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Special Olympics Massachusetts Inc.

 The Yawkey Sports Training Center, 512 Forest Street
 Marlborough, MA 01752
[P] (508) 485-0986
[F] (508) 481-0786
http://www.specialolympicsma.org/
[email protected]
Nick Savarese
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INCORPORATED: 1971
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7242294

LAST UPDATED: 12/11/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names Massachusetts Special Olympics Association (1998)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

 The mission of Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of well-coached Olympic-type sports for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics Massachusetts also provides athletes with continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, prepare for entry into school and community programs, express courage, experience joy, and participate in the sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics Athletes, and the community.

Mission Statement

 The mission of Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of well-coached Olympic-type sports for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics Massachusetts also provides athletes with continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, prepare for entry into school and community programs, express courage, experience joy, and participate in the sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics Athletes, and the community.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $5,450,000.00
Projected Expense $5,440,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Healthy Athletes
  • School-Based Programs
  • Unified Sports

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

 The mission of Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of well-coached Olympic-type sports for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics Massachusetts also provides athletes with continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, prepare for entry into school and community programs, express courage, experience joy, and participate in the sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics Athletes, and the community.


Background Statement

 Special Olympics, Inc., founded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver in 1968, began as a back-yard swim exhibition for individuals with intellectual disabilities, and has since grown to become the world’s largest amateur sports organization. Today, almost four million participants in 170 countries benefit from Special Olympics programs. While this international impact is noteworthy, Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA), an independent chapter of Special Olympics, Inc., is a local initiative. SOMA raises all of its own money within the state, and has a staff that collaborates with thousands of volunteers, families, schools, community organizations, foundations, and corporations to improve lives for people with intellectual disabilities.

Special Olympics Massachusetts was founded in 1971, to serve individuals with intellectual disabilities within the state. SOMA’s mission is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition for individuals with intellectual disabilities, providing opportunities to develop physical fitness, prepare for entry into school and community programs, and experience the joy of organized sports. Equally important, SOMA programs change the perception of the general population of people with intellectual disabilities and their potential for success and inclusion within communities. SOMA serves more than 12,000 youth and adults with intellectual disabilities through athletic training and competition as well as health-improvement and advocacy/stigma-reduction programs. SOMA offers 23 sports and over 250 organized competitions annually. Participants live throughout Massachusetts, and are organized locally as “Local Programs”. These programs are run by volunteers in affiliation with recreation departments, schools, service providers, families, or other local groups. This work is all possible due to the 1,300 volunteer coaches who are trained and re-certified every three years, and more than 11,000 other volunteers who plan and stage events.

 


Impact Statement

2016 Outputs...

Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) served 14,804 athletes with & without intellectual disabilities  through year-round athletic training, competition, and health-improvement programs. These athletes competed in 23 sports and over 250 organized competitions (increased from 120 competitions in 2012) conducted and hosted by 10,705 volunteers with guidance from SOMA’s professional staff of 24 full time & 5 part time employees. SOMA provided all services at zero cost to participants, and efficiently averaged $325 to serve one athlete year-round.


Needs Statement

1. Operating revenue: SOMA does not charge participation fees to participants, and therefore must raise $5.4 million yearly to fund services.
 
2. Skilled Volunteers: SOMA needs trained coaches, officials, medical volunteers, health care clinicians, as well as experienced event management and fundraising volunteers. These volunteers help execute ongoing sports training, competitions, and fundraising initiatives.
 
3. Education Partners. SOMA is a solution provider for the US Department of Education Guidance 504, mandating equal access to sports in schools for stuidents with intellectual disabilities. SOMA is looking to grow partnerships with schools and districts, particularly in urban settings.
 
5. Health Provider Partnerships: SOMA seeks qualified medical professionals to execute ongoing health programs including screenings and referalls in many disciplines at events throughout the year. 

CEO Statement

I am honored to be the President & CEO of Special Olympics Massachusetts.  I have been with this amazing organization for 30 years starting as a volunteer and then working across the country in various capacities before coming back home for this dream job.  Over the years, I have seen amazing changes in the lives that individuals with intellectual disabilities can and do lead. No longer are they living in institutions or being educated in segregated settings but they are living, working and being educated in the community.  We have been there all along the way, advocating for individuals with intellectual disabilities. 

