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National Education for Assistance Dog Services Inc. (NEADS/Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans)

 PO Box 1100
 Princeton, MA 01541
[P] (978) 422-9064
[F] (978) 422-3255
http://www.neads.org
[email protected]
Cathy Zemaitis
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INCORPORATED: 1976
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7281887

LAST UPDATED: 01/17/2017
Organization DBA NEADS/Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans
Former Names National Education for Assistance Dog Services, Inc. (1994)
New England Assistance Dog Service, Inc. (1989)
Hearing Ear Program (1978)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

NEADS/Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans was founded in 1976 to train and place assistance dogs to help people who have disabilities and children who have autism.  NEADS has trained over 1,400 Assistance Dog partners (person and dog) now living and working together across the USA, including assistance dogs to help veterans of our wars with physical disabilities and with PTSD.    
NEADS is the oldest continuing Hearing Dog program in the country and the first program on the East Coast to train a Service Dog.

 

Mission Statement

NEADS/Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans was founded in 1976 to train and place assistance dogs to help people who have disabilities and children who have autism.  NEADS has trained over 1,400 Assistance Dog partners (person and dog) now living and working together across the USA, including assistance dogs to help veterans of our wars with physical disabilities and with PTSD.    
NEADS is the oldest continuing Hearing Dog program in the country and the first program on the East Coast to train a Service Dog.

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2016 to Aug 31, 2017
Projected Income $2,540,400.00
Projected Expense $2,538,629.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Assistance Dogs for Children, Ministry, Classroom and Therapy
  • Dogs for People with a Physical Disability
  • Dogs for those who are Deaf or have a Hearing Loss
  • Prison PUP Partnership
  • Service Dogs for Veterens and Trauma Assistance Dogs
  • The Pawsitively Strong Fund

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

NEADS/Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans was founded in 1976 to train and place assistance dogs to help people who have disabilities and children who have autism.  NEADS has trained over 1,400 Assistance Dog partners (person and dog) now living and working together across the USA, including assistance dogs to help veterans of our wars with physical disabilities and with PTSD.    
NEADS is the oldest continuing Hearing Dog program in the country and the first program on the East Coast to train a Service Dog.

 


Background Statement

NEADS began as an experiment to see if dogs could do for people who are deaf and/or disabled the same things they had been doing for people who are blind.  Dogs became the ears for people who are deaf and the arms for people who could not use them.  As NEADS expanded, it began to include dogs for the ministry, for the classroom, and for children on the autism spectrum. The latest program, Canines for Combat Veterans, provides assistance dogs for people who are disabled physically or who have Post Traumatic Stress as a result of recent combat. (Trauma Assistance Dogs)

Impact Statement

We run the largest Prison PUP Partnershipin the USA. NEADS actually instituted the concept of advanced training by inmates long before industry peers. We are the only assistance dog program in the country to have a correctional facility dedicated to training hearing dogs: MCI-Shirley.

Because of NEADS' expertise,international trainers have come to NEADS for several weeks of instruction in starting similar programs in South Korea, Japan, New Zealand, England, Australia and South Africa. 

We trained and provided the first assistance dog for a veteran who was wounded in the Iraq/Afghanistan wars. Since its inception in 2006, NEADS has placed over 50 specialized assistance dogs with veterans from all services and conflicts. NEADS is now first to institute a TAD Program (Trauma Assistance Dogs) for veterans suffering from effects of PTS (Post Traumatic Stress).       

NEADS Canines for Combat Veterans was featured at VFW and American Legion conventions introducing them to the emotional and functional tasks embedded in NEADS’ highly trained assistance dogs. The demonstrations brought into sharp focus, the challenges of our nations’ wounded veterans and the benefits of canine assistance.

We offer facility-based education, a training method whereby deaf and disabled clients develop a strong working relationship with their assistance dog by living and training in a home-like environment on campus, while under the supervision of our expert training staff.

 

 

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Needs Statement

1. Client House: Clients spend on average 2 weeks on campus training before they leave with their assistance dog. The current facility is inadequate to meet the needs of the training program as well as that of the clients. We have identified a building on campus that can be renovated and expanded to dramatically enhance the quality of the training and ultimately the experience.

2..    Kennel Improvements: There is a dramatic need to improve both the external and internal components of the kennel. 

3.    Puppy House: We receive puppies at approximately 8 weeks of age. They live at the NEADS Puppy House prior to sending them off to prison for training at 16 weeks. Early socialization is key to the long term success of our assistance dogs and much of this occurs during the weeks that the pups stay at the Puppy House.  To do this as efficiently as possible, we need to upgrade the Puppy House facilities.

