Share |

Community Servings, Inc.

 18 Marbury Terrace
 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
[P] (617) 522-7777
[F] (617) 522-7770
www.servings.org
[email protected]
Tim Leahy
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1990
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 22-3154028

LAST UPDATED: 03/14/2019
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Community Servings is a not-for-profit food and nutrition organization providing services throughout Massachusetts to individuals and families living with critical and chronic illnesses. We give our clients, their dependent families, and caregivers appealing, nutritious meals, and send the message to those in greatest need that someone cares. Our goals are to help our clients maintain their health and dignity and preserve the integrity of their families through culturally appropriate, home-delivered meals, nutrition education, and other community programs.

Mission Statement

Community Servings is a not-for-profit food and nutrition organization providing services throughout Massachusetts to individuals and families living with critical and chronic illnesses. We give our clients, their dependent families, and caregivers appealing, nutritious meals, and send the message to those in greatest need that someone cares. Our goals are to help our clients maintain their health and dignity and preserve the integrity of their families through culturally appropriate, home-delivered meals, nutrition education, and other community programs.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $7,985,750.00
Projected Expense $7,510,208.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Food and Health Policy
  • Food is Medicine: Medically Tailored Nutrition Program for Individuals and Families Affected by Critical Illnesses 
  • Local Foods
  • Nutrition Education and Counseling
  • Teaching Kitchen Food Service Job-Training

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Community Servings is a not-for-profit food and nutrition organization providing services throughout Massachusetts to individuals and families living with critical and chronic illnesses. We give our clients, their dependent families, and caregivers appealing, nutritious meals, and send the message to those in greatest need that someone cares. Our goals are to help our clients maintain their health and dignity and preserve the integrity of their families through culturally appropriate, home-delivered meals, nutrition education, and other community programs.


Background Statement

Community Servings was founded in 1990 by a diverse coalition of AIDS activists, faith groups, and community organizations to provide home-delivered meals to individuals living with HIV/AIDS through the leadership of the American Jewish Congress. In June 2004, we expanded our mission, and we now serve as a health care intervention for the critically ill, regardless of illness, and an emergency feeding program for their dependents and caregivers. We serve clients in every Boston neighborhood and 20 surrounding cities and towns who are battling more than 35 different types of illnesses, including breast and other cancers, multiple sclerosis, HIV, liver and kidney disease, hepatitis, and lupus. Ninety-four percent (94%) of our clients live in poverty, and 65% come from communities of color.

In our Jamaica Plain nutrition facility, we produce 2,500 meals per day, engage 7,500 volunteers annually, offer on-site nutrition classes, and have integrated complimentary programs including food service job training. As we celebrate 29 years in operation, we have served more than 8 million meals to the critically ill since 1990, helping those from Massachusetts' most disenfranchised communities fight hunger and illness.

This year, we will serve more than 600,000 meals to 2,200 people affected by a critical or chronic illness. As part of our broader nutrition education program, we will provide 7,000 hours of nutrition education to more than 2,200 individuals affected by a critical or chronic illness. 


Impact Statement

Medically Tailored Nutrition Program & Nutrition Education/Counseling: In fiscal year 2018, we provided 619,662 medically tailored meals to 2,126 clients, their children and caregivers who were affected by a critical illness. As part of our broader nutrition education program, we provided 5,989 hours of nutrition education to 2,224 individuals. In fiscal year, 2019, we aim to serve 600,000 medically tailored meals to 2,200 individuals and families affected by a critical illness, and provide 7,000 hours of nutrition education to 2,200 individuals. 

Food and Health Policy Initiative: As part of this initiative, we recently published the results of two studies examining the impact of our meals program. The first study was as a retrospective analysis of claims data for Commonwealth Care Alliance clients receiving Community Servings' meals and was published in the leading health policy journal, Health Affairs, in April 2018. The results of a second research study, specific to food insecure individuals with advanced diabetes, were published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine in November 2018. These studies demonstrated the impact of Community Servings’ meals on health outcomes and cost savings.

To continue building the evidence base for our work, we are engaged in a significantly larger research study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s “Evidence for Action” program. In fiscal year 2019, we will complete this study and publish the data in a peer-reviewed academic journal.

Food Service Job-Training Program: Through our 12-week food service job-training program, we enrolled 37 trainees in fiscal year 2018 and 76% graduated. All are low-income and have multiple major barriers to employment such as criminal records, substance abuse, and homelessness. Eighty-six percent (86%) of graduates have found meaningful employment in our community and the majority (79%) retained their job for 30+ days. In fiscal year 2019, we will enroll 37 job trainees, graduate 80%, and place 75% in food-service related jobs.

Volunteer Program: In fiscal year 2018, 7,563 volunteers contributed 53,928 hours, helping us prepare, package and deliver our meals. In fiscal year 2019, we will welcome 7,500 volunteers who will contribute 54,000 hours.


