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Organization DBA BCNC
Former Names Quincy School Community Council (1995)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of BCNC is to ensure that the children, youth, and families we serve have the resources and supports they need to achieve greater economic success and social well-being.

Mission Statement

The mission of BCNC is to ensure that the children, youth, and families we serve have the resources and supports they need to achieve greater economic success and social well-being.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $5,153,528.00
Projected Expense $5,105,991.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Adult Education
  • Arts and Enrichment & Recreation
  • Family Child Care & Early Education
  • Family Services
  • Red Oak After School Program
  • Youth Center (YC)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of BCNC is to ensure that the children, youth, and families we serve have the resources and supports they need to achieve greater economic success and social well-being.


Background Statement

There are 349,768 Asians residing in Massachusetts, a community that represents the fastest growing racial groups in New England with a 47% growth rate between Census 2000 and 2010. Current census data shows that the Chinese community remains the largest Asian subgroup with approximately 122,957 residing within the state. Middlesex, Norfolk, and Suffolk are the counties with the greatest number of Asians. While the largest concentrations of Asians are in Boston (60,712), the cities of Malden (12,448) and Quincy (22,968) have two of the highest percentages of Asians among their population, 21% and 25% respectively. At approximately 10% of the overall population, Asians account for the largest minority group in Middlesex and Norfolk counties.

Based on census reporting Massachusetts is ranked fourth highest in household inequality among all 50 states and that these lines of inequality highlight an ethnic and racial divide that is pervasive throughout the region. In Boston: 23% of African Americans, 31% of Latinos, and 30% of Asians live below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), compared to just 13% of Whites. In Malden: 21% of Asians live below FPL compared to 11% Whites. In Quincy the numbers are closer: 10% of Asians are below FPL compared to 9% of Whites. (Source: 2008-2012 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates)

The effects of the economic divide are felt deeply by Asian American and Asian immigrant families. For many Asian immigrants and Asian Americans the model minority myth does not hold, and this stereotype can be an obstacle to their own economic development and receiving much-needed support.

Since 1969, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC) has worked to address the needs of the Asian American and Asian American community through a comprehensive continuum of services that support adults’ ability to work, such as teaching English, providing child care, and offering educational support for children. Over the past 45 years, BCNC has grown along with the community it serves – As the Asian immigrant and Asian American community in the Greater Boston area diversified and expanded, BCNC continues its commitment to comprehensive, constituent-focused, family-centered programs.


Impact Statement

As a family-centered organization, BCNC seeks to leverage resources and maximize impact with families through coordination and alignment of services from toddler to adult. In 2013, BCNC served over 2,000 people with an annual operating budget of $4,680,604. Focusing on low-income families, over 70% of BCNC’s constituents meet poverty guidelines for food stamps, Mass Health Insurance, or subsidized child care. Of the youth served by BCNC, 88% are of Chinese descent, and 77% do not speak English at home. Of the adults served, nearly 100% are immigrants, 98% have Chinese as their primary language and one-third have less than a 9th grade education from their home country.

With a long history of success, some of BCNC’s 2013 accomplishments include:

  • BCNC undertakes a successful leadership transition and names Giles Li as its new Executive Director.
  • Executive Director Giles Li appointed to serve on newly elected Mayor Marty Walsh’s transition team.
  • BCNC was the lead agency in Boston for Asian Americans Advancing Justice’s “A Community of Contrasts” Asian demographics report, which compiled disaggregated data across metrics such as demographic trends, civic engagement, immigration, language, education, income, employment, housing and health.
  • BCNC met with Malden Mayor Gary Christenson to discuss how to make its services more accessible to the city’s growing Asian population.
  • BCNC’s Quincy office was established, increasing access to its services to the growing Asian American community in Norfolk County.
  • Both of its Boston and Quincy Adult ESOL programs were ranked among the state’s top three Adult Education programs.

Not willing to rest on its achievements, BCNC’s organizational goals for 2014 are:

  • Provide high-quality, holistic services to more than 2,000 clients through its family-centered approach.
  • Increase access and availability of supportive youth, adult, and family services to an additional 200 clients outside of Boston/Suffolk County.
  • Embark on the agency’s next strategic planning process.
BCNC works with families to determine their best plan for success and helps to find the resources to get them there, whether family and community engagement, education or workforce initiatives, childcare, or other supports. From providing quality early education and child care that supports a parent’s ability to go to work, to ESOL and job readiness that moves a new immigrant from survival to success, BCNC has a proven track record that it continues to build on. BCNC’s ability to design and implement innovative programs resulted in the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Families Count national award, which celebrates organizations that help support strong, capable families. BCNC’s youth program was recognized by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation as a model program that engages in best practices. BCNC also received The Boston Foundation's My Neighborhood: Boston Award for improving the quality of life in Boston's neighborhoods.

 


Needs Statement

While the numbers of families in Massachusetts qualifying for and utilizing state-funded services has skyrocketed, the funding for many programs that ease the burden of poverty and support children’s development were cut due to state budget shortfalls. For instance, in 2012 the state cut funding to public pre-kindergarten child care by 38%, making affordable child care less available for working parents (Kahn, Charlotte B.; Martin, Jessica K. City of Ideas: Reinventing Boston’s Innovation Economy (2012), p. 36). Lack of low-cost child care makes staying home and out of the workforce a more cost-effective option for many parents. BCNC’s Acorn Center for Early Education and Care fills an important gap in affordable high quality child care services for low-income immigrant families. Approximately 70% of BCNC’s Acorn families meet Federal poverty guidelines and receive assistance to support the cost of care. The program allows families to focus on working or participating in job training to advance their careers and achieve greater self-sufficiency, and provides children with the skills for school success. Additionally, the state’s health promotion and disease prevention programs were cut by 77% and employment services by 80%. BCNC’s nutrition and exercise programs for adults, and recreational activities for youth, provide linguistically and culturally appropriate outreach and health education that is no longer provided by the state. Families are further supported by BCNC in navigating the Boston Public School system and social service departments to ensure they have access to the resources they need. BCNC’s Adult Education program provides new immigrants with language classes and job preparation classes—all of which put immigrants on a path to increased education, career advancement and integration.


