Share |

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Inc.

 885 Washington Street
 Boston, MA 02111
[P] (617) 635-5129
[F] (617) 292-1887
http://www.bcnc.net
[email protected]
Nathaniel Kerr
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1969
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7209691

LAST UPDATED: 08/28/2017
Organization DBA BCNC
Former Names Quincy School Community Council (1995)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of BCNC is to ensure that the children, youth, and families we serve have the resources and supports they need to achieve greater economic success and social well-being.

Mission Statement

The mission of BCNC is to ensure that the children, youth, and families we serve have the resources and supports they need to achieve greater economic success and social well-being.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $6,247,635.00
Projected Expense $6,076,700.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Adult Education & Workforce Initiatives
  • Child Care & Enrichment Programs:
  • Family Services
  • Pao Arts Center
  • Youth Center

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of BCNC is to ensure that the children, youth, and families we serve have the resources and supports they need to achieve greater economic success and social well-being.


Background Statement

 

There are 349,768 Asians residing in Massachusetts, a community that represents the fastest growing racial groups in New England with a 47% growth rate between Census 2000 and 2010. Current census data shows that the Chinese community remains the largest Asian subgroup with approximately 122,957 residing within the state. Middlesex, Norfolk, and Suffolk are the counties with the greatest number of Asians. While the largest concentrations of Asians are in Boston (60,712), the cities of Malden (12,448) and Quincy (22,968) have two of the highest percentages of Asians among their population, 21% and 25% respectively. At approximately 10% of the overall population, Asians account for the largest minority group in Middlesex and Norfolk counties.

Based on census reporting Massachusetts is ranked fourth highest in household inequality among all 50 states and that these lines of inequality highlight an ethnic and racial divide that is pervasive throughout the region. In Boston: 23% of African Americans, 31% of Latinos, and 30% of Asians live below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), compared to just 13% of Whites. In Malden: 21% of Asians live below FPL compared to 11% Whites. In Quincy the numbers are closer: 10% of Asians are below FPL compared to 9% of Whites. (Source: 2008-2012 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates)

The effects of the economic divide are felt deeply by Asian American and Asian immigrant families. For many Asian immigrants and Asian Americans the model minority myth does not hold, and this stereotype can be an obstacle to their own economic development and receiving much-needed support.

Since 1969, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC) has worked to address the needs of the Asian American and Asian American community through a comprehensive continuum of services that support adults’ ability to work, such as teaching English, providing child care, and offering educational support for children. Over the past 48 years, BCNC has grown along with the community it serves – As the Asian immigrant and Asian American community in the Greater Boston area diversified and expanded, BCNC continues its commitment to comprehensive, constituent-focused, family-centered programs.

 


Impact Statement

As a family-centered organization, BCNC seeks to leverage resources and maximize impact with families through coordination and alignment of services from toddler to adult. Over 2016-2017, BCNC served over 2,600 people with an annual operating budget of $5,230,648. Over 70% of BCNC’s constituents meet poverty guidelines for food stamps, Mass Health Insurance, or subsidized child care. Of the youth served by BCNC, 88% are of Chinese descent, and 77% do not speak English at home. Of the adults served, nearly 100% are immigrants, 98% have Chinese as their primary language and one-third have less than a 9th grade education from their home country.

With a long history of success, some of BCNC’s 2016-2017 accomplishments include:

  • BCNC opened the Pao Arts Center in May 2017, a new creative placemaking initiative whose goal is to mitigate the negative impacts of gentrification and displacement.

  • Executive Director Giles Li received the Mass Nonprofit Network’s Nonprofit Excellence Award.

  • BCNC hired its first full-time family coordinator at its Quincy site in fall of 2016, increasing its capacity to serve south shore families.

  • In BCNC’s Youth Center, 100% of high school seniors graduated high school and matriculated at post-secondary institutions with financial aid packages.

Not willing to rest on its achievements, BCNC’s organizational goals for 2017-2022 are:

  • Protecting the cultural vitality of Chinatown amidst gentrification; this goal will be achieved by engaging 250 residents and 10 community-based artists/arts organizations annually in placemaking efforts at the newly established Pao Arts Center.

  • Increase programmatic impact in Quincy by; 1) increasing the number of adult learners served by 66%; 2) increase number of at-risk families served through wrap around case management services by 56%, and; 3) fully replicating the agency’s College Access Program in Quincy.

  • Improve family wellness by; 1) increasing number of Family Connector case manager positions from 2 to 4; 2) doubling the agency’s case management capacity and; 3) redesigning BCNC’s physical spaces to better support families.


