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La Alianza Hispana Inc

 1000 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 101
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 427-7175 x 716
[F] (617) 442-2259
www.laalianza.org
[email protected]
Marisol Amaya-Aluigi
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INCORPORATED: 1971
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7121158

LAST UPDATED: 06/02/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

La Alianza Hispana is a community-based nonprofit organization serving the Latino community and all residents of the surrounding neighborhoods. La Alianza Hispana’s services target on family support services, elder care programming, and workforce development and education. People and their families are the heart of our work, and our impact is measured in the number of individuals who have: stabilized their lives, developed healthy parenting styles, obtained sustainable employment and are now living independent and healthy lives.

The goal is to empower individuals and families, strengthen communities, and develop leaders through high-quality education and social services, advocacy and community organizing. Our services are culturally and linguistically integrated in our community. La Alianza believes in social justice as a means of creating a more egalitarian, participatory and peaceful society in which all members can realize their fullest potential.

Mission Statement

La Alianza Hispana is a community-based nonprofit organization serving the Latino community and all residents of the surrounding neighborhoods. La Alianza Hispana’s services target on family support services, elder care programming, and workforce development and education. People and their families are the heart of our work, and our impact is measured in the number of individuals who have: stabilized their lives, developed healthy parenting styles, obtained sustainable employment and are now living independent and healthy lives.

The goal is to empower individuals and families, strengthen communities, and develop leaders through high-quality education and social services, advocacy and community organizing. Our services are culturally and linguistically integrated in our community. La Alianza believes in social justice as a means of creating a more egalitarian, participatory and peaceful society in which all members can realize their fullest potential.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,454,432.00
Projected Expense $1,453,046.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • La Alianza Hispana Departments

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

La Alianza Hispana is a community-based nonprofit organization serving the Latino community and all residents of the surrounding neighborhoods. La Alianza Hispana’s services target on family support services, elder care programming, and workforce development and education. People and their families are the heart of our work, and our impact is measured in the number of individuals who have: stabilized their lives, developed healthy parenting styles, obtained sustainable employment and are now living independent and healthy lives.

The goal is to empower individuals and families, strengthen communities, and develop leaders through high-quality education and social services, advocacy and community organizing. Our services are culturally and linguistically integrated in our community. La Alianza believes in social justice as a means of creating a more egalitarian, participatory and peaceful society in which all members can realize their fullest potential.


Background Statement

A Call for Leaders 
 
Since 1971, La Alianza Hispana has been an icon of Latino leadership and has consistently served as a portal to hope for well over 30,000 Bostonians. As a hub of social service delivery, advocacy, and education, our organization has changed the landscape of community resources and has changed lives. Woven into our core values of empowerment and supporting social justice, La Alianza has a rich history of incubating ideas that have evolved into powerful models of community leadership. Today, we continue to build on our legacy, and are committed to providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services to meet the needs of Boston’s Latino community.

 In July 1969, during an era of great social change and activism, a group of concerned Boston residents were moved to respond to the education, employment, housing, and health needs of the, then, 7,000 Boston Latinos, largely residing in the Dudley Street Neighborhood. Through outreach to community leaders and the local philanthropic community, these founding members and community organizers made a compelling case for support and inspired a leadership movement in the Latino community. In 1971 La Alianza Hispana was incorporated as a citywide service delivery organization that provided culturally competent and community-centered services that changed the economic and social reality for many Boston area Latinos.  


Impact Statement

2013 Accomplishments:
 
1. A total of 21 trainees/employees from Guardian HealthCare and The Caribbean Foundation Home Making and Home Health Aides Training Program received their 12-week ESOL Workplace in Healthcare Certificate with flying colors at La Alianza Hispana thanks to partial funding from the BYN Mellon Trust Foundation for ESOL Workplace Program. We are very pleased and eager to keep working on ESOL workplace opportunities with employers such as The Guardian Health Care and The Caribbean Foundation of Boston in the next cycle as Guardian Health Care has submitted a request for funding from the Commonwealth Corporation's Workforce Training Fund to expand the training program at La Alianza Hispana.  
 
