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Nashua River Watershed Association Inc.

 592 Main Street
 Groton, MA 01450
[P] (978) 448-0299
[F] (978) 448-0941
www.NashuaRiverWatershed.org
[email protected]
Elizabeth Ainsley Campbell
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1969
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7055674

LAST UPDATED: 03/06/2017
Organization DBA NRWA
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

"Protecting our water, our land, our communities"
 
Working for a healthy ecosystem with clean water and open spaces for human and wildlife communities, where people work together to sustain mutual economic and environmental well-being in the Nashua River watershed.
 
Founded in 1969, the Nashua River Watershed Association uses a watershed approach to protect natural resources in 32 communities in north central Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire.

Mission Statement

"Protecting our water, our land, our communities"
 
Working for a healthy ecosystem with clean water and open spaces for human and wildlife communities, where people work together to sustain mutual economic and environmental well-being in the Nashua River watershed.
 
Founded in 1969, the Nashua River Watershed Association uses a watershed approach to protect natural resources in 32 communities in north central Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $529,170.00
Projected Expense $657,782.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Environmental Education On the Water: River Classroom®
  • Environmental Education: Schoolyard, Classroom, Eco-Adventures, and Programs for Adults
  • Land Protection and Stewardship
  • Land Use Planning
  • Water Resources Protection

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

"Protecting our water, our land, our communities"
 
Working for a healthy ecosystem with clean water and open spaces for human and wildlife communities, where people work together to sustain mutual economic and environmental well-being in the Nashua River watershed.
 
Founded in 1969, the Nashua River Watershed Association uses a watershed approach to protect natural resources in 32 communities in north central Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire.

Background Statement

The Nashua River Watershed Association was founded in 1969 on the belief that every individual has the power to make a difference. That belief led to the clean-up of one of the nation’s most polluted rivers, an internationally recognized success story.  The NRWA's work has been the subject of National Geographic articles and an award-winning children's book, A River Ran Wild, by Lynne Cherry.

That same belief powers the work of the NRWA today, to act as a regional leader in natural resource protection and environmental education for our 32 watershed communities.  Our goals:

  • Restore and protect water quality and quantity for people, fish, and wildlife
  • Conserve open spaces for water quality, wildlife habitat, farms, forests, and recreation
  • Encourage careful land use with well-planned development
Our work is guided by our 1995 to 2020 Vision for the Nashua River Watershed.
 
The NRWA works to protect both water and land resources, one of the only organizations in Massachusetts and New Hampshire that has this dual focus. We work to protect drinking water supplies, monitor river water quality and quantity, and create riverside greenways. We participate in collaborative projects to protect forests and farm lands, encourage land stewardship, and help our communities use sustainable land-use tools in their planning processes.
 
Environmental education is a key strategy we use in our work to protect our natural resources. We provide educational opportunities for all ages because well informed citizens make better decisions, and today’s children are tomorrow’s stewards. Our signature RiverClassroom® program takes groups of youth out on the river for a full day of hands-on science adventure. Our Scientist in Residence and Schoolyard/Classroom programs are tailored to the individual needs of each class, and the MA and NH standards for science and technology. We also offer Eco-Adventures, outdoor science-based programs for families and youth, including vacation programs and weekend workshops. We encourage youth to connect with nature, a relationship we hope will last a lifetime. We seek to expand the reach of our education programs by educating the educators and other community leaders and professionals, through seminars for teachers, land-use planners, and foresters.
 
Other strategies to achieve our goal include advocacy for resource stewardship, resource-based community planning, and working together for co-operative watershed management.

