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Heading Home, Inc.

 529 Main Street, Suite 100, The Schrafft Center
 Charlestown, MA 02129
[P] (617) 864-8140
[F] (617) 864-2541
www.headinghomeinc.org
[email protected]
Emily Smaldon
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1972
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7364546

LAST UPDATED: 12/01/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names Shelter Inc (2008)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Heading Home's mission is to end homelessness in Greater Boston by providing a supported pathway to self-sufficiency that begins with a home, together with critical services such as life skills, financial literacy, and job training.

Mission Statement

Heading Home's mission is to end homelessness in Greater Boston by providing a supported pathway to self-sufficiency that begins with a home, together with critical services such as life skills, financial literacy, and job training.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $16,508,852.00
Projected Expense $16,508,852.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Bridges to Permanent Housing
  • Economic Mobility Center (EMC)
  • Family Mobility Programs
  • Individual Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Heading Home's mission is to end homelessness in Greater Boston by providing a supported pathway to self-sufficiency that begins with a home, together with critical services such as life skills, financial literacy, and job training.


Background Statement

Heading Home was founded as “Shelter, Inc.” in 1974 and for many years existed as a small grassroots organization operating three local emergency shelters. In 1981, we established Massachusetts’ first emergency shelter for homeless families, and in the late 1990s we began to operate permanent housing. In 2004, we completed a strategic plan which encouraged expansion and a shift in focus from emergency services to permanent, supportive housing, an approach with the most potential to end homelessness. While continuing to operate shelters and transitional programs, during the five-year life of the plan we officially changed our name to “Heading Home” to reflect this shift in focus and added 120 new units of permanent, supportive housing. The majority of this housing uses the Housing First approach, which we pioneered in the Commonwealth.

Over the past decade Heading Home quadrupled in size and became one of the area’s largest providers of housing for homeless families. In 2013 we received significant funding from the state to create eight new emergency family shelters throughout Dorchester and Roxbury. We now serve 200+ families (400+ people) in the Dorchester/Roxbury area. In 2015 we leveraged additional funding from the state to open an Economic Mobility Center in Dorchester with convenient access where the majority of our families reside. Our in-house staff specialists design and deliver curriculum to focus parents on career development and financial education, encouraging measurable gains in income and savings. The Center fills a critical void as the first and only program of its kind offered by Boston-area homeless organizations.

Today Heading Home serves nearly 1,600 Greater Bostonians. Clients span from infants to elderly, and we serve both individuals and families. While we provide all forms of housing, the ultimate goal is to get people permanently housed. Our housing is created in two ways: purchase and rehabilitation of buildings and renting apartments on behalf of our clients. We own and operate 10 properties that both house and serve clients. In addition, we secure rental vouchers from state and federal sources and use them to rent apartments on the private rental market. Formerly homeless people need assistance both with getting housed and staying housed. Our support services encourage gains in income, savings and independence, complemented by the essential outside services we broker. 


Impact Statement

Points of pride:

  • Since 2006, we have created more than 430 housing units.

  • For 11 straight years, 90+% of the residents in our permanent housing programs have remained successfully housed one year later.

Family highlights:

  • Most of our families are headed by parents who grew up in poverty, and as a result have underdeveloped executive function. Last year our master’s educated clinicians provided specialized, intensive behavioral interventions with select parents to develop executive function and undo past behaviors. Few other local homeless organizations have developed similar programming.

  • We have added a two-generation approach to our family programming through exercises that both teach children about work and money and reinforce their parents’ learning. For example, parents read age-appropriate books to their children with themes related to money and career or take children on field trips to banks and help their children open savings accounts.

Individual highlights:

  • Chronically homeless individuals represent roughly 10% of the homeless population yet consume 50+% of total resources. Research shows that the chronically homeless expend less resources once they are permanently housed through the Housing First model. Recently, we were one of select local nonprofits to be awarded first-in-the-nation social innovation financing via “Massachusetts Pay for Success”—a program that leverages private and public dollars, along with coordination, to end chronic homelessness and expand Housing First locally.

Top goals for the coming year:

  • Directly serve at least 1,600 people in one or more of our programs.

  • Place at least 120 families and 35 individuals into permanent housing.

  • At least 90% of individuals and families in permanent housing programs will remain successfully housed one year later.

