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Tech Goes Home

 867 Boylston Street, 5th Floor
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (617) 3987831
[F] --
www.techgoeshome.org
theo@techgoeshome.org
Theodora Hanna
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 2009
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 20-8629591

LAST UPDATED: 03/27/2019
Organization DBA --
Former Names openairboston.net Inc (2016)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Tech Goes Home (TGH) empowers communities to access and use digital tools to overcome barriers and advance lives.

Mission Statement

Tech Goes Home (TGH) empowers communities to access and use digital tools to overcome barriers and advance lives.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $1,340,503.00
Projected Expense $1,335,837.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. TGH School
  • 2. TGH Community
  • 3. TGH Early Childhood
  • 4. TGH Small Business

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Tech Goes Home (TGH) empowers communities to access and use digital tools to overcome barriers and advance lives.

Background Statement

Founded in 2000, TGH is an award winning 501(c)(3) nonprofit that partners with local schools and community organizations to offer free digital skills training, discounted new computers, and assistance with low-cost, high-quality Internet. Simply put, TGH helps bring computers, Internet, and training to those without so students can do homework, adults can find jobs and manage finances, and seniors can connect with loved ones.

 

Digital equity is a three-legged stool, relying on skills, hardware, and Internet access, and our approach encompasses all three. The TGH model tackles digital exclusion by providing 15 hours of digital skills training, a new computer to course graduates for $50, and help finding and securing low-cost, high-quality Internet. We do this through four programs: TGH Community serves adult and senior learners, TGH Small Business serves micro-entrepreneurs, TGH School serves K-12 students and their caregivers, and TGH Early Childhood serves children 3-6 and their caregivers.

 

The current TGH model was developed in 2005 at the Frederick Middle School in Dorchester. Recognizing the necessity of educating low-income urban youth using the most up-to-date and powerful technology, the Frederick team transformed the school into one of the nation’s first urban one-to-one laptop middle schools. Since 24/7 learning was a critical component of the project, and knowing that many families did not have adequate technology at home, the school worked with TGH to educate and equip families with digital literacy training and a home computer.

 

In 2010, the City of Boston applied for and won a federal grant to expand TGH using the “Frederick Model” on a citywide basis in collaboration with the Boston Public Schools, Boston Public Library, Boston Centers for Youth & Families, and the Housing Authority. The expanded TGH initiative supported three times the number of families citywide at a substantially lower cost as compared to the previous model. Training was revamped and TGH moved from using refurbished desktops to a new netbook, thereby eliminating the need to warehouse, refurbish, deliver, and repair older machines. This transition saved time, cut costs, and added more dignity to the TGH participant experience. 

 

TGH continues to use the train-the-trainer program model, which allows us to serve over 4,000 participants each year with only five full-time employees. Further, our lean model minimizes costs while creating an opportunity for participants to develop strong relationships with the community organizations that run TGH. TGH’s goal is to deliver high-quality digital literacy training while amplifying existing work that addresses employment, financial coaching, education, and health. Our long-term goal is to make Greater Boston the first metropolitan area in the country where technology and the opportunity it provides are accessible to all. In 2018 alone, our goal is to serve 4,275 people, a 25% increase from past years.


Impact Statement

TGH serves people of all ages, from 3 to 93, with a focus on those without technology at home, the un/underemployed, English learners, and people with disabilities. More than 75% of TGH participants have annual households incomes under $30,000. In addition, 35% of participants in our community program are unemployed and 17% are retired. Of the population TGH serves, nearly 90% are people of color and more than 45% are immigrants.

 

TGH has trained 25,000+ Greater Boston residents and distributed 15,000+ new computers to graduating families. The computers are used to do homework, find jobs, and, ultimately, to transform lives. One year after graduation, 85% of students report using their TGH computer for homework and 50% of adult learners reported the TGH program helped them at their current job or find a new job.