Needs Statement

 

While the numbers of families in Massachusetts qualifying for and utilizing state-funded services has skyrocketed, the funding for many programs that ease the burden of poverty and support children’s development were cut due to state budget shortfalls. For instance, in 2012 the state cut funding to public pre-kindergarten child care by 38%, making affordable child care less available for working parents (Kahn, Charlotte B.; Martin, Jessica K. City of Ideas: Reinventing Boston’s Innovation Economy (2012), p. 36). Lack of low-cost child care makes staying home and out of the workforce a more cost-effective option for many parents. BCNC’s Acorn Center for Early Education and Care fills an important gap in affordable high quality child care services for low-income immigrant families. Approximately 70% of BCNC’s Acorn families meet Federal poverty guidelines and receive assistance to support the cost of care. The program allows families to focus on working or participating in job training to advance their careers and achieve greater self-sufficiency, and provides children with the skills for school success. Additionally, the state’s health promotion and disease prevention programs were cut by 77% and employment services by 80%. BCNC’s nutrition and exercise programs for adults, and recreational activities for youth, provide linguistically and culturally appropriate outreach and health education that is no longer provided by the state. Families are further supported by BCNC in navigating the Boston Public School system and social service departments to ensure they have access to the resources they need. BCNC’s Adult Education program provides new immigrants with language classes and job preparation classes—all of which put immigrants on a path to increased education, career advancement and integration.


CEO Statement

 

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC) was founded in 1969 based on two premises – community members know best what their needs are, and strong families create strong communities. Throughout the years BCNC has remained true to its commitment to being responsive to the needs of those we serve while striving for excellence in the delivery of those services. I truly believe these core values are why we have naturally expanded beyond the Chinatown neighborhood-based after school program we started out as so many years ago.

BCNC’s development into a multi-faceted mid-sized organization is necessitated in our responsiveness to the needs of the families we serve, which has been demonstrated time and again throughout our history. BCNC’s connection to the community is reflected in the diversity of our leadership, staff, and the strengths-based and family-centered approach in empowering and learning from our participants that permeates all of our programing.

Growing up locally in an Asian immigrant family, spending more than a decade in Boston’s non-profit field, and now serving as BCNC’s Executive Director, I have personally witnessed the changing demographics of our constituent population and the rapid growth of Asian populations in the region (2010 US Census). Boston’s Asian population grew by 27% between 2000 and 2010, making it the fastest growing racial group regionally, but still does not even compare to the growth in cities like Quincy (65%) and Malden (51%).

It is because of population shifts like these that BCNC identified a priority area in our most recent strategic plan, to address the changing demographics and retain the cultural vitality of Chinatown. Because of changes in environment, housing prices, and social support networks in the region, large numbers of families are choosing to live in other places. In the past several years, BCNC has seen a consistent number of constituents coming to us from these cities and towns. As an organization that considers the full range of needs among our constituents, it became clear that we needed to both establish a site outside of Chinatown to best support families where they live, while also reaffirming our commitment to strengthening the social fabric and cultural identity of the neighborhood. Accordingly, BCNC established a satellite office in Quincy in 2014 and opened the Pao Arts Center in Chinatown in May of 2017. We are continuing to look ahead, and preparing the organization to offer our expertise
and high-quality services to the communities where we can maximize impact. Now, more than ever, there is a clear need for a regional organization like BCNC, with a proven track record of innovative, family-centered, collaborative, and culturally and ethnically competent services.

BCNC was founded by the community in order to fulfill community needs, and we continue to do so within the context of our constituent population becoming more diverse, expansive, and multi-generational. Today, BCNC is honored to be the largest regional social service providers for Asian American and Asian immigrant families in the area. Moving forward, even as the community’s geographic boundaries change and grow, we will continue to work to make our services more accessible to those most in need of our support.

Giles Li

Executive Director

Board Chair Statement

 

Serving on BCNC’s board is rewarding because I know that the services we provide to the community are transformational. When I was growing up in New York’s Chinatown, the resources available to the immigrant community were very limited. By comparison, the breadth and depth of what BCNC provides today shows how far we have come as a community. And yet, I am constantly reminded of the challenges faced by the newly arrived immigrants who encounter years of hardship adjusting to a new culture. Many leave loved ones behind in their homeland to seek their version of the American Dream, and then face isolation in the U.S. because of their inability to speak English.

One of BCNC’s most notable achievements is in its service model--BCNC not only provides opportunities for individual growth, but also supports the development of families and the community. It is these ties that bind me to BCNC’s mission, a mission to provide the resources to the children, youth and families that we serve to improve their economic and social well-being.