Impact Statement

Recent Accomplishments

  • 24 Consecutive Years of Monitoring Water Quality & stream conditions at sites on local rivers & streams, volunteers directed by NRWA's professional staff. Data shared with MADEP, NHDES, & USEPA; available online. Leading the Nashua River Wild & Scenic River Study Committee to explore eligibility of segments of the Nashua & 2 tributaries for federal designation, & developing a Management Plan with the communities.
  • 3,000 Acres of Key Forestland Protected thru landscape-scale Forest Legacy projects funded by US Forest Service & achieved thru partnership with landowners, land trusts, state agencies, & local municipalities.
  • 174 Miles of Riverside Greenway Permanently Protected (# of miles doubled in recent times) leading to improved water quality & wildlife habitat, and creating recreational opportunities.
  • 2,500+ Students & Chaperones Participated in NRWA River Classroom®, a day of paddling and on-shore science studies on river health. For most, this is their 1st experience paddling & being on a river, an opportunity to connect with nature.
  • 4,400 Youth Engaged in Environmental Education Programs in schools/schoolyards, during school vacations, or with their families, with hands-on, science-based lessons on the water cycle, non-point source pollution, river & forest ecology.
 Future Goals
  • Attaining a status of fishable & swimmable water quality in the Nashua River and its tributaries 100% of the time by working with stakeholders to achieve further reduction in point source/non-point source pollution.
  • Completing the Nashua River Greenway, creating a protective greenway on 100% of both shores of the Nashua River and its tributaries, to protect water quality, provide wildlife habitat, & create places for recreational trails and parks.
  • Ensuring a sustainable water supply for humans & wildlife by working with policymakers at the federal, state, & local level, and informing the public.
  • Educating and engaging the next generation--our future stewards.
 

Needs Statement

NRWA needs annual operating support of $600,000 to help our professional staff complete long-range projects that proactively protect resources, and also to respond to emerging issues which can range from an unexpected land protection opportunity to an oil spill in the river.
 
Staff and Board are working on early stages of the Wellspring endowment campaign and would welcome gifts to endowment.
 

CEO Statement

The Nashua River Watershed Association has been protecting water and land for over forty years.  Healthy watersheds provide valuable economic and environmental benefits.  With increasing pressure on natural resources, the NRWA utilizes the latest scientific approaches to proactively protect resources and respond to emerging issues.  The NRWA is a regional leader, providing detailed knowledge of the local landscape and issues, a thorough understanding of the broader environmental picture, and an ability to work across political boundaries.


Board Chair Statement

Having had a career with the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation and being involved with my hometown's Conservation Commission and Board of Selectmen, protection of local natural resources has always been vitally important to me. I've been active with the Nashua River Watershed Association for nearly two decades because this organization has real impact across the region. We have a unique ability to work on a regional scale, across town and state borders, at the same time we have knowledge of the local issues, leaders, and stakeholders. It's rewarding to be part of the Association where I know the professional staff can negotiate complex land deals, comment on complicated water policies, or lead 80 fourth graders on an exploration on the river, but can also stand in the River Resource Center lobby and have a one-on-one conversation with a passerby about what to do with the turtle they just saw crossing a nearby road. 
 
Our communities have important water, forest and farm resources, as well as natural beauty and historic significance. This region, so close to the Boston metropolitan area, faces the pressure of rapid population growth and development. People look to the NRWA to provide leadership and information on the best ways to balance environmental health and economic health in order to create communities that are great places to live and work now and in the future. I'm proud to be part of the fine work the Association is doing today and I'm motivated to ensure that the NRWA achieves financial sustainability to continue its work for years to come. 
 

Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA

We serve 32 communities. In MA: Ashburnham, Ashby, Ayer, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Devens, Dunstable, Fitchburg, Gardner, Groton, Harvard, Holden, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenburg, Paxton, Pepperell, Princeton, Rutland, Shirley, Sterling, Townsend, West Boylston, Westminster. In NH: Brookline, Greenville, Hollis, Mason, Milford, Nashua, New Ipswich. 
 
NRWA works beyond our watershed collaborating with sister organizations on large scale projects and state & federal policy development.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation & Management
  2. Environment - Land Resources Conservation
  3. Environment - Environmental Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Environmental Education On the Water: River Classroom®

