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Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts Inc

 88 Warren Street
 Roxbury, MA 02119
[P] (617) 4424519 x 235
[F] (617) 4420562
www.ulem.org
nrousseau@ulem.org
Nancy Rachel Rousseau
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INCORPORATED: 1974
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7349132

LAST UPDATED: 11/03/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1917, the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts (ULEM) is a 501c3 nonprofit organization which is one of the oldest affiliates within the National Urban League movement.  From the time that our doors opened to the at-large Boston community and surrounding metropolitan area residents, ULEM has been employing a multi-point strategy to deliver services and programs which aim to increase self-reliance, specifically in the area of workforce development. 

The mission of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts is to be a champion of civil rights dedicated to helping people improve their lives and to build stronger communities by providing local residents with education, job training and placement at no cost. For nearly 100 years, ULEM’s programs and services have given hope to our members and made a lasting, positive impact in the community.

Mission Statement

Founded in 1917, the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts (ULEM) is a 501c3 nonprofit organization which is one of the oldest affiliates within the National Urban League movement.  From the time that our doors opened to the at-large Boston community and surrounding metropolitan area residents, ULEM has been employing a multi-point strategy to deliver services and programs which aim to increase self-reliance, specifically in the area of workforce development. 

The mission of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts is to be a champion of civil rights dedicated to helping people improve their lives and to build stronger communities by providing local residents with education, job training and placement at no cost. For nearly 100 years, ULEM’s programs and services have given hope to our members and made a lasting, positive impact in the community.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $2,616,435.00
Projected Expense $2,573,890.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Camp/Youth Programs
  • Mature Worker Program
  • Professional Skills Training Programs
  • State of Black Boston

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Founded in 1917, the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts (ULEM) is a 501c3 nonprofit organization which is one of the oldest affiliates within the National Urban League movement.  From the time that our doors opened to the at-large Boston community and surrounding metropolitan area residents, ULEM has been employing a multi-point strategy to deliver services and programs which aim to increase self-reliance, specifically in the area of workforce development. 

The mission of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts is to be a champion of civil rights dedicated to helping people improve their lives and to build stronger communities by providing local residents with education, job training and placement at no cost. For nearly 100 years, ULEM’s programs and services have given hope to our members and made a lasting, positive impact in the community.


Background Statement

The ULEM has been marching through history for equality in employment, housing, and health in Massachusetts since its’ 1917 founding by Eugene Kinckle Jones, an organizer for the National Urban League (NUL). Jones was aided by a group of concerned citizens led by local activist Butler Wilson, who also helped found the Boston branch of the NAACP. Robert Treat Paine, the first Board Chairman for the Boston Urban League, was a well-known philanthropist and descendant of a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Early funding for ULEM was provided by John F. Moors, co-founder of Moors & Cabot, now a major investment firm in Boston. In 1919, the ULEM began its affiliation with the NUL, the nation’s largest community-based organization providing direct service, advocacy, and research on behalf of African Americans and other individuals of color.  Throughout the different eras of the 20th century - the Great Depression, the Civil Rights movement, the riots in the ‘90s, the ULEM was tireless in its many efforts to gain jobs, healthcare and education for Boston’s people of color. The new millennium began as Greater Boston experienced growth in high-level positions held by African Americans and there was evidence of relaxed residential segregation with more black families in the suburbs. Despite impressive gains, grave challenges remain, especially in education, training, and employment. While many financial and professional services were expanding, factory jobs continued their decades-long decline. Guided by a new five year strategic plan adopted in 2009, the ULEM responded with a deepened commitment to education and job training for people of all ages and ethnic backgrounds. Emerging with new energy and leadership, ULEM hosted the NUL Conference in July 2011 and focused on employment with the theme of Jobs Rebuild America.  This conference provided a powerful showcase of America's thought leaders working together with Fortune 500 companies to demonstrate the local and broad impact of the Urban League movement.  During that week, the city of Boston reclaimed its position as a destination of choice for people of color.  Furthermore, the conference drove home the message that strategic and sustained investment in an educated minority workforce is critical to the economic future of the region.  The State of Black Boston report led by the Trotter Institute, NAACP, ULEM and the State of Black Boston Advisory Committee was also released. This effort focused on assessing both the progress and lack of progress that Black Bostonians have experienced in recent years in 11 different arenas including health, education, housing and economic development, etc. In the 2012 year, this effort will continue to provide a public platform to engage the corporate/non-profit communities and grassroot leaders in a meaningful dialogue about these issues and develop clear actions steps on how to change the current statistics. 