CEO Statement

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC) was founded in 1969 based on two premises – community members know best what their needs are, and strong families contribute to strong communities. Throughout the years BCNC has remained true to its commitment to being responsive to the needs of those we serve while striving for excellence in the delivery of those services. I truly believe these core values are why we have naturally expanded beyond the Chinatown neighborhood-based after school program we started out as so many years ago.

BCNC’s development into a $5 million organization is necessitated in our responsiveness to the needs of the families we serve, which has been demonstrated time and again throughout our history. BCNC’s connection to the community is reflected in the diversity of our leadership, staff, and the strengths-based approach in empowering and learning from our participants that permeates all of our programing.

Growing up locally in an Asian immigrant family, spending more than a decade in Boston’s non-profit field, and now serving as BCNC’s Executive Director, I have personally witnessed the changing demographics of our constituent population and the rapid growth of Asian populations in the region (2010 US Census). Boston’s Asian population grew by 27% between 2000 and 2010, which was the fastest growing race group, but still does not even compare to the growth in cities like Quincy (65%) and Malden (51%).

It is because of population shifts like these that BCNC identified a priority area in our most recent strategic plan, to address the changing demographics of Chinatown. Because of changes in environment, housing prices, and social support networks in the region, large numbers of families are choosing to live in other places. In the past several years, BCNC has seen a consistent number of constituents coming to us from these cities and towns. As an organization that considers the full range of needs among our constituents, it became clear that we needed to establish a site outside of Chinatown to best support families where they live, work, and play. This is the motivation behind the recent opening of our Quincy-based office, and we are continuing to look ahead, and preparing the organization to offer our expertise and high-quality services to the communities where we can maximize impact.

As the growing Asian population spreads outside of Boston, both community needs and community-based social service infrastructure echo those of Chinatown thirty years ago – poverty, linguistic isolation, lack of affordable child care, untreated mental health issues, need for civic engagement and participation, and a dearth of culturally competent, multi-service providers. Now, more than ever, there is a clear need for a regional organization like BCNC, with a proven track record of innovative, family-centered, collaborative, and culturally and ethnically competent services.

BCNC was founded by the community in order to fulfill community needs, and we continue to do so within the context of our constituent population becoming more diverse, expansive, and multi-generational. Today, BCNC is honored to be one of the largest regional social service providers for Asian American and Asian immigrant families in the area. Moving forward, even as the community’s geographic boundaries change and grow, we will continue to work to make our services more accessible to those most in need of our support.

Giles Li
Executive Director

Board Chair Statement

I enjoy serving on BCNC’s board because I know that the services we provide to the community are transformational.  I am also humbled by the newly arrived immigrants who face years of hardship and the challenges of adjusting to a new culture. Many leave loved ones behind in their homeland to seek a better life, and then face isolation in the U.S. because of their inability to speak English; yet they have such determination. 

My parents were immigrants from China and although I was born in the U.S., I appreciate how difficult it was for my parents to learn English, gain U.S. citizenship, raise a young family without childcare assistance and provide their children more opportunity than what they had for themselves.  I often wonder how my parents did this without the resources of an organization like BCNC, an organization that not only provides opportunities for individual growth, but also supports the development of families and the community. It is these ties that bind me to BCNC’s mission, a mission to provide the resources to the children, youth and families that we serve to improve their economic and social well-being.

In 2011, BCNC launched a new three-year strategic plan which recognizes that in order to address the needs of our constituents in a relevant way, we have to integrate our program delivery to be more family-centered and expand to a second location to meet the demand for services.  Though reorganizing and aligning programs and building services in another city are daunting tasks for a community-based organization, I’m proud that we have made significant progress with these goals. 

Nationally, Asians are the fastest growing demographic group, with growth driven mostly by immigration. In Massachusetts, the Asian population increased 46 % from 2000 to 2010 and now number approximately 350,000; and in the city of Quincy, almost 25% of residents are Asian immigrants or of Asian descent. At BCNC, we witnessed this burgeoning population growth in the number of people who access our programs and since the majority of our participants are low income and in need of linguistically and culturally appropriate services, our waitlists have grown in step with the population.

As we grow and evolve, organizational challenges manifest in different ways. In our programming, we are challenged to address increasing demand for our services while maintaining a commitment to high quality programs.  We also recognize the need to develop opportunities for participant and staff growth while we strive to improve and integrate our service delivery. We have implemented a performance measurement system to measure and track outcomes.  By evaluating the results, we can fine-tune our programs to have more impact.  In this way, as an organization we are able to be strategic, deliberate, and mindful of the need to keep quality and community at the forefront.  In our expansion efforts, the challenge is to replicate our high quality and high impact programming while learning and adapting to a new environment.

In the nonprofit sector, there is always the simultaneous challenge of investing resources in operational support while also developing new programs and services.  To address this, we are fundraising with greater rigor, diversifying our revenue base and keeping our operations efficient and nimble.  Looking towards the future, I am confident that BCNC will continue transforming lives and making a positive difference in our community for generations to come.

Selina Chow
Board President 

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

BCNC has expanded its reach to become a critical service provider and regional leader for Asian Americans of all ages and income levels in New England, with program participants coming from Suffolk, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, Essex, Bristol, and Worcester counties. Of over 2,000 people BCNC serves each year, an equal number of its community members reside outside Boston city limits as those within. In Boston, 50% of its participants call the neighborhoods of Chinatown, South End and Back Bay home, while the other half represents virtually every neighborhood in the city, including Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Outside Boston, 46% of BCNC’s program participants are from Quincy, 26% are from the Middlesex County towns of Malden and Medford, and 28% are from surrounding areas. Recognizing the quality of BCNC services, a number of participants travel from communities that are over 20 miles away, such as Andover, Acton and Bridgewater.

 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services
  2. Education - Adult Education
  3. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Adult Education

The need to increase English proficiency among adult immigrants is well-documented. Research shows that immigrants who do not speak English at all or do not speak it well are considerably less likely to be employed than those who speak English “very well.” English speaking immigrants earn nearly twice that of non-English speaking workers – on average, an immigrant in Massachusetts who speaks only English earns $38,526 annually compared to an immigrant who does not speak English well, who earns $14,221 (Commonwealth Corporation Report: Breaking the Language Barrier, 2011).

BCNC Adult Education program provides English language classes that are offered three days a week and are three hours long, for a total of nine hours minimum of study each week. Classes are offered both in the morning and in the evening to accommodate student schedules. Additional program activities and services include supplemental writing and computer skill classes, a volunteer tutoring program, educational and career advising, and citizenship and naturalization assistance.
 