  • At least 200 families will engage in financial-education services at our Economic Mobility Center.

  • At least 200 families will utilize our career-development services.


Needs Statement

1. Apartment Start-Up Costs: As a result of the competitive local rental market, we typically have to pay $250/month above the value of the housing subsidy to get a client housed. Additionally, public funders sometimes cover security deposits and last month’s rent, but none cover broker fees.

2. Economic Mobility: Our multi-pronged approach to help families exit poverty includes financial-literacy education, employment-readiness coaching, and self-sufficiency coaching.  Private funding ensures the full staff needed in all areas.

 

3. Matched Savings: Heading Home raises private funds to match savings deposits for families dollar for dollar.

 

4. Chronically homeless individuals represent ~10% of the homeless yet consume 50+% of resources. It is more cost effective—and effective—to permanently house this group. Last year we served 172 chronically homeless individuals, 150 through permanent, supportive housing. These individual programs consistently lack private funders.  

 

5. Core Support: In response to local needs, since 2004 Heading Home has quadrupled in size and become one of the area’s largest providers of housing for homeless families. Operating an effective $16MM organization requires ample staff in finance, human resources and development. Private donors can support these core areas.


CEO Statement

Over time, Heading Home has remained an organization of firsts. We established Massachusetts’ first emergency shelter for homeless families more than 30 years ago. In the late 1990s we began to experiment with operating permanent housing, and a few years later we pioneered Housing First in the Commonwealth, widely viewed as the most effective strategy to end long-term homelessness. More recently, Heading Home has created locally unique programs to end family homelessness and built a team of staff specialists who utilize distinctive coaching practices to encourage long-term economic mobility; for years we were one of few local organizations to have fully implemented motivational interviewing, a goal-oriented, client-focused coaching practice. In 2015 Heading Home leveraged significant funding from the state to open an Economic Mobility Center in Dorchester, conveniently located near hundreds of our clients residing in Dorchester and Roxbury. Having thoughtfully developed curriculum for the Center, our in-house staff specialists focus parents on career development and financial education to encourage measurable gains in income and savings. Offering ample meeting space and in-house child care provided by volunteers, the Center fills a critical void as the first and only program of its kind offered by Boston-area homeless organizations. We remain proud of Heading Home’s long - and unique - history of operating “ahead of the curve,” early adopters of noteworthy, innovative practices to end homelessness.

--Tom Lorello, CEO 


Board Chair Statement

I currently serve as President of the Board, but I identify best as a Heading Home volunteer. My involvement with the organization began as a founding member of our Outreach Council, a group that engages young professionals in promoting and supporting Heading Home’s mission. During my time on the Outreach Council, we developed Up & Out, now a signature volunteer program of the organization. Up & Out pairs volunteers with local homeless families and individuals moving from shelter into permanent housing. Through funds raised, plus donations of new and gently used housewares and furniture, volunteers outfit and decorate a client’s new apartment. The half-day experience concludes with welcoming the client into his or her new home. Today, Heading Home organizes 20 Up & Out moves annually, and the Outreach Council is 20+ members strong.

Every year we reach new milestones at Heading Home: Our reach grows and our team grows - both in size and strength - and we celebrate new achievements in our fundraising efforts. It is unique that an organization can do so much on such a broad scale.

One thing that remains constant is our staff’s dedication to their mission. My commitment to this organization has in no small part been fueled by the moms, dads, children and staff I have gotten to know through the Up & Out program. While each family we move has a different story, the moves share a common thread: the stabilizing impact resulting from Heading Home’s care, compassion and hard work. There is a tireless focus on helping one client at a time head home. To me, this is Heading Home’s unstated mission.

--- Jonathan Weintraub, Board President


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)

Heading Home provides emergency, transitional and permanent housing, and support services, to homeless and formerly homeless families and individuals in the communities of Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Malden, Medford, Quincy, Revere and Somerville with heavy focus on the essential combination of permanent housing and supportive services as the optimal long-term solution to homelessness. More than half of our clients reside in the City of Boston.