Impact Statement

With the support of The Boston Foundation, Wellspring Consulting, and others, ULEM was able to create and adopt its new strategic plan in 2009. Over the years 2009-14, ULEM has committed to strengthen its position as a leader in Workforce Development in the Boston metro area, focusing on case management-supported, placement-based models for adult workers. The five year strategic goals are:  1) Establish a clear sense of ULEM’s identity and purpose among key stakeholders; 2) Become a leader in workforce development, focusing on placement-based models for transitional adult workers; 3) Align advocacy with programmatic efforts to increase its impact; 4) Continue to employ public education to promote economic self-reliance; 5) Longer term, enter new program areas (beyond workforce development) in which ULEM can develop a distinctive and leading position; and, 6) Achieve a stronger, more durable financial position. To achieve the goals of its Strategic Plan, ULEM is committed to work together with funders and corporate partners to ease barriers to employment and advocate for new opportunities for people of color in the neighborhoods and communities it serves.

The ULEM is committed to working together with funders and corporations to ease barriers to employment and advocate for new opportunities for people of color in the neighborhoods and communities it serves.  As an affiliate partner of the National Urban League’s “I Am Empowered” initiative, ULEM provides local leadership in workforce development training and advocacy to ensure that the nation is empowered to achieve the following goals by 2025: 1) Every American child is ready for college, work and life; 2) Every American has access to jobs with a living wage and good benefits; 3) Every American lives in safe, decent, affordable and energy-efficient housing on fair terms; and 4) Every American has access to quality and affordable health care solutions

Needs Statement

Our top most pressing need is finances for both our operations and programs.  We ended FY12 with a small deficit and we had to downsize program staff and implement a pay cut for all staff for FY13.  Our desire is to operate all of our workforce development programs at an optimum and place more people in jobs but federal, state, and local funding continues to be cut, and some foundations have changed their priorities.  These funds total $1,960,456.  Also we need funding for our State of Black Boston advocacy efforts totaling $114,510 and our camp and youth leadership summer programs are in need of $71,982.  Along those lines it would be beneficial to have skilled volunteers in the areas of fundraising, IT, website development, and database entry work.  In terms of fundraising, we are looking for someone who could help with membership and activating that group as well as update membership materials. We have a need to improve our internal operating system which crashes due to differences with building a new system with a new server.  Similarly our website needs to be renovated and reconfigured to the new system.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
We serve all individuals from any location in Eastern Massachusetts. However, those who access our services live in the predominantly minority neighborhoods of Boston including: Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, and Jamaica Plain. In those areas, City Data shows that: 53% are Black, 19% are White, 16% are Latino/a, 5% are Asian, 2% are of Mixed Race and 5% Other; over 20% live below the federal poverty level, compared to 10.3% Statewide. 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Urban League
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Camp/Youth Programs

The ULEM focuses on youth leadership development and camperships for inner-city children and youth every summer. Our youth leadership program trains 16-20 inner-city youth on how to be leaders in one's community and builds a pathway to being college and career ready. The goal is to build their leadership skills and design, develop, and submit a project at the National Youth Summit as part of the Project Ready Case Competition conjunction with other youth from other Urban League affiliate's across the country.  Our campership program exposes 40-60 inner city children ages 8-16 to the camp lifestyle in Brookfield, MA.  Camp Atwater is the nation's oldest African-American leadership development summer camp. The mission of Camp Atwater is to assist in the academic & social aspects of the youth’s growth/development by offering a high quality residential camp experience within a safe, nurturing and Afro-centric environment away from urban violence and distractions.   