4.  Vehicles and equipment: Our fleet of vehicles needs to be overhauled. Trainers go to prisons in the tri-state area every week to train inmates to train our dogs.This travel as well as travel with clients and travel to pick up puppies adds up. Currently we need to replace our client van with a vehicle that can handle additional clients in a safe and efficient manner. With approximately 90 dogs in training throughout the year and approximately 50 graduates per year there is a great deal of wear and tear on our vehicles as they crisscross New England  and other parts of the East coast. Other training equipment needs to be replaced on a frequent basis due to wear or even the damage that an adolescent dog can do.

 

 

 

 

 

 


CEO Statement

NEADS is one of the oldest assistance dog organizations in the country. From its very beginning NEADS has worked hard to offer innovative programs to help our clients.

We are driven to train the very best dogs for our clients,who can achieve a greater level of independence through canine assistance. A veteran who was injured in the war told me that he defines his life as ‘before’ and ‘after’ dog. I was struck that receiving his dog versus his injury was a defining moment in his life. Since that time I have heard similar comments from other veterans and even other clients.

 

Over the years we have used rescue dogs as part of our hearing program. Today, we use a mixture of rescue dogs and bred dogs for our various programs. The demand for our dogs continues to grow. However the cycle to produce a full assistance dog is between 18-24 months. Our plans are to increase capacity from approximately 50 dogs per year to 75-80 dogs. This will require us to modify portions of our facility as well as our approach to training the dogs. However, we expect that in 3-4 years we will attain our goal.

 

At the same time we are planning a new client house on campus. Clients typically spend 2 weeks on campus being trained on how to best utilize their new best buddy. However, the current client house is inadequate to meet the growth in clients as well as their special needs. We are fortunate to have a facility on campus that we can rehabilitate to keep the costs down. Hopefully construction can begin in approximately one year.

 

I am frequently asked “how long is your waiting list?” That is a difficult question to answer because of something that is a source of great pride as well as unique about NEADS. We have a very thorough matching process to ensure that our clients get the very best dog suited for his or her needs. So as the dogs come out of prison they are matched with clients that will best benefit from the unique features of the dog. It could be the dog’s height, energy, confidence, comfort with equipment and a variety of the characteristics that will enable an optimum match between client and canine.This ensures an awesome partnership.

 

We work to ensure a fiscal discipline that benefits our clients as well as our donors. Each year approximately 87 cents per dollar goes directly to our programs. We have been 4-Star rated by Charity Navigator for 11 straight years.

 

We invite you to become part of NEADS Nation. Become part of an organization that is truly changing lives one client at a time!   
 - Gerry DeRoche                                                                                                   
 
 
 
 
 

 


Board Chair Statement

Currently I serve as the Chairman of the Board of Directors. I have been involved with NEADS for years and joined the board in 2007. As a veteran I was originally drawn to NEADS because of the Canine for Combat Veterans (CCV) program. It didn’t take long to embrace the various NEADS programs that represent so much more than the original one that caught my attention.

 

NEADS began as a class experiment at Holden Junior College to see if dogs could be helpful for individuals that were deaf or hard of hearing. Although the experiment was successful that college went out of business soon after. An enterprising Director from the school decided to establish a not for profit and NEADS was born. In the years that followed NEADS became known for its constant innovation, the incredibly well trained canines and the matching process between the client and the canine.

 

Now more than 35 years later NEADS is still known for those three things and continues as the only program in New England and the oldest program in the United States providing canines to individuals that are deaf or hard of hearing. In the 90’sNEADS began to place dogs with individuals with various disabilities. CCV was created in 2006 to assist veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. NEADS also places canines with children that have autism as well as social therapy dogs in a variety of settings.

 

I am extremely proud of our latest program: TAD or TraumaAssistance Dog. After a two year pilot we have formally approved TAD as a coreprogram. To date we have graduated 16 client pairs. In addition we are the onlyprogram in the country that utilizes the services of a psychologist as afundamental part of the program. One of our graduates said it best: “My dog hasbecome my battle-buddy. She helps to make me feel safe and to cope with stressfrom my combat-related PTS”. We hope with this program, heroes who haveexperienced Post Traumatic Stress will feel more comfortable venturing out intothe community and know that his canine buddy is there to assist every step ofthe way.

 

In terms of successes we are true to our mission but we areso much more than our mission. For example to be able to have a large number ofdogs in training at any given time we partnered with the Department ofCorrection to utilize inmates to train our dogs. This is a win-win for everyoneand clearly gives the inmates a greater self worth and sense of accomplishment.In addition we use rescue dogs as part of our hearing dog program. Those aretwo examples of success beyond our mission.

 

Our challenges are not unlike those of other not forprofits. We receive no Federal funding so we depend for the most part on thegenerosity of individuals and foundations to fund our programs. The demand forour canines is growing every day. This is compounded by the development cycleof the canine. It takes between 18-24 months for a dog to be ready. Ourstandards are extremely high so only 50% of all dogs entering our program willbe ultimately matched with a client.