In 2016, BCNC launched a new five-year strategic plan which recognizes that in order to address the needs of our constituents in a relevant way, BCNC must meet the needs of a growing community by expanding its reach to satellite cities such as Quincy, protecting the cultural vitality of Chinatown, strengthening its family-centered programs, and more deeply engaging constituents and institutional partners to drive positive change for the people BCNC serves. Though reorganizing and aligning programs and building services in other cities are daunting tasks for a community-based organization, I’m proud that we have made significant progress with these goals.

Nationally, Asians are the fastest growing demographic group, with growth driven mostly by immigration. In Massachusetts, the Asian population increased 46 % from 2000 to 2010 and now numbers approximately 350,000. In the city of Quincy, almost 25% of residents are Asian immigrants or of Asian descent. At BCNC, we witnessed this burgeoning population growth in the number of people who access our programs and since the majority of our participants are low income and in need of linguistically and culturally appropriate services, our waitlists have grown in step with the population.

As we grow and evolve, organizational challenges manifest in different ways. In our programming, we are challenged to address increasing demand for our services while maintaining a commitment to high quality programs. We also recognize the need to develop opportunities for participant and staff growth while we strive to improve and integrate our service delivery. We have implemented a performance measurement system to measure and track outcomes. By evaluating the results, we can fine-tune our programs to have more impact. In this way, as an organization we are able to be strategic, deliberate, and mindful of the need to keep quality and community at the forefront. In our expansion efforts, the challenge is to replicate our high quality and high impact programming while learning and adapting to a new environment.

In the nonprofit sector, there is always the simultaneous challenge of investing resources in operational support while also developing new programs and services. To address this, we are fundraising with greater rigor, diversifying our revenue base and keeping our operations efficient and nimble. Looking towards the future, I am confident that BCNC will continue transforming lives and making a positive difference in our community for generations to come.

Eugene Mahr

Board President, BCNC



Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

BCNC has expanded its reach to become a critical service provider and regional leader for Asian Americans of all ages and income levels in New England, with program participants coming from Suffolk, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, Essex, Bristol, and Worcester counties. Of over 2,000 people BCNC serves each year, an equal number of its community members reside outside Boston city limits as those within. In Boston, 50% of its participants call the neighborhoods of Chinatown, South End and Back Bay home, while the other half represents virtually every neighborhood in the city, including Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Outside Boston, 46% of BCNC’s program participants are from Quincy, 26% are from the Middlesex County towns of Malden and Medford, and 28% are from surrounding areas. Recognizing the quality of BCNC services, a number of participants travel from communities that are over 20 miles away, such as Andover, Acton and Bridgewater.

 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services
  2. Education - Adult Education
  3. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Adult Education & Workforce Initiatives

BCNC Adult Education and Workforce Initiatives provides ESOL classes and pre-vocational skills training for 315 adult learners every year. Classes are offered both in the morning and in the evening to accommodate student schedules. Additional program activities and services include digital literacy classes, a volunteer tutoring program, educational and career advising, and citizenship and naturalization assistance.


Of the over 300 adults served by the program each year, approximately 40% come from Suffolk County, 33% from Norfolk, 23% from Middlesex, and the remainder from Essex and Plymouth Counties. Nearly 100% are immigrants, 98% have Chinese as their primary language and one-third have less than a 9th grade education from their home country. 60% have been in the US for less than five years; of those, 46% have been here for less than one year.

Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Ethnic & Immigrant Groups
Population Served Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage At-Risk Populations Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 
  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #1: AE Boston will move from “Meets Standard” to “Advanced” on the Learner Gains Benchmarks performance rating issued by the state each year. “Advanced” programs are defined as those that ensure 50% or more of all students demonstrate “significant gain” on one of the state-approved standardized assessments for English Language learning.

  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #2: 80% of all participants will have identified an educational/career plan of action for enrolling in a post-secondary institution, job training program, or obtaining a mainstream job.

Program Long-Term Success  The long term goal of BCNC's Adult Education and Workforce Initiatives Program is to increase the number of low-income adult immigrant learners who successfully enroll in post-secondary education, job training programs, or mainstream jobs.
Program Success Monitored By  BCNC has invested over a quarter of a million dollars in program evaluation and related systems, staffing, and training, including a customized Social Solutions Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) deployment. In order to achieve maximum impact and sustainability, BCNC strongly believes that programs and services should not be blindly developed, but rather be evidenced-based and driven by actual community needs. With that being said, BCNC undergoes an extensive Evaluation Management process quarterly. At each review, Senior Management updates and refines the following evaluation documents that have been tailored to each program, the services offered, and community served.
Examples of Program Success  .

Child Care & Enrichment Programs:

BCNC supports working families through child care programs, the Acorn Center for Early Education and Care, the Red Oak After School and Summer program, and the Family Child Care (FCC) program.


The Acorn Center is an NAEYC-accredited program serving 81 children (15 months to 6 years) with dual language early education 5 days a week from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm. The dual language model promotes bilingualism and healthy brain development.