Organization Categories

  1. Housing, Shelter - Low-Income & Subsidized Rental Housing
  2. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers
  3. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Bridges to Permanent Housing

Chronically homeless individuals represent roughly 10% of the homeless population yet consume more than 50% of total resources. Research shows that the chronically homeless expend significantly less resources once they are permanently housed through the Housing First model. Recently, Heading Home was one of select local nonprofits to be awarded social innovation financing via “Massachusetts Pay for Success” — a program that leverages private and public dollars, along with coordination, to end chronic homelessness and expand Housing First locally. Despite access to these resources, housing placements have been predictably slow due to the area’s competitive rental market. Public funders will sometimes cover security deposits and occasionally last month’s rent, but none cover broker fees. Through Bridges to Permanent Housing, private funders can assist with a one-time investment of housing start-up costs to get chronically homeless individuals permanently housed.

Budget  $405,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing Support
Population Served Homeless People/Families with of People with Disabilities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

· Place at least 40 homeless individual clients into permanent housing.

· After stabilizing, 100% of clients will receive a thorough employment and education assessment.

· 100% of clients enroll in MassHealth (Massachusetts’ Medicaid program).

o 100% of clients show increased income through benefits.

· 50% of clients show increased participation in outpatient mental health programs.

· 20% of clients show increased participation in substance abuse services.

· 70% of clients show increased usage of primary/routine medical care.

· 60% of clients show decreased usage of emergency room visits.

Program Long-Term Success 

· At least 90% of clients placed into permanent housing programs will remain successfully housed one year later.

Program Success Monitored By 

More than many organizations, Heading Home reflects on our approaches and data, remaining open to change when modification may improve outcomes. Per our contracts with major public funders, we must utilize their databases to ensure proper data sharing and tracking over the long term as clients move into and out of Heading Home’s care. Depending on the Heading Home program, we currently utilize either Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) or Clarity. Both of these systems track organizational outcomes (e.g., placement into permanent housing) as well as individualized goals and achievements (e.g., measurable economic gains). We currently have two fulltime in-house data and research staff who consult on collection methods and assist with extracting and analyzing data. Also of note, our data and research staff conduct twice-monthly internal staff “community workshops,” an opportunity for staff entering client data to sit together and seek tips and best practices in a supportive environment. Client data, plus direct client and staff feedback, help us identify ways to improve and adapt existing programs and/or point out areas for new program development.

Examples of Program Success 

“Flo” has remained housed since 2011. Flo just received her certification in drug and alcohol counseling from Cambridge College in early 2016. She continues to volunteer at Rosie's Place, leading creative writing groups, art classes and quilting classes. Flo is in the process of publishing a memoir on her interesting road to recovery - - she has remained sober for 22 years…”Jane” has been housed since 2005. Jane received her certificate in real estate from the Lee Institute in June 2016 and is currently preparing to take her real estate license exam. She continues to budget well and pay her bills on time…Finally, “Eric” leads a stable life while coping with anxiety and depression. Since entering one of our programs in 2002, he has been connected to a counselor with whom he meets or speaks every day. Heading Home has helped Eric achieve basic life-skills milestones; he continues to pay his bills and rent on time.


Economic Mobility Center (EMC)

To overcome homelessness for good, formerly homeless parents need to know how to build savings and increase income over time. Extensive research shows that providing supportive services alongside housing is much more effective than just providing one or the other. In 2015 Heading Home leveraged funding from the state to open an Economic Mobility Center (EMC) in Dorchester, conveniently located near hundreds of our families residing in Dorchester and Roxbury. The EMC provides three main services: career development, financial education and behavioral coaching to develop executive function, all delivered by our staff specialists who have developed curriculum in these areas. Offering ample meeting space and in-house child care provided by volunteers, the EMC fills a critical void as the first and only program of its kind offered by Boston-area homeless organizations. Private funding complements essential EMC services not covered by public funders.

Budget  $491,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Financial Counseling
Population Served Homeless Families Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

· At least 200 families will engage in financial-education services at our EMC.

o 75 total new accounts will be opened (either IDA or personal savings account).

o Utilizing our IDA program and personal savings accounts, at least 60% will actively save a total of $50,000.

· At least 200 families will utilize our career-development services.

o At least 35% will secure employment and increase their income, earning on average between $13.00 (part-time) to $17.00 per hour (full-time).

o At least 50% will engage in educational goals. Of this group, 40 will work to earn a high school equivalency certificate and 60 will pursue further education through occupational training and college degrees.