Of the over 400 adults served by the program each year, approximately 40% come from Suffolk County, 33% from Norfolk, 23% from Middlesex, and the remainder from Essex and Plymouth Counties. Nearly 100% are immigrants, 98% have Chinese as their primary language and one-third have less than a 9th grade education from their home country. 60% have been in the US for less than five years; of those, 46% have been here for less than one year. To learn more about the program go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/adult-education.html
Budget  $982,869.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Adults Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Families
Program Short-Term Success 
  • At least 50% of students show a significant improvement on standardized test at the end of each semester
  • At least 70% of students are successfully promoted to the next level at the end of each semester
  • At least 50% of graduates will enroll in other ESOL, Adult Basic Education, or academic programs
Program Long-Term Success 

Ultimate changes that result from Adult Education services contribute to BCNC achieving its long-term organizational goals are as follows:

Goal 1. Families and Individuals are self-sufficient

  • Provide educational and career development services that foster job acquisition and higher levels of academic performance

Goal 2. Families are strong, healthy, and safe

  • Increase knowledge of adults regarding access to and uptake of social services

Goal 3. Children have opportunities for school success

  • Increase parent/guardian awareness about Boston public school system
  • Increase number of adults who know when, where, and how to access help when a child displays or expresses difficulty with school

Goal 4. Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive

  • Strengthen partnerships with the state, local and private organization that provide services to adult immigrants
  • Establish linkages with community-based organizations that target immigrant populations
Program Success Monitored By 
Program success is evaluated utilizing the following monitoring and tracking tools:
 
ESOL
  • Center for Applied Linguistics’ Basic English Skills Test (BEST) Plus to assess speaking and listening skills
  • Test for Adult Basic Education to assess reading and writing skills
  • Counselors set goals with students and monitor progress regularly

Parents & Caregivers
  • Teacher assessment and custom tool design by English for New Bostonians to monitor progress
Examples of Program Success 
Hua Li Chang* came to BCNC too old for high school and with English not yet ready for college. BCNC prepared her so when she completed the Adult Education program, she was able to get into UMass Boston for Management and Accounting. After graduation she was able to get a job with State Street.  She continues stay in touch with BCNC as tutor and a volunteer to help clients with their income tax forms.
 
*Name changed to protect client confidentiality.

Arts and Enrichment & Recreation

In a 2007 report, “Access to After School Programs” by Priscilla Little of the Harvard Family Research Project, it was found that in Massachusetts an estimated 5,700 children ages 5 to 13 are waiting for after school services. The report documented that after school program participation varied widely between low- and higher-income children as well as between minority and non-minority children. Due to the language barrier, low-income and minority parents are considerably less likely to report that it is easy to find programs that are affordable, run by trustworthy adults, conveniently located, of high quality and/or interesting to their child.

BCNC recognizes the need for comprehensive, culturally competent enrichment services. Enrollment data reflect that the majority of program participants are low income; 21% speak English at home as their primary language; 74% speak a Chinese dialect; and 5% speak other languages. Of the nearly 1,000 participants served by Arts, Enrichment & Recreation in 2013, the majority reside in Suffolk; program participants also come from Middlesex, Norfolk, Bristol, and Worcester Counties.
 
Arts & Enrichment provides after school and weekend classes to children and youth. The program is designed to increase access to quality arts education and enrichment opportunities to support children and youth to become engaged learners and empowered individuals. Offerings encourage children and youth to explore modern modes of creative expression such as contemporary music and digital storytelling, as well as traditional art forms, such as Chinese lion dance. BCNC also offers enrichment and recreation activities through a partnership with Boston Centers for Youth and Families, including sports activities for elementary school children, as well as martial arts, clinics, and leagues for adults. To learn more about BCNC's Arts & Enrichment and Recreation programs go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/arts-and-enrichment.html.
Budget  $441,864.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Families Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 100 participants experience increased exposure to arts and cultural activities and local cultural institutions outside of Chinatown
  • 250 children and youth participate in arts programming
  • Children and youth develop positive relationships with caring adults, which contributes to increased student engagement and a positive attitude towards learning and participation
Program Long-Term Success 
Ultimate changes that result from Arts & Enrichment services contribute to BCNC achieving its long-term organizational goals are as follows:

Goal 1. Families and Individuals are self-sufficient
  • Enhance children’s ability to develop an informed perception; articulate a vision; learn to problem solve and make decisions; and build self-confidence and self-discipline

Goal 2. Families are strong, healthy, and safe

  • Increase opportunities for enjoyment within family context which open avenues of greater self-expression

Goal 3. Children have opportunities for school success

  • Strengthen problem-solving and critical-thinking skills, adding to overall academic achievement and school success
  • Develops a sense of craftsmanship, quality task performance, and goal-setting-skills needed to succeed in the classroom and beyond

Goal 4. Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive

  • Enhance values, which include respecting alternative viewpoints; team-building skills; and appreciating cultures and traditions; and effective conflict resolution skills
  • Increase community pride in the cultural traditions of Chinatown and other communities
  • Provide an experience of collective efficacy and civic engagement, which spurs participants for further collective action
Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is evaluated using the following monitoring and tracking tools:

  • Pre- and post-program self- reports by students and parents, as well as assessments from instructors that can be divided into three primary categories:
  • Skill acquisition: how well the student learned new expressive or thinking skills, and social skills such as teamwork or responding positively to peers and adults
  • Self-efficacy: how the student develops an increase in self-esteem, confidence, commitment and follow-through, ability to make mistakes and move forward
  • Community: how the student perceives him/herself in connection to others; how the student contributes to his learning environment, family, friends, or the larger community through positive behavior, art work
Examples of Program Success 
Jennifer Chien came to BCNC as a new immigrant without English skills. During her time in our ESOL programming, she became very involved in arts programs, including illustration, digital storytelling, and especially playing guitar in the BCNC band. Her freshman year of high school, she applied to be an intern in the Arts program, where she gained classroom management and job readiness skills, which were put to good use the following year when she became a mentor in our band program. She went on to sing lead vocals in many band performances, and ended her senior year with a surprise performance at BCNC. Lisa has spent many hours at BCNC learning arts skills, and almost any many hours passing them on to younger youth. She is currently in her first year at Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and working part-time in BCNC’s Digital Multimedia Lab, teaching video-making and running the youth band program where she first started.
 