FCC is Greater Boston’s only Chinese family child care system, providing licensed child care that is linguistically and culturally accessible. FCC supports providers with workshops on state licensing, business management and childhood development, and a pathway to further postsecondary education.


The Red Oak After School and Summer program offers affordable licensed care with arts enrichment and literacy development to 100 children in grades K through 8 in a multilingual environment, after school during the school year and full days during the summer.


Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Child Care
Population Served Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Acorn:
  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #1: 81 children in Greater Boston will have access to quality early education and care at Acorn Center for Early Education and Care

  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #2: 100% of families in Acorn Center for Early Education and Care will have access to high quality early education and care that is culturally and linguistically competent.

  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #3: 95% of children in Acorn Center for Early Education & Care will thrive in all domains of development and children with special needs will receive support to obtain services.

Family Child Care: 
  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #1: 100% of families in BCNC’s Family Child Care program will have access to high quality early education and care that is culturally and linguistically competent.

  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #2: 95% of children in BCNC system homes will thrive in all domains of development and children who need special needs services will receive support to acquire them.

  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #3: 20 providers in Greater Boston will receive support in obtaining a license and gaining knowledge/skills on how to maintain a successful quality Family Child Care home.

 Red Oak After School Program: 
  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #1: 100 or more children in Greater Boston will have access to quality out-of-school care and summer camp.

  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #2: 100% of Red Oak families will have access to high quality out-of-school care and summer camp.

  • STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #3: 95% of Red Oak children will thrive in all domains of development and children with special needs will receive support to obtain services.

Program Long-Term Success  The long-term goal of BCNC's Child Care and Enrichment programs are for children to receive quality dual-language care which maximizes their growth while allowing their parents to pursue career and academic goals. 
Program Success Monitored By 
BCNC has invested over a quarter of a million dollars in program evaluation and related systems, staffing, and training, including a customized Social Solutions Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) deployment. In order to achieve maximum impact and sustainability, BCNC strongly believes that programs and services should not be blindly developed, but rather be evidenced-based and driven by actual community needs. With that being said, BCNC undergoes an extensive Evaluation Management process quarterly. At each review, Senior Management updates and refines the following evaluation documents that have been tailored to each program, the services offered, and community served.
Examples of Program Success  .

Family Services

Programs that work with entire family units and with the community are essential to tackle persistent health, educational, and economic issues. Coordinated and integrated services positively impacts those with highest need: immigrant and low-income families.


Family Services, operating in Boston and Quincy, is a holistic parent education and family support program that uses a strengths-based approach to support low-income immigrant participants to address their needs. This is accomplished through case management, parent education and training and support groups for families with children with special needs.


Family Services serves 300 participants each year. Approximately 60% of Family Services participants reside in Suffolk County, 20% in Norfolk, almost 20% in Middlesex, and the remainder in Essex.


Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Families
Program Short-Term Success 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #1:  90% of low-income immigrant families attending Parent Journey (PJ) or Strengthening Family Program (SFP) will improve their parent/child relationship. 80% of participants attending one-time parenting workshop will increase their knowledge of parenting.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #2: 90% of low-income immigrant families seeking education system support will increase knowledge of public education system and community resources.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE #3:  85% of low-income immigrant families seeking case management services will meet their service goals.
Program Long-Term Success  The long term goal of BCNC's Family Services is to improve the psychosocial well-being of low-income immigrant families in Greater Boston and surrounding areas.
Program Success Monitored By  CNC has invested over a quarter of a million dollars in program evaluation and related systems, staffing, and training, including a customized Social Solutions Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) deployment. In order to achieve maximum impact and sustainability, BCNC strongly believes that programs and services should not be blindly developed, but rather be evidenced-based and driven by actual community needs. With that being said, BCNC undergoes an extensive Evaluation Management process quarterly. At each review, Senior Management updates and refines the following evaluation documents that have been tailored to each program, the services offered, and community served.
Examples of Program Success  .

Pao Arts Center

The Pao Arts Center is a space for thought leaders, artists, and neighbors to preserve traditional and contemporary artistic practice and carry on the legacy of the Asian American community. Using the arts, BCNC seeks to reclaim space for creative dialogue, amplify underrepresented voices, and strengthen family bonds.


In partnership with Bunker Hill Community College, BCNC opened the Arts Center in 2017 to be Chinatown’s first community-based arts center and Boston’s newly dedicated Asian American and Asian immigrant cultural space. The Pao Arts Center will provide arts programs and create a newfound sense of place for this diverse neighborhood.

Program and activities will:

· Empower artists, organization and residents of Chinatown to mitigate effects of gentrification;

· Increase the visibility of Asian American artists and organizations; and

· Preserve cultural creative practices.


Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 
Strategic Objective 1: Host an artist-in-residence who will engage 300 members of the Chinatown community in artistic/creative activities. 
 
Strategic Objective 2: Conduct 3 creative place making activities in Chinatown and Chinatown-adjacent parcels.
 
Strategic Objective 3: Support 3 to 5 local artists through a collaborative space program 
Program Long-Term Success  The long term goal of the Pao Arts Center is to help preserve the cultural vitality of Boston's Chinatown amidst increasing displacement and gentrification. 
Program Success Monitored By  CNC has invested over a quarter of a million dollars in program evaluation and related systems, staffing, and training, including a customized Social Solutions Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) deployment. In order to achieve maximum impact and sustainability, BCNC strongly believes that programs and services should not be blindly developed, but rather be evidenced-based and driven by actual community needs. With that being said, BCNC undergoes an extensive Evaluation Management process quarterly. At each review, Senior Management updates and refines the following evaluation documents that have been tailored to each program, the services offered, and community served.
Examples of Program Success  .

Youth Center

Asian youth face many social challenges. Many Asian youth serve as informal interpreters for family members, forcing them to take on adult responsibilities at an early age. Parents working long hours means there is not close parental supervision. A youth program is an important resource for youth who are going through many academic and social transitions.


The Youth Center provides culturally and linguistically sensitive education, leadership and college-access programs that empower low-income immigrant youth with the life skills and education foundation necessary to achieve post-secondary success.


The Youth Center serves 150 youth each year; 90% are low-income and 80% do not speak English at home. An estimated 85% of participants are residents of Boston, including Chinatown, South End, Allston-Brighton and South Boston; an additional 8% come from Middlesex County, 4% from Norfolk, and the remaining from Plymouth. BCNC also serves 35 youth in Quincy.


Budget  --
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Strategic Objective 1: 90% of Youth Center’s high school seniors will be accepted to and matriculate at post-secondary institutions.

  • Strategic Objective 2: 55% of Youth Center’s participants will increase their functioning of 21st century skills.

Program Long-Term Success  The overall goal of the Youth Center is to empower youth with the twenty-first century skills to achieve post-secondary success.
Program Success Monitored By 

BCNC’s results-based evaluation and learning system ensures that the agency’s programs measure progress towards intended impact on children, youth, and families. The system generates information on project/program performance that forms a clear basis for management decision making, greater accountability to all stakeholders including direct beneficiaries and builds the evidence base for scaling up interventions and advocacy work. Output and process monitoring and evaluation are managed through Efforts-to-Outcomes (ETO), a comprehensive web-based data collection system for tracking services, participant demographics and outcomes for children, families and communities.

Primary data (i.e. pre and post-tests, attendance rosters, surveys, etc.) will be compiled and entered into ETO for project participants. Program staff will establish clear documentation of methods to be used to collect primary data. This will ensure that data is collected in the same manner at different points in time and by different people, which is critical for ensuring that data is comparable and improves accuracy of assessing the changes over time.

Additionally, Youth Center staff at all levels are in the process of critical inquiry of program performance to improve practice and maximize program adaptation throughout the year. Staff monitor which outputs and outcomes are being achieved along with project operations (i.e. financial management and resource use).


Examples of Program Success  .

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In 2017, BCNC concluded its third consecutive year of surpluses and the second year of a very successful capital campaign. Much of the surplus in the past two years has been attributable to the capital campaign whose goal is to raise funds necessary to embark on an expansion of the delivery of BCNC’s services and programs and to invest in key areas of the organization. BCNC currently operates on an approximately $5 million balanced annual budget and generates a small surplus that can be used to re-invest in broader services to the community. BCNC’s revenue is diversified, as it generates approximately $1 million in revenues from program fees and the remaining $4 million of revenue comes largely from individual donors, governmental support, and foundation and corporate grants. On the expenses side, $4 million is spent directly on funding the 8 major BCNC programs, while the remaining $1 million (20% of the overall budget) is spent on fundraising and general & administrative expenses. Since 2015, BCNC has maintained a healthy cash flow to cover 90 days of operating costs. BCNC owns its main office building in Chinatown has carries no long-term debt.

BCNC has identified several areas and projects in which an investment of new funds from donors will result in meaningful impact. These areas can be summarized as investments in (i) meeting the growing needs of the community (ii) the development of new and identified programs, and (iii) infrastructure required to maintain the stability of the organization. In 2015, BCNC expanded and opened an office in Quincy to serve the growing Asian population. In 2017, BCNC opened the Pao Arts Center to provide a center for arts education and cultural experiences, as well as a home-base for the many masters of cultural practice and contemporary arts in our community.