2. The federal Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) continued its commitment to support La Alianza Hispana's Cuidate Teen Pregnancy Prevention Project, a five year grant from said office, as one of the nine evaluation projects nationwide to be implemented in 2013-2014. Our program competed with 1,000 proposals and was one of the 97 finalists selected for the grant.
 
3.La Alianza Hispana celebrated its signature fundraising event, 4Th Annual Women of Courage award event on June 21, 2012 successfully and raised approximately $70K.
 
4. La Alianza Hispana was recognized with First Prize in the Puerto Rican Festival Parade 2013 with its Cultural Float that depicted the cultural traditions and customes of the Latino Caribbean culture in its ornaments and music. Special thanks go to the Cuidate Team, parents and teens, as well as Zach Castro, a talented artist who has always said Yes, We Can!
 
5. La Alianza Hispana was chosen as one of the ten community organizations in Boston to receive capacity building technical assistance from the Mayor's Office of New Bostonians and The Haitian Fund. This resource is helping the agency to refocus on priorities, resources and planning for the next few  years.
 
 6. La Alianza Hispana has been blessed in counting on the interim leadership of a seasoned veteran manager in Mr. Tristram Blake, well know founder and manager of the South End Community Health Center, who retired a few years ago and has been working wtih the Board of Directors in tackling the priorities of funding, program priorities and capacity building for the agency.
 
Expected Accomplishments for 2014:
 
1. The Cuidate Teen Pregnancy Prevention Project will start its Year 4 implementation reaching out and working with schools in Lawrence, Chelsea and Boston.
 
2. Five hundred teens ages 13 to 17 years will participate in the experiment project and 500 in control group from the communities of Lawrence, Chelsea, and Boston.
 
3. A range of partnerships with employers in the area of child care, healthcare, and business are in pre-implementation phase for 2014 and solicit funds from the Workforce Training Fund to assist in educational training opporutnities for employers. Partnerships include Urban College, Project Hope, New England Center for Arts and Technology, Guardian Healthcare, The Carribean Foundation, among others.
 
3. The Board and Leadership team will work on the implementation of the continuation of its strategic plan to seek a diversified portfolio of funding streams to stabilize and grow the organization to its next level of growth.
 
4. Ms. Marisol Amaya has been selected as the future Executive Director and currently the Assistant Director under Mr. Tristram Blake. Ms. Amaya has been the program director of the very well known and recognized Elder Center of La Alianza Hispana for nine years. She is doing an amazing job in transitioning from her program manager role to the upcoming ED for the agency.

Needs Statement

1. The most pressing needs for the agency is to build the capacity infrastructure. Currently we are missing a full-time Development Director or grant writer, that can focus entirely in securing a portfolio of funding streams and work with the Director of Programs and Program managers in entrepreneurial initiatives and contracting opportunities and partnerships. This will require $60K plus fringe benefits for this position.
  
2.The need to assist the Board of Directors with fundraising efforts,board development, and expansion of its membership to represent other areas of need represent a need for $100K
 
3 The need to contract a CFO with a range of experience to augment the financial stability, and growth of the organization. This represents an additional $70K plus fringe benefits for that position.
 
 

CEO Statement

La Alianza Hispana has a rich history of over 40 years of service to the Latino community that starts their journey in Boston by opening doors with our assistance. It is a thriving community that is determined to succeed in spite of multiple social determinants of health barriers such as language, poverty, adapting to a new culture and health disparities. Other community based organization might serve part of the Latino community. However, there is no other Latino led community-based organization that has the mission of serving the Greater Boston community as well as the surrounding neighborhoods where our facilities are enclaved - Roxbury - which is the poorest section of the city of Boston. The past six years with the economic shakedown - where 14 community-based organizations closed their doors in this region - La Alianza Hispana has survived in spite of all the financial and operational capacity challenges. It is critical for donors to understand the impact that La Alianza Hispana continues having in the Latino community as word-of-mouth and experience in getting services helping families and individuals make through progress is as strongest as ever. Every month we get over 100 requests for ESOL classes not counting requests for employment skills, computer literacy, family and individual support services, such as housing, access to medical care and other issues. Latinos receive not only the direct care service at La Alianza Hispana but it is a service that it is offered by qualified experienced bilingual/bicultural staff that are culturally and linguistically compatible with the clients, and participants' language and cultural context. This creates "confianza" -trust- and once this is established, they keep coming back and feel they are part of a family. Above all, we believe in teaching to fish rather than fishing for them-we help them understand and learn how to navigate the system to get access to services, information, referrals and direct care services by a dedicated team of staff that are professional, empathetic and know how to deliver positive outcomes and goals for their client's lives.