*Name changed to protect client confidentiality.

Family Child Care & Early Education

There is a critical need for affordable quality early education and child care for the state’s Asian American and Asian immigrant community. Unfortunately, due to prohibitive costs, limited availability, and language and cultural barriers, low-income immigrant families are less likely to receive the benefits of a high quality center based childcare program. The cost of childcare in Massachusetts is among the highest in the country. With a dearth of affordable early education and child care in the city of Boston, BCNC’s Acorn Center for Early Education and Care and Family Child Care (FCC) provides affordable childcare and creates licensed home-based child care providers for critically needed services to the community.
 
BCNC’s Acorn Center for Early Education and Care is a NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) accredited program that serves families five days a week, from 7:30 to 5:30 by providing quality early childhood programming for 81 children throughout the year. Acorn was the first bilingual child care program in the state of Massachusetts. Supported by the current research on promoting children’s English language acquisition and brain development, Acorn provides children with a dual language learning environment that builds English on a child’s firmly developed home language and utilizes the recommended Massachusetts Guidelines for Preschool Learning. Every classroom has a Chinese speaking lead teacher who can communicate with families in their home language and understand the family’s cultural practices.
 
BCNC’s Family Child Care program trains Chinese-speaking immigrant women to run a high-quality fully-licensed home-based family child care businesses. The program has three components that offer participants the support they need to become independent business owners: 1) licensing support 2) a professional network 3) intensive support services for state funded system providers.
 
The two programs served nearly 500 participants in 2013, with 49% residing in Suffolk County, 26% in Norfolk, and 24% in Middlesex County. To learn more visit: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/early-education-and-care.html
Budget  $1,554,481.00
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Family Child Care

  • 100 newly trained adults begin process to obtain child care licenses each year
  • 30 childcare providers will attend at least 3 BCNC business skill trainings each year
  • 15 adults trained about ownership and operation of family child care facilities each year

Acorn
  • 90% of children will meet or exceed standards in all areas: social-emotional, physical, language, cognitive, literacy, and mathematics each year
  • Continue to meet Massachusetts QRIS standards
  • Maintain national accreditation

Child Care
  • 100% of students advance to next grade level each year
  • 100% of special needs children receive additional support services at BCNC or through an external partner as needed each year
Program Long-Term Success 
Ultimate changes that result from Early Education & Child Care services contribute to BCNC achieving its long-term organizational goals are as follows:
 
Goal 1. Families and Individuals are self-sufficient
  • Increase availability of childcare services to afford families the ability to obtain and maintain employment opportunities
  • Increase access to entrepreneurial development and training for potential childcare providers

Goal 2. Families are strong, healthy, and safe
  • Provide a safe, child-friendly environment that fosters healthy growth and development of children
  • Increase availability of affordable quality childcare for immigrants
  • Increase access to services for children with special needs
  • Increase parent’s knowledge on how to foster children’s optimal developmental achievement

Goal 3. Children have opportunities for school success
  • Identify and utilize age-appropriate activities and materials that foster language and literacy development.
  • Improve academic performance and related academic skills of low income children
  • Improve social-emotional development and related social skills of low income children

Goal 4.Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive
  • Increase community knowledge of mutual support networks and resources that foster optimal child cognitive, physical, and social/emotional development
  • Strengthens community’s confidence and autonomy to advocate for necessary resources for holistic development of children
  • Improve mutual support network systems’ capacity to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate resources for children
Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is evaluated through the use of the following monitoring and tracking tools:


Family Child Care
  • Detailed case management notes and annual teacher evaluations
  • Ages and Stages evaluation tool to identify developmental concerns
  • Arnet evaluation tool to assess teacher warmth and interactions with children
  • Creative Curriculum to monitor children’s progress and inform curriculum planning
  • Family Childcare Environmental Rating Scale to assess program environment
  • Business Administration Scale to assess business skill and know-how

Acorn
  • Teaching Strategies Gold to monitor children’s progress and inform curriculum planning
  • Early Childhood Environmental Rating Scale to assess classroom environment
  • Infant /Toddler Environmental Rating Scale to assess classroom environment
  • Program Administration Scale to measure program operations
Examples of Program Success 

BCNC played a critical role in the growth of Jane Wilson's* family since the transnational adoption of her two daughters. She had her daughters attend BCNC’s early education program because she wanted them to have a connection to their cultural and linguistic background. One of the adopted girls, Ming, was 15 months behind in her chronological age developmentally, and was recovering from emotional trauma and malnutrition. Despite these challenges, Jane was confident in her daughter’s potential and discussed this with the staff. Within a year, Ming’s development surpassed the doctors’ predictions. “My child who was initially diagnosed as mentally challenged now responds to and speaks Mandarin, Cantonese and English,” said Jane. Jane believes Ming’s rapid progress is a testament to the strength of BCNC’s program and the deep commitment of its staff.

*Name changed to protect client confidentiality

Family Services

In the public sector, there is a growing understanding that programs that work with entire family units and with the community are essential if organizations are to tackle persistent health, educational, and economic issues. The long-held tendency of social service programs to work with individuals rather than family units has created uncoordinated and siloed prevention, intervention and treatment programs. This lack of coordinated and integrated service impacts those with highest need: immigrant and low-income families.
 
BCNC Family Services, operating in Boston and Quincy, is a holistic parent education and family support program that uses a strengths-based approach to support participants to address their needs. This is accomplished through:

• Parent Solutions, a curriculum which supports parents to be advocates for their children in public schools, has been adopted by Boston Public Schools to teach all immigrant parents how to become engaged in their children’s education

• Parenting Journey, a support group for parents that encourages positive parenting

• Shining Star Project, to support children with autism and their families, including art classes, playgroups, expressive therapy, and support and education for parents

• Health and Wellness education, such as healthy cooking classes, stress reduction workshops

• Family Connectors, consisting of case management, individual consultation and counseling, information and referral services, and parent advocacy

• Public education and family events

• Counseling service and referrals

 
Family Services served 300 participants in 2013. Approximately 60% of Family Services participants reside in Suffolk County, 20% in Norfolk, almost 20% in Middlesex, and the remainder in Essex. To learn more about BCNC's Family Services program go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/family-services.html
Budget  $208,885.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Adults People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 
Parenting
  • 95% of participants in Parent Solutions, Parenting Journey and case management increase self-efficacy
  • 80% of participants increase in understanding of public education system and how to navigate resources for their children
  • 80% of case management participants who achieved set goals
  • Launch Quincy-based program, serving at least 100 parents
 
Health & Wellness
  • 60% of participants try cooking a new healthy meal for their family
  • 80 of targeted immigrants will increase use of various coping strategies for stress reduction.
 