 

These statistics are confirmed by what we see and hear from participants and trainers. Recently, a Northeastern Co-op intern at Bain Capital approached us after a presentation on TGH to tell us her sister had taken TGH as a child with her mother and spoke highly of the program's impact on their lives. In addition, trainers share their stories of their formerly unemployed participants subsequently working at places like Amazon and Home Depot. These anecdotes are just glimpses of how technology skills and access can change the trajectory of a person’s life.

 

Along with teaching digital skills, the TGH School Program is a parent-engagement tool for our partner schools. Nearly 70% of caregivers report the TGH program is their first time participating in an activity at their child’s school. After the program, 95% report they plan to participate in a future activity at the school and during our annual follow-up survey, 64% reported still being in touch with their TGH Trainer. This is important because studies show that caregivers’ involvement in their child’s education increases a students chance to succeed (Child Trends, 2013). During a recent course visit, a teacher pulled a TGH trainer and school staff member aside to tell us they had been trying for months to get a father into the school to talk about his son. She said, “Thanks to the TGH course he’s here and we’ve been able to talk to him about his son’s educational needs.”

 

The skills and tools they gain through the TGH program empower our participants to become active digital learners and advance their lives.


Needs Statement

With TGH waitlists across our program footprint and hundreds of thousands of Greater Boston residents living in poverty, we are facing an enormous unmet need. In order to meet this demand and make our digital skills training and subsidized technology accessible to all, we look to build sustainable private sector funding and increase the number of partners sites offering Tech Goes Home.

 

The City of Boston continues to be a critical supporter of Tech Goes Home, providing a base of funding for approximately 3,000 residents to graduate from the 15-hour digital literacy training program each year. As we work to expand our reach, according to milestones established in a strategic planning process, by an immediate 25% increase to 4,275 graduates in 2018, we need more foundation, corporate, and individual support to fund the remaining $500,000 in program costs, at an average of $350 per graduate.

 

We also continue to seek qualified trainers and partner sites to serve more TGH learners. We are especially interested in launching new partnerships in Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, Malden, Quincy, and Somerville.


CEO Statement

Given this opportunity to add information about our organization, I’d like to first emphasize that at TGH we’re not only connecting people to technology, but also to their communities. Countless times I’ve heard parents mention that they had never even visited their child’s school before TGH, but now they feel invested in their child’s education both at school and at home. Given evidence that up to 25% of a child’s grade is related to parental involvement, we are proud to have been able to connect parents to schools in such high numbers. Likewise, within the TGH Small Business Initiative, our program trains Boston’s most under-resourced entrepreneurs, and it also provides a venue to create professional and personal bonds that go far beyond the classroom. Our staff is only comprised of five dedicated full-time employees, but, with invaluable support from our trainers, partners, volunteers, and Board, we are able to make a real difference in Boston. This impact is never more evident than during the annual graduation ceremony. The event provides an occasion for celebration to people who don’t often get those. Our combination of technology training without losing sight of the human element is what distinguishes TGH as a unique member within Boston’s nonprofit space.

Board Chair Statement

As head of external affairs for Google in the Northeast, I spend my professional life thinking about how technology can help our users and communities thrive. In this work, we are often guilty of carrying the assumption that everyone has access to and knowledge of how to use these technologies. So many of us take for granted the ease of using computers and the internet to do homework, search for information, look for jobs, and more. Think for a moment about the folks who have no access to this technology or don't know how to use a computer. This information and access gap make daily life tasks so much harder than they need to be: communicating with your child's teacher, paying bills online, reading about the latest news.

 

It doesn't have to be this way. That's why I am passionate about Tech Goes home and the work the team is doing to bridge this digital divide. It's a solvable problem that has proven to vastly improve the quality of life for those who go through our programs.

 

We have a goal to reach all residents of Greater Boston in need of computer training and hardware, making us the first major metropolitan area in the country to do so. We have the resources, strong entrepreneurial spirit, and growing technology community here to support our mission, and I believe it is our shared responsibility to achieve this goal and provide an example for other regions to follow. Boston is a city of firsts -- let's add another!


Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Greater Boston

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Primary & Elementary Schools
  2. Education - Adult Education
  3. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

1. TGH School

Students and their parents/caregivers learn together from the students’ teachers, focusing on topics such as tracking grades, increasing parent-school engagement, finding after-school programs, and more. The program involves 15 hours of group training outside the school day conducted by a TGH trained staff member from the child’s school in which the course is run. Tutorials focus on topics such as tracking the child’s grades and attendance online, securing a professional email, and finding web-based family resources. Upon completion, families have the option of purchasing a new computer for $50 and TGH helps them find low-cost Internet options.

Budget  $750,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education & Technology
Population Served Families Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success  TGH School has graduated more than 9,000 families, or 18,000 individuals since inception, and the program currently runs in approximately 60 Boston Public Schools. Participation in TGH equips families with (1) digital skills to meet their most pressing needs, (2) brand new devices to continue using those skills at home, and (3) help finding and signing up for low cost internet access.
Program Long-Term Success 

TGH has significantly impacted the digital divide in Boston, serving 25,000+ people and distributing 15,000+ new computers. Participants learn how technology and access can improve their quality of life. TGH has created a network of 200 schools and community-based sites that provide local training opportunities. Learners participate in their neighborhoods and with trainers who will be able to provide continued support over time. Graduates not only stay connected to one another, but together they create a solid sense of community.

Program Success Monitored By  For each TGH program, we administer pre- and post-training surveys, and follow up surveys to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. Analysis of the data guides us to make changes such as curriculum addition or modification, and coaching technique adjustments. The surveys include questions about resources used, skills learned, and relationships impacted.
Examples of Program Success 
More than 90% of survey respondents subscribe to and maintain Internet access in their homes long after program completion.

In addition:

  • More than 85% of students who completed TGH at their school regularly use their new computer to do homework and extend learning time
  • Students who complete TGH spend more of their home computer time on school assignments than other connected students
  • Enrolling in TGH led to first-time school involvement for 69% of parents in the program. For Spanish-speaking parents, first-time participation reached 80%.

2. TGH Community

Adults learn fundamental digital skills from local community site staff. Courses cover topics including but not limited to job searching, financial literacy, communicating with friends and family, and finding educational programs. The program involves 15 hours of training conducted by a TGH trained staff member from the community organization in which the course is run. Courses run in libraries, community centers, public housing developments, and more. Upon completion of TGH, participants have the option of purchasing a new computer for $50 and we help them sign up for low-cost Internet access.

Budget  $550,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education & Technology
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 

TGH Community has graduated more than 5,500 adult learners. Participation in TGH equips individuals and families with (1) digital skills to meet their most pressing needs, (2) brand new devices to continue using those skills at home, and (3) help finding and signing up for low cost internet access.

Program Long-Term Success 

Similar to those in TGH School, TGH Community participants learn how technology and access can improve their quality of life. TGH has created a network of 250 community-based sites that provide local training opportunities. Learners participate in their neighborhoods and with trainers who will be able to provide continued support over time. Graduates not only stay connected to one another, but together they create a solid sense of community.

Program Success Monitored By 

For each TGH program, we administer pre- and post-training surveys, and follow up surveys to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. Analysis of the data guides us to make changes such as curriculum addition or modification, and coaching technique adjustments. The surveys include questions about resources used, skills learned, and relationships impacted.

Examples of Program Success 

Results from one-year followup surveys include the following:

  • 74% of respondents report they use their TGH device for job searching, and 33% report getting a job or promotion due to the skills they learned at TGH.
  • Further, 91% of respondents use their TGH device for communicating with others, 85% for educational purposes, 78% for accessing City resources, 67% for financial management, 66% for finding health and wellness resources.