· Heading Home staff will utilize survey tool to measure executive function (EF) with 100 parents to determine most pressing EF needs. Based on results, each parent will be assigned at least one EF-related goal. For example, to measure gains in time-management skills we will track decrease in lateness to appointments.

Program Long-Term Success 

· At least 90% of families in permanent housing programs will remain successfully housed one year later.

Program Success Monitored By 

More than many organizations, Heading Home reflects on our approaches and data, remaining open to change when modification may improve outcomes. Per our contracts with major public funders, we must utilize their databases to ensure proper data sharing and tracking over the long term as clients move into and out of Heading Home’s care. Depending on the Heading Home program, we currently utilize either Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) or Clarity. Both of these systems track organizational outcomes (e.g., placement into permanent housing) as well as individualized goals and achievements (e.g., measurable economic gains). We currently have two fulltime in-house data and research staff who consult on collection methods and assist with extracting and analyzing data. Also of note, our data and research staff conduct twice-monthly internal staff “community workshops,” an opportunity for staff entering client data to sit together and seek tips and best practices in a supportive environment. Client data, plus direct client and staff feedback, help us identify ways to improve and adapt existing programs and/or point out areas for new program development.

Examples of Program Success 

In 2015, Georgia and her two school-age children fled an abusive domestic environment with few personal belongings and little savings. They were placed into a Heading Home family shelter in Roxbury, where they could get back on track within a safe, supportive environment. Soon thereafter, Georgia completed our core financial-literacy curriculum and met several times with the employment specialist at our Economic Mobility Center. Over the past year, Georgia has worked hard to build her skills and meet her life goals: enrolling in a HiSET class, getting focused on educational and career direction, obtaining permanent housing. She has begun to build savings and reduce debt, and in spring 2016 Georgia and her children were placed into a permanent apartment. Georgia still works in retail to pay the bills, but she is now pursuing her medical assistant certification. Georgia is on track to receive her certification in 2018, at which time she plans to secure fulltime employment in the field.


Family Mobility Programs

Massachusetts has nearly 4,000 homeless families, close to 300 of whom living in motels. Greater Boston’s rental market suffers from an unfortunate combination of high rent, high demand and low stock. Currently, the average two-bedroom apartment is about $2,500/month, an expense that cannot be supported by working several minimum-wage jobs. Children who are chronically homeless suffer profound, life-long effects, including poor academic performance, less likelihood of graduating and poor health. Local families need stable housing plus the skills and income to afford and maintain that housing. Heading Home is one of the area’s largest providers of housing for homeless families, and our FMPs provide the most effective solutions to this crisis. FMPs provide the comforts of home plus intensive staff support to 400 Boston-area families, helping them develop skills that enable housing stability and economic mobility: employment readiness, financial education and life skills.

Budget  $3,400,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing Support
Population Served Homeless Families Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

· Directly serve at least 400 families/1,200 people through emergency, transitional and permanent housing.

· 100% of families will receive help to address immediate needs (e.g., clothing, childcare).

· 100% of children will access day care and/or education.

· Of the families placed into our shelters, 70% will access affordable permanent housing within 9 months, and the remaining 30% within 15-24 months.

· At least 200 families will engage in financial-education services at our Economic Mobility Center.

o 75 total new accounts will be opened (either IDA or personal savings account).

o Utilizing our IDA program and personal savings accounts, at least 60% will actively save a total of $50,000.

· At least 200 families will utilize career-development services at our Economic Mobility Center.

o At least 35% will secure employment and increase their income, earning on average between $13.00 (part-time) to $17.00 per hour (full-time).

o At least 50% will engage in educational goals. Of this group, 40 will work to earn a high school equivalency certificate and 60 will pursue further education through occupational training and college degrees.

Program Long-Term Success 

·         At least 90% of families in permanent housing programs will remain successfully housed one year later. 