Board Chair Statement

It is with great honor that I have been serving at the Board of Directors of La Alianza Hispana, Inc. as Chair for the past few years of this very dynamic and mission driven institution. As a Latino I feel proud of the accomplishments that staff, volunteers and staff have achieved in spite of the last difficult years of economic disparity for our Latino community. As an architect that believes in the importance of creating systems and design plans that are effective, efficient and yield quality of space, services and results, I am committed to keep supporting La Alianza Hispana's mission and human capital that makes this organization unique. I have been a board member in other organizations but there is this special quality of La Alianza Hispana that grabs your heart as you see the faces of transformation on parents, students, children, and young people that are helped by our services. We have a challenge of financial support from the philanthropyy community that unfortunately only provides 2% of the dollars in the Latino community. La Alianza Hispana has struggled in making the case of why funding this agency is a good business investment for all: it is a win-win for the individuals, their families, the community, the providers, the businesses, as these individuals, families learn English, get employed, continue to college, transfer their credentials from their countries of origin, receive individual and family counseling services, young minds get help with information on making choices in their lives. There is no other place where I can say I feel like home: La Alianza Hispana is the place where you learn to say "mi casa es su casa" (My home is your home). We need to honor this legacy to continue this work of love for the next decade and of course, the next forty years of service. Thanks for the opportunity and join us to help Latinos achieve their goals and be a healthy community.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Greater Boston and surrounding neighborhoods including Roxbury, North and South Dorchester, East Boston, Chelsea, Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, Roslindale, South End, Allston, Brighton, and outside the area from Randolph, Brockton, Quincy, Malden, among others.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Services (Adolescent Parents)
  2. Human Services - Senior Centers/Services
  3. Human Services - Pregnancy Centers

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

La Alianza Hispana Departments

1. The Workforce and Learning programs help to prepare Latinos and non English speakers  for the world of work by offering services that enhance basic skills.
 
 A. ESOL workplace programs with employers who need employees to acquire English language skills and communication for the workplace needs, productivity and impact.
 
B. The Timothy Smith and LULAC computer labs with 27 computers accessible to community weekdays from 9am-5pm. The ESOL workforce program has been awarded the best workplace award in 2010 by MIRA Coalition and New Bostonians.
 
2. La Alianza Mental Public and Community Health programs are helping to bridge the gap in health disparities. The agency offers bilingual/bicultural case management and supportive services to families and individuals.
 
 
A. Boston Healhty Start Initiative and the Parent to Parent programs provide critical case management services for expecting mothers and young families with children under 2 years of age; 
 
D. Hijas Adelante, a psycho-educational group for girls at risk of violence and trauma  and the new federal project, Cuidate Teen Pregnancy Prevention Project to reach out to 13 to 17 years of age teens in learning about their cultural values, decision making and choices. The Cuidate Project was selected as one of the nine national models to be in a national evaluation study.
 
3. La Alianza Elder services are helping Latino seniors to age in place and continue living independent lives.
 
A. The Senior Center provides services  to over 150 Latino seniors many foreign-born, mid-to- late-life immigrants, to stay healthy and maintain their independence. 
 