Needs Statement

Food Campus Capital Expansion Project: Over the past five years, we have experienced a 63% growth in service, yet we still have more than 150 people too sick to feed themselves or their children on our waitlist. To address this demand, we are in the midst of the most significant capital and programmatic expansion in our history – the creation of a 31,000 square foot “Food Campus” on our property in Jamaica Plain. Our expansion will allow us to "grow in place," nearly triple the number of medically tailored meals produced each year from 600,000 to 1.5 million, serve a larger geographic service area, grow our job training and nutrition education programs, and expand our volunteer program. To fund this capital project, we are currently in the midst of a $10M capital campaign and we have raised $9.85M toward this goal. In May 2018, we broke ground on our Food Campus capital expansion project with the Mayor of Boston, CEO of the Nonprofit Finance Fund, and the Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health.

Programmatic Expansions: Our new “Food Campus” will afford us the opportunity to grow our medically tailored meals, job training, nutrition education, and volunteer programs. To provide the resources needed to expand our programs, we have a $1M fundraising goal.


CEO Statement

Dear Friend,

Community Servings is the story of a community coming together in support of our critically ill neighbors and their families. We were founded 29 years ago to deliver a hot dinner to 30 individuals struggling with HIV/AIDS in the communities of Roxbury and Dorchester. Due to community demand, we have since expanded to serve people throughout Massachusetts affected by many different illnesses, including cancer, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes. Throughout this growth, we have maintained our connection to our community.

Through our volunteer program which hosts 600 volunteers each month, our Teaching Kitchen workforce development program that offers individuals with obstacles to employment a second chance, a local foods program that supports local farms and food suppliers, and community-wide special events involving hundreds of local chefs, bakeries, and restaurants, Community Servings has created and sustained a large community and a powerful sense of caring for the critically ill. Together, we have prepared and delivered more than 8 million medically tailored meals for the critically ill!

We are currently at a critical moment in our history: we have more than 150 individuals on our waitlist in need of our medically tailored meals. To meet this demand, we are in the midst of a major expansion of our facility and programs through the construction of a 31,000 square foot "Food Campus" on our Jamaica Plain property. Our expansion will allow us to "grow in place," without disrupting current meal production, nearly triple the number of medically tailored meals produced each year from 600,000 to 1.5 million, serve a larger geographic service area, grow our job-training and nutrition education programs, and expand our volunteer program. To fund this ambitious project, we launched a $10M capital campaign, and we are asking the community to come together, once again, to help make this new building, and the significant program expansions it will afford us, a reality.

If you are inspired by what you learn through our Giving Common profile, we would welcome you to learn more through a visit to our facility for a tour! You can also make a difference in our work by volunteering, making a donation, or simply spreading the word about Community Servings.

Sincerely,

David Waters
CEO

 


Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- West Roxbury
CENTRAL REGION, MA

Boston, Braintree, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Framingham, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, Malden, Medford, Quincy, Randolph, Revere, Somerville, Weymouth, Winthrop, Worcester, Fitchburg, and Leominster.

Organization Categories

  1. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food Programs
  2. Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Food and Health Policy

The problems of food insecurity and inadequate nutrition are increasingly recognized by healthcare providers, patients, and communities as important social determinants of health which have health consequences at the up, mid and downstream levels. Launched in 2014, the goal of this initiative is to integrate medically tailored meals into healthcare payment and delivery models.

As part of this initiative, we have undertaken robust research studies in partnership with Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of North Carolina. Two of these studies were published in academic journals in 2018, the results of which provide compelling evidence that our medically tailored meals can provide a cost-effective critical-care nutrition intervention for the severely ill. This research demonstrates the impact of our medically tailored meals on health outcomes and cost savings, catalyzing the interest among insurers to contract with us to deliver medically tailored meals to some of their sickest and most vulnerable clients. Through our “Health Care Initiative,” we have five contracts with health insurers and providers, providing an emerging new revenue stream that is allowing us to expand our reach to serve more critically ill individuals in need.

Budget  --
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

1. Release the Food is Medicine State Plan in early 2019. This plan will assess existing Food is Medicine interventions and set forth policy recommendations to expand access to interventions.

2. Complete and publish the results of our third research study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s “Evidence for Action” program. This project, "Evaluating the Food is Medicine Approach on Health," will evaluate the impact of Community Servings' medically tailored meals program on health care expenditures, inpatient hospitalizations, and emergency room visits in severely ill and nutritionally vulnerable adults. The resulting data will be instrumental in building the evidence base and furthering our own work and that of the broader Food Is Medicine field. 

3. Build new partnerships with insurers to provide medically tailored meals to their most vulnerable patients. 

Program Long-Term Success 

1. The medically tailored meal intervention is included in the delivery of healthcare-related flexible services for severely ill populations

2. Enhance the visibility of our policy work locally and nationally.

3. Launch our Food and Health Policy Center, which will enable the replication and scaling of our medically tailored meal model nationally through a national Food is Medicine Accelerator.

Program Success Monitored By 

We will have succeeded when high quality home-delivered, medically tailored meals are a low-cost intervention used to prevent the need for costly acute care services, assure better health outcomes, independence, and an improved quality of life for the low-income, nutritionally vulnerable who battle a critical or chronic illness. This is a long-term measure (5-10 years) of our “Food is Medicine” work. Short-term benchmarks of success will include:

1. Reimbursement contracts with healthcare providers or payers are secured, including contract-specific referral and compliance systems.

2. Launch and implementation of the nation's first Food is Medicine State Plan, including dissemination of the report's recommendations, legislative briefings and technical assistance to FIM providers and key stakeholders.