 

I am honored to help provide a greater degree ofindependence for our clients through the use of canines. I am awed by the passion of our staff andvolunteers and I can think of no higher calling or better investment of my time.
- Gary Hough

Geographic Area Served

Massachusetts-All Regions
NATIONAL

NEADS places dogs nationally.

Organization Categories

  1. Animal Related - Animal Training
  2. Human Services - Deaf/Hearing Impaired Centers, Services
  3. Health Care - Rehabilitative Care

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Assistance Dogs for Children, Ministry, Classroom and Therapy

  • For Children With a Physical Disability.Service dogs perform tasks for children like: picking up dropped items, opening doors, and turning lights on or off, among many other things. Children under the age of 15 require the help of a responsible adult to control and care for the assistance dog while the dog is working.
  • For Children on the Autism Spectrum..Social dogs are trained to accompany their partner to doctor's appointments, restaurants, sporting events, and other public places, and help a child with autism feel calmer and more confident. 
  • In addition to providing assistance dogs directly for people with a disability, NEADS also trains service dogs for partnership with teachers, therapists and those who perform religious ministry. These canine assistants are matched with teachers or therapists that work with students who have mental or physical disabilities and ministers who seek to engage with their general community.
Budget  $526,146.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Service dogsassist children with a physical disability by performing tasks that the child cannot do or has trouble doing. These tasks are similar to the tasks that service dogs do for adults. These tasks include picking up dropped items, retrieving objects from tables or counters, turning light switches on and off, pushing automatic door buttons, tugging doors and cabinets open, standing and bracing for stability during a transfer, barking on command for help, and getting a cordless phone in an emergency.
Program Long-Term Success 
Social dogs serve as assistants and companions to children with autism or another disability who are ages 6 and up. Kids have a hard time fitting in and making friends, and social interaction for children with autism can be even more difficult. For many of these kids, a social dog can make all the difference.Dogs won't judge a child; they don’t care how popular a child is or how he or she forms sentences. The constant companionship and friendship of such a loving creature can help a child with autism build confidence.
 Service dogs assist children with a physical disability by performing tasks that the child cannot do or has trouble doing.
 NEADS places assistance dogs with children age 10 and up with the partnership of a parent or guardian (also known as a facilitator). This facilitator must live with the client and accompany him or her in all public places whenever the dog is present. Although the child is the main caregiver for the dog and does most of the work with the dog, the facilitator may take on some responsibility for assisting the child in the care, health and safety of the dog. Ultimately, the facilitator must make sure that the dog's needs are being met and that all training criteria are adhered to.Facilitated service dogs do not attend school with children, since the facilitator must always accompany the dog and client in public places. After the child reaches the age of 15, young clients often mature enough to use their dog without the use of a facilitator, and may be retested and recertified to do so.
Program Success Monitored By  NEADS staff monitors the client/Assistance Dog team for the duration of the working relationship.
Examples of Program Success  Cassidy's life hs changed tremendously for the better since we brought home her yellow Lab, Trixie. When I tell Cassidy's story, some people look at me funny and say "It's just a dog, what's the big deal?" Cassidy and I know Trixie is more than just a dog. She is a friend and companion that provides Cassidy with things people cannot. She is non-judgemental and kind. She offers Cassidy unconditional lovve and only positive attention. She doesn't correct Cassidy or tease her. She provides a relaxed environment in which Cassidy doesn't have to use words to communicated. Cassidy feels safe and confident with her. She can reach down and pat Trixie instead of trying to figure out what the right words would be to tell Trixie she loves her. When the rest of the world sees Cassidy as autistic, different or strange...Trixie only sees Cassidy. -Stephanie Dufault, Cassidy's Mom

Dogs for People with a Physical Disability

Service dogs assist people with a physical disability by performing tasks that their partner cannot do or has trouble doing. These tasks include picking up dropped items, retrieving objects from tables or counters, turning light switches on and off, pushing automatic door buttons, tugging doors and cabinets open, standing and bracing for stability during a transfer, barking on command for help, and getting a cordless phone in an emergency.

Assistance dogs accompany their partner wherever they go, including the workplace, school, shopping and traveling. These dogs provide a degree of independence that many people with a disability have never had before. Not having to depend on another person is a priceless gift.