Budget  $71,982.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

The programs will be a success in 2012 if we can send 40-60 at-risk children to camp and 16 youth and 4 chaperones to our National Youth Leadership Summit. If they participate they will be exposed to new lifestyles, new ideas, new geography, team-building and leadership development skills, and will experience positive growth and development. For the youth who attend the Summit, they will provide culturally diverse urban youth with:opportunities for their academic, personal and social development;assistance in developing long-term goals and strategies to fulfill them, leading to productive adult life experiences;training that will groom them as future leaders by developing communication and decision making skills, tools for increased civic responsibility and exposure to and interaction with urban leaders on a national level; andinvolvement in active and sustained community service projects, that they develop and execute themselves to improve the conditions of their neighborhoods. 

Program Long-Term Success 

The long-term success of the youth program is to have a life-changing experience that exposes them to new thinking that will increase our youth’s abilities to plan for and achieve a college education in preparation for a career that allows them to discover, explore and achieve their full potential.  At this moment we have not tracked all those who have participated in the program in previous years because the program has not been in operation for consecutive years.  This will be addressed in 2012. Our long-term goal for the camp program is to expose as many inner-city children as possible to this camp experience.  We try to enroll new children each year in order to widen our long-term impact.  

Program Success Monitored By 

The Camp Atwater program will be monitored by the numbers who are enrolled.  All campers are required to pay a small fee and have their parents fill out the proper documentation to ensure that they qualify for camp.  For our youth program, participants are required to fill out an intake form with their parents consent, and they must attend 4-6 team-building/leadership development trainings as a group before attending the National Youth Summit. After the experience they are required to fill out a survey which has questions in regards to what they learned from the experience.

Examples of Program Success 

Marcus was 11 when he first went to Camp Atwater on a scholarship three years ago. Marcus had struggled for years with dyslexia; he was shy and had few friends; and he did not know any of the other kids who were going to camp with him. When his mom dropped him off at the bus, he told her he did not want to go.  She drove home with a heavy heart, and hesitated to go to Parent’s Day during the weekend in between the two week session, afraid he would beg her to come home.  To her delight, when she got there she discovered it was just the opposite.  He loved Camp Atwater, had made many friends and returned again the following year on another scholarship.  Now at 13 in 2011, Marcus was became one of the 12 youth leaders hosting hundreds of teens at the National Youth Leadership Summit in Boston. It was a huge success to see his transformation over the years and develop from a shy boy into a youth leader.  


Mature Worker Program

MWP is an innovative community-based workforce development program that combines “soft” and “hard” skills training, job placement, career coaching, and retention support for 150 low-income and mainly minority adults, ages 55-85 in the greater Boston area. MWP's focus is to nurture a healthy, vibrant lifestyle and promote dignity and the independence of older workers through various assignments at specific community-based nonprofit host training agencies, which prepares them to enter the job market and establish a positive work/volunteer record to obtain living wage employment. Each person is enrolled from 24-48 months and works closely with a case manager with the goal of reducing barriers to become self-sufficient and to gain regular employment in order to live above the poverty level.

Budget  $1,372,287.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

In the 2011 year, the MWP effectively transitioned 34 participants with multiple barriers into long-term employment with a 70% retention rate and completed over 150,000 hours of volunteering. Our annual goals include measuring the following: Enrollment numbers, number of community services hours, average hours worked, monthly meeting attendance, workshops participation levels, and case management services provided.  For FY13 our goals have not been set by our National affiliation yet. However, in FY12 we had 137 enrolled in the program and the following goals were set by National and tracked in SPARQ: 1) 50% had to complete a minimum of 148,785 community service hours, 2) 25% of 53 people had to enter employment, 3) 70% of had to retain their employment, 4) The average earnings had to be a minimum annual rate of $8,500, 5) a 100% service participation level, and 6) a 2.24 goal that all clients served will be the “most in need” by having a minimum of 3 different barriers.  

Program Long-Term Success 

The MWP is mostly funded through a grant by the Department of Labor and its long-term success depends upon the renewal of the funds every three years.  ULEM is one of five affiliates who are a part of this program across the country and it has been such a success in Boston that we have been receiving funds since 2006.  We are one of two agencies in Norfolk and Suffolk country that provides this type of service to the elderly.  We have a high referral rate due to the success of completing our short-term goals, and others have viewed this as a winning long-term model to help older adults gain valuable skills to transition to employment and self-sufficiency.  ULEM hopes to continue this program in FY13 and will know in September if this program will be funded for another 3 years.