3. Completion and publication of our retrospective study using the Massachusetts All-Payer Claims Database, in partnership with the University of North Carolina and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Evidence for Action program.

4. Presentations on the above research, Food is Medicine State Plan, and medically tailored meal intervention at state and national conferences including the Root Cause Coalition annual conference, national Food is Medicine Coalition annual conference, and the annual conference of the National Center for Complex Health and Social Needs.

Examples of Program Success 

To demonstrate the impact of our home-delivered, medically tailored meals, we recently undertook a rigorous examination of our meals program in partnership with Massachusetts General Hospital. This study examined Community Servings’ medically tailored meals and a non-medically tailored meals program as well as two control groups (i.e. people not receiving either meal type). Results showed that individuals who received Community Servings’ meals experienced fewer emergency room visits, inpatient admissions, and emergency transportation services, resulting in a 16% net reduction in healthcare costs.

This research was published in the leading health policy journal, Health Affairs, in April 2018 and provides compelling evidence that our medically tailored meals can provide a cost-effective critical-care nutrition intervention for the severely ill. The results of a second research study, specific to food insecure individuals with advanced diabetes, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine in November 2018, showed that patients receiving Community Servings’ home-delivered medically tailored meals, demonstrated statistically significant improvements in dietary quality, according to the Healthy Eating Index 2010, reduced food insecurity and purchasing trade-offs between buying food and medications, and better control of hypoglycemia.


Food is Medicine: Medically Tailored Nutrition Program for Individuals and Families Affected by Critical Illnesses 

Each year, Community Servings delivers 600,000 medically tailored meals to 2,200 individuals, dependents and caregivers affected by critical and chronic illnesses. We serve Massachusetts’ historically disadvantaged populations: 94% of our clients are living in poverty and 65% are from communities of color. Our clients live in every neighborhood of Boston as well as 20 surrounding cities and towns, reaching a geographic service area of 325 square miles. Community Servings is the only nutrition program of its kind in New England.

Serving individuals with multiple illnesses and chronic conditions, Community Servings’ medically tailored meal model aligns diet with clinical conditions as a means to maintain and/or improve health. We offer 15 different types of medically tailored diets that are customized by on-staff registered dietitian nutritionists into more than 80 different diet combinations based on an individual's primary illness, co-morbidities, and medication regimens. Medically tailored nutrition helps our clients combat specific diseases and manage the effects of drugs and other powerful medical treatments. 

Budget  $5,831,945.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Meal Distribution
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions People/Families of People with HIV/AIDS People/Families of People with Cancer
Program Short-Term Success 

1. 600,000 medically tailored meals will be served to 2,200 individuals, dependents and caregivers affected by a critical illness or chronic disease.

2. At least 50% of clients responding to our annual survey will report improved household food security.

3. At least 70% of clients responding to our annual survey will report improved health after starting our meals.

4. Clients will also report decreased hospitalizations after starting the meal service.

5. Referral partnerships will be maintained with more than 200 health and social service agencies.


Program Long-Term Success 

1. Promote the health of 2,200 individuals annually, helping our clients combat specific diseases and manage the effects of drugs and other powerful medicinal treatments.

2. Promote the food security of the families we serve, of which 94% live in poverty.

3. Prevent hospitalizations as a result of poor nutrition, a lack of healthy food access and an inability to follow a medically tailored diet.

Program Success Monitored By 

We regularly evaluate our programs and use the resulting data to ensure that we continue to serve our clients and other constituents as effectively and efficiently as possible.  

- We take comprehensive nutritional information from each new client and periodically update that data to monitor eating habits and judge the quality and effectiveness of our services.

- We evaluate a client’s progress through nutrition assessments and reassessments done by phone.

- We also solicit feedback through Client Surveys. Survey forms are distributed to every client in one of their meal deliveries and picked up later by members of our delivery team.

- In conjunction with JSI Research and Training Institute, Inc., we collect outcome measurements for a random sample of our HIV/AIDS clients. This includes clients’ viral load, adherence to medical therapies, level of side effects from HIV/AIDS medication, mental health status and level of self-sufficiency.

Examples of Program Success 

Maria: Age 63, living with acute-stage diabetes and cardiac disease

Maria says that there was a time when she and her sister were so overwhelmed each week from dealing with their health—diabetes, heart disease, and other issues—that making sure they had enough healthy food on hand was not always a priority. That changed for Maria when Community Servings started delivering medically tailored meals to the home in Boston’s Dorchester neighborhood that she shares with her sister Susan, who functions as Maria’s primary caregiver. Maria spent years battling acute-stage diabetes and cardiac disease. As a Community Servings client, Maria receives a delivery of lunches, dinners, and snacks each week that are customized to meet her nutritional and medical needs. As Maria’s caregiver, Susan also receives meals. “It was a blessing. You can just say it was a blessing to get these meals,” says Maria. “Because of Community Servings, we don’t have to worry about food being in the house, and the food we do buy goes further. The meals that get delivered are good … and I would say that both of us feel better because of it. We review our medications with our doctors and have seen a change in how many prescriptions we are dealing with.”

 


Local Foods

Through our Local Foods program, we work with more than a dozen farm partners to integrate 100,000lbs of local produce and product into our meals, elevating the nutrient quality of our meals for our sick, low-income, clients.