River Classroom®, NRWA's canoe-based, day long adventure teaches young people about our rivers, their history and ecology, and the capacity of humans to impact the health of our waterways, for better or worse. For most children and parent chaperones, this will be their first time on the river. After basic paddling & safety instruction, students spend a half day paddling while conducting wildlife field studies and learning about non-point source pollution & river health. The other half of the day is spent on the riverbank conducting an Aquatic Insect Investigation-- capturing and identifying macro-invertebrates and using their data to determine water quality & general health of the river ecosystem. This program is designed for grades 4-8. A more in-depth variation for grades 7-12, “Nutrient Cycles and the Fresh Water Ecosystem,” focuses on nutrient cycles and molecular components that support healthy rivers. The NRWA partners with canoe-outfitter Nashoba Paddler.
Budget  19%
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
Thousands of students each year participate in NRWA's environmental education program.  These students engage in hands-on science activities, usually in an outdoor setting.  NRWA educators are able to tie these natural science activities to other disciplines such as language arts, math and history.  Educational studies have shown that students participating in such programs show improved test scores and increased retention of information.  NRWA has worked hard to expand our programs to schools throughout the watershed and to work with school districts to find funding in communities that need financial assistance to provide these opportunities to their students.
Program Long-Term Success 
The goals of the NRWA's education programs are to help young people connect with the natural world, to offer them lessons based on solid natural sciences, and to provide them with opportunities to explore and discover the wonders of the outdoors.  The long-term belief is that these young people, our stewards of tomorrow, will then be better decision makers with more informed views on key issues and that they will value our natural resources and assist in their protection. 
Program Success Monitored By 
NRWA's River Classroom Director works closely with school teachers and administrators, as well as with our canoe outfitter and river guides, to ensure that the program is meeting the curriculum needs of the schools, the safety protocols of the outfitter, and that it is a high quality experience for students and the adult chaperones.  The solid base of schools that return each year along with the expansion of the program to new schools is a good indicator of its success.  The program won the MA Secretary's Award of Excellence in Environmental Education. 
Examples of Program Success 
2,500+ students and adult chaperones participated in River Classroom just this year.  That number has grown from past years and even remained fairly stabile during the economic downturn.  Teachers and school systems see this program as a key piece of their curriculum.
 
It is most rewarding to read letters written by students who participate in River Classroom.  They draw pictures of what they saw, tell how excited they were to go home and report to their family about their day; they frequently say it was their best school day ever.  The program has been in existence long enough, we now have high school students who intern with us who say they participated in River Classroom and are looking to study environmental science in college and make a career in related fields. Even adults who chaperoned these trips enjoyed it so much that they will come to us to learn where they can paddle on the river with the rest of their family.

Environmental Education: Schoolyard, Classroom, Eco-Adventures, and Programs for Adults

NRWA offers education programs and workshops for all ages to help people connect with nature and understand local environmental issues. Youth learn best by active participation. NRWA encourages them to be “citizen scientists” through observation, development of hypotheses, data collection, analysis, and sharing of information. We deliver programs in schoolyards, classrooms, & nearby properties. Our award-winning Scientist-in-Residence program includes multiple visits to assist teachers with curriculum development to meet MA & NH standards for science & technology at multiple grade levels. Our Eco-Adventures include afterschool, summer & school vacation programs. Families enjoy workshops such as animal tracking. Adult programs feature presentations by leaders in wildlife biology, forest management, land use planning, & notable authors; environmental film screenings; and guided walks. We lead professional seminars & training for teachers, foresters, and municipal officials. 

Budget  19%
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Our short term success for our on land programs is the same as it is for our River Classroom program. Thousands of students each year participate in NRWA's environmental education program.  These students engage in hands-on science activities, usually in an outdoor setting.  NRWA educators are able to tie these natural science activities to other disciplines such as language arts, math and history.  Educational studies have shown that students participating in such programs show improved test scores and increased retention of information.  NRWA has worked hard to expand our programs to schools throughout the watershed and to work with school districts to find funding in communities that need financial assistance to provide these opportunities to their students.

Program Long-Term Success 

As with our River Classroom program, the goals of the NRWA's land-based education programs are to help young people and adults connect with the natural world, to offer them lessons based on solid natural sciences, and to provide them with opportunities to explore and discover the wonders of the outdoors. In the near term, we believe participation in our programs aid adults in making decisions on environmental issues facing their communities. The long-term belief is that the young people, our stewards of tomorrow, will be better decision makers with more informed views on key issues and that they will value our natural resources and assist in their protection. 

 

Program Success Monitored By 
NRWA's environmental education school curricula meet the requirements of the MA and NH standards for science & technology. 
 
NRWA received a MA Secretary's Award for Excellence in Environmental Education for our work with JR Briggs Elementary School in Ashburnham, MA which assisted nearly every teacher to create curricula integrating environmental education into language arts, math, science, and history disciplines.
 
NRWA's close partnership with professional educators and school administrators ensures a level of peer review of our programs and lessons.  That schools choose to repeat program work with NRWA year after year and our programs expand to new schools is an indicator of the high level of quality brought by our educators.
 