Giles Li

Executive Director


Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Giles Li
CEO Term Start Nov 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Giles Li is the Executive Director of Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC), and has been at BCNC since 2006. With more than 15 years of experience in the nonprofit sector, Giles has a proven track record of direct service, advocacy work, and management experience. Having grown up locally in an immigrant family, he has a life-long connection and commitment to the community in and beyond Chinatown.

Giles was named the winner of the statewide 2017 Excellence in Leadership award from the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network for his strategic vision, passion, ethical integrity, innovation, perseverance, and collaborative style. He is a cross-sector leader who serves on the board of directors for Associated Grant Makers, and has been on advisory committees for the Attorney General, State Treasurer, and Mayor’s Office for Immigrant Advancement. He holds a Master’s degree in Public Affairs from UMass-Boston and is an alumnus of the Institute for Nonprofit Practice. 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Elaine Ng Nov 2006 Nov 2013
Mr. David Moy -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Carmen Chan Director of Development

Carmen Chan is the Director of Development after having served as director of BCNC’s successful capital campaign that was completed in 2005. Carmen has 18 years of fundraising experience and has worked on endowment, capital campaign, special events,  major gifts and planned gifts. Previously, Carmen was director of fundraising at Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation, executive director of the Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence, and director of development and marketing for the Boston Women's Fund. Carmen is active in the Asian community including serving on the Board of the Chinese Historical Society of New England and a member of the Asian American Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy.  In 2002, Carmen received the Ten Outstanding Young Leaders award by Boston Jaycees. In 2011, Carmen received a certificate from the Institute of Non-profit Management and Leadership at Boston University.

Ms. Bernadette Davidson Director of Child Care & Enrichment Programs

Bernadette Davidson has a Master’s Degree in Early Education and Care from Lesley University. She has had many roles in the field including teacher, early intervention specialist, director of two different dual language early education programs, college instructor at several Greater Boston colleges, director of the Child Care Careers Institute, assistant director of one child care resource and referral and professional development director at another and child care consultant.

Mr. David M Jacobs Director of Finance and Administration

David has been with BCNC since May 2013 and serves as Director of Finance and Administration.  He has nearly two decades of experience assisting organizations in the professional services, internet, and nonprofit industries.  Prior to joining BCNC, David worked as a Senior Consultant at Accounting Management Solutions and as Director of Finance and Operations for Minuteman Senior Services, Inc., in Burlington, MA.  He received his BA in Economics from Hobart College and MBA from the Colgate Darden Graduate School at the University of Virginia.

Ms. Yoyo Yau Director of Family & Community Engagement

Yoyo Yau, MA, LMHC is a licensed mental health counselor with a background in early intervention, mental health counseling and brain injury recovery. She has worked with non-profits, hospital settings and state agencies to provide assessment, therapy, treatment and crisis intervention. In 2013, Yoyo was selected in the Boston-Haifa Exchange Learning Program which she will have firsthand experienced the dimensions of social justice and leadership in America and Israel. She was trained as a facilitator by Cordoba Group International LLC in 2012 and conducted a series of Boston Public School student assignment community meetings. Yoyo presented “neuro-art therapy and brain injury” at the 2008 American Art Therapy Conference in Ohio, and at the 2006 Del Giarcco art therapy annual conference in New York, Yoyo has a bachelor’s degree in social work from Hong Kong Polytechnic University, a master’s in expressive therapy from Lesley University, and has had post graduate training in the Existential Psychotherapy Institute and the American Neuro Arts Therapy Institute.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Leadership Excellence Award Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2017
Champion of Change White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders 2012
Change Maker Award to Executive Director Elaine Ng Boston Foundation 2012
Community Partner Museum of Fine Arts 2009
President's Award Points of Light Foundation 2002
Family Counts - National Honors Program Award Annie E. Casey Foundation 2001

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Associated Grant Makers 2017
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 2016
Associated Grant Makers 2013
Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2013
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Massachusetts Department of Early and Secondary Education (Mass DESE) 2018
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 5 Year Accreditation 2015

Collaborations

 

BCNC is committed to a collaborative approach in providing services. Sharing our expertise, we partner with Boston Public Schools (BPS) to implement a parent education curriculum developed to train limited English proficient parents to be advocates and engaged in their child's education. BCNC partners closely with Josiah Quincy Elementary School. We work with teachers to align curriculum, with support staff to discuss case management, and with administration to ensure long-term coordinated efforts. BCNC has programmatic relationships with Charlestown High and Josiah Quincy Upper School in Chinatown.

BCNC provides leadership in coalitions, including Thrive in 5, a city-wide early education initiative, A-WAY, a coalition of youth workers who work with Asian American youth, and the Chinatown Coalition, a coalition that sets an agenda for Chinatown.