Special Olympics is not a one day track meet for children. It is a year round program for all ages that happens in every community, every day. Our youngest athlete is 2 ½ and our oldest turned 101 on March 1, 2013.  We offer this programming to over 12,900 athletes for FREE in 24 sports while utilizing over 10,000 volunteers
 
Real Sports Experience: Sports are a powerful force. They can shift the focus from disability to ability, from isolation to involvement. We offer the highest quality Olympic-style sports training and competition for people with intellectual disabilities. This changes attitudes and changes lives.  The transformative power of sports to instill confidence, improve health and inspire a sense of competition is at the core of what we do.
 
Transformative Education: We provide a platform through sports to help change the attitudes and perceptions of youth and young adults towards peers with intellectual disabilities. Through our programs, we are helping to solve the problem of isolation and misunderstanding in the classroom. Students with intellectual disabilities are two to three times more likely to be bullied than peers without intellectual disabilities.
 
Community Building: Special Olympics spreads compassion and acceptance in a way that unites. We do this through a wide range of trainings, competitions, health screenings and fund-raising events. We also create opportunities for families, community members, businesses, law enforcement, and others to band together to change attitudes and support athletes.

Sustaining Athlete Health:
Though Sports is at our core, Special Olympics is the leading advocate for establishing better health programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Our Healthy Athletes programs provide health screenings for eyes, teeth, feet, nutrition, exercise and more.

We welcome all to join us as a partner to allow our athletes to live longer, healthy and vibrant lives. 


Board Chair Statement

Being part of an organization that helps enhance the lives of people with intellectual disabilities has become a personal passion. Many years ago, I had the opportunity to teach kids with intellectual disabilities how to ice skate. It was incredibly rewarding to see their skills, determination to succeed, and constant smiles. I also saw how grateful many parents were to have their children being supported.

Now as a professional, I am even more excited about the opportunity to be part of the Special Olympics Movement. This organization continues to enhance offerings and provide more services that increasequality of life for all individuals through sport. People with intellectual disabilities and those lucky enough to be touched by these individuals benefit greatly from the Special Olympics Movement.

In the coming years, Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) will continue to have a significant impact on the health and well-being of individuals with intellectual disabilities through sports participation. Also, through growing partnerships with schools and a focus on inclusive programs, SOMA will be building communities of acceptance, respect, and opportunity for people with disabilities throughout the state.

I look forward to working with Special Olympics Massachusetts athletes, staff and 10,000 of my fellow volunteers annually to accomplish the following goals:

  • Grow School-Based Programs:SOMA will continue to partner with schools and districts throughout the state to ensure equal access to meaningful athletic training and competition for people with intellectual disabilities.
  • Increase Inclusive Programs:SOMA will continue to be a leader in promoting inclusion and integration for people with intellectual disabilities within their communities through “Unified Sports”. In “Unified Sports”, athletes with and without disabilities participate together as teammates and friends.
  • Strengthen Program and Development Collaborations:SOMA will partner with other agencies within sports and disability advocacy to make programs more efficient and will grow partnerships with Foundation and Corporate funders to ensure long-term funding.
  • Engage Donors and Other Funders or Long-Term Support:In the same way that SOMA serves the same athletes year-after-year, we will focus on engaging and stewarding donors and other funders to continue to invest long-term.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
STATEWIDE

Massachusetts   

Organization Categories

  1. Recreation & Sports - Special Olympics
  2. Human Services - Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Disabled Persons' Rights

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Healthy Athletes

The Healthy Athletes program, founded in Massachusetts and now a Global Initiative, gives athletes and their families access to quality healthcare. Utilizing volunteer services of qualified local health professionals, the program provides dental, vision, hearing, foot and spinal screenings and, if necessary, referrals, free-of-charge at various Special Olympics events.
Budget  $15,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Health Care, General/Other
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
In the short-term, SOMA ensures that at least one screening within each Healthy Athletes discipline is performed annually. Additionally SOMA will ensure that at least one volunteer certified physician serves as Clinical SDirector of each discipline. Success is acheived each time an athlete is screened and/or refferred for further treatment.
Program Long-Term Success 
The over-arching goal of the Healthy Athletes program is to have a significant impact on the quality and availabiltiy of health-care for individuals with intellectual disabilities.
 