 

Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

1. Integrate a total of 100,000 pounds of local produce and product from a dozen local sources (identified local farms, farm-to-institution organizations and food aggregators) locally sourcing approximately 35% of our produce needs.

2. Include locally grown produce and products (fish/eggs/milk) in 50-75% of total meals delivered to the critically ill, their dependents and caregivers during the grant period.

3. Highlight local foods partnerships in our nutrition education newsletters so our clients have an increased understanding of how their meals are prepared and sourced.

Program Long-Term Success 

1. Foster ongoing partnerships with local farms and providers.

2. Elevate the nutrient quality of our meals, bringing fresh local foods to our clients, the majority of whom would be unable to regularly purchase or prepare similar quality foods.

3. Reduce our carbon footprint by reducing our purchasing from bulk suppliers and focusing on increased purchasing with local farms and farming cooperatives.

 
Program Success Monitored By 

1. Track the number of pounds of local foods purchased and donated.

2. Track the sources of local foods and number of partnerships

3. Track the number of meals that have increased nutrient quality as a result of local foods

4. Track percentage of meal consumption by clients and meal satisfaction

Examples of Program Success 

 

In 2011 we were able to retrieve more 27,650 pounds of local food for our meals, including produce, eggs, dairy and bread from eight local farms. The market value is equal to $53,000 worth of local food, which would have been thrown away or left in the fields, but was instead used to elevate our approach to nutrition care for the critically ill.  Approximately 25% of our produce needs during the growing season were met through the Farmers' Abundance initiative.


 


Nutrition Education and Counseling

Community Servings offers nutrition education for clients and individuals in the community who are nutritionally vulnerable, with the goal of teaching participants how to maintain and improve their health through the food choices they make and techniques they use to prepare food at home.  

Each year, we provide 7,000 hours of nutrition education to 2,200 individuals, through newsletters, workshops, and classes led by our Registered Dietitian Nutritionists. We are especially proud of our successful "Farm to Fork" program that combines free shares of local produce from farm partners with on-site nutrition education in our Nutrition Classroom.

 

Budget  --
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions Adults Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 

1. Provide 7,000 hours of nutrition education to the broader community of critically and chronically ill in fiscal year 2019. 

2. Reach 2,200 individuals in fiscal year 2019. Target groups include those living with HIV, cancer, diabetes, obesity, low-income families and homeless transitioning to housing.

 

Program Long-Term Success 

1. To advance the health of our clients and nutritionally vulnerable individuals in the community by teaching participants how to maintain and improve their health through the food choices they make and techniques they use to prepare food at home.

Program Success Monitored By 

To monitor the impact of our nutrition education program, we track the number of classes, nutrition counseling and nutrition assessments provided as well as class attendance. Post class participant surveys evaluate effectiveness and outcomes of the curriculum.

Examples of Program Success 

In fiscal year 2018, we significantly expanded our nutrition education program by launching several new initiatives, and we reached 2,224 individuals through this program.


Teaching Kitchen Food Service Job-Training

Community Servings’ Teaching Kitchen is a 12-week food service job-training program, focused on those with barriers to employment, hosting approximately 35-40 job trainees each year. 

Trainees learn basic cooking skills, life skills, food sanitation and receive job placement support. Most importantly, trainees build their self-confidence as they work alongside our staff to help us prepare and deliver meals to the critically ill, giving their job-training experience purpose, and connecting them to the communities in which they live.

Budget  $301,237.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Offenders/Ex-Offenders Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

1. 37 trainees will enroll in our Teaching Kitchen job training program in fiscal year 2019.

2. 80% will graduate.

3. 75% will be placed in food-service related jobs.

Program Long-Term Success 

1. Trainees with barriers to employment (ex-offenders, substance abuse, mental health challenges) gain specific technical and life skills for employment in the food service industry.

2. Job Placement is focused on living wage jobs that offer benefits.

3. We will maintain partnerships with 100 employers.

4. Job Retention: at least 80% will retain jobs for 30 days or more.
Program Success Monitored By 

1. We track trainees throughout the program through a comprehensive case management approach.

2. Job Placement is monitored at 3/6/9/12 months and trainees can receive employment support for up to one year.

3. Trainee self and program evaluations at the completion of the session.

4. Comprehensive data tracking: referral partners, applicants, enrollment, graduation rates, job placement, employment partners and job retention.
Examples of Program Success 
Teaching Kitchen Job Trainee Story
Kermit started the Teaching Kitchen program last year but dropped out after two weeks to take a full time job to support his family.  During this time away, he left the job, got into trouble and was arrested. He eventually made contact with Teaching Kitchen staff and asked for another chance.  Kermit said he knew the Teaching Kitchen program was a safe place for him where he could receive support and job skills.  After being accepted into our winter 2011 class, Kermit committed himself to the program, staying focused with an inspiring sense of determination. With staff support, Kermit graduated in March 2012. With job placement support, Kermit was placed in a full-time job with benefits at a large health institution’s dining services department, which fit with his family schedule. We check in with Kermit each month and are pleased to share he is just recently passed his three month mark at his new job!

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As mentioned, we are working to integrate medically tailored meals into healthcare payment and delivery models. We currently have five contracts with insurers. While these contracts have offered a new revenue stream and allowed us to expand our reach, the overwhelming majority of the client meals we serve are not reimbursed by an insurer/provider, and philanthropy is vital to sustaining this service.