Program Success Monitored By 

More than many organizations, Heading Home reflects on our approaches and data, remaining open to change when modification may improve outcomes. Per our contracts with major public funders, we must utilize their databases to ensure proper data sharing and tracking over the long term as clients move into and out of Heading Home’s care. Depending on the Heading Home program, we currently utilize either Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) or Clarity. Both of these systems track organizational outcomes (e.g., placement into permanent housing) as well as individualized goals and achievements (e.g., measurable economic gains). We currently have two fulltime in-house data and research staff who consult on collection methods and assist with extracting and analyzing data. Also of note, our data and research staff conduct twice-monthly internal staff “community workshops,” an opportunity for staff entering client data to sit together and seek tips and best practices in a supportive environment. Client data, plus direct client and staff feedback, help us identify ways to improve and adapt existing programs and/or point out areas for new program development. 

Examples of Program Success 

In 2015, Georgia and her two school-age children fled an abusive domestic environment with few personal belongings and little savings. They were placed into a Heading Home family shelter in Roxbury, where they could get back on track within a safe, supportive environment. Soon thereafter, Georgia completed our core financial-literacy curriculum and met several times with the employment specialist at our Economic Mobility Center. Over the past year, Georgia has worked hard to build her skills and meet her life goals: enrolling in a HiSET class, getting focused on educational and career direction, obtaining permanent housing. She has begun to build savings and reduce debt, and in spring 2016 Georgia and her children were placed into a permanent apartment. Georgia still works in retail to pay the bills, but she is now pursuing her medical assistant certification. Georgia is on track to receive her certification in 2018, at which time she plans to secure fulltime employment in the field. 


Individual Programs

Heading Home’s first activities 40+ years ago involved local volunteers providing a room full of beds, a shower, and moral support for homeless individuals in Cambridge’s Central Square. Our individual programs now extend throughout Greater Boston and serve nearly 400 people. For example, our Cambridge Shelter (emergency male/female), Duley House and Rindge Avenue House (permanent, supportive female), Lopez House (permanent, supportive male) and McKay House (permanent, supportive male). These essential programs get homeless people off of the street and focused on overcoming the obstacles that had led to their homelessness, providing a safe, sober, home-like environment. The supportive living environment also helps residents realize their individual strengths to make and maintain positive change in their lives so they can work toward remaining permanently housed and self-sufficient. Despite their importance, these programs tend to run on a deficit due to consistently steep operating increases and public funding cutbacks.

Budget  $1,570,000.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Housing Support
Population Served Homeless People/Families with of People with Disabilities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 100% of clients will receive help to address basic needs (e.g., access to healthcare, transportation and outside counseling) and continued, personalized case management to address barriers that had prevented them from obtaining and maintaining self-sufficiency.
  • 100% of clients will maintain or establish an income, either by accessing state benefits or through employment.
  • 90% of clients will maintain appropriate and affordable permanent housing.
Program Long-Term Success 

· At least 90% of clients placed into permanent housing programs will remain successfully housed one year later.

Program Success Monitored By 

More than many organizations, Heading Home reflects on our approaches and data, remaining open to change when modification may improve outcomes. Per our contracts with major public funders, we must utilize their databases to ensure proper data sharing and tracking over the long term as clients move into and out of Heading Home’s care. Depending on the Heading Home program, we currently utilize either Social Solutions’ Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) or Clarity. Both of these systems track organizational outcomes (e.g., placement into permanent housing) as well as individualized goals and achievements (e.g., measurable economic gains). We currently have two fulltime in-house data and research staff who consult on collection methods and assist with extracting and analyzing data. Also of note, our data and research staff conduct twice-monthly internal staff “community workshops,” an opportunity for staff entering client data to sit together and seek tips and best practices in a supportive environment. Client data, plus direct client and staff feedback, help us identify ways to improve and adapt existing programs and/or point out areas for new program development.

Examples of Program Success 

“Flo” has remained housed since 2011. Flo just received her certification in drug and alcohol counseling from Cambridge College in early 2016. She continues to volunteer at Rosie's Place, leading creative writing groups, art classes and quilting classes. Flo is in the process of publishing a memoir on her interesting road to recovery - - she has remained sober for 22 years…”Jane” has been housed since 2005. Jane received her certificate in real estate from the Lee Institute in June 2016 and is currently preparing to take her real estate license exam. She continues to budget well and pay her bills on time…Finally, “Eric” leads a stable life while coping with anxiety and depression. Since entering one of our programs in 2002, he has been connected to a counselor with whom he meets or speaks every day. Heading Home has helped Eric achieve basic life-skills milestones; he continues to pay his bills and rent on time.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Heading Home’s programs and services respond to clients’ widely varying life circumstances and skillsets; some will accept shorter-term services, while others will benefit from longer-term services. Our wide array of support services includes housing searches and placement, life-skills development, career coaching, financial education, agency-matched savings opportunities, assistance in obtaining basic benefits, child care and transportation. In collaboration with community partners, our staff also brokers essential outside services (e.g., access to medical and mental health providers, counseling). 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Tom Lorello
CEO Term Start Sept 2004
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