NRWA is able to attract speakers for our adult programs who are professionals in their fields, whether land protection, wildlife biology, land use planning, or noted authors.
Examples of Program Success 
NRWA's Environmental Education Director was invited to and did become a member of the MA Secretary of Energy and Environment's Advisory Group on Environmental Education.
 
Families who send their children to our eco-adventures (non-school vacation programs) enthusiastically send their children to multiple programs over multiple years.  They encourage their friends to send their children as well.  There is no better spokesperson for our programs than these parents and children.
 
Adults attending our workshops and presentations come from communities all over our watershed and beyond.  They know they will hear high quality speakers with knowledge of the latest science and methodology on their topic. The growth in the distribution of NRWA's enewsletter that announces upcoming programs and events each month is evidence that the public is eager to be aware of and to participate in these programs.

Land Protection and Stewardship

NRWA knows that what people do on the land impacts water quality & quantity, and the quality & quantity of our water impacts the quality of life in our communities. NRWA facilitates permanent protection of key parcels of land that help complete the greenway along the river and its tributaries, protect drinking water supplies, provide linkage in major wildlife corridors, or are important in other strategic ways. NRWA is the sponsor & a major partner in landscape-scale federal Forest Legacy projects (funded through US Forest Service) that protected 1,000s of acres of prime watershed forestland. Our participation in the MA Land Initiative for Tomorrow project with AmeriCorps service members provided added staff for land protection work. NRWA assists landowners, provides technical assistance to municipal boards, offers educational presentations & seminars, and leads collaborative efforts, i.e. the former multi-year "Protecting Today's Water for Tomorrow" project funded by US EPA.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Land Conservation
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 
NRWA has been very successful in leading and participating in complex multi-partner, landscape-scale land protection projects.  Through programs like US Forest Service's Forest Legacy Program and Forest Redesign Program, thousands of acres of crucial forestlands have been permanently protected.  NRWA's ability to lead and collaborate in such projects is one of its greatest strengths.  It would be nearly impossible for these projects to be completed by single organizations.
 
The Association has a standing Greenway Committee working on the completion of the greenway, doing landowner outreach, and coordinating with federal, state, and local partners.  NRWA was a founding member and has continued active membership in the Fitchburg Greenway Committee that is assisting the City of Fitchburg in revitalizing its riverfront/downtown areas and in making the North Nashua River a focal point of that revitalization.
Program Long-Term Success 
One long range goal of NRWA's land protection program is to complete the greenway on both banks of the Nashua River and its major tributaries.  Protected greenway helps to preserve water quality, provide wildlife habitat, and areas for trails and parks for recreation.  The completion of the greenway has been a part of NRWA's vision since its founding.
 
Protecting prime forest land is also a high priority for NRWA.  Our region's forests are some of the most valuable in the nation for a vital product--clean drinking water.  Preserving key forestlands and stewarding those lands will help to ensure clean water supplies for generations to come. 
 

Additionally, working with farmers to protect valuable farmlands and operate under best management practices can mean that those lands remain undeveloped and productive.

Program Success Monitored By 
Success in land protection can be measured by the number of acres protected in a space of time.  The US Forest Legacy Program has a website where projects under that program are tracked and viewers can see the number of acres, locations, and other details of the projects.
 
We also view our progress through the lens of our relationships with landowners, land trusts, partners, and the public.  When a landowner thanks us for bringing a land protection/stewardship opportunity to their attention and for helping them work through what are frequently complicated processes, we know we've achieved a goal beyond just more acres protected.  And when land trusts and other partners seek out NRWA for consultation and assistance we know we are maintaining a high level of work quality.
Examples of Program Success 

In recent years, NRWA has participated in partnerships that permanently preserved over 3,000 acres of prime forestlands that will protect drinking water and other water resources.

NRWA's "Farms, Fields, & Forests: Voices from the Land" project is videotaping oral history interviews with landowners who have protected their lands to inspire others to value & conserve working lands.
 
NRWA & partners have permanently protected 174 miles of riverside greenway for improved water quality, wildlife habitat, and recreation.

NRWA has identified, posted, and led walks on Heart Healthy Trails in six communities to introduce people to trails in their own “greater backyard” that are accessible to everyone, even those with some physical limitations.

NRWA in collaboration with the National Park Service leads the Nashua River Wild & Scenic River Study Committee investigating the eligibility and suitability of segments of the Nashua River & two tributaries for federal designation as Wild & Scenic Rivers.