Long-term SOMA would like to significantly increase the number of physicians trained and willing to accept an individual with an intellectual disability into their practice. As recently as 2001 this number stood at 1-in-50. Additionally, SOMA will ensure that athletes with intellectual disabilities have access to better quality health care through screenings and referrals at SOMA events.
Program Success Monitored By 
program success is monitored through on-going evaluations by the Clinical Director of each discipline in collaboration with SOMA staff. These evaluations consist of survey results, screening and referral, and narrative feed-back.
Examples of Program Success 
At a  Healthy Athletes screening held at SOMA headquarters in 2012, it was discovered that an athlete had recently had a heart attack. this individual was immediately referred to a qualified cardiologist, who assessed and treated the patient. Were it not for this healthy Athlete screening, this heart attack may not have been discovered and the athlete would have been at greater risk for serious heart-related health issues.

School-Based Programs

School-based programs include the After School Intramural activities and “School-Day-Games”, full-day events offering competition for individuals and school teams, involving school officials, teachers, families and community volunteers. Many school-based programs include advocacy initiatives, including Project UNIFY, which includes advocacy and education campaigns such as “Spread The Word to End The Word”, a youth-activated projects where people pledge to end use of the word “retarded”.
 
In January 2013, the United States  Department of Education Office of Civil Rights announced guidance detailing school districts’ legal obligations to provide students with disabilities equal access to athletics activities. The guidance letter clarifies existing law and encourages school districts to improve and expand upon athletic opportunities for students with disabilities. In light of this, SOMA school-based partnerships will continue to grow. 
Budget  $500,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Extracurricular Sports
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

 SOMA will use research and survey tools developed by Special Olympics SOMA measures success of individual school programs based on the following measurable outcomes:

•     Participating students without disabilities will hold more positive attitudes toward their peers with intellectual disabilities. (Measure: attitude and behavior change)

•     School communities will develop cultures of acceptance where students with intellectual disabilities feel welcome and are routinely included in, and feel a part of, all school activities, opportunities and functions; (Measure: perceptions of school climate)

•     Improved perception of Special Olympics as a school and community partner that offers programming that benefits all students. (Measure: perceptions of Special Olympics by general educators and school administrators)

•     More students with and without intellectual disabilities playing sports together (Measures: increased Unified Sports Teams and programs).

Program Long-Term Success 
Long-term success would be reached if every student with an intellectual disabilitiy in Massachusetts had an opportunity to participate in meaningful athletic competition through his/her school. This would mean that SOMA would have robust and inclusive athletic programming in every school district within the state.
Program Success Monitored By 
SOMA uses research and survey tools developed by Special Olympics International in addition to annual anecdotal and year-end numbers analysis to gauge the effectiveness of school-based programs. Surveys are conducted of participating students, teachers and school adminstrators before and after the duration of programs within a school year.
Examples of Program Success 
Spring of 2013 will mark the second annual SOMA Unified Track and Field League in collaboration with the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic association (MIAA) Mid-Watch league. SOMA partners with 12 high schools to execute fully inclusive weekly track-and-field competition. Teams include athelets with and without disabilties participating together as teammates on the track and friends off it. This first-of-its-kind league exemplifies all the benefits of inclusive, school-based programs.

Unified Sports

Founded in Massachusetts, and now a Global Initiative, Unified Sports brings together athletes with and without intellectual disabilities. Through training and competing on the same team, Unified athletes and their partners improve their physical fitness, sharpen their skills and learn acceptance and inclusion. All SOMA programming is offered in inclusive (i.e. unified) form.
Budget  $666,230.00
Category  Recreation & Sports, General/Other Special Olympics Progams
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Upon completeion of one season of Unified Sports, athletes with intellectual disabilities will report and exhibit improved self-confidence and physical fitness. Peers without disabilities will report greater acceptance as well as a stronger belief in the skills and abilities of poeple with intellectual disabilities.
 