 

Tom began his work with the homeless as a mental health clinician in the 1980s and later advanced to leadership roles within agencies focused on helping homeless and low-income people. Tom joined Heading Home in 2004, and under his leadership the agency successfully shifted its focus from providing emergency services to developing permanent, supportive housing, and more than quadrupled its organizational budget. As a widely regarded expert in the field, Tom speaks both locally and nationally on innovative approaches to ending homelessness. In 2013 Tom was honored with the Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance’s “Cornerstone Award” for his commitment to providing assistance and care for homeless people in Greater Boston. Tom received his MSW degree at the University of Connecticut, and most recently has completed extensive Ph.D. coursework in social work and sociology at Boston University (ABD status). He teaches part-time at the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Joe Finn July 1999 Sept

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Lisa Kaplan COO


Emily Smaldon Director of Development --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
“Organization of the Year” Boston/SF News 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
United Way Member Agency --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
US Department of Housing and Urban Development --

Collaborations

Community partnerships enhance Heading Home’s effectiveness and prevent the unnecessary duplication of services. Our partners include: Bunker Hill Community College, Cambridge College, Center for Social Innovation, College Bound Dorchester, Community Servings, Dress for Success, Eliot Community Human Services, EMPath, Found in Translation, Horizons for Homeless Children, Jeremiah-Endicott Partnership, Massachusetts Community Colleges Executive Office, Massachusetts Housing & Shelter Alliance (MHSA), Metropolitan Boston Housing Partnership, Midas Collaborative, More Than Words, One Family and Year Up.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 114
Number of Part Time Staff 64
Number of Volunteers 700
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 64
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 23
Hispanic/Latino: 12
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 135
Male: 43
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Automobile Insurance
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Commercial General Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
General Property Coverage
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Professional Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jonathan Weintraub
Board Chair Company Affiliation Financial Advisor
Board Chair Term Dec 2014 - Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Robert Boyle Darmody, Merlino & Co. Voting
Sherry Davis PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Voting
Stephen Davis The Davis Companies Voting
Reesa Fischer NAIOP Massachusetts --
Mary Fowler Community Volunteer Voting
Elliot Gould Faros Properties Voting
Joseph Hanley McDermott, Quilty & Miller LLP Voting
Andrew Hoar CBRE New England Voting
Tito Jackson Boston City Council Voting
Brian Kavoogian Charles River Realty Investors Voting
Emmett Lyne Rich May Voting
Andrew Maher Anchor Line Partners Voting
Kevin McCarthy Eliot Community Human Services Voting
Patrick McMahon Federal Realty Investment Trust --
Bill Musto The Baupost Group Voting
Donna Quirk Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mass. Bay Voting
Joshua Solomon DSF Group Voting
Nancy Solomon Community Volunteer Voting
Carolyn Spicer McDermott Ventures Voting
David Weinberg Pathologist (retired) and Artist Voting
Jonathan Weintraub Financial Advisor Voting
Gilbert Winn WinnCompanies Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Nagib Charles -- --
Travis D'Amato -- --
Molly Davis -- --
Katy Dugan Sovereign Bank NonVoting
Kristin Flynn Cone NonVoting
Amy Garanin -- NonVoting
Derrick Goodwin -- --
Garrett Hatton RBJ Real Estate NonVoting
Katelyn Hunt -- --
Vadim Karamov WB Engineers | Consultants NonVoting
Tucker Kelton Beacon Capital Partners, LLC NonVoting
Andrew Klopfer Property Resources, Inc. NonVoting
Chris LaFrance -- --
Penelope Lambropoulos Green Mountain Coffee Roasters NonVoting
Elle Litwinetz -- --
Dan McGrath -- --
Patrick Mulvihill Boston Properties NonVoting
Michael Murphy Boston Properties NonVoting
Allison Powers CB Richard Ellis/New England NonVoting
Heather Richter -- --
Sean Robinson Crosspoint Associates NonVoting
Joseph Simon J. Calnan & Associates, Inc. NonVoting
Erin Sloane -- --
Patrick Sousa -- --
Eric Speede McDermott, Quilty & Miller NonVoting
Cate Suter -- --
Lauren Vecchione -- --
Matthew Wells Stack Design Build, LLC NonVoting
Clayton Wentworth -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
William Creelman -- --
Nicholas Iselin University of Massachusetts NonVoting
Anne Margulies Harvard University NonVoting
Marc Margulies -- --
Dan Omstead Hambrecht & Quist Capital Management NonVoting
Peter Sanborn Community Opportunities Group, Inc. NonVoting
Michele Whitham Foley Hoag LLP NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 16
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 86%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Real Estate