Budget  $721,015.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Population Served People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Ourspecialty dogs are taught to aid a partner who has both a physical disability (as a service dog would) and hearing loss (as a hearing dog would). These dogs with dual abilities are trained to meet each client's needs, depending on the specifics of the client’s disability. As a service dog, the dog may be able to retrieve items, turn light switches on and off, and open or shut doors. As a hearing dog, the dog would be able to alert his person to trained sounds in the home, such as the smoke alarm, telephone ringing or a door knock. Specialty dogs are rare because the demands of each role typically require completely different temperaments in a dog. Service dogs are patient and laid back, and they wait for direction. Hearing dogs are energetic and they take initiative. A specialty dog's personality can range anywhere on this scale. A client may be asked which tasks are most important to him or her so that NEADS trainers can select a dog that excels at that type of training.
Program Long-Term Success  NEADS has placed over 1,400 Assistance Dogs nation-wide since 1976.
Program Success Monitored By  NEADS staff monitors the client and dog for the duration of the working relationship
Examples of Program Success  Service dogsassist people with a physical disability by performing tasks that their partner cannot do or has trouble doing. These tasks include picking up dropped items, retrieving objects from tables or counters, turning light switches on and off, pushing automatic door buttons, tugging doors and cabinets open, standing and bracing for stability during a transfer, barking on command for help, and getting a cordless phone in an emergency.

Dogs for those who are Deaf or have a Hearing Loss

Hearing dogs are specially trained canine assistants who help people who are deaf or have hearing loss. Hearing dogs can alert their partners to sounds around the home such as a door knock, smoke detector, alarm clock, tea kettle or telephone ringing. In public, hearing dogs can be helpful in alerting their partner to a cell phone ringing, keys dropping or traffic approaching. Dogs can even be taught to recognize their handler’s name to alert the person when he or she is being spoken to.

While responding to these trained sounds is the primary role of a hearing dog, many people can also benefit from this type of dog's natural sound awareness. Hearing dogs are especially sensitive to noises and will notice sudden things that happen around them, even in public. A deaf partner can learn a lot about his or her environment just by watching his or her dog’s visual cues. For example, a dog may notice when someone approaches from behind and tries to get the attention of his or her handler. Many times people in public do not realize that a person is deaf, and mistake an individual’s lack of response for rudeness. The presence of a hearing dog, along with the notifying "hearing dog" patch on the dog’s vest, is often the first indicator to the public that the deaf individual may need to be spoken to face to face or in another manner.

Nearly 100% of our hearing dogs are rescued from shelters or rescue groups and begin their assistance dog training with NEADS as young adults. Many of these dogs are mixed breeds from 10 to 60 lbs. Occasionally we may utilize a dog from our puppy program that is better suited to a career as a hearing dog. These dogs are typically small labradors.Hearing dogs come in all shapes and sizes.

Budget  $272,817.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Other Health/Disability
Program Short-Term Success  While responding to these trained sounds is the primary role of a hearing dog, many people can also benefit from this type of dog's natural sound awareness. Hearing dogs are especially sensitive to noises and will notice sudden things that happen around them, even in public. A deaf partner can learn a lot about his or her environment just by watching his or her dog’s visual cues. For example, a dog may notice when someone approaches from behind and tries to get the attention of his or her handler. Many times people in public do not realize that a person is deaf, and mistake an individual’s lack of response for rudeness. The presence of a hearing dog, along with the notifying "hearing dog" patch on the dog’s vest, is often the first indicator to the public that the deaf individual may need to be spoken to face to face or in another manner.
Program Long-Term Success  NEADS/ Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans in the oldest Hearing Dog Program in the country. (Est. 1976)
Program Success Monitored By  NEADS staff
Examples of Program Success  Hearing dogs can alert their partners to sounds around the home such as a door knock, smoke detector, alarm clock, tea kettle or telephone ringing. In public, hearing dogs can be helpful in alerting their partner to a cell phone ringing, keys dropping or traffic approaching. Dogs can even be taught to recognize their handler’s name to alert the person when he or she is being spoken to.

Prison PUP Partnership

90-95% of NEADS puppies are trained in correctional facilities throughout New England.
 
Our Inmate Trainers

Each inmate that applies to be a puppy trainer must meet certain criteria in behavioral history and must make a 12-18 month commitment. A liaison assigned to the NEADS program conducts initial interviews to select inmate handlers and then a NEADS trainer conducts secondary interviews to ensure that the handlers selected are appropriate for the program. The men and women who are selected are usually described as model inmates with exceptional records. NEADS maintains consistent, ongoing communication with correctional officers, inmates and prison administrators at all times.

 

Inmates provide the puppies with socialization by bringing the dogs with them whenever possible. Whether going to a medical appointment, the TV lounge, or the family and friends visiting room, the puppy is usually right by the handler’s side.

Budget  $388,762
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success 
Our statistics show that dogs trained by prison inmates complete the additional required advanced training in half the time of dogs raised exclusively in foster homes. Inmates are able to provide more consistent training at a higher level simply because of the amount of time they are able to devote to the dogs. This enables us to place dogs faster with people in need.
 