Land Use Planning

By planning for development, communities can protect their drinking water and other important natural resources and simultaneously guide their business and residential development to areas that are not environmentally sensitive.

The NRWA introduces its watershed communities to the more innovative, environmentally-friendly forms of zoning and regulations. Some of these planning tools come under the name of Smart Growth, which is a planning philosophy that seeks to minimize human impacts on the land while still providing for needed development. The NRWA also assists with Low Impact Development and Stormwater Management, Open Space Plans, and drafting of protective Bylaws, Ordinances, and Regulations. NRWA offers professional workshops for land use planners, developers, engineers, and municipal officials to offer an opportunity to learn about the latest land use innovations and to network with colleagues facing similar development challenges.

 
Budget  $0.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Land Use Planning
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

NRWA continues to have a very positive relationship with municipal boards, city leadership, community planners, and local land trusts throughout our watershed.  The Association takes every opportunity to inform these entities of the latest thought in community growth that incorporates natural resource protection, and to assist local boards with the drafting of long term plans, bylaws, regulations and ordinances that will protect each communities vital resources, i.e. aquifer overlay protection districts.

Program Long-Term Success 

The NRWA views long-term success as the point in time when each of our 32 watershed communities has Master Plans, Open Space and Recreation Plans, and other long view plans that include sound provisions for protecting their water and land resources as part of their community and development planning.  The Association would also want to see municipalities guided by bylaws, regulations, and ordinances that protect drinking water supplies, provide for aquifer and wetland protection, define terms for development following smart growth and low impact development standards, and are in compliance with the most up to date standards for management of stormwater and erosion control.

Program Success Monitored By 

The best measure of success for NRWA's recent land use work is the passage of numerous new natural resource protection bylaws, regulations, and ordinances by town meetings.  NRWA's assistance in drafting such measures meets the quality required by municipal boards, town legal counsel, and other professional planners with whom we partner.

Examples of Program Success 
Through its "Protecting Today's Water for Tomorrow" project, NRWA's Smart Growth Circuit Rider worked hand in hand with eleven communities to create twelve new bylaws, ordinances and regulations, ranging in topic from open space residential development to stormwater management and low-impact development. Six of the bylaws and ordinances were adopted at town meetings. 
 
The NRWA also takes on smaller projects that are highly successful. For example, the NRWA assisted the Town of Lancaster with educational outreach to inform local businesses of the state/local regulations on floor drains and the impact of polluted run-off from storm drains on local waterways.
 
The Association has partnered to provide training to municipal officials and planners on topics like stormwater management, low impact development, and smart growth planning featuring experts in the field.
 

Water Resources Protection

The NRWA works to protect drinking water & groundwater supplies and, also, works to protect river water quality & quantity. A major component of Water Resources Protection is our Water Monitoring Program, which has been active for over two decades. Each sampling season, April to October, water samples are collected and stream conditions are recorded at dozens of sites along watershed streams and rivers. The resulting data is shared with the US EPA, MA DEP, NH DES, and municipalities to provide scientific information from which to formulate strategies and programs to protect the water quality and quantity. The NRWA also works on numerous initiatives such as dam removal and ecological stream restoration, sustainable water policy, low flow and stream continuity issues, tracking sources of bacterial contamination, and reducing invasive species in order to protect water quality for human and wildlife needs.  
Budget  $0.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Watershed Conservation
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 
Continuation of the Water Monitoring Program this season will add an additional consecutive year to the existing two plus decades of data.  We are the only entity that monitors stream/river conditions in the watershed every year.  The constancy and quality of the program makes the data valuable not only to NRWA but also to state and federal agencies as they formulate water protection policies.  Recruiting and maintaining volunteers for the program offers outreach & educational opportunities. 
 
Working with watershed communities on dam removal/ecological restoration projects has formed valuable partnerships and one dam is scheduled for removal, with another under consideration.  Removal can provide economic relief to the communities required to pay for inspection & maintenance and can allow the impounded stream and surrounding habitat to return to a natural state. NRWA considers the merit of any proposed dam removal project on a case-by-case basis.
Program Long-Term Success 
NRWA seeks continued improvement in water quality over the long term with reduction, even ultimately elimination, of both point source and non-point source pollution.  A goal is to have a fishable and swimmable Nashua River, along with its tributaries, 100% of the time.  A return to natural stream flows and restoration of healthy riverine ecosystems through dam removal (when appropriate), installation of fish friendly culverts, and sustainable management of water supplies by state and municipal agencies is also a long-term goal.  Ultimately, NRWA works toward ensuring that our rivers and streams are protected as crucial water resources, as wildlife habits, and as recreational resources for all.
Program Success Monitored By 
The NRWA Water Monitoring Program operates in accordance with a Quality Assurance Project Plan that has been reviewed and approved by US EPA, MA DEP, and NH DES.
 