3. TGH Early Childhood

TGH Early Childhood helps families better prepare their youth for kindergarten by focusing on student readiness, parent engagement, and teacher training. As in other TGH programs, participants engage in 15 hours of hands on training led by the child's teacher. Parents practice strategies and apps for early language, literacy, and STEAM skill-building, all while developing stronger relationships with their child's school and teacher. Upon program completion, graduating families take home their brand new iPad for $50. 
Budget  $110,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  More than 600 families have completed TGH Early Childhood at sites across Boston since the program began in 2014. Families graduate with (1) strategies and apps for early literacy and STEAM skill-building, (2) a new iPad to practice those skills, (3) help securing low cost home Internet, and (4) a stronger relationships with their children's teachers.
Program Long-Term Success  There is an ever-widening gap between the literacy level of children from wealthy families entering school compared to children from low-income households. With this in mind, TGH Early Childhood is improving Kindergarten readiness for students in low-income neighborhoods and families through the targeted use of mobile technology and apps that engages early learners, helps prepare educators, and equips caregivers/families with tools for 21st century success.
Program Success Monitored By  For each TGH program, we administer pre- and post-training surveys, and follow up surveys to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. Analysis of the data guides us to make changes such as curriculum addition or modification, and coaching technique adjustments. The surveys include questions about resources used, skills learned, and relationships impacted.
Examples of Program Success 
  • Upon program completion, 78% of parents/guardians report using their computer/mobile device for reading with their children, up from 53% at the beginning of the course. Similarly, 69% report using letter recognition apps with their children, up from 52%; 59% report using vocabulary apps, up from 42%; and 53% use their device to practice writing with their children, up from 27%. 
  • For 61% of participants, this is the first educational program they have attended at their child's school/center. Following the course, 93% report that TGH improved their relationship with the school/teacher, and 98% plan to participate in future activities there.

  • Participants reported an average of 9.2 out of 10 for their overall satisfaction with TGH Early Childhood and 99% say they would recommend the program to others.


4. TGH Small Business

TGH Small Business strives to put 21st century tools into the hands of micro entrepreneurs in Boston, thereby strengthening the local economy. We offer small business owners 15 hours of free, hands-on technology and Internet resource instruction via qualified trainers from the community. Upon program completion, participants can purchase a new device for $50. The curriculum focuses on online and mobile tools that help businesses leverage city resources, manage their finances, develop an effective web presence, accept credit card payments, and more. Our partner training sites include Dorchester Bay EDC, Codman Square NDC, BCYF, Project Hope, Project Place, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, and many more.
Budget  $85,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adults Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

TGH Small Business has graduated more than 600 participants at 20+ sites across Boston since launching in 2013. Graduates walk away with (1) digital skills for management, marketing, and sales, (2) a new device to use those skills, and (3) a stronger network of support in their business community.

Program Long-Term Success  TGH Small Business helps under-resourced micro enterprises gain the necessary skills, access, and hardware to manage and grow their businesses, thus impacting their lives and improving their local economies. 
Program Success Monitored By  For each TGH program, we administer pre- and post-training surveys, and follow up surveys to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. Analysis of the data guides us to make changes such as curriculum addition or modification, and coaching technique adjustments. The surveys include questions about resources used, skills learned, and whether participants have strengthened their businesses and networks.
Examples of Program Success 
  • More than 96% of graduates report that because of their TGH training they are more likely to use the Internet for their business needs, including business planning/management (63%), financial management (61%), communication (76%), marketing (73%), accessing municipal resources (61%), and sales (48%). 
  • For 77% of participants, this is the first educational program they have attended at the training site. Following the course, 91% report that TGH improved their relationship with the site, and 95% plan to participate in future activities there.

  • Participants reported an average of 9.2 out of 10 for their overall satisfaction with TGH Small Business, and 99% say they would recommend the program to others.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

TGH has a good brand and a positive reputation within the communities we serve. It is wonderful to have the trust of our many partners and the citizens of Boston, but we cannot meet the demand given our current funding. Thus, we have waiting lists in many locations. We are addressing this via multiple methods - seeking long-term funding commitments, developing strong partnerships with corporations, universities, and foundations, and by building our volunteer program to help us reduce costs.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr Daniel Noyes
CEO Term Start June 2014
CEO Email dan@techgoeshome.org
CEO Experience
Co-CEO Ms Theodora Higginson Hanna
Co-CEO Term Start June 2014
Co-CEO Email theo@techgoeshome.org
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Debra Socia June 2010 June 2014