Program Success Monitored By 

MWP has a formal evaluation that is mandatory by both the National Urban League (NUL) (since we are one of five affiliates to receive the federal MWP grant through the NUL) and the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL).  Monthly MWP reports are prepared and submitted to both entities utilizing the SPARQ database which is designed and developed through the DOL. (Senior Community Service Employment Program – Performance – And – Results – QPR – System)  The six core outcome measurements tracked in SPARQ include: 1) # of community service hours, 2) # entered employment, 3) # employment retention, 4) average earnings, 5) service level, and 6) service to most in need.  Our Program Counselor has been trained and certified in the SPARQ system for MWP’s documentation.  

Examples of Program Success 

Lynette worked at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and attended Emmanuel College. One day she was crossing the street and was hit by a truck and severely hurt. She had a long recuperation period and was unemployed for 8 years. Her only income was her disability check. She was struggling physically and financially. A former ULEM client told her about the MWP. She was a month away from meeting the required age of 55 and applied as soon as she was eligible. She was accepted and became a Case Manager Trainee. She was trained in social services. It helped her improve her customer service skills, communication skills, listening and evaluation skills. All of these skills she gained have been instrumental in her ability to refer her assigned case load of clients to the resources they need. Lynette had a durational limit date of July 2011 to depart from the MWP.  However her dream to work full time became a reality in June 2011 when ULEM was able to hire her for an open Case Manager position.


Professional Skills Training Programs

Programs include: Volunteer 2 Work, Dollars & Sense Financial Literacy Training, Online Learning Readiness Training, Fund Administration Preparatory Program, Banking Excellence and Sales Training, and our drop-in Employment Resource Center. In order to enroll, each client begins the process by filling out intake forms which gather information on their family, education, and income levels.  If they qualify, they go through an assessment process to determine a baseline. Then they are placed in a job training program that suits their needs, skill level, and interests, or they are referred to an agency that better suits their needs. During their training they receive case management and job placement support. ULEM works with each client to develop an Individual Employment Plan. We have an on-site Employment Resource Center with additional resources to ensure rapid and suitable job placement. Once the training is completed many of our clients are placed directly in jobs. 

Budget  $588,169.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

All of these programs have a common set of measured objectives. They are to increase the job readiness skills and experiences; increase job placement; and increase job retention.  Our success rate is consistently above the industry standard of 70% which attests to the strength of our program models. In FY13, ULEM will create and maintain a Jobs Rebuild Boston initiative building off the momentum from the NUL Conference in July 2011. Annually, we will host a career fair to bring viable job opportunities to the greater Roxbury neighborhood.  We will also place a minimum of 90 adults in jobs with an average wage of $14-$24/hr in the industries of Customer Service & Sales, Financial Services & Banking, and Retail Management. We will incrementally grow and stabilize our program model by developing 3-5 new corporate partnerships with signed MOA's, instituting 5 formalized MOA's with existing partners, and develop formalized MOU's with up to 6 non-profit partners within the next 3 years. 

Program Long-Term Success 

ULEM's 5 Year Strategic Plan (FY10-FY14) focuses on 6 key areas. Our primary focus is: (1) Increase the organization's capacity to sustain and expand its placement-based workforce initiatives with the employer and non-profit partners by adding new programs for job placement and an annual Career Fair in Roxbury. As part of our capacity building strategy we are developing formal agreements with up to 10 corporations to provide diverse and qualified candidates. (2) Serve more clients in our training programs and place them in jobs at a living wage to impact Boston's working poor community and revitalize the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan neighborhoods with new opportunities. (3) Elevate ULEM's advocacy position of social justice and civil rights activism in the public arena. We have successfully launched our State of Black Boston efforts mobilizing grassroots leaders in the community to change inequalities in areas such as education, health, employment, economic development, etc.