Furthermore, for those clients whom insurance will cover, healthcare payers will only reimburse medically tailored meals for the sick individual, and not for any dependents or caregivers in the household. Ninety-four percent (94%) of our clients are food insecure and are living in poverty. Experience has shown us that meals delivered to only the ill client will be shared among hungry family members, so philanthropy enables us to serve all dependents in the household as well as the caregiver. This ‘whole home’ approach ensures the nutritional needs of the sick client are met and improves the food security of the entire household. This reduces the stress of families who are managing a life-threatening illness and the reality of not having enough food to eat.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. David B. Waters
CEO Term Start Dec 1999
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

David Waters, Community Servings' CEO, has been involved with Community Servings since its inception in 1989, moving from volunteer to board member, Board Chair, Director of Development, and eventually CEO, in 1999.

Under David’s leadership, Community Servings has evolved from a small neighborhood meals program delivering dinner to 30 people, to a critical regional program providing 15 medically tailored meals plans to 2,200 people with acute life-threatening illnesses, their dependents, and caregivers in 21 Massachusetts communities.

He manages the agency and oversees 55 staff members working in seven areas: nutrition and client services, food & health policy, kitchen and delivery, volunteer recruitment and management, finance, development and communications and food service job-training. His creativity and skill have enabled us to streamline our operations, improve cost efficiency, and serve a growing client base effectively, all while ensuring the highest quality of meals and client services.

He is the former Board Chair of the Association of Nutrition Service Agencies, and is a founding member of the national Food Is Medicine Coalition. In recognition of his leadership and impact at Community Servings and within the Greater Boston community, David was named a Barr Foundation Fellow in 2017.

David has more than 35 years of experience in food service management and holds graduate degrees from Middlebury College and Boston University.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Kevin Conner Director of Food Services

As Director of Food Services, Kevin oversees all kitchen operations including the preparation, cooking, packaging, handling and storage of 4,000 daily meals that are tailored to meet the needs of more than 15 different diets. Kevin, a native of upstate New York, has been a professional chef for 20 years. His culinary experience includes crafting menus and recipes at some of the region’s most well-known restaurants, including No. 9 Park, Radius, Union Bar Grille in Boston and Al Forno in Providence. Prior to joining the staff of Community Servings, Kevin worked as the Executive Chef at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Chef Conner is motivated by the significant impact that food can have on someone who is sick and he aims to integrate new recipes and different cuisines into the menu to help ensure that our medically tailored meals are flavorful, while still meeting the dietary needs of our clients. Kevin is a graduate of Johnson & Wales Culinary Arts Program.

Ms. Janet Dillon CFO

Janet handles all aspects of financial management from internal control and contract management to insurance and audits. In 2000, Janet came to Community Servings with 20 years of financial management experience at a wide variety of Boston area nonprofits, including Victory Programs. She currently serves on the steering committee of the Boston Nonprofit Financial Managers group.

Janet holds a Masters in Human Services Management from the Heller School of Social Welfare at Brandeis University.

Mr. Tim Leahy Vice President of Development and Communications

In his role as Chief Development Officer, Tim oversees all fundraising events, including Pie in the Sky and LifeSavor, and directs the effort to secure corporate and foundation grants as well as individual donors. He is also responsible for the agency’s online presence, print communications, and press.

Tim brings more than 23 years of fundraising and communications experience, along with a food service background, to the job. He worked for 16 years in the food service industry, from ice cream parlors to fine dining, and for six years in sales and marketing, with the world’s largest Macintosh computer show, MacWorld Expo. After years of working in the private sector, Tim chose to dedicate his efforts to nonprofit development. Before coming to Community Servings in 1999, Tim served for two years as the Director of Development for the Boston Salvation Army and for three years at the United Way of Dutchess County, NY. Tim has long been a passionate supporter of HIV/AIDS and hunger-relief causes, volunteering for a number of organizations and participating in the AIDS LifeCycle from 2009 – present, and the Harbor to the Bay bike ride from 2003 – present. He received a BA in English and Economics from UMASS Boston.

 

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Four Start Rating Charity Navigator 2016
Four Star Rating Charity Navigator 2015
Neighborhood Builders Bank of America 2015
Four Star Rating Charity Navigator 2014
Four Star Rating Charity Navigator 2013
Four Star Rating Charity Navigator 2011
Four Star Rating Charity Navigator 2010
New England Innovation Award Smaller Business Association of New England 2009
Nonprofit Innovation Award Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2009
Congressional Hunger Award Congressional Hunger Center 2007

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

We have created strong, lasting partnerships with more than 200 healthcare providers and social service agencies to leverage the knowledge and effectiveness of all involved. Examples include: Boston Medical Center, Boston Healthcare for the Homeless, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, and AIDS Action Committee of MA.

We have research and policy partnerships with Massachusetts General Hospital, the University of North Carolina, the Nonprofit Finance Fund, the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation at Harvard Law School and we are a founding member of both the Food is Medicine Coalition and the Root Cause Coalition.

In partnership with the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, we are leading the development of the nation's first Food is Medicine State Plan, which we expect to release in early 2019. This plan will assess existing Food is Medicine interventions and set forth policy recommendations to expand access to interventions.

