrón-Rivera served as Interim Chief Executive Officer of IBA, as the current CEO was on a Barr Fellowship sabbatical. During this period, she successfully oversaw all operations, programmatic and fundraising components of IBA, including the annual Festival Betances and the launching of two new youth initiatives—StreetSafe and Teen Futures.

Current and Past Civic involvement

·Board Member of South End Community Health Center
 · Member of Dana Farber Cancer Institute External Advisory Committee
· Member of John D. O’Bryant School Site Council and Co-Treasurer of the Parent Site Council
· Member of Boston Real Estate Investors Association
· Former Member of Blackstone Elementary School Site School Council
· Member of the Blackstone Elementary School Principal Search
· Member of Advisory Committee of Center for Community Health Improvement at Massachusetts General Hospital

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Commonwealth Award (highest arts and culture honor in MA) Massachusetts Cultural Council 2011
Finalist in Collaboration Category for Pathway Technology Campus, IBA’s partnership with Bunker Hill Community College MA Non-Profit Network Awards 2010
IBA’s Escuelita Borikén selected as one of top 21 MA school readiness programs after studying more than four hundred Social Impact Research 2010
IBA's CEO, Vanessa Calderon-Rosado was selected to be a board member. Massachusetts Board of Education 2010
Urban Service Award Berklee College of Music 2010
Barr Fellowship Awarded to our CEO, Vanessa Calderon-Rosado Barr Foundation 2009
Champion in Action for the Arts Citizens Bank 2009
National Award for Arts Access in Underserved Communities MetLife 2009
Finalist Social Innovation Forum 2008
Award for Campus-Community Collaboration, Honorable Mention Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership 2007
Champion Award Boston Center for the Arts 2007
selection Massachusetts Catalogue for Philanthropy 2007
Best Practice in Teen Programming , Honorable Mention in Skill Development Boston Foundation and Boston After-School and Beyond 2005
National Finalist Ford Foundation's Artography/ Leveraging Investments in Neighborhood Creativity, LINC 2005
Maxwell Awards for Affordable Housing Excellence, Honorable Mention Fannie Mae 2003

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC) --
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) --
United Way Member Agency --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 5 Year Accreditation --

Collaborations

To help ensure long-term programmatic and financial sustainability, IBA has intentionally established multi-year partnerships with institutions of higher learning and other non-profit organizations. Self-sustaining and mutually beneficial, our partnerships (e.g. Berklee College of Music, South End Community Health Center, The Connection Center, Year Up, Y.O.U. Boston (Youth Options Unlimited), Appalachian Mountain Club, The City School, Youth Jobs Coalition, Blackstone Community Center, D4 Police, and St Stephen's) allow us to be more consistent with the highest quality programming and less reliant on fundraising to meet programmatic needs. Partnerships also allow us to share resources and best practices, while ensuring that we do not replicate services when it is not necessary. IBA’s College and Workforce Development Program partnered with Bunker Hill Community College has been honored by Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Award for Campus-Community Collaboration, Honorable Mention (2007) and was a finalist for Massachusetts Non-Profit Awards for Collaboration (2010).

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

With the upcoming conclusion of IBA’s Strategic Planning 2015, there are great opportunities lying ahead for us and for our community. We see this period as one of growth and renewal of our mission, vision and community development values. We are embarking in a new planning process that will support the next five years of our organization as we approach our 50th anniversary in 2018. But before we proceed, it is imperative to stop and reflect on the successes of the past five years of upcoming closing strategy. In 2013, we successfully and smoothly concluded the merger of IBA with its real estate subsidiary, ETC Development Corporation, one of the key strategic goals of IBA 2015. This merger has strengthen our programs and operations, and allowed us to position IBA as a strong and bona fide affordable housing developer in the City, and in the South End.

 

Another success that we achieved through our plan was to launch a new unifying brand for IBA, its program and affordable housing portfolio. We did this via refreshing our logo, rebranding our programs, redoing our website, and increasing our social media presence to let the world know about our great work.

Our new plan will provide a new roadmap with many opportunities. The strategic planning process will be participatory and inclusive of Board, staff, residents and key stakeholders. But with each opportunity, we see challenges looming ahead as well. We have seen the positive changes in our neighborhood, but those changes have come at a cost of displacement of middle-income families and small minority businesses. IBA is interested in preserving and developing additional affordable (low-income and middle-income) housing units and sustain the important programs that have been a catalyst for our community.

Another challenge that will be tackled in this next round is finalizing our need to track outcomes by establishing a rigorous program evaluation system through our Salesforce database.