BCNC’s latest initiative, the Pao Arts Center, is a joint effort between BCNC and Bunker Hill Community College, and is host to a variety of cross-sectoral partnerships with Tufts Dept. of Public & Community Health, the Asian Community Development Corporation, and the city of Boston Mayor’s Office of Arts & Culture. These partners will work together, leveraging their expertise in public health, community development and the arts to ensure the success of the Pao Arts Center’s innovative Creative Placemaking efforts.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 49
Number of Part Time Staff 52
Number of Volunteers 210
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 79%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 85
Caucasian: 18
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 76
Male: 22
Not Specified 3

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Eugene Mahr
Board Chair Company Affiliation Boston University
Board Chair Term July 2017 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Patrick Cahill Harvard Pilgrim Health Care --
Mr. Stephen Chan The Boston Foundation Voting
Mr. Russell Chin Chin Law Firm --
Ms. Selina Chow No Affiliation Voting
Ms. Lorrayne Chu Lorrayne Yen Chu Consulting Inc. Voting
Mr. Brian Downer State Street Corporation Voting
Ms. Julia Kuo Spectrum Equity --
Ms. San San Lee Deloitte --
Mr. Giles Li BCNC --
Mr. Eugene Mahr Mass General Hospital Voting
Ms. Marie Moy Tufts Medical Center Voting
Ms. Shari Wyner Narva Narva & Company --
Ms. Betty Szeto Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA Voting
Ms. Marian Tse Goodwin Procter LLP Voting
Ms. Karen Wong marlo marketing --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Nancy Wang Adams -- --
Mr. Paul Chan Mass Housing Investment Corporation NonVoting
Mr. Charles Chin -- --
Ms. Susan Fung Boston Public Schools` NonVoting
Ms. Rhys Gardiner Community Volunteer NonVoting
Ms. Maya Honda Wheelock College NonVoting
Ms. Joy Nakrin -- --
Mr. Grant Pattison -- --
Mr. Fred Taw -- --
Ms. Beverly Wing The Chinatown Coalition NonVoting
Mr. Perry Wu Staples NonVoting
Ms. Anna Yee Interpreter/Consultant NonVoting
Mr. Raymond Yu Pandemonium Design NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 12
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • --
  • Board Governance
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $6,247,635.00
Projected Expense $6,076,700.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $5,779,022 $5,078,939 $5,068,271
Total Expenses $5,190,601 $5,015,628 $5,033,219

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$884,125 $1,052,725 $1,123,993
Government Contributions $2,011,996 $1,933,415 $1,818,521
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $2,011,996 $1,933,415 $1,818,521
Individual Contributions $833,396 $212,628 $213,156
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $836,445 $862,061 $888,546
Investment Income, Net of Losses $12,798 $14,753 $73,447
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $405,642 $384,231 $369,744
Revenue In-Kind $794,620 $619,126 $580,864
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $3,876,581 $3,975,598 $4,040,821
Administration Expense $914,271 $685,861 $611,366
Fundraising Expense $399,749 $354,169 $381,032
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.11 1.01 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 75% 79% 80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 10% 10% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $5,113,235 $4,592,671 $4,492,729
Current Assets $1,954,424 $1,508,157 $1,398,488
Long-Term Liabilities $5,184 $9,968 $14,753
Current Liabilities $445,433 $508,506 $467,090
Total Net Assets $4,662,618 $4,074,197 $4,010,886

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal $3,500,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Oct 2015 - Dec 2018
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $2,738,254.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.39 2.97 2.99

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In 2017, BCNC concluded its third consecutive year of surpluses and the second year of a very successful capital campaign. Much of the surplus in the past two years has been attributable to the capital campaign whose goal is to raise funds necessary to embark on an expansion of the delivery of BCNC’s services and programs and to invest in key areas of the organization. BCNC currently operates on an approximately $5 million balanced annual budget and generates a small surplus that can be used to re-invest in broader services to the community. BCNC’s revenue is diversified, as it generates approximately $1 million in revenues from program fees and the remaining $4 million of revenue comes largely from individual donors, governmental support, and foundation and corporate grants. On the expenses side, $4 million is spent directly on funding the 8 major BCNC programs, while the remaining $1 million (20% of the overall budget) is spent on fundraising and general & administrative expenses. Since 2015, BCNC has maintained a healthy cash flow to cover 90 days of operating costs. BCNC owns its main office building in Chinatown has carries no long-term debt.