Within our Teaching Kitchen job-training program, we have developed relationships with 80 referral partners and more than 100 employers to introduce them to the program and develop job-placement partnerships. Other partnerships include Catalyst Kitchen, MA Job Training Alliance and MPACT, and the MA Professional Association of Culinary Trainers.

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 53
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 7,500
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 20
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 34
Hispanic/Latino: 8
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 28
Male: 27
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Boiler and Machinery
Commercial General Liability
Computer Equipment and Software
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
General Property Coverage
Medical Health Insurance
Special Event Liability
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Karen Bressler
Board Chair Company Affiliation Amuleto Mexican Table
Board Chair Term June 2017 - June 2020
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Liliana Bachrach Philanthropist --
Ms. Karen Bressler Reinhart / AGAR Voting
Ms. Mary-Catherine Deibel UpStairs on the Square Voting
Ms. Beverly Edgehill The TJX Companies, Inc. Voting
Ms. Robin Glasco Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Ms. Maureen Goggin Partners Healthcare --
Ms. Amy Gorin Community Activist Voting
Mr. Dave Hamilton Bain Capital Voting
Mr. Garrett Harker Eastern Standard, Island Creek Oyster Bar, Row 34, The Hawthorne, Branch Line, Les Sablons Voting
Mr. Dan Heintzelman Retired Voting
Ms. Thea James Boston Medical Center Voting
Mr. Corby Kummer Atlantic Monthly Voting
Ms. Michela Larson Michela Larson, LLC Voting
Ms. Diane LeClair Greenberg, Rosenblatt, Kull & Bitsoli, P.C. Voting
Ms. Catherine R. Matthews Philanthropist Voting
Ms. Sian McAlpin John Hancock Financial Services Voting
Ms. Diane Moes Partner, Donaghue Barrett & Singal, PC Voting
Mr. Larry Moulter UMASS Boston Voting
Mr. Richard Musiol Citizens Bank of Massachusetts Voting
Ms. Tristam Oakley Google Voting
Ms. Helen Rasmussen Tufts University Voting
Mr. Gary Sherr Principal Owner Carl P. Sherr & Co, LLC Voting
Ms. Fredi Shonkoff Retired Health Care Administrator Voting
Mr. Ken Tutunjian Coldwell Banker Voting
Mr. Eric Weil Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Mr. Peter Zane Investor Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Oedipus -- Oedipus Foundation --
Mr. Michael Ansara Open Source --
Mr. Ron Ansin Ansin Foundation --
Mr. Carl Axelrod Brown Rudnick --
Mr. Alan Balsam Brookline Board of Health & Services --
Ms. Julie Barron VP, Fiduciary Trust Company --
Mr. Henry Berman CEO, Association of Small Foundations --
Ms. Lisa Burlingham Retired Nurse --
Mr. Trey Byrnes President, Inverness Financial Group, Inc. --
Ms. Kathleen Connor Lora Piana --
Mr. Jeff Conrad President & Founder, AgIS Capital LLC --
Ms. Carol Cosenza UMass Boston --
Mr. Kenneth F. Dec Senior Vice President, Client Service, MC2 --
Ms. Shiela Decter JALSA --
Mr. Serge Denis Langham Hotel --
Ms. Deborah Devaux Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA --
Mr. Ronald Gibson Human Resources Consultant --
Mr. David Hayter Philanthropist --
Mr. Kevin Hogan Chubb Insurance --
Mr. Anthony E. Hubbard Attorney, Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. --
Ms. Deborah Hughes UpStairs on the Square --
Ms. Barbara Jordan Philanthropist --
Mr. Blake Jordan Highland Street Foundation --
Ms. Karen Kaplan Hill Holliday --
Mr. Edgar Knudson Retired, National Amusements --
Ms. Ellen Kurz Consultant --
Mr. Peter Lannan Lannan Chevrolet-Oldsmobile Inc. --
Ms. Mary Lapointe Philanthropist --
Ms. Julie Linsdell Management Consultant --
Mr. Mark Lippolt HAMMOND RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE, LLC --
Mr. Glynn Lloyd City Fresh Foods --
Ms. Stephanie Lovell -- --
Mr. Christopher Mayer Philanthropist --
Mr. John Milligan Retired --
Ms. Nancy Norman MASS BEHAVIORAL HEALTH PARTNERSHIP --
Mr. Richard D. Olson Jr. -- --
Mr. Bob Pemberton Philanthropist --
Mr. John Pepper Boloco --
Ms. Colette Phillips Colette Phillips Communications --
Mr. Jay Philomena INDEPENDENT DESIGN PROFESSIONAL --
Ms. Doreen Rigby State Street Bank --
Mr. Oliver Rosen DECIPHERA PHARMACEUTICALS --
Mr. Charles Roussel COLLEGE OF AMERICAN PATHOLOGISTS --
Mr. Dan Salera Salera Consulting --
Mr. Phil Schneider Brown Rudnick --
Mr. Dan Scully INDEPENDENT MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT --
Jhana Senxian SUSTAINABILITY GUILD INTERNATIONAL --
Mr. Darryl Settles DARRYL'S CORNER BAR --
Ms. Michelle Shell Harvard Business School --
Mr. Adam Sholley BROWN UNIVERSITY --
Ms. Jodie Silverman The Medical Foundation --
Ms. Doreen Vigue COMCAST CORPORATION --
Mr. David Whitman Coldwell Banker --
Mr. Bob Wiggens Gourmet Caterer --
Ms. Simone Williamson Be Our Guest --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 21
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 16
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Capital Campaign
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Revenue $11,747,663 $9,434,456 $6,032,731
Total Expenses $7,173,224 $6,196,926 $5,836,398