 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 35
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 45
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 31
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 30
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Hector Cruz
Board Chair Company Affiliation Winn Residential
Board Chair Term Jan 2013 - Dec 2017
Board Co-Chair Mr. Edwin Seda
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Villa Victoria Resident
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2014 - Dec 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Hector Cruz Winn Residential Voting
Ms. Josephine Erewa Community Member Voting
Ms. Jennifer Fauth RECAP Real Estate Advisors Voting
Mr. Bob Goldstein R.E. Goldstein Development Consulting Voting
Ms Gale Hayde Resident/Community Volunteer Voting
Mr Vadim Kuksin Eastern Bank Voting
Ms. Carmen Lennon Comcast Corporation – Northeast Division Voting
Mr. Bart Lloyd Preservation of Affordable Housing Voting
Mr. Jose Maisonet Community Member Voting
Ms. Wendy Melendez Villa Victoria Resident --
Mr. Paul Patton Community Member Voting
Mr. Eric Rivas Sovereign Bank Voting
Ms. Reinalda Rivera Community Member Voting
Mr. Jonathan Ruiz Villa Victoria resident --
Mr. Edwin Seda Community Member Voting
Ms. Monique Tolbert Villa Victoria resident --
Ms Maria Vasallo Cambridge College Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 9
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 79%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 55%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 3%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Real Estate

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

IBA has ensured that our Board of Directors remains true to our founding principle and continues to be resident-controlled.  IBA's Board of Directors is comprised of 17 individuals: nine community residents and eight non-residents.  Our Board is responsible for overseeing the overall strategic plan goals for IBA, its financial performance and management. The Board oversees the Chief Executive Officer, who oversees all of IBA's programs and staff.  Given the composition of our our Board (51% residents), there is a constant need for Board development training on areas of real estate, and more specifically on roles and responsibilities of nonprofit board members.

 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $726,982 $849,154 $517,330
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $726,982 $849,154 $517,330
Individual Contributions $736,670 $1,023,497 $954,900
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $4,415,883 $4,278,600 $3,273,551
Investment Income, Net of Losses $138,545 $131,429 $92,737
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $66,043 $56,954 $102,718
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $-524,057 $-60,544 $112,663

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $4,719,598 $4,631,872 $3,631,274
Administration Expense $935,277 $867,165 $563,312
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 1.14 1.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 84% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $27,704,076 $29,039,643 $29,484,546
Current Assets $4,846,758 $5,866,207 $6,745,718
Long-Term Liabilities $20,210,869 $21,014,452 $11,336,046
Current Liabilities $864,525 $1,301,707 $2,784,564
Total Net Assets $6,628,682 $6,723,484 $15,363,936

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.61 4.51 2.42

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 73% 72% 38%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. For the FY 2014 audit, the independent auditors removed previous qualification to their opinion regarding the omission of information regarding an affiliate and subsidiaries. All affiliate and subsidiaries assets and liabilities are enclosed and audited in FY2014.

Please note, per Note 9 in the 2013 audit, effective March 18, 2013, IBA merged with ETC. All assets and liabilities of IBA were assumed by ETC. Effective March 18, 2013, ETC changed its name to Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion, Inc. Grants and contributions are still credited to Inquilinos Boricuas En Accion Inc. (EIN: 23-7090081).

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials and reflects IBA data only. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. The Other revenue category for all three years above includes non-operating revenues. FY13 data above covers a ~9 month period (March 18, 2013 - Dec. 31, 2013) due to a change in fiscal year.*
 
For the FY09 through FY13 audit documents posted above, the independent auditors issued a qualification to their opinion regarding the omission of information regarding an affiliate and subsidiaries. Please review the Auditors opinion for further information.
 
*Please note, per Note 9 in the FY13 audit, effective March 18, 2013, Inquilinos Boricuas En Accion Inc. (IBA) merged with ETC. All assets and liabilities of IBA were assumed by ETC. Effective March 18, 2013, ETC changed its name to Inquilinos Boricuas En Accion Inc. (EIN:23-7090081). As a result of the merger, the organization changed its fiscal year from July 1 - June 30 to Jan. 1 to Dec. 31. A 990 file and audit file covering July 1, 2012 - March 17, 2013, and an audit file covering March 18, 2013 - Dec. 31, 2013, are posted above.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Beginning in 2017, IBA has outlined a five-year strategic plan. To reach its vision, IBA has set forth priorities and goals focused on its work to achieve impact in the community.

Strategic priorities for community impact:
 
Housing: IBA’s housing is high quality, affordable, sustainable and safe, and provides a vibrant place for lower-income families to live and build community.
 
Resident services and engagement: IBA residents are core to the organization’s mission and demonstrate strong leadership throughout the organization and the community.
 
Education: IBA’s educational programs will address student needs and individual development for residents and community members from preschool through young adulthood.
 
Arts: IBA’s arts programming will preserve Latino culture and heritage and will be a vehicle for building community and for sharing and embracing its diversity.
 
By reinforcing these objectives in all programs and endeavors, IBA strives to empower and enhance the lives of residents in Villa Victoria and the surrounding community. IBA serves as a national model for the integration of affordable housing with comprehensive, culturally responsive and bilingual (English/Spanish) programming strengthened by social supports. We preserve 521 units of affordable housing and reach over 800 people annually.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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