To ensure that the puppies have a full range of experiences, volunteers help out by socializing the puppies on weekends. Theseweekend puppy raisers, specially trained in socialization skills by NEADS, are assigned to a puppy for the entire time the dog is in the prison program. Puppies spend their weekends at a volunteer’s home and follow the volunteer’s routine around town. This way, the puppies become accustomed to things like car rides, traffic, bus stations, movie theaters, restaurants, grocery stores, and all the typical experiences of life. 
Program Long-Term Success 
NEADS began the Prison PUP Partnership in 1998 at North Central Correctional Center in Gardner, Massachusetts. Since then, we’ve added more than a dozen additional participating prisons to our partnership.
Our Prison PUP Partnerships

NEADS currently has partnerships with approximately 13 prisons around New England. There are usually six to eight (and as many as 12) puppies in every facility. Each prison administration decides how many dogs it can house and raise comfortably. Most facilities designate a section of housing for the program where handlers are given single rooms to accommodate the inmate and puppy.

 
Program Success Monitored By 
The Prison PUP Partnership is closely monitored by NEADS Director of Canine Services, Carol Lidington. In addition, NEADS trainers and prison administration and staff are directly involved in the success of the program.
NEADS trainers make regular visits to each participating prison to conduct classes for the inmates in the program. In class, the inmates learn how to teach their puppy tasks and exceptional obedience skills. In addition, they learn how to groom and properly care for their puppy, provide basic first aid, and monitor canine health. The NEADS staff trainers assess each puppy to make training recommendations and assign homework for the handler.
Examples of Program Success 
"I do see a change in these guys. They are a person...accomplishing something." Sgt. Dean Gray, Northeastern Correctional Facility
 
The influence of the Prison PUP Partnership on the men and women in prison is tremendous, and even the officers and inmates who do not participate in the program report that the presence of NEADS dogs changes the atmosphere for everyone. 

Service Dogs for Veterens and Trauma Assistance Dogs

In May of 2006, NEADS was invited to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington DC to give a presentation about the many skills and tasks that our dogs could offer to combat veterans.NEADS was the first assistance dog organization to be invited to Walter Reed for this purpose. In addition to hospital staff and administrators, many servicemen and women who had served in Iraq or Afghanistan (and were at Walter Reed being treated for injuries) were in attendance at the meeting. Our presentation drew a great deal of interest and enthusiasm. NEADS immediately recognized that the growing population of combat veterans required a program that was specially designed to meet their needs, and NEADS formed the Service Dogs for Veterans(SDV) program.

NEADS returned to Walter Reed in August of that same year to interview interested veterans. Since then,NEADS has placed more than 55 dogs with veterans and the successful program has expanded to include qualifying veterans from all wars at no cost.

Trauma Assistance Dogs
 
Trauma Assistance Dogs (TAD) are placed with war veterans that are suffering from Post Traumatic Stress (PTS)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Budget  $428,712.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Veterans Adults People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Service Dogs can: Turn lights on and off, offer valuable social interaction, help with the transition to prosthetics, retrieve and carry objects, press buttons and open doors, assist with tasks if using a wheelchair, respond to sounds if you are hearing impaired, fetch a cordless phone in an emergency, speak on command to summon help, wear a backpack to carry articles.
Program Long-Term Success 
NEADS conducted a detailed 2-year pilot program and determined that dogs could help with:
Overcoming fear of public places, coping with general anxiety, reintegration into a civilian setting, developing feelings of being safe, overcoming sleep problems, coping with social anxiety, coping with flashbacks, learning to trust again. 
Program Success Monitored By  NEADS  stays in touch with all of the clients we support through surveys, follow-up calls and visits.
Examples of Program Success 
"Since getting my service dog, its been like having one of my Marines with me all the time. He is my best friend..." - Nicholas Lanteri/ Assistance Dog "Fenway"
 
I went from fighting on the battlefield, to laying in a bed and having people take of me, back to being independent and doing everything on my own... - Chris Strickland, Corporal, US Army regarding his service dog.
 "I broke my kneecap while in Iraq and I had surgery and countless hours of physical therapy and things, and then I also have post‑traumatic stress disorder, and Perry was assigned to me to help me with my knee problems. He picks things up for me. He can turn on and off lights. Opens and closes my office door when people come in. And I wouldn't go out in public very often if I could help it. Perry has been such a wonderful addition to my life, and I don't know what I've done ‑‑ what I did without him, you know, before, but he's just been great." - Christopher and Assistance Dog Perry