BCNC has identified several areas and projects in which an investment of new funds from donors will result in meaningful impact. These areas can be summarized as investments in (i) meeting the growing needs of the community (ii) the development of new and identified programs, and (iii) infrastructure required to maintain the stability of the organization. In 2015, BCNC expanded and opened an office in Quincy to serve the growing Asian population. In 2017, BCNC opened the Pao Arts Center to provide a center for arts education and cultural experiences, as well as a home-base for the many masters of cultural practice and contemporary arts in our community.


Giles Li

Executive Director

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financial statements.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

BCNC believes that families have enormous potential to thrive, and that when immigrants are able to participate fully in society and create their own success stories, all of society benefits.

BCNC’s vision is that:

· Families and individuals are self-sufficient;

· Families are strong, healthy, and safe;

· Children have opportunities for school success; and

· Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive.

BCNC defines family as an interdependent group of individuals who are related biologically, legally, emotionally, or by a shared sense of history who are committed to each other and the group’s well-being. BCNC believes that building and strengthening the capacity of families will ultimately impact the larger community to address their own needs.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Programs that work with the entire family and with the community are essential if organizations are to tackle the persistent educational and economic issues facing the towns and cities of the region. The long-held tendency of social service programs to work with individual units rather than family units has created uncoordinated and siloed prevention, intervention and treatment programs. This lack of coordinated and integrated service impacts those with highest need: immigrant and low-income families. To counter this lack of coordinated service delivery, BCNC’s approach is to invest in impact for families.

BCNC’s family-centered approach recognizes that families and individuals do not face life challenges one at a time, therefore it offers constituents access to a holistic array of services that build on their strengths and offer support for their vulnerabilities. The organization believes that impact on one family can be improved through the coordination of services and provision of culturally competent professional support informed by each individual’s personal identity and family history.

BCNC programs are built on supporting five recognized protective factors that strengthen families: parental/caregiver resilience, social connections, social and emotional competence of children, knowledge of parenting and child development, and concrete support in times of need. BCNC’s strengthening families objective is achieved through the following strategies:

  • Facilitation of Friendships and Mutual Supports
  • Strengthen Parenting
  • Respond to Family Crises
  • Link Families to Services and Opportunities
  • Value and Support Individuals
  • Facilitate Social and Emotional Development
  • Observe and Respond to Early Warning Signs of Abuse and Neglect
  • Empower communities to address identified needs
  • Enhance community stakeholder capacity to advocate on its own behalf

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

 

BCNC has nearly half a century of community-based experience in serving the diverse Asian American population in the Greater Boston area. As an organization, BCNC has evolved along with the changing and growing Asian American community, and its family-centered programs have been proven to tangibly impact individuals and families on a sustainable basis. BCNC currently has 80 full and part-time staff on payroll, and over 300 active volunteers.

The leadership structure of the organization is comprised of an Executive Director that manages the day to day operations of the agency and a Board of Directors that provides financial oversight, supports fundraising, sets the mission and vision of the agency, and supervises the Executive Director. Responsible directly to the Executive Director is administrative management staff that includes the Director of Development, Director of Finance and Administration, Director of Family and Community Engagement, Director of Childcare, Director of Workforce Initiatives, Director of Youth Education and Director of the Pao Arts Center. The Development Office is responsible for all fundraising as well as marketing activity. This includes individual donor cultivation; government, corporate and foundation grant writing, as well as special events. The Finance Office is tasked with maintaining BCNC’s unblemished record of sound fiscal management as demonstrated through annual audits. BCNC is debt-free and maintains three months of operating reserves on hand. A cost-effective approach to high quality services is employed and a broad base of financial support is consistently maintained.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

 

BCNC has invested over a quarter of a million dollars in program evaluation and related systems, including a customized Social Solutions Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) deployment and a full-time Learning & Evaluation Manager. In order to achieve maximum impact and sustainability, BCNC strongly believes that programs and services should be evidence-based and community-centered. BCNC’s deep commitment to evaluation enables us to monitor program effectiveness and strategic progress.


In addition, BCNC regularly undergoes agency-wide strategic planning. These strategic planning processes incorporate internal data, external research, program participant feedback, and Asian American community trends in evaluating how far BCNC has come, where it currently is, and what it will be focusing on moving forward.

 


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Since 1969, BCNC has effectively served the Asian American community in the Greater Boston area with a proven, award-winning track record. It is one of the largest Asian social service providers in New England, and its holistic, family-centered toddler-to-adult programming enables impacts to be both wide in scope and deep in impact.

However, just as the Asian American community is rapidly expanding throughout the Greater Boston area, BCNC is also actively working to increase access to its services. While sustaining its high quality programming in Boston, in the coming years, BCNC plans to invest heavily in serving and supporting Asian Americans in geographic areas outside of Boston, such as Quincy and Malden. BCNC will also be integrating a research-based family-centered approach into its programmatic framework to further align services with its vision for a strong, viable community.