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our Board of Directors has 22 members: 6 women and 16 men; Caucasian and African-American representation with a wide range of expertise including: non-profit management, organizational development, education, finance/investment, law, community planning, public relations and marketing, human resources, real estate development, government and public policy, substance abuse and elder issues. Meetings focus on governance issues (e.g., fiscal responsibility and oversight, program approval and monitoring) and carrying out organizational planning and are held eight times annually, including an annual meeting with donors.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $14,083,472 $10,852,633 $9,509,028
Total Expenses $13,710,023 $10,350,733 $8,742,452

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $11,280,904 $8,495,220 $6,844,820
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $11,280,904 $8,495,220 $6,844,820
Individual Contributions $1,297,433 $1,043,779 $886,887
Indirect Public Support $126,469 $140,233 --
Earned Revenue $365,588 $249,303 $983,351
Investment Income, Net of Losses $140,065 $98,434 $42,090
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $871,143 $822,544 $750,960
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $1,870 $3,120 $920

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $11,987,061 $8,973,192 $7,496,619
Administration Expense $1,247,132 $899,717 $822,666
Fundraising Expense $475,830 $477,824 $423,167
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 1.05 1.09
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 87% 86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 5% 5%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $14,510,969 $14,427,806 $13,281,647
Current Assets $4,358,843 $3,210,668 $3,508,954
Long-Term Liabilities $6,740,344 $6,625,182 $6,628,253
Current Liabilities $558,579 $924,345 $448,698
Total Net Assets $7,212,046 $6,878,279 $6,204,696

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose A capital campaign would raise funds to help Heading Home purchase and renovate properties, and support major program renovations.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.80 3.47 7.82

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 46% 46% 50%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Heading Home draws from a diverse funding base consisting of public funding and major gifts from individuals, corporations and private foundations. While federal/state funding is always subject to cutbacks and fluctuates, Heading Home’s housing-plus-services model is still prioritized by the Commonwealth as a preferable alternative to the inadequate motel voucher system or paying for short-term emergency shelters. For the coming year, we have again secured housing vouchers from the City of Cambridge/CHA (which may be applied outside of Cambridge), and we foresee this long-term relationship continuing at some level as state/federal entities prioritize Heading Home-type models that focus on permanent housing and effective human services. Amidst a constantly shifting landscape of public funding, we will also seek to create new sources of housing subsidies through longtime public partners. On the private funding side, we are in constant contact with program funders who seem pleased with our continued positive outcomes and innovation, so we do not foresee any drastic changes to this private funding stream. 

Our overall health as an agency and budget is managed by our director of finance and overseen by our executive director and Board of Directors. Together, we closely monitor any changes in support and overall costs, ensuring that we continue to uphold Heading Home’s mission and vital programs. Even though we are only in the first quarter of FY15, the financial outlook is healthy and we anticipate continued growth.

As we have evolved into a housing-focused agency, Heading Home has also developed extensive volunteer opportunities: property maintenance, assistance with “Up & Out” moves. (Up & Out is our signature volunteer program, similar to television’s “Extreme Home Makeover,” which last year mobilized hundreds of local volunteer groups to help 24 once-homeless families make milestone moves into permanent housing.) Through considerable volunteer engagement, last year Heading Home leveraged approximately $125,000 in in-kind support.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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