The NRWA Water Programs Director and Water Monitoring Coordinator work closely with monitoring volunteers to provide training and oversight on the collecting and testing of water samples, as well as to encourage and engage the volunteers to be sure the volunteers know the value of their contribution to the organization and the watershed.
Examples of Program Success 

NRWA's Water Monitoring Program has engaged 1000s of volunteers over the years, providing us with capacity to run the program & providing volunteers with an opportunity to help protect their waterways & become some of our most passionate advocates.

Data developed thru the Water Monitoring Program is used to identify pollution "hot-spots" allowing NRWA staff to seek resolution of those issues, i.e. NRWA partnered with the City of Fitchburg to conduct bacterial source tracking leading to the repair of sewer system issues contributing to high bacteria counts in the North Nashua River.

NRWA has successfully organized the Nashua River Regional Aquatic Invasives Alliance with business, non-profit, federal, state, & local governmental partners.

NRWA in collaboration with the National Park Service leads the Nashua River Wild & Scenic River Study Committee investigating the eligibility of segments of the Nashua River & two tributaries for federal designation as Wild & Scenic Rivers.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The NRWA invests approximately equally in its Water Resources Program, Land Protection Program, and Environmental Education Programs. At this point in time, the Land Use program is a relatively small subset of our Land Protection Program. Overall, the NRWA invests approximately equally in the two parts of its Envionmental Education Program. In combination, the Environmental Education activites are given approximate equal weight with our Water Resources and Land Protection programs. An approximation of the percentage of staff time for each program area is as follows:
Water Resources Protection 31%
Land Protection and Stewardship 25%
Land Use Planning 6%
Environmental Education: River Classroom 19%
Environmental Education:  Schoolyard, Classroom, Eco-Adventures, and Programs for Adults 19%
 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Elizabeth Ainsley Campbell
CEO Term Start Sept 1994
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Elizabeth joined the NRWA as Executive Director in 1994. Under her leadership the Association has become more sophisticated in its watershed approach, has grown in its capacity to protect the natural resources of the watershed, and has launched an award-winning environmental education program for youth and adults. The Association is making significant strides in fulfilling the goals of its long-range “2020 Vision Plan.” Elizabeth has provided oversight on many large projects, including the “Protecting Today’s Water for Tomorrow” multi-year partnership project funded by the U.S. EPA for over $700,000 which garnered more than $400,000 in matching services from three dozen partners. Elizabeth holds a Bachelor’s degree from Radcliffe College in General Studies and a Master’s degree from the University of Michigan in Communications.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mark Archambault AICP Smart Growth Circuit Rider Mark joined the NRWA team to work on the smart growth component of the “Protecting Today’s Water for Tomorrow” project in the Squannacook-Nissitissit sub-basin. Mark assisted communities in both Massachusetts and New Hampshire with consideration of regulatory tools such as zoning and subdivision regulations that help to protect drinking water sources. Under the “Protecting Today’s Water for Tomorrow” project, he prepared 12 bylaws and ordinances for towns in both states, 6 of which were adopted by the Planning Board or vote of Town Meeting. He continues to assist communities with approaches to Low Impact Development and stormwater management, as well as facilitate interstate cooperation on watershed protection efforts. Mark has been the NRWA’s Smart Growth Circuit Rider since 2005. Mark holds both a Bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree in Regional Planning from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
Stacey Billings Chilcoat River Classroom/Environmental Education Director Stacey coordinates and implements the NRWA’s “on the water”, canoe-based education programs for youth and adults serving 2000+ participants annually. In this position, she serves as lead environmental educator and river guide on river trips for all ages. She also works with the Environmental Education Team to create and lead “off water” programs including in school and school yard science classes, family workshops, afterschool nature and science clubs, and outdoor adventure hiking programs for young teens. Stacey serves as an educational consultant to teachers, administrators, and schools developing inquiry-based science programs within the Nashua River watershed. She has been the NRWA’s River Classroom Director since 2001. Stacey holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York. She is certified in CPR and Wilderness First Aid, and holds an American Canoe Association Level 3: River Canoeing Instructor Certification.