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Qingjian Shi Program Director Ms. Shi is the Program Director at Tech Goes Home. Previous to Tech Goes Home, Ms. Shi was Executive Director at English At Large, an organization providing free and accessible English language instruction to immigrants and refugees in Middlesex County. As the Director of Education and Outreach at the Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence, Qingjian conceptualized and implemented a youth initiative called the Youth Empowerment Project – a program engaging Asian American adolescents to become leaders in their communities and voices of anti-violence. Ms. Shi has a B.A. from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She is bilingual in Chinese and English.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Digital Inclusion Leadership Award Google Fiber and Next Century Cities 2017
Digital Inclusion Leadership Award Google Fiber and Next Century Cities 2017
Special Recognition Award Boston Public Schools Parent University 2016
Community Collaboration Award Boston Public Schools and Today's Students Tomorrow's Teachers 2015
ONEin3 Positive Impact Award ONEin3 2014
Unsexy Policy Award Winner Harvard Kennedy School 2014
Community Broadband Hero NATOA 2013
Service to ELL Families Empowerment Award Boston Public Schools 2013
Computer World Honors Laureate Computer World Honors 2011
PTI Solutions Award Public Technology Institute 2011
Verizon Tech Savvy Award Verizon 2009

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Non-Profit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

One of TGH’s greatest strengths is collaborating with organizations to create mutually beneficial partnerships. Our team has developed partnerships with more than 250 sites across Boston. In those collaborations, TGH staff serve as the program managers, recruiting and training individuals from the partner organizations to run the digital literacy classes. TGH provides the course model, hand-picked step-by-step tutorials, course volunteers, and a significantly subsidized computer for graduating participants. TGH also collects data before, during, and after each course to increase program efficacy. To see where we run TGH courses, please visit www.techgoeshome.org/courses, and for more partners, check out www.techgoeshome.org/partners.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As an evolving non-profit, TGH has steadily built its policy and procedure manual as guided by non-profit best practices, with the support of our Board of Directors, non-profit partners, the Massachusetts Non-profit Network, and our auditors.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 85
Number of Contract Staff 177
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): Not specified
Gender Female: 3
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Liz Schwab
Board Chair Company Affiliation Google
Board Chair Term Dec 2016 - Dec 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Anne Bailey Berman Chadwick Martin Bailey Voting
Louie Balasny botkeeper Voting
Prince Charles Codman Square Neighborhood Development Center Voting
Jascha Franklin-Hodge Former City of Boston Voting
Joe Hedal Harvard Law School Voting
Laura Mittelman Burns & Levinson Voting
Liz Schwab Google Voting
Tim Smith Boston Foundation Voting
Purnima Thakre refine+focus Voting
Claire Wadlington Clear Path Voting
Chris Wixom JMA Wireless Voting
Robert Zaccardi J.P. Morgan Private Bank Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
David Beck Boston Medical Center --
Bing Broderick Haley House --
Elizabeth Dobrska TUGG --
Peter R. Doliber MHSA, MPH Alliance of Massachusetts YMCAs --
Adam Goff Box --
Maria Harris Boston Public Schools --
Joerg Meissner Bemis Associates --
Randy Parker Brevi --
Anne Schwieger City of Boston --
Marie St. Fleur St. Fleur Communications --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Governance and Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As head of external affairs for Google in the Northeast, I spend my professional life thinking about how technology can help our users and communities thrive. In this work, we are often guilty of carrying the assumption that everyone has access and knowledge of how to use these technologies. So many of us take for granted the ease of using computers and the internet to do homework, search for information, look for jobs and more. Think for a moment about the folks who have no access to this technology or don't know how to use a computer. This information and access gap makes daily life tasks so much harder than they need to be: communicating with your child's teacher, paying bills online, reading about the latest news.