Program Success Monitored By 

The ULEM is committed to the use of metrics and data to evaluate our participant success rate and to improve our program operations.  We use an Online Database Management software from Community TechKnowledge to track clients, facilitate staff collaboration and provide real-time reports on client demographics, service provision, outputs and outcomes. Its customizable reporting functionality allows ULEM to create its own mechanisms to inform and improve service delivery and outcomes. We use this for all funders and track how many program participants go through an intake, are enrolled, complete the program, secure a job, and retain a job. We can also segment our outcomes by age, race, geographic location based on a funders needs.  All clients also complete surveys to give us feedback on how to improve the program.  Furthermore, clients see their case management weekly if clients are displeased with our services we have an official grievance policy.

Examples of Program Success 

Aryanne is a 37 year old single, African-American female, and a mother of 2 boys, ages 10 and 5 who have health problems. She possesses an Associate's degree from a community college; and her last position was with a bank that down-sized. She found herself unemployed and looking for work for 2 years. She tried to improve her situation and moved in with family. This enabled her to keep her from being placed in a shelter. She went to the Dept. of Transitional Assistance which helped her with daycare vouchers while she attended training programs. This allowed her to continue her job search and she was referred to ULEM. She met with our Case Manager, and enrolled in our job training programs. Aryanne was able to develop new networks and a new set of skills. In one month, she accepted a new job at a marketable salary with health and dental benefits. She said that without ULEM she would never have been able to rebuild her confidence, her skill sets, and get into the job market again.


State of Black Boston

The SOBB is a call to action to understand the social/economic issues affecting Boston’s Black population and to collectively formulate strategies to address them at the grassroots level. It is a partnership that began in 2010 between ULEM, the NAACP, and the UMass Trotter Institute.  In 2011, the SOBB report was published documenting the current state of Black Bostonians described in an extensive demographic and community profile focusing in on key areas including health, housing & economic development, criminal justice, k-12 education, higher education, civic engagement, arts & culture, and media. This document has become a benchmark for the Black community and other social activists in Boston containing 84 recommendations on how to reduce inequalities in those areas. In 2012, we have narrowed our focus to the four areas of employment, education, health, and economic development and are hosting four community forums culminating in a conference at the State House in November.  

Budget  $114,500.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Blacks, African Heritage Minorities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Each year the goals have varied based on tasks that need to be completed. Since our report was released in 2011 we want to build on that success and focus in on four areas including education, employment, health, and economic development.  Making that determination was the first goal that was set and achieved.  Currently, we plan to have four meetings to address one topic per meeting. At each meeting we would like to have a minimum of 50 grassroot leaders attend.  Our goal is to have these efforts culminate in a conference at the State House that provides these grassroot leaders with the tools and access to our State legislators to create effective change on these respective issues.  Our goal is to have a minimum of 300 people at the State House in November. 

Program Long-Term Success 

ULEM's 5 Year Strategic Plan (FY10-FY14) focuses on 6 key areas. In regards to the SOBB area our primary focus is to elevate ULEM's advocacy position of social justice and civil rights activism in the public arena. Since 2009 we have ramped up our advocacy efforts with the creation, implementation and stabilization of SOBB mobilizing grassroots leaders in the community to change inequalities in 10 key areas.  Much of the data that was compiled included other races such as Latino, Asian, and Caucasian.  Our long-term goal is to take the advocacy work to the next level and release a State of Latino Boston in the upcoming years. Also, these efforts are part of our national affiliation and five other Urban League organizations have also released reports on Blacks in their respective cities.

Program Success Monitored By 

We will measure the success of our 2012 SOBB Town Hall meeting by tracking attendance, and by measuring the number of meetings leading up to the event with attendance numbers.  We will also track any outcomes developed from those meetings relative to mobilizing our constituents in the four areas of health, education, employment, and economic development.  At each meeting it is the goal to have an open forum with an expert panelist with a time for question and answer and each participant will not just gain knowledge but a tool-kit will be provided for them to take home with them. We will also track the attendance at our Massachusetts State House rally and numbers of community/corporate partners involved for both the SOBB and the rally.