Special Needs
  • 100% of special needs cases managed by BCNC obtain IEP and begin implementation
Program Long-Term Success 
Ultimate changes that result from Family Services contribute to BCNC achieving its long-term organizational goals are as follows:
 
Goal 1. Families and Individuals are self-sufficient
• Immigrant families have access to mainstream resources, regardless of language ability, education level, immigrant status, cultural barriers, or other challenges
 
Goal 2. Families are strong, healthy, and safe
• Improve immigrant parents’ engagement in positive parenting practices, which include listening, curiosity, and self-reflection
• Improve cross-generational relationships among immigrant families
 
Goal 3. Children have opportunities for school success
• Increase immigrant families understanding of their rights and responsibilities as parents within the public schools
• Increase knowledge of families of children with special needs on how to monitor Individualized Education Plans (IEP) in school
 
Goal 4. Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive
• Foster mutual support networks that support immigrant families
• Increase access of immigrants to culturally-competent and linguistically-appropriate social services, public benefits, and mental health supports
Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is evaluated through the use of the following monitoring and tracking tools:

  • Detailed progress notes for individual through a case management system
  • Satisfaction surveys for all workshops
  • Pre- and post-surveys for parent education workshops
Examples of Program Success  Shirley Chen* came to the U.S. ten years ago. Today, Shirley has a 3 year old girl and a 1 year old boy who was born with special needs. Like many parents of a child with special needs, Shirley dealt with isolation and feelings of inadequacy and found navigating the social and medical services very challenging.

Shirley attended the BCNC Parent Solutions workshop series that helps parents understand the education system. Shirley explains, "The staff are so helpful and encouraging. I am now prepared to get involved with the school for my children."

In June 2011, BCNC brought Shirley's family to meet Governor Deval Patrick. " I would have never imagined that I would have the courage to speak to the governor. I was able to talk to Governor Patrick about how BCNC helped me as a first time Chinese immigrant obtain resources I needed to adjust to American life and culture," shares Shirley.
 
*Name changed to protect client confidentiality. 

Red Oak After School Program

Research shows that after school programs can keep children and youth safe, support working families, improve academic achievement, and promote the civic and social development of young people yet in Massachusetts thousands of school-age children ages 5-13 that are waiting for afterschool services. (Harvard Family Research Project Issue Brief: Access to Afterschool Programs: Overcoming the Barriers to Getting Youth “in the Door”, 2007).
 
The Red Oak After School Program addresses the issue by providing affordable licensed after school child care for up to 160 children ages 5 to 13 during both the school year and summer in a multicultural and bilingual environment. The program runs from 3:00 pm to 6:15 pm during school days, 12:00 pm to 6:00 pm during half days, and 8:30 am to 6:30 pm during school vacation weeks, professional days, and the summer. Children are provided in homework help and educational activities that are aligned with the school curriculum as well as engaged in enrichment and recreation activities such as cooking clubs, multicultural arts, chess, and Taiko drumming.
 
Red Oak served 160 participants in 2013, with 58% residing in Suffolk County, 21% in Middlesex, and 20% in Norfolk County. To learn more visit: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/after-school.html
Budget  $599,140.00
Category  Education, General/Other Extracurricular Arts & Culture
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Families
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 50% of students will improve grades in English Language Arts by the end of the school year
  • 60% of students will improve homework effort by the end of the school year
  • 80% of students will improve self-organization by the end of the school year
  • 80% of students will improve conflict-resolution skills by the end of the school year
Program Long-Term Success 
Ultimate changes that result from Early Education & Child Care services contribute to BCNC achieving its long-term organizational goals are as follows:
Goal 1. Families and Individuals are self-sufficient
  • Increase availability of childcare services to afford families the ability to obtain and maintain employment opportunities

Goal 2. Families are strong, healthy, and safe
  • Provide a safe, child-friendly environment that fosters healthy growth and development of children
  • Increase availability of affordable quality childcare for immigrants
  • Increase access to services for children with special needs
  • Increase parent’s knowledge on how to foster children’s optimal developmental achievement

Goal 3. Children have opportunities for school success
  • Identify and utilize age-appropriate activities and materials that foster language and literacy development.
  • Improve academic performance and related academic skills of low income children
  • Improve social-emotional development and related social skills of low income children

Goal 4.Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive
  • Increase community knowledge of mutual support networks and resources that foster optimal child cognitive, physical, and social/emotional development
  • Strengthens community’s confidence and autonomy to advocate for necessary resources for holistic development of children
  • Improve mutual support network systems’ capacity to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate resources for children
Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is evaluated through the use of the following monitoring and tracking tools:

  • Report cards to monitor academic performance
  • Custom rubric to monitor study habits and homework effort
  • Survey of After-school Youth Outcomes to assess behavior and social skills
Examples of Program Success 
Sally* had been attending Red Oak for several years -- she expressed disinterest in academics, was disinclined to read, and often had a poor attitude and negative interactions with staff. Last year, her group participated in Red Oak's literacy initiative. Staff read aloud at least twice a week and students participated in follow-up discussions/activities. Although initially reluctant, over the course of a few months Sally became absorbed in stories, began to volunteer to answer questions, and shared with staff the language that she admired in the book. She sought out the book at her library to read previous chapters and look ahead. She also checked out a biography on the author and wrote her a letter. Her interactions with staff and her attitude in the group improved vastly. She became more willing to focus on academic work, particularly her writing, and her grades steadily improved.
 
*Name changed to protect client confidentiality

Youth Center (YC)

Asian American and immigrant youth have many challenges in their home, school and social lives. At home, there are intergenerational conflicts with parents who do not understand American culture. Many Asian youth serve as informal interpreters for family, forcing them to take on adult responsibilities at an early age. Often both parents work, which means there are limited means for close parental supervision. A quality youth program is an important resource for Asian youth who developmentally are going through many academic and social transitions.
 