It doesn't have to be this way. That's why I am passionate about Tech Goes home and the work the team is doing to bridge this digital divide. It's a solvable problem that has proven to vastly improve the quality of life for those who go through our programs.

We have a goal to reach all residents of Greater Boston in need of computer training and hardware, making us the first major metropolitan area in the country to do so. We have the resources, strong entrepreneurial spirit and growing technology community here to support our mission, and I believe it is our shared responsibility to achieve this goal and provide an example for other regions to follow. Boston is a city of firsts -- let's add another!

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Revenue $1,926,511 $1,020,139 $1,035,054
Total Expenses $1,837,644 $1,037,283 $955,635

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$368,750 $270,000 $166,495
Government Contributions $1,383,563 $657,447 $837,479
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local $1,383,563 $657,447 $837,479
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $113,224 $58,867 $7,150
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- $19,378
Investment Income, Net of Losses $3,682 $325 $152
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $57,292 $33,500 $4,400
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Program Expense $1,505,344 $779,851 $840,409
Administration Expense $108,495 $156,882 $84,983
Fundraising Expense $223,805 $100,550 $30,243
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.05 0.98 1.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 75% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 10% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Assets $1,488,456 $1,744,723 $1,410,074
Current Assets $1,459,440 $1,706,726 $1,410,074
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 --
Current Liabilities $1,110,804 $1,455,938 $1,104,145
Total Net Assets $377,652 $288,785 $305,929

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.31 1.17 1.28

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

In 2016 this organization changed its name from Openairbostonnet Incorporated to Tech Goes Home Incorporated.
 
Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. Revenue breakout detail was provided by the organization for fiscal year 2016.
 
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Tech Goes Home will ensure that Greater Boston becomes the first major metropolitan area to empower every low-income resident to access and use life-changing digital tools to address their most pressing needs. In doing so, TGH will lead the wave of national change.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

We provide residents not only with the tools to access the Internet, but also with 15 hours of relevance and skills training to ensure that they are joining the online community as knowledgeable and responsible participants.

To accomplish this successfully, we will: 
  • Partner with organizations across Boston to provide trusted, local training and to facilitate lasting relationships within the communities.

  • Raise awareness of digital disparities and barriers to access through outreach and advocacy.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Tech Goes Home has a strong team of collaborators who assist the core team to successfully support our mission. The following is a partial list of our partners: Boston Public Schools (and Charters), Boston Public Libraries, Boston Centers for Youth and Families, Boston Housing Authority, City of Boston Department of Innovation and Technology, Mayor’s Office of New Bostonians, ABCD, Salvation Army, Dorchester Bay EDC, South Boston En Accion, Family Aid Boston, Adult Learning Center, Project Hope, Project Place, SEIU1199, and many more. Because we run our program using a train the trainer model, each of our partner sites builds the capacity of their staff to use technology and online resources to support their clients.

In addition, we have approximately 150 short- or long-term volunteers who support our participants. This core of supporters helps within classes, translating, giving individual and small group support, and assisting the classroom trainer to ensure the success of every participant.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

In an ongoing effort to enhance TGH’s impact, we administer a phone- and web-based series of surveys to participants, including Pre- and Post-Training Surveys and followups one year after program completion. We use the survey results to assess what impact the program has had on participants’ capacity to take advantage of online resources.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

What we have accomplished:

  • 2000 - Tech Goes Home founded, first community course runs with 25 graduates
  • 2008 - TGH and the Frederick Middle School receive national attention for their innovative partnership
  • 2010 - TGH receives funding to revamp model and launch citywide
  • 2012 - TGH is replicated in New York, soon to be followed by communities in New Mexico, Connecticut, Tennessee, and Louisiana
  • 2016 - TGH graduates its 20,000th participant
  • 2017 - TGH recognized as Leader in Digital Inclusion with award from Google Fiber and Next Century Cities
  • 2017 - TGH has run courses in more than 250 sites and launches Greater Boston expansion

What we haven’t accomplished yet:

  • We will not rest until we have ensured that everyone has access to the resources and opportunities that come with using the Internet.