Examples of Program Success 

An example of program success is the published report that vividly describes the current state of Black Bostonians in an extensive demographic and community profile focusing on health, housing & economic development, criminal justice, k-12 education, higher education, civic engagement, arts & culture, and media. This report is now a benchmark for the Black community and other social activists in Boston containing 84 recommendations on how to reduce inequalities in those areas. The SOBB report was showcased at a “Town Hall” meeting as a precursor to the National Urban League Conference held in Boston in July of 2011.This meeting was attended by 1,100 people with the keynote address given by CNN’s national news anchor, Soledad O’Brien. The day included an opening session, breakout workshops, a keynote address luncheon and a time for networking/strategy discussions. A 100+ person Civic Engagement Committee helped bring awareness to these issues and made the day a success.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Darnell L. Williams
CEO Term Start May 2001
CEO Email dwilliams@ulem.org
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. JacQuie Cairo-Williams Director of Mature Worker Program --
Ms. Jacquie George Director of Finance --
Ms. Lauren Hunter Director of Workforce Development --
Ms. Amy L. Malkemes Director of Development --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 13
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 40
Number of Contract Staff 5
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 24
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 17
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jeffrey L. Musman Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Seyfarth & Shaw, LLP
Board Chair Term Jan 2004 - Dec 2012
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Greg Almieda Global View Communications Voting
Ms. JacQuie Cairo-Williams Urban League Guild Voting
Mr. David Casey CVS Caremark Voting
Mr. Michael Cawley Tufts Health Plan Voting
Mr. William Fenton Bank of America Voting
Ms. Jackie Gadsden Comcast Cable Voting
Mr. Samuel J. Gershon Deceased Exofficio
Mr. Alan Greene State Street Corporation Voting
Mr. Jim Hogan Target Corporation Voting
Mr. Damon Jones Proctor & Gamble, a division of the Gillette Company Voting
Mrs. Andrea Kershaw Enterprise Holdings Voting
Ms. Joyce London United States District Courthouse Exofficio
Mr. Vincent Loporchio Fidelity Investments Voting
Mr. Bruce Martin MetroPCS Voting
Mr. Michael Matney Pepsi Corporation Voting
Mr. Quincy Miller Citizen's Bank Voting
Ms. Katie Morey Ocean Spray Cranberries Voting
Mr. Jason Robart Blue Cross / Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Ms. Debra Roberts Tufts Health Plan Voting
Mr. Samuel Rose Raytheon Voting
Ms. Nancy Rousseau Urban League -Young Professionals Network Voting
Mr. George Russell State Street Corporation Exofficio
Ms. Nancy Stager Eastern Bank Voting
Mr. Glenn Straughn Target Corporation Voting
Mr. Richard Taylor Taylor Smith Properties, Inc. Voting
Mrs. DC Ware Verizon Voting
Ms. Taunya Williams-Garrett Stop and Shop, a division of Ahold Corporation Voting
Ms. Jane Willis Ropes & Gray, LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 15
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Middle Eastern
Gender Female: 13
Male: 18
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 45%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $2,616,435.00
Projected Expense $2,573,890.00
Form 990s

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

2008 Form 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $2,330,154 $2,798,378 $1,948,769
Total Expenses $2,318,627 $2,439,866 $2,804,911

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $659,238 $820,805
Government Contributions $0 $250,000 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- $250,000 --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,916,522 $1,257,794 $1,349,709
Indirect Public Support $47,239 $47,239 $50,302
Earned Revenue $125,740 $178,252 $205,855
Investment Income, Net of Losses $1,672 $1,848 $2,922
Membership Dues $5,326 $9,871 $18,892
Special Events $220,561 $364,136 $-457,216
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $13,094 $30,000 $-42,500

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $1,791,417 $1,886,127 $2,133,281
Administration Expense $319,827 $359,589 $390,730
Fundraising Expense $207,383 $194,150 $280,900
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.15 0.69
Program Expense/Total Expenses 77% 77% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 9% 8% 16%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $1,879,663 $2,137,622 $2,036,328
Current Assets $489,005 $590,689 $457,171
Long-Term Liabilities $391,645 $484,172 $379,590
Current Liabilities $375,656 $373,481 $735,281
Total Net Assets $1,112,362 $1,279,969 $921,457

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
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2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.30 1.58 0.62

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 21% 23% 19%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Previous fiscal period financial information was obtained from the organization's Audited Financials.  For FY2013 and FY2012, the independent auditors conducting this audit have issued a going concern opinion, which means simply whether there is significant doubt that the nonprofit will have sufficient resources in the foreseeable future. Please review the Auditors opinion and related notes for further information.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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