BCNC’s Youth Center addresses this need by providing culturally and linguistically sensitive education, leadership and enrichment programs that empower low-income immigrant youth with the life skills and education foundation necessary to achieve post-secondary success. 
 
YC Education:
  • English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes for recent immigrants
  • College Access Program supports youth from 11th grade through application process, who are usually the first in their families to finish high school

YC Leadership:
  • YouLead, a 2 year program where youth develop leadership, teamwork and mentoring skills
  • Chinese Immigrant Student Leadership (ChISL), a 2 year program based at Charlestown High, teaching youth to be leaders and build bridges with other students
  • Leadership culminates in a third year Youth Advisory Group (YAG) where youth develop and implement community-based projects

In 2013, YC served 225 youth ages 11 to 18; 90% are low-income and 80% do not speak English at home. An estimated 85% of participants are residents of Boston, including Chinatown, South End, Allston-Brighton and South Boston; an additional 8% come from Middlesex County, 4% from Norfolk, and the remaining from Plymouth. In late 2013, BCNC Youth Center began operations in Quincy, serving over 30 youth on a weekly basis. To learn more about BCNC's Youth Center go to: http://bcnc.net/index.php/programs/youth-center.html
Budget  $467,023.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Asian, Pacific Islander Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 

ESOL

  • 60% of youth improve in at least two: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension
  • 90% of youth increase understanding of civic life
  • 75% of youth increase confidence speaking English in multiple settings

Learning Center
  • 70% of youth improve study skills

College Access
  • 100% of seniors graduate and be accepted to college with financial aid

Leadership
  • 80% of youth increase self-efficacy, including being able to identify their own capabilities, and being able to set and achieve goals
  • 80% of youth increase community involvement, including identifying and solving problems in their own lives, and developing relationships with peers
  • 80% of youth improve leadership skills, including public speaking and teamwork
  • YouLead: 100% of 20 students complete 56 hours of community service sharing knowledge and technical skills with the community

ChISL: 100% of 15 students lead community education workshops about important issues in their school community
Program Long-Term Success 

Ultimate changes that result from Youth Center services contribute to BCNC achieving its long-term organizational goals are as follows:

Goal 1. Families and Individuals are self-sufficient

  • Increase of low-income immigrant families’ awareness of the benefits of early financial savings and preparation for college
  • Increase youth and parent/guardian knowledge of college and financial aid application process

Goal 2. Families are strong, healthy, and safe

  • Low-income and immigrant youth are confident and civically engaged

Goal 3. Children have opportunities for school success

  • Increase access to - appropriate ESOL supports both in and outside of school for recent immigrant students
  • Provide afterschool academic support for students with academic challenges

Goal 4. Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive

  • Improve coordination of schools and social service providers who provide full range of supports to youth and their families
  • Increase visibility of youth leaders who raise public awareness of important community issues
Program Success Monitored By 
Program success is evaluated through the following monitoring and tracking tools:
 
ESOL
  • Holistic English Language Learner (ELL) Rubric, a custom tool developed from the learning standards identified in the Office of English Language Learner's (OELL) English as a Second Language Curriculum Guide Grades 9-12

Learning Center
  • Report cards to monitor academic performance
  • Custom rubric to monitor study habits and homework effort

College Access
  • College acceptance letters and financial aid notification

Leadership
  • Survey of After-school Youth Outcomes to assess behavior and social skills
Examples of Program Success 
With his parents and younger sister, Bao Nguyen* came to Boston from Vietnam when he was seven years old. When Bao entered his senior year of my high school, he realized his first generation immigrant parents who both worked full-time had no knowledge of the college process. His parents had limited English and were unable to help Bao with deciding what college to go to or how to apply. Bao joined the BCNC college advising program and together Bao and his father attended workshops about the college process. Bao reflects: "What I thought was the most important part is the opportunity that it gave me and my parents to come together and discuss my plans for college." Bao now is at UMass Amherst and aspires to be a doctor. He attributes BCNC to helping him become the person he is today. Bao's father gained much from BCNC as well and he is motivated to be more active in helping Bao's younger sister, in getting into college.
 
*Name changed to protect client confidentiality.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Giles Li
CEO Term Start Nov 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Giles Li joined BCNC as program manager in 2006 and was promoted to Director of Programs in 2011, where he held management responsibility over all agency programs. With more than a decade of experience in the nonprofit sector, Giles has a proven track record of direct service, advocacy work, and management experience. Having grown up locally in an immigrant family, he has a life-long connection and commitment to the community in and beyond Chinatown.

Giles is a recognized thought leader and public speaker in Asian American communities nationwide. He holds a Masters degree in Public Affairs from UMass-Boston and is an alumnus of the Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership at Boston University's (BU) School of Management. Giles has also served as adjunct faculty in the Asian American Studies program at UMass-Boston, and he is currently a mentor for the Community Fellows Program at BU.

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Elaine Ng Nov 2006 Nov 2013

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Carmen Chan Director of Development

Carmen Chan is the Director of Development after having served as director of BCNC’s successful capital campaign that was completed in 2005. Carmen has 18 years of fundraising experience and has worked on endowment, capital campaign, special events,  major gifts and planned gifts. Previously, Carmen was director of fundraising at Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation, executive director of the Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence, and director of development and marketing for the Boston Women's Fund. Carmen is active in the Asian community including serving on the Board of the Chinese Historical Society of New England and a member of the Asian American Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy.  In 2002, Carmen received the Ten Outstanding Young Leaders award by Boston Jaycees. In 2011, Carmen received a certificate from the Institute of Non-profit Management and Leadership at Boston University.

Ms. Bernadette Davidson Director of Child Care & Enrichment Programs

Bernadette Davidson has a Master’s Degree in Early Education and Care from Lesley University. She has had many roles in the field including teacher, early intervention specialist, director of two different dual language early education programs, college instructor at several Greater Boston colleges, director of the Child Care Careers Institute, assistant director of one child care resource and referral and professional development director at another and child care consultant.

Mr. David M Jacobs Director of Finance and Administration

David has been with BCNC since May 2013 and serves as Director of Finance and Administration.  He has nearly two decades of experience assisting organizations in the professional services, internet, and nonprofit industries.  Prior to joining BCNC, David worked as a Senior Consultant at Accounting Management Solutions and as Director of Finance and Operations for Minuteman Senior Services, Inc., in Burlington, MA.  He received his BA in Economics from Hobart College and MBA from the Colgate Darden Graduate School at the University of Virginia.