Alan Futterman M.P.H. Land Programs Director Al forwards the NRWA’s Greenway Program and Land Protection Program, working with landowners to permanently protect riverfront and other priority properties through conservation restrictions or easements and through acquisition by local land trusts, municipalities, or state and federal conservation agencies. Al participates in numerous collaborations, including staffing the Nashua River Wild & Scenic River Study Committee. The NRWA serves as Sponsor of the Nashua River Greenway Forest Legacy Program, and Mr. Futterman oversees that effort. Al co-chairs the Montachusett Regional Trails Coalition that created Heart Healthy Trails. Al also assists watershed towns with their Open Space plans and provides educational programs for adults at the River Resource Center. Al has been the NRWA’s Land Programs and Outreach Director since 1999. Al holds a Bachelor’s degree in Rural Sociology from Cornell University, a Master’s degree in Public Health from Boston University, and has done additional graduate study at the University of Massachusetts Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning Program at Amherst.
Lauri K. Johnson Development Manager Lauri focuses on increasing awareness of and support for the Association from individuals and businesses in the community. She coordinates support from individuals via memberships, annual appeals, and major gifts as well as business and organization membership, sponsorship, and matching gifts. She also supports the Association’s marketing, planning, and outreach activities. Lauri has been the NRWA’s Development Manager since 2002. Lauri holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
Mary Marro Environmental Education Associate Mary assists NRWA’s Environmental Education Director & River Classroom Director, and the Environmental Education Assistant, with designing lessons that are linked to the learning standards of the MA Curriculum Frameworks.and NH Common Core State Standards, providing insight on the needs of today’s teachers. She initiated curriculum-based environmental education school programs in Pepperell, Fitchburg, Ayer, Leominster, Ashburnham, and Shirley, MA and in Nashua, NH. Mary serves as Scientist-in-Residence in several schools. Mary helped to develop professional development and college credit for teachers at Fitchburg State University and with the Museum Institute for Teaching Science. Mary has with NRWA’s Environmental Education programs since 2001. Mary holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Education from Pennsylvania State University and a Master’s degree in Environmental Biology from Antioch New England Graduate School.
Martha Snow Morgan Water Programs Director Martha supervises the NRWA’s Water Monitoring Program, including authoring the NRWA’s EPA, MassDEP and NH DES-approved Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Water Monitoring Program. She manages other water quality-related projects, including Bacterial Source Investigations and nutrient investigations, and provides comments and advocacy on issues concerning water quantity and quality as they affect the Nashua River watershed, including NPDES permits, dam issues, water conservation, and land use issues as they affect water. Martha has been the NRWA’s Water Programs Director since 1999. Martha holds a Bachelor of Science in Geology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, an Associate Degree in Animal Science, Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, and a Master’s degree in Geological Sciences from the University of Maine at Orono.
Kathryn Nelson Water Monitoring Coordinator Kath coordinates seasonal water sample collection with the NRWA stream monitoring teams and supervises laboratory analysis for the NRWA’s Water Monitoring Program. She works closely with Water Programs Director in addressing a wide range of water issues. Kath also coordinates student interns and volunteers who assist with special projects, data analysis, and field work, including the NRWA’s bio-control project to reduce invasive purple loosestrife. Kath has been the NRWA’s Water Monitoring Coordinator since 2006. Additionally, Kath serves as Chair of the Lower Merrimack River Advisory Committee, and is a member of the NH Rivers Management Advisory Committee providing input on stream flow policy and regulation. Kath holds a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Boston College and a Master’s degree in Regional Planning from University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
Wynne Treanor-Kvenvold Communications Manager Wynne publicizes NRWA events and programs through press releases, bi-monthly newsletters, monthly e-newsletters, the NRWA website, and various other avenues. She serves as the constituent database administrator, and is a member of the staff Development Team, working on online appeals, assisting with event planning and logistics, and supporting individual and organizational membership acquisition and retention efforts. She also serves as staff IT support. Wynne has been the NRWA’s Communications Manager since 2000. Wynne holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Paralegal Studies from Winona State University in Minnesota.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Conservationist of the Year given to Fitchburg Greenway Committee in which NRWA is a founding and active member The Trustees of Reservations 2010
Secretary's Award for Excellence in Environmental Education MA Executive Office of Environmental Affairs 2007