The Pawsitively Strong Fund

In collaboration with the Massachusetts Attorney General's Victim Assistance Program and the Massachusetts Office for Victim Assistance, NEADS has committed to providing highly skilled Assistance Dogs to survivors of the Boston Marathon bombings who have sustained a permanent physical disability. NEADS knows how much an Assistance Dog will help those who were permanently disabled from the blasts. As a Massachusetts nonprofit organization, NEADS understands the desire of Massachusetts residents to take care of their own in a way that is personal, efffective and meaningful. It may take months or even years for the injured survivors of the bombings to regain the independence to which they were accustomed. The Pawsitively Strong Fund will be there for the Marathon bombing survivors should they decide that a service dog is right for them, whether that's six months, one year or ten years down the road.
Budget  2500000 / dog
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Training
Population Served People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Currently (Fall 2013) one Assistance Dog has been placed with a Boston Marathon bombing survivor. There have been several inquiries. Many more are expected as the survivors begin to determine those modalities that will enhance their lives.
Program Long-Term Success  As a result of this program, people with our Assistance Dogs will experience life changing freedom, companionship and connection. Going forward, the Pawsitively Strong Fund will open to to those Massachusetts residents who have sustained a permanent physical disability as a result of violent crime.
Program Success Monitored By 
-Clients will report the changes in their lifestyle as a result of receiving a service dog
- Clients will report the usefulness of various service dog tasks and  suggest other task training that may be helpful
-The monetary success of the fund will be monitored on an on-going basis to be sure the fund is sustainable. 
- Regular and consistent appeals will be offered to assure continued funding
Examples of Program Success  "There was so much loss for us - our legs, our independence, our plans, my ability to work, my husband's fellowship, our apartment. You felt lik you were being stripped of so many things. (Receiving Assistance Dog) Rescue was the first time we felt like something was being added back." - First survivor placed with a NEADS Assistance Dog

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

NEADS’ services include a variety of dog applications to meet the needs of adults and children who are physically disabled, multi-disabled and on the autism spectrum across all socio-economic levels, race, ethnicity, gender and age.

The average cost of raising and training a NEADS dog is over $25,000. We ask our clients to fund raise or contribute a $9,500 portion of this cost. The balance is covered through donations made to the NEADS organization and NEADS continues to keep the client’s portion of the cost as low as possible. We do believe that it is important for our clients to participate in the fundraising process however,NEADS understands that some of our clients have circumstances that may make fundraising very difficult. For those individuals, funding through grants and private donors may become available. Those clients lacking personal resources and/or are unable to raise funds may contact our Supervisor of Client Accounts.As many of our clients rely upon disability assistance, many are on a fixed income. The NEADS organization strives to assist those who are in need.

Service dogs are provided to qualifying veterans at no cost. Often, being matched with an assistance dog enables our veterans to re-enter the work place and begin to regain some independence both personally and professionally.

One of our most successful alliances is with the Department of Correction. In 1998, we established a Prison PUP Partnership whose mission is for inmates to raise assistance dogs while in correctional institutions. We currently have puppies in 13 correctional facilities in three states.

The dogs trained by inmates are some of our best-trained dogs.  Training our dogs provides them with a task that not only helps them pass the time but allows them to use their prison time to give something back.  The dogs also help the inmates, providing a calming presence and unconditional love. “I do see a change in these guys. They’re a person and accomplishing something,”says Sgt. Dean Gray of the Northeastern Correctional Facility. Inmate Russell Jones says,“It feels like my time isn’t exactly wasted, I’m helping somebody and feel good at the end of the day about it.”

We are particularly proud of this program as many of the inmates come from a lower socio-economic background. This program enhances their self-esteem and begins to lay the ground work for re-entry into society. The inmates receive consistent training and support from the NEADS Assistance Dog Trainers.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gerry DeRoche
CEO Term Start Dec 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Gerry DeRoches' career in banking spanned 33 years. During that time he held a variety of management positions, most recently with Fleet Bank and Bank of America. Gerry is a graduate of the University of Connecticut where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing and an MBA in Finance.

“The opportunity to lead an organization like NEADS that does so much for hearing impaired and disabled Americans is a very special privilege,” says Gerry. “In addition, our work with Veterans, who have gallantly served our country, is a constant source of inspiration. I look forward to continuing to provide the very best trained dogs for our clients while we look for additional opportunities to be of service.”

Gerry is past Chair and Trustee of Nativity Preparatory School and Founding Chair of the Vision 5K Road Race/Walk as well as a trustee of the National Braille Press, Emerson Umbrella and Lasell College. He also served as a member of the Boston Museum of Science’s Diversity Resource Advisory Group. In addition, he has served as Captain for the Jimmy Fund Marathon Walk and is a member of the Yankee Golden Retriever Rescue. Gerry, his wife, two sons, and their two golden retrievers reside in Massachusetts.