Ms. Debby Wiesen Director of Adult Education --
Ms. Yoyo Yau Director of Family & Community Engagement

Yoyo Yau, MA, LMHC is a licensed mental health counselor with a background in early intervention, mental health counseling and brain injury recovery. She has worked with non-profits, hospital settings and state agencies to provide assessment, therapy, treatment and crisis intervention. In 2013, Yoyo was selected in the Boston-Haifa Exchange Learning Program which she will have firsthand experienced the dimensions of social justice and leadership in America and Israel. She was trained as a facilitator by Cordoba Group International LLC in 2012 and conducted a series of Boston Public School student assignment community meetings. Yoyo presented “neuro-art therapy and brain injury” at the 2008 American Art Therapy Conference in Ohio, and at the 2006 Del Giarcco art therapy annual conference in New York, Yoyo has a bachelor’s degree in social work from Hong Kong Polytechnic University, a master’s in expressive therapy from Lesley University, and has had post graduate training in the Existential Psychotherapy Institute and the American Neuro Arts Therapy Institute.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Champion of Change White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders 2012
Change Maker Award to Executive Director Elaine Ng Boston Foundation 2012
Community Partner Museum of Fine Arts 2009
President's Award Points of Light Foundation 2002
Family Counts - National Honors Program Award Annie E. Casey Foundation 2001

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Associated Grant Makers 2013
Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2013
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Massachusetts Department of Early and Secondary Education (Mass DESE) 2013
Massachusetts Department of Early and Secondary Education (Mass DESE) 2013
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 3 Year Accreditation 2013

Collaborations

BCNC is committed to a collaborative approach in providing services. Sharing our expertise, we partner with Boston Public Schools (BPS) to implement a parent education curriculum developed to train limited English proficient parents to be advocates and engaged in their child's education. BCNC worked with the Boston United for Students Coalition and the Boston Parents Organizing Network to ensure parent voices were included in teacher union contract negotiations. BCNCalso run a site for the BPS summer enrichment academy with 50 English Language Learners.

BCNC partners closely with Josiah Quincy Elementary School. We work with teachers to align curriculum, with support staff to discuss case management, and with administration to ensure long-term coordinated efforts. BCNC has programmatic relationships with Charlestown High, which has a Sheltered English Immersion program for Chinese speakers, and Josiah Quincy Upper School in Chinatown.


BCNC provides leadership in coalitions, including Thrive in 5, a city-wide early education initiative, A-WAY, a coalition of youth workers who work with Asian American youth, and the Chinatown Coalition, a coalition that sets an agenda for Chinatown. This year, BCNC will be collaborating with the Fish Family Foundation and MIRA Coalition on a new initiative to increase naturalization rates in Greater Boston.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 42
Number of Part Time Staff 44
Number of Volunteers 210
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 79%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 55
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 55
Male: 24
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Selina Chow
Board Chair Company Affiliation No Affiliation
Board Chair Term May 2009 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Stephen Chan The Boston Foundation Voting
Mr. Dean Chin Caring Senior Service Voting
Mr. Russell Chin Chin Law Firm --
Mr. Jimmy Chiu Commonwealth Care Alliance Voting
Ms. Selina Chow No Affiliation Voting
Ms. Lorrayne Chu Lorrayne Yen Chu Consulting Inc. Voting
Mr. Brian Downer State Street Corporation Voting
Ms. Julia Kuo Spectrum Equity --
Ms. Mabel Lam Network of Multicultural Training Professionals, Inc. Voting
Mr. Eugene Mahr Mass General Hospital Voting
Ms. Marie Moy Tufts Medical Center Voting
Ms. Shari Wyner Narva Narva & Company --
Ms. Betty Szeto Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA Voting
Ms. Marian Tse Goodwin Procter LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Debra Ashton Ashton Associates NonVoting
Ms. Frances Burke Integrity Internaitonal NonVoting
Mr. Paul Chan Mass Housing Investment Corporation NonVoting
Ms. Annie Chin-Louie United Way of Mass Bay and Merrimack Valley NonVoting
Ms. Susan Fung Boston Public Schools` NonVoting
Ms. Phys Gardiner Community Volunteer NonVoting
Mr. Edward Gee Verizon NonVoting
Ms. Maya Honda Wheelock College NonVoting
Mr. Johnny Ip East West Bank NonVoting
Ms. San San Lee Deloitte NonVoting
Ms. Irma Mann Irma. Inc. NonVoting
Ms. Ruth Mercado-Zizzo Citi Performing Arts Center NonVoting
Ms. Tamara Pitts Harvard Pilgrim Health Care NonVoting
Mr. Win Tung Citibank NonVoting
Mr. Hong T. Vuong Chaston Associates NonVoting
Ms. Beverly Wing The Chinatown Coalition NonVoting
Mr. Perry Wu Staples NonVoting
Ms. Anna Yee Interpreter/Consultant NonVoting
Mr. Raymond Yu Pandemonium Design NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 13
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • --
  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $5,153,528.00
Projected Expense $5,105,991.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $5,078,939 $5,068,271 $4,580,159
Total Expenses $5,015,628 $5,033,219 $4,741,293

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,052,725 $1,123,993 $985,011
Government Contributions $1,933,415 $1,818,521 $1,698,054
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,933,415 $1,818,521 $1,698,054
Individual Contributions $212,628 $213,156 $169,747
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $862,061 $888,546 $851,250
Investment Income, Net of Losses $14,753 $73,447 $40,633
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $384,231 $369,744 $318,627
Revenue In-Kind $619,126 $580,864 $516,837
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $3,975,598 $4,040,821 $3,838,454
Administration Expense $685,861 $611,366 $569,480
Fundraising Expense $354,169 $381,032 $333,359
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 1.01 0.97
Program Expense/Total Expenses 79% 80% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 10% 11% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $4,592,671 $4,492,729 $4,461,153
Current Assets $1,508,157 $1,398,488 $1,431,046
Long-Term Liabilities $9,968 $14,753 $0
Current Liabilities $508,506 $467,090 $485,319
Total Net Assets $4,074,197 $4,010,886 $3,975,834

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $232,083.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 4.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.97 2.99 2.95

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In 2008, BCNC began developing a three-year strategic plan which detailed the next phase of growth for the organization. The three-point plan included separation from a 35-year affiliation with the City of Boston as one of Boston's community centers; expansion to Quincy, a neighboring city; and the subsequent organizational realignment. In preparation for these major changes in BCNC’s infrastructure, we strengthened our financial position from 2008-2010 in order to accrue cash reserves to fund the planned deficit for the implementation of our strategic plan 2011 to 2013.  We should return to a surplus position in 2014.
 