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

The Nashua River Watershed Association’s position as a regional organization allows us to work across town and state boundaries, and to work with groups and individuals focused on land protection, water quality or environmental education, all in the effort to improve and sustain a healthy quality of life in our communities. One of the Association’s greatest strengths is its ability to form partnerships, gathering together interested stakeholders, government officials, community leaders, educators, and funders, to accomplish both large and small scale projects.  Our list of collaborators includes:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
U.S. Forest Service
National Park Service 
MA Department of Environmental Protection
NH Department of Environmental Services
MA Department of Conservation & Recreation
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
Freedom's Way Heritage Association 
Trust for Public Lands
The Trustees of Reservations
Local land trusts
Municipal Mayors, Boards of Selectmen, and Conservation Commissions
Sportsmen's groups, i.e.Trout Unlimited and Ducks Unlimited 
Sister organizations, i.e.watershed groups, Environmental League of Massachusetts, Mass Watershed Coalition, MassAudubon
Local businesses

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In addition to our One Year Strategic Action Plan, the NRWA's work is guided by our long-term plan, 1995 to 2020 Vision for the Nashua River Watershed.  Our organization has a rich history of accomplishment which has been the subject of an award-winning children's book, The River Ran Wild, and has been documented by National Geographic, and most recently by the Work of 1000 Project, which produced an award-winning documentary film about our founder, Marion Stoddart. 
 
 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 9
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Lucy Wallace
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Chair Term Nov 2009 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Robert Antonioni Esq. Antonioni and Antonioni Law Offices Voting
Ralph Baker PhD Retired environmental scientist Voting
Fredericka Baytos Deluxe Corporation Voting
Arthur Feehan Rollstone Bank & Trust Voting
Michael Fleming Shirley Conservation Agent Voting
Warren Kimball Retired environmental engineer MA DEP Voting
Judith K. Larter Community Volunteer Voting
Melissa Maranda Rollstone Bank and Trust Voting
Daniel Nigrosh Can-Am Machinery, Inc. Voting
Robert Pine Pine and Swallow Environmental Voting
Thomas Ryden Mass Robotics Voting
Gerald Smith retired freshwater biologist Voting
William Stevenson Aquatic Control Technology Voting
Todd Sumner Francis W. Parker Charter Essential School Voting
Charles Vander Linden Starr Vander Linden, LLP Voting
Lucy Wallace Community Volunteer Voting
William G. Wilkinson Retired bank executive Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 17
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 13
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 68%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

NRWA’s Board of Directors and Executive Director work together to ensure appropriate oversight and accountability. In addition to the standing Board committees already listed, the NRWA has a Nashua River Greenway Advisory Committee focused on completing the the greenway on both sides of the Nashua River and its major tributaries, a long term vision to protect water quality.  The organization also has a Dam Policy/Water Policy Task Force to address dam removal/ecological restoration and water policy issues. We are fortunate that our Board represents our constituency coming from various watershed communities, many with records of service in their local land trusts, conservation commissions, and as school science educators.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $529,170.00
Projected Expense $657,782.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $919,850 $1,736,764 $567,576
Total Expenses $613,738 $600,547 $620,523

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$178,550 $157,853 $90,826
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $594,340 $1,502,629 $331,206
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $58,743 $56,656 $53,499
Investment Income, Net of Losses $11,342 $2,023 $9,016
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $76,624 $17,581 $82,282
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $251 $22 $747

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $293,450 $302,050 $299,266
Administration Expense $155,182 $158,945 $156,117
Fundraising Expense $165,106 $139,552 $165,140
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.50 2.89 0.91
Program Expense/Total Expenses 48% 50% 48%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 19% 8% 33%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $2,188,495 $1,903,678 $760,199
Current Assets $932,362 $814,036 $504,878
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $43,621 $64,916 $57,654
Total Net Assets $2,144,874 $1,838,762 $702,545

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $295,325.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose The purpose of Wellsprings Endowment Campaign is to fund NRWA's ongoing programs.
Campaign Goal $3,300,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates June 2012 - Dec 2023
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $460,700.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 21.37 12.54 8.76

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The NRWA takes the long term view and may spread the benefit of a large donation or project over several fiscal years, recognizing that this may impact reported financial performance for a single fiscal year. 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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