B. The Adult Day Health Program, an award-winning program that placed 2nd in a 2006 national competition of adult day providers, provides direct care to 42 elderly Latinos who may require more intensive care because of disabilities.
Budget  $1,900,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Hispanic, Latino Heritage Families Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
100% of ESOL students will acquire English language skills moving from basic to Level 1, 2, and 3; 85% of them will attend in regular attendance; 75% will improve in learning gains as measured by pre and post testing; ESOL workplace employees at MMGI will progress (90%) to the next ESOL level and MMGI will gain (80%) of more productivity, motivation, and retention of employees with the ability to move on the ladder of the organization as they acquire more workforce skills in computer literacy, critical thinking skills, and language communication skills.
Adults in the Elder Department will receive (100%) quality of supervised day time care in the program which will reduce depression, and isolation.
Teens (85%) will show with pre and post testing behavioral improvements in knowledge and decision making skills with the program experience.
100% of clients referred to the Family Counseling Center will receive quality of care and demonstrate progress in their mental health coping skills addressed in individual or family therapy received at the program.
Program Long-Term Success  150 families enrolled in our public health and mental health services. 150 working adults graduated from our English classes with 300 on our wailing list and 20 Adult English Language Learners receiving workforce-integrated ESOL instruction on site at their jobs through our collaboration with Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries. 425 people received computer instruction at our Timothy Smith Learning Center and the lab was utilized by over 750 people..
Program Success Monitored By 
La Alianza Hispana tracks program outcomes in its agencywide database system, Efforts to Outcomes (ETOS) software from the past five years. Staff also uses the respective contractor database system such as SMARTT for DESE, BHSI, DCF and other agencies in the local, state and federal levels.
Examples of Program Success 
ESOL adult students accomplished goals including entering employment, entering college, transfering credentials from their countries of origin, change careers, become US citizens, apply for citizenship, learn how to do a budget, purchase home, achieve stable housing, obtain drivers license, among other professional and personal goals.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

La Alianza Hispana is an organization with a history of creating leaders and innovation since its inception in 1971. It is an icon of community strength-based in spite of the socio-economic determinants that impact low-income immigrant communities and its health. La Alianza Hispana has survived through ups and downs in the past four decades due to the determination of leaders, community support and partners that see the value added of this organization by their contribution of financial, professional or partnership support. The agency was faced with a challenge to spring back as a phoenix from the dismantling of the Adult Educatin program due to defunding from DESE Adult and community learning contract for the next five years. The transition of leadership has also been seen as an opportunity to rekindle new ideas, innovation, and focus on the greatest assets of the community and agency: its people, and the passion for the agency's mission of giving to others who need help. We look forward to a new decade of programs, services, and outcomes that will help the Latino community strive for its evolvement and win-win solutions with our partners and friends.  Si se puede...

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Marisol Amaya-Aluigi
CEO Term Start June 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Janet Carmen Collazo MA June 2004 Nov

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Marisol Amaya-Aluigi MPH Program Director --
Ms. Dolores C. Calaf M.A., Ed. D. student Director of Programs --
Ms. Rosita Colon B.A Contracts / HR / Facilities Manager --
Ms. Alba Yaniris Rosado M.M. Director of Finance --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
First Prize as a Cultural Float in the Parade Puerto Rican Festival 2013 2013
Community Support Award Puerto Rican Festival of Boston 2012
Community Innovation Award Boston Latino TV Access 2011
Community Organization Award El Mundo Newspaper 2011
Education Partner for Learn at Work Commonwealth Corporation 2010

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
National Council of La Raza (NCLR) - Affiliate 2012
Associated Grant Makers 1981
United Way Member Agency 1981
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

La Alianza Hispana has a history of building collaborations and partnerships through its years of service. Among them GEMS, a coalition of five organizations in Roxbury serving the community; Roxbury Adult Literacy Coalition for ABE providers in Roxbury, Boston Promise Neighborhood Initiative, Action for Boston Community Action (ABCD), Martha Eliot Community Health Center, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Resilient Community of Roxbury Initiative, Chelsea Collaborative, schools such as the Greater Lawrence Technical High School, and others.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