BCNC's public/private partnership with the City was originally formed in 1976. BCNC effectively functioned as one of the City’s community centers for 35 years, utilizing City resources to develop responsive, community-based solutions. With the City providing support through facilities and salaries for key staff, BCNC grew to become nationally recognized and the largest community center in the City’s network of 40 neighborhood-based centers. However, with the advent of Sarbanes-Oaxley and the need for clear accountability, the public/private partnership became unsustainable.
 
As a result of a careful two-year planning process with the City, BCNC negotiated a mutually beneficial partnership agreement with Boston’s community centers, thereby releasing key BCNC staff from City payroll and the potential conflicts of interest. As a result, BCNC managed a planned deficit as we added two senior staff positions to our payroll that were previously on City payroll (Executive Director and Director of Programs), and invested in developing an internal operational and administrative infrastructure which supports the remaining strategic goals of expansion to Quincy and integration of programs.
 
The bulk of BCNC’s in-kind revenues and expenses reflect the cost of the City partnership contribution including facilities and programmatic staff. Additionally, in 2011 and 2012, BCNC was fortunate to receive in-kind commercial airings from Comcast which significantly increased the amount of in-kind revenues booked for these two years. The negative net results of our 2011 to 2013 budgets are directly correlated to the implementation of our strategic plan and are funded by our strong reserves, as planned. Now, moving forward, BCNC has stabilized in all these areas and positioned to return to balanced budgets.
 
Giles Li
Executive Director 
 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financial statements.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

 

BCNC believes that families have enormous potential to thrive, and that when immigrants are able to participate fully in society and create their own success stories, all of society benefits.

BCNC’s vision is that:

· Families and individuals are self-sufficient;

· Families are strong, healthy, and safe;

· Children have opportunities for school success; and

· Neighborhoods are strong and cohesive.

 

BCNC defines family as an interdependent group of individuals who are related biologically, legally, emotionally, or by a shared sense of history who are committed to each other and the group’s well-being. BCNC believes that building and strengthening the capacity of families will ultimately impact the larger community to address their own needs.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Programs that work with the entire family and with the community are essential if organizations are to tackle the persistent educational and economic issues facing the towns and cities of the region. The long-held tendency of social service programs to work with individual units rather than family units has created uncoordinated and siloed prevention, intervention and treatment programs. This lack of coordinated and integrated service impacts those with highest need: immigrant and low-income families. To counter this lack of coordinated service delivery, BCNC’s approach is to invest in impact for families.

BCNC’s family-centered approach recognizes that families and individuals do not face life challenges one at a time, therefore it offers constituents access to a holistic array of services that build on their strengths and offer support for their vulnerabilities. The organization believes that impact on one family can be improved through the coordination of services and provision of culturally competent professional support informed by each individual’s personal identity and family history.

BCNC programs are built on supporting five recognized protective factors that strengthen families: parental/caregiver resilience, social connections, social and emotional competence of children, knowledge of parenting and child development, and concrete support in times of need. BCNC’s strengthening families objective is achieved through the following strategies:

  • Facilitation of Friendships and Mutual Supports
  • Strengthen Parenting
  • Respond to Family Crises
  • Link Families to Services and Opportunities
  • Value and Support Individuals
  • Facilitate Social and Emotional Development
  • Observe and Respond to Early Warning Signs of Abuse and Neglect
  • Empower communities to address identified needs
  • Enhance community stakeholder capacity to advocate on its own behalf

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

BCNC has nearly half a century of community-based experience in serving the diverse Asian American population in the Greater Boston area. As an organization, BCNC has evolved along with the changing and growing Asian American community, and its family-centered programs have been proven to tangibly impact individuals and families on a sustainable basis. BCNC currently has 80 full and part-time staff on payroll, and over 300 active volunteers.

The leadership structure of the organization is comprised of an Executive Director that manages the day to day operations of the agency and a 14 member Board of Directors that provides financial oversight, supports fundraising, sets the mission and vision of the agency, and supervises the Executive Director. Responsible directly to the Executive Director is administrative management staff that includes the Director of Development, Director of Finance and Administration, and Director of Programs. The Development Office is responsible for all fundraising as well as marketing activity. This includes individual donor cultivation; government, corporate and foundation grant writing, as well as special events. The Finance Office is tasked with maintaining BCNC’s unblemished record of sound fiscal management as demonstrated through annual audits. BCNC is debt-free and maintains three months of operating reserves on hand. A cost-effective approach to high quality services is employed and a broad base of financial support is consistently maintained.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

BCNC has invested over a quarter of a million dollars in program evaluation and related systems, including a customized Social Solutions Efforts To Outcomes (ETO) deployment and a full-time Learning & Evaluation Manager. In order to achieve maximum impact and sustainability, BCNC strongly believes that programs and services should be evidence-based and community-centered. BCNC’s deep commitment to evaluation enables us to monitor program effectiveness and strategic progress.

In addition, BCNC regularly undergoes agency-wide strategic planning, with the next process scheduled to take place in late 2014. These strategic planning processes incorporate internal data, external research, program participant feedback, and Asian American community trends in evaluating how far BCNC has come, where it currently is, and what it will be focusing on moving forward.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Over the past 45 years, BCNC has effectively served the Asian American community in the Greater Boston area with a proven, award-winning track record. It is one of the largest Asian social service providers in New England, and its holistic, family-centered toddler-to-adult programming enables impacts to be both wide in scope and deep in impact.

However, just as the Asian American community is rapidly expanding throughout the Greater Boston area, BCNC is also actively working to increase access to its services. While sustaining its high quality programming in Boston, in the coming years, BCNC plans to invest heavily in serving and supporting Asian Americans in geographic areas outside of Boston, such as Quincy and Malden. BCNC will also be integrating a research-based family-centered approach into its programmatic framework to further align services with its vision for a strong, viable community.