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $2,131,245 $1,895,769 $1,673,257
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $2,131,245 $1,895,769 $1,673,257
Individual Contributions $6,780,626 $4,961,122 $2,277,028
Indirect Public Support -- -- $0
Earned Revenue $1,421,193 $1,244,107 $895,843
Investment Income, Net of Losses $44,444 $10,013 $6,461
Membership Dues -- -- $0
Special Events $1,370,155 $1,305,845 $1,180,142
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $17,600 $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Program Expense $5,453,862 $4,762,554 $4,382,709
Administration Expense $669,864 $603,633 $871,695
Fundraising Expense $1,049,498 $830,775 $581,994
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.64 1.52 1.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses 76% 77% 75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 10% 10% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Assets $11,750,020 $7,062,048 $3,873,383
Current Assets $10,654,983 $6,523,534 $3,452,559
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $437,147 $473,814 $522,643
Total Net Assets $11,312,873 $6,588,234 $3,350,740

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose

To construct a 31,000 square foot "Food Campus" on our Jamaica Plain property in order to meet an urgent demand for our medically tailored meals.

Campaign Goal $10,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Jan 2016 - Nov 2019
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $9,850,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 24.37 13.77 6.61

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

Summary financial data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, the above charts and graphs do not include the revenue, assets, nor expenses of the affiliates Marbury Terrace, Inc. and CS Amory, Inc.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

When individuals are ill, one of the first things to deteriorate is good nutrition, making recovery and stabilization much more difficult, if not impossible. For these individuals, the role of medically tailored nutrition cannot be overstated. Our priority is to make sure our clients do not go hungry despite the debilitating effects of a devastating illness and scarce economic resources. Our goals are to supply the acutely ill with the nutrition they need to support effective medical treatment and recovery; relieve our clients of the burdens of shopping and food preparation, and provide essential economic assistance to the 94% of our clients who are living in low-income households.

Our objectives within these goals are to:

1. Improve the health, quality of life, and ability to perform routine activities among nutritionally vulnerable primary clients, their dependent children and caregivers through the provision of culturally appropriate, medically tailored meals.

2. Offer a wide range of nutrition education services to our clients and the broader community of critically and chronically ill.

3. Expand our social justice vision by providing food-service job training to low-income trainees and partnering with local farms and farmers to use fresh local foods in our meals.

In the healthcare community, there is growing recognition of food insecurity as a key social determinant of health. Studies show that food insecurity is related to lower nutrient intakes, poorer health, and a higher probability of being hospitalized. Furthermore, poor nutrition is an important contributor to the development and management of chronic diseases, and healthcare providers, patients, and communities are increasingly recognizing the role that medically tailored nutrition has on individuals affected by critical and chronic illnesses. As a thought leader in the field of Food is Medicine, we are advocating for formal inclusion and reimbursement of medically tailored meals by healthcare providers and insurers as an innovative component of care for the severely ill. By promoting medical nutrition therapy as part of an integrated approach to holistic health, we will broaden our reach to bring our medically tailored meal intervention to individuals who need it most.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

1. Expand Home-Delivery of Medically-Tailored Meals: continue to expand our nutrition program, generating the resources and capacity to produce 1.5M medically tailored meals annually in our new building, reaching more low-income, severely ill individuals and their family members. This includes continued expansion of our geographic service area, to underserved communities and regions. 

2. Increase Nutrition Education & Counseling: expand our on and off site nutrition education opportunities for our clients and the broader community of critically and chronically ill.

3. Engage in “Food is Medicine” Policy Advocacy: continue to leverage our expertise in the fields of nutrition and health to advance the integration of medically tailored meals into healthcare payment and delivery models. Conduct additional research that further supports the impact of our home-delivered medically tailored meal model on health outcomes and cost savings.

 


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

History and Expertise: Over our 29-year history, Community Servings has provided more than 8 million medically tailored meals to thousands of individuals with critical and chronic illnesses. Community Servings is unique within the region; no other agency provides comparable medically tailored meals, particularly with regard to the diversity of chronic disease populations served and the number, variety, and combinations of medically tailored meals offered. 

Recognition for our Work: Nationally, Community Servings has received the respect of colleagues in our field and public recognition for our work. We regularly present data on our nutrition model at national conferences including the 2018 Root Cause Coalition, MIT Sloan’s Designing for Health Conference, and the 2018 Invest in Results Boston Conference. Furthermore, we have published the results of two research publications in the academic journals Health Affairs and the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Our evidence-based research was featured in a May 2018 Food is Medicine Congressional Briefing on Capitol Hill and in the Associated Press, Boston Globe and other major outlets.