Gary Hough, president of NEADS Board of Directors said, “Gerry’s leadership qualities and extensive experience in a range of non-profit and for profit venues make him the right CEO to lead NEADS, not only in supporting what NEADS has accomplished in 35 years but in leading us as we continue to develop new programs for those with a disability. Gerry understands the unique qualities that set NEADS apart.”
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Sheila O'Brien Mar 1978 Aug 2009

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Kathy Foreman Director, Client Services --
Mr. John Moon Director of Programs and Communications --
Ms. Cathy Zemaitis Director of Development --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
4 star charity (highest rating) Charity Navigator 2015
Best 5 Star Award Independent Charities of America 2015

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Independent Charities of America 1991
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) --
Assistance Dogs International (ADI) --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- 2010

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We now place over 30 dogs per year with deaf, disabled and autistic clients. We plan to increase this number of team placements by 2014. The goal is to place ten more dogs each year for five years to reach the goal. To do this, we must increase training and development staffs, maintain, improve and expand housing conditions for our clients, replace some of our vehicles, and find sponsors to underwrite the $25,000 cost to raise and train a NEADS assistance dog.

The demand for these dogs steadily increasesas th epopulation ages and the over 30,000 wounded veterans return home. We also face increased demand for our social dogs as statistics now show that 1 out of 88 children under the age 8 will have an autism spectrum disorder.

The Foundations for the Future Capital Campaign to raise funds to expand and improve housing conditions for our clients is a major step toward achieving one of ou rgoals. It is for this effort that we are reaching out to the Petco Foundation,who has so generously supported us in the past.  Our goal of $945,000 includes all costs associated with the project.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 22
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 80
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 32
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 27
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Beverly Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation UNUM
Board Chair Term Feb 2015 - Oct 2019
Board Co-Chair Ms. Abbey Henderson
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Abaris Financial Group
Board Co-Chair Term Feb 2015 - Oct 2019

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. James Ciociolo Finance, TD Bank Voting
Dr. Cynthia Crosson Psychologist Voting
Mr. Winthrop Handy Winthrop Handy Studios: Photography Voting
Atty. Lowry Heussler Attorney Cambridge, MA Voting
Mr. Gary Hough Executive Search Voting
Dr. Ira Kaplan DVM McGrath Animal Hospital --
Mr. Kevin Lambert Massachusetts Department of Veteren's Services Voting
Ms. Meghan Maceiko UnumProvident Corporation Voting
Ms. Laura McTaggart McTaggart Management Consulting Voting
Dr. Anita Migday DVM Slade Veterinary Hospital, Framingham, MA Voting
Ms. Beverly Stewart UNUMProvident Corporation Voting
Mr. Arthur Twiss Canines for Combat Veterans Reading, MA Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Bambi Azarian Real Estate Agent NonVoting
Mr. Ed Bradley -- NonVoting
Mr. Andrew Burke Law Student NonVoting
Mr Stephen Carey Polar Beverages NonVoting
Ms Maria Cerniauskas Therapist NonVoting
Mr. Matthew Collins NEADS Client NonVoting
Ms. Alexis Courneen NEADS Canines for Combat Veterans NonVoting
Mr. Paul DeMarkles American Airlines/Pilot NonVoting
Mr. Bill Densmore Non-profit consultant NonVoting
Ms. Debbie Depp-Wilson The Fenmore Group/VP Voting
Mr. Keith Dunn Westminster Cracker/GM,VP Ret. NonVoting
Ms. Jeanne Dupre Financial Advisor NonVoting
Mr. Timothy Edgar Ph.D Emerson College NonVoting
Ms. J. Stanley Edwards IBM SWG Program Manager NonVoting
Dana Esposito Graphic Artist NonVoting
Ms. Wendy Foster NEADS Client NonVoting
Mr. Bob Frederick Goodwill/Operations Manager NonVoting
Mr. James Hansman LPL Financial NonVoting
Mr. Norman Harkins Retired NonVoting
Mr. Joe Harney Consultant NonVoting
Mr. Ron Jenssen Financial Advisor NonVoting
Ms. Beth Johnson Leicester Middle School/Lead Teacher, Math NonVoting
Ms. Cheryl Johnson -- NonVoting
Mr. Paul Journet Montechusett Regional Technical School NonVoting
Ms. Sarah Keller Likens Military Friends Foundation/Ex. Director NonVoting
Ms. Kathryn Kempf Public Relations NonVoting
Mr. Brendan J. King Esq. Estate Preservation Attorney NonVoting
Ms. Kimberlie King Ph.D Psychologist NonVoting
Ms. Cynthia Korad Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Carol Krauss NEADS/Weekend Puppy Raiser NonVoting
Ms. Allie Kussin ARK-Ports of Change,Founding Director NonVoting
Ms. Alicia Lenahan Esq. Childrens Trust Fund/Chief Dev. Officer NonVoting
Ms. Cynthia Lucier Media Designer NonVoting
Mr. Paul MacKinnon Finance/Banking NonVoting
Ms. Veronica Madden Esq. MA DOC/Deputy Commissioner NonVoting
Ms. Gale Marshall Media Consultant NonVoting
Dr. Marianne Martin DVM Veterinarian NonVoting
Ms. Pamela Massad Esq. Fletcher Tilton NonVoting
Ms. Terri McCallister American Airlines/Pilot NonVoting
Mr. Brian McDonald Retired/Human Resources NonVoting
Mr. Gary McGrath M5Net/Regional Director --
Ms. Kara Milotte Boston College/MSW Program NonVoting
Cary Morrill Cook Assoc. Inc./VP NonVoting
Rep. Harold Naughton Jr. Massachusetts State Representative NonVoting
Mr. Scott Notargiacomo Morgan Stanley Graystone NonVoting
Mr. David O'Donnell Patriot Financial Group NonVoting
Mr. Andrew Plummer Executive Officer Navy Recruiting/NE --
Mr. Russ Pratt -- NonVoting
Ms. Elspeth Richie Chief Medical Officer/Dept. of Mental Health -- NonVoting
Ms. Ellen Rogers Author:Kasey to the Rescue NonVoting
Ms. Karen Rohan Aetna/Exec. VP,Specialty Products NonVoting
Ms. Mary Ellen Root Solid Benefits Group/Principal NonVoting
Ms. Margot Rutledge KidsWin.Org/Founder NonVoting
Ms. Deborah Sanford -- NonVoting
Mr. Kevin Sanford -- NonVoting
Ms. Carol Sim Health Care Executive NonVoting
Ms. Kim Stone -- NonVoting
Mr. Ray Stone -- NonVoting
Ms. Susan Sundquist UNUM NonVoting
Ms. Kathy Trout Community Volunteer NonVoting
Dr. Nick Trout DVM Angell Memorial/Orthopedic Surgeon --
Ms. Lori Tully Return to Life/Prudential Mgr. NonVoting
Ms. Kathy White NEADS Client NonVoting
Ms. Sue Willumsen Breeder: Labs and Beagles NonVoting
Mr. David Wilson Streamcast Media, President NonVoting
Ms. Karen Wojtanek Insurance Underwriter NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 95%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 80%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Sept 01, 2016 to Aug 31, 2017
Projected Income $2,540,400.00
Projected Expense $2,538,629.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $2,755,269 $4,023,518 $2,381,627
Total Expenses $2,402,397 $2,422,695 $2,372,295