La Alianza Hispana has addressed the financial burden from years past due to a combination of economic gaps and less philanthropic dollars raised in the past two years. Additional efforts have been implemented through more aggressive fundraising initiatives and events as well as entrepreneurial products and ideas. It is our goal to reach the financial stability of the organization and the Board of Directors have committed to make this goal a reality for the next two years. As Executive Director and designated leader of a team of very dedicated staff, I firmly believe that we can do this working together in partnership with businesses, government, higher education institutions, healthcare providers, and workforce investment initiatives.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 32
Number of Volunteers 13
Number of Contract Staff 6
Staff Retention Rate % 95%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 29
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 20
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Alberto Cardenas
Board Chair Company Affiliation DHK Architects
Board Chair Term Mar 1998 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Marisol Amaya-Aluigi La Alianza Hispana NonVoting
Mr. Alberto Cardenas Board Chair President, DHK Architects Voting
Ms. Monica Dean Nuestra Community Development Corporation Voting
Ms. Patricia A. Groves Law Office of Green & Greenberg Voting
Mr. George G. Montgomery NeighborWorks America Voting
Mr. Moises Numa William Blair & Company Voting
Mr. Nicholas Oslon Keystone Strategy, LLC Voting
Mr. Livio Perez Safeco Voting
Ms. Lucinda V. Rivera Law Office of Lucinda V. Rivera Voting
Mr. Frank Sepulveda Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 1
Hispanic/Latino: 7
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 25%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Board of Directors has a balance of experience board members as well as newly elected members. This combination allows experience, continuity and new creative innovation to the board dynamics. The biggest challenge for the Board of Directors is to assist in the financial stability of the organization within the context of economic changes and reduction of funding streams among the philanthrophy community in the past two years. This is due in part for the lack of a full-time development director that in the past was the conduit to opportunities and presence in fundraising and grant writing activities as a dedicated member of the leadership team. There are a couple of new board members that are interested and committed in supporting the financial development of the organization with their contacts, network, and experience. Currently there are 7 board members which is the minimum as requested by the by-laws plus the non-voting membership of the Executive Director. This year we are seeking additional board members that bring additional expertise to the table. A criteria grid was put together in making sure that the Board has representation not only from a range of sectors but as well reflect the diversity within the Latino and non-Latino community at the board level.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,162,225 $1,708,584 $1,477,522
Total Expenses $1,066,113 $1,404,933 $1,479,094

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $109,515 $160,794 $169,150
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $789,149 $1,533,597 $1,231,522
Investment Income, Net of Losses $832 -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $262,729 $14,193 $76,850

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $763,579 $926,248 $1,008,010
Administration Expense $302,534 $470,331 $398,195
Fundraising Expense -- $8,354 $72,889
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.09 1.22 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 72% 66% 68%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 5% 43%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $897,223 $782,992 $1,273,663
Current Assets $894,933 $775,493 $186,993
Long-Term Liabilities $16,061 $16,061 $714,917
Current Liabilities $110,668 $92,549 $188,015
Total Net Assets $770,494 $674,382 $370,731

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 8.09 8.38 0.99

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 2% 2% 56%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

For the past few years, our team comprised of the Executive Director, the Board of  Directors and senior finance staff have been working in meeting the challenge of cash flow needs and reducing the dependency on government and contracts while looking for entrepreneurial opportunities for revenue income from services, consultancies and other products related to our expertise in community health and education. This initiative is reflected in the strategic plan that was put together with the assistance of the Bridgespan team funded by The Boston Foundation during 2011. Many accomplishments have been completed in terms of realignment of services; some other accomplishments have been in boosting up the accountability system from program managers and staff to produce the expected outcomes and goal to yield the revenues and business impact. More has to be done in the next two years to increase the financial stability of the agency and the capacity building needs. We are committed to win this task but we need your help, as partners in philanthrophy to provide the financial assistance to hire the individuals that will bring expertise to make it a reality. We believe in accountability and we believe La Alianza Hispana is an asset to donors that believe in equity and justice. Thanks for the opportunity of your trust.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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