Food is Medicine Thought Leadership & Collaborations: Through our Food and Health Policy Initiative, we have deepened our engagement in “food is medicine” in Massachusetts and nationally. For the past six years, we have co-hosted an annual “Food is Medicine Symposium” at Harvard Law School, bringing speakers from across the country to present research and best practices in the field. Recognizing the value of Food is Medicine interventions among the nutritionally vulnerable, Community Servings has partnered with The Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation at Harvard Law School to launch the Massachusetts Food is Medicine Statewide Plan. The plan aims to increase access to medically tailored Food is Medicine interventions across the state by convening healthcare providers, payers, and policy leaders and conducting cutting-edge research over the next year.

Research: As part of our food and health policy initiative, we recently completed two research projects and results provide compelling evidence that our medically tailored meals can provide a cost-effective critical-care nutrition intervention for the severely ill. We and are undertaking a third research study funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s “Evidence for Action” program.

Funding Partners: Thousands of individual donors, foundations such as the Yawkey Foundation and the Cummings Foundation, along with corporate donors and sponsors including Citizens Bank, Liberty Mutual and State Street provide the resources needed to meet the demands of our mission.

Volunteers: To accomplish our mission, we welcome 7,500 unique volunteers who donate almost 54,000 hours annually. Our robust volunteer program is the backbone of our operations.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

As we plan for major programmatic expansions in our new building, we have developed the following short (FY2019) and long-term (FY2023) objectives, which we will measure through internal data collection and evaluation.

1. Medically Tailored Meals Program:

FY19: 600,000 medically tailored meals are provided to 2,200 individuals, dependents and caregivers affected by a critical or chronic illness across our geographic service area. Waitlisted clients are transitioned onto our meal service within 90 days.

FY23: 800,000 medically tailored meals are provided to 3,100 individuals, dependents, and caregivers affected by a critical or chronic illness.

2. Nutrition Education Program: 

FY19: Provide 7,000 hours of nutrition education to 2,200 individuals and the broader community of critically and chronically ill through workshops, classes, and newsletters. 

FY23: Provide 9,100 hours of nutrition education to 3,100 clients and the broader community of critically and chronically ill through workshops, classes, and newsletters. 

3. "Food Campus" Capital Expansion Project:

FY19: Reach our $10M capital campaign goal, and raise an additional $1M to provide the resources needed for our programmatic expansion. 

FY20: Complete construction (fall 2019) of our new 31,000 square foot Food Campus. 

4. Teaching Kitchen Job Training Program:

FY19: 37 trainees enroll in our Teaching Kitchen job training program, and we offer four 12-week sessions over the course of the year. All of our job trainees are low-income with multiple major barriers to employment such as criminal records and homelessness. We maintain relationships with 100 employment partners including hotels, hospitals, restaurants and smaller food-service facilities such as residential programs, and 80 different referral partners who referred potential trainees to our program, including The Work Place, JobNet, and Career Link.

FY23: 56 trainees enroll in our Teaching Kitchen job training program, and we offer six training sessions over the course of the year.

5. Health Care Initiative:

FY19: Raise $1.2M in revenue through contracts with healthcare payers to serve their most vulnerable clients.

FY23: Raise $2M in revenue through contracts with healthcare payers to serve their most vulnerable clients.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

The publication of our two research studies, a small clinical trial with acute stage Type II food insecure diabetes patients and a larger study of medical claims data of contract clients and a control group, have been transformative for Community Servings. This body of outcomes-based research is strengthening our case with new and current insurers who are contracting with us for our medically tailored meals to lower the health costs and improve health outcomes for their patients. By building the evidence base for our nutrition model, we are making a compelling return-on-investment (ROI) case to expand contracts within healthcare. This expands our ability to bring our medically tailored meal model to those who are sick and food insecure. We have partnerships with five insurers to deliver medically tailored meals to their most vulnerable patients. Looking ahead, we will continue to work to integrate home-delivered meals into the health care delivery system as a matter of good public health and cost containment.

Building on these research and policy efforts, Community Servings has partnered with The Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation at Harvard Law School to launch the Massachusetts Food is Medicine Statewide Plan. The plan aims to increase access to medically tailored Food is Medicine interventions across the state by convening healthcare providers, payers, and policy leaders and conducting cutting-edge research over the next year. We expect this plan to be released in early 2019.

Our nutrition program continues to experience significant growth. Over the past 5 years we have experienced a 63% growth in service. In fiscal year 2018, we served more than 619,000 medically tailored meals, made from scratch meals to 2,126 clients, their dependent children and caregivers affected by critical and chronic illness. Unfortunately, there is still an unmet demand for our medically tailored meals. We have more than 150 medically certified individuals waiting to start our nutrition service. While we try to transition these clients to our nutrition program within three months, this is far too long for someone who is food insecure and critically or chronically ill.

To address this demand, we are in the midst of the most important endeavor in our 29-year history: a major expansion of our facility and programs through the construction of a 31,000 square foot “Food Campus” on our Jamaica Plain property. Our expansion will allow us to "grow in place," without disrupting current meal production, nearly triple the number of medically tailored meals produced each year from 600,000 to 1.5 million, serve a larger geographic service area, grow our job-training and nutrition education programs, and expand our volunteer program. In May 2018, we broke ground on our “Food Campus” capital expansion project. Joining us in this celebration were the Mayor of Boston and the MA Commissioner of Public Health. We anticipate completing construction in fall 2019.