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$699,200 $171,511 $356,512
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,070,952 $3,438,883 $1,726,666
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-198,681 $248,540 $134,553
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $182,183 $164,584 $160,708
Other $1,615 -- $3,188

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,990,554 $2,039,131 $2,048,596
Administration Expense $198,015 $198,937 $151,254
Fundraising Expense $213,828 $184,627 $172,445
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.15 1.66 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 84% 86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 31% 108% 48%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $7,097,371 $6,630,734 $4,969,869
Current Assets $585,530 $1,037,049 $203,657
Long-Term Liabilities $215,048 $234,823 $250,287
Current Liabilities $352,205 $218,665 $143,159
Total Net Assets $6,530,118 $6,177,246 $4,576,423

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $2,730,806.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose Under the leadership of CEO Gerry DeRoche, NEADS/Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans is undertaking the renewal and rehabilitation of the “Red House” located on Rt. 140 in Princeton, MA.
Campaign Goal $945,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates July 2012 - Aug 2014
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $10,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.66 4.74 1.42

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 3% 4% 5%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

NEADS has enjoyed a long history of sound prudent financial management. We are routinely a Charity Navigator 4 Star rated organization. In recent years we have experienced the same challenges as most not-for-profits: funding sources have been more difficult to maintain while expenses have continued to rise.
 
Our primary source of funds is individuals and foundation grants. We participate in the Combined Federal Campaign and have a loyal group of foundations and individual donors who have supported us for the past 36 years. We receive NO Federal funding. However, as part of our program we provide trained Assistance Dogs  to veterans at no charge. Non-veterans are asked to raise a $9,500 fee to help underwrite the costs to fully train an Assistance Dog. We estimate that our direct expense is approximately $25,000 per dog.
 
We strive to maximize the utilization of our donor contributions. 87% of our revenues are directed toward program related expenses. The nature of our business dictates that our fixed costs are fairly high with 64% of our expenses directed toward staff and such as trainers and kennel resources. 
 
As an organization we have been fortunate to have an endowment of approximately $25. million that has helped us to overcome revenue shortfalls. Unfortunately the stock market has performed poorly the past few years and we have shown an operating loss. One of  our immediate goals has been to establish a stronger major donor base. Over the past few years this group has aged and in some cases passed away.
 
We have a strategic goal to increase our client pairs per year by 50%. To accomplish this objective will require modest increases in expenditures inasmuch as we have much of the capacity in place. Regardless, we are confident that there will not be a 50% growth in expenses.
 
The need for our dogs is great. We remain committed to providing the very best canines in the most cost effective manner. 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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