75% of athletes with and without disabilities will sign up for the following sports season offerred within their respective programs.
Program Long-Term Success 
Long term, Special Olympics Massachusetts envisions a state where people with intellectual disabilities live fully and inclusively within their communities, without facing discrimination.
Program Success Monitored By 
Programs success is monitored by surveys conduted of athletes, peers, volunteers, and families. These surveys include anecdotes as well as satisfaction statistics. Additionally success is determined by the rate at which the athletes renew partivcipation for the next available season.
Examples of Program Success 

 Research studies by Siperstein (2010) andӦzer (2011) have confirmed the positive social impact of Unified Sports on individuals with and without intellectual disabilities as well as their communities. Unified Sports is effective in decreasing the problem behaviors of individuals with intellectual disabilities and improving attitudes of individuals without disabilities toward participants with disabilities. Unified Sports helps increase the skills necessary for individuals with intellectual disabilities to be accepted and fulfilled socially (developing meaningful relationships, being accepted and respected andbeing better prepared for community living).

 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Mary Beth McMahon
CEO Term Start Feb 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Mary Beth McMahon started with Special Olympics as a volunteer for the Rhode Island chapter in 1983 and in 1986 started working with the area management team for the Greater Boston area at SOMA, while starting her career in the financial services. In 1991 she made the decision to make Special Olympics her career by accepting a position with Special Olympics Maryland, as their director of competition. In 1995 she moved to Northern California where she became the vice president of sports program and helped start the new program of Special Olympics Northern California. In 2002 she took over the management of Special Olympics Nevada and became the executive vice president of Special Olympics Northern California and Nevada. In 2011 Mary Beth was given the opportunity to come home to Massachusetts and accepted the role of Senior Vice President. She was named president and CEO in February, 2013.

Her career has crossed every aspect of Special Olympics, from local program management to sports and competition management, and all aspects of development. She was inducted into the Special Olympics International Law Enforcement Torch Run’s Richard LaMunyon Hall of Fame in 2010, for her contributions to the growth of the  program at a local, state, national and international level.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Gayle Fehlmann VP for Finance --
Terry Keilty VP for Programs --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

SOMA collaborates with numerous schools and other organizations to deliver services.
 
SOMA public school collaborations include but are not limited to the following schoold districts: Barsntable, Boston, Brockton, Everett, Lawrence, Lexington, Malden, Medfield, North Andover, North Attleboro, Quabbin,  Somerville, Weston, and Worcester.
 
SOMA is also a partner of the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association through a partnership with each of 12 schools in the Mid-watch league. This partnership consists of  a Unified Track-and-Field.
 
SOMA also collaborates with many private schools including Governor's Academy, Cardinal Cushing, and Ivy Street School.
 
Collaborations with disability-service providers includes but is not limited to ARC of Massachusetts chapters, Bridgewell, Seven Hills Academy, Shrewsbury Parks and Recreation.
 
SOMA is an affilliate of University of Massachusetts Medical School and a partner of Regis College, to execute the "Healthy Athletes" program.
 
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 24
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 9,748
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 91%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 33
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 20
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Commercial General Liability and Medical Malpractice
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
General Property Coverage
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Inland Marine and Mobile Equipment
Life Insurance
Liquor Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Risk Management Provisions
Special Event Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Automobile Insurance

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Gregg Beloff
Board Chair Company Affiliation Danforth Advisors
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 - Dec 2018
Board Co-Chair Mr. Gregg Beloff
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Danforth Advisors
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2015 - Dec 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Greg Beloff Danforth Advisors Voting
Katharine Chandler K.C. Ability Voting
Brett Cohen President & CEO, eMagazine Voting
Vinnie Daboul Sage Benefit Advisors Voting
Patrick Delahunty Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Inc. --
Fritz Ferbert Retired: Fleet Bank Voting
Robert Friedman John Hancock Financial Services Voting
Elliot Greenberg Bay State ObGyn Voting
Joanne Y. Jaxtimer Bank of New York Mellon Voting
Douglas Keith GMO Voting
Matt Millett Special Olympics Athlete Voting
Deborah Millin Upper Solutions --
Gerry Morrissey The Mentor Network Voting
Gale Murray The Business Journals Voting
Jeff Nothnagle Retired - MKA Planning; SOMA Parent Voting
Brian Oates NE Patriots Voting
Franklin Quigley FD Quigley & Associates Voting
Melissa Reilly Legislative Aide; SOMA athlete Voting
Julie Santosus Partner, Cutwater Capital, LLC Voting
Richard Scioli Babson Fellow NonVoting
Eric Spindt Commonwealth Financial Group Voting
Eric Walters CarNova, Inc. Voting
Peter Wyman Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
James Brett The New England Council --
Tom Carleo New Balance --
Ted English Bob's Discount Furniture --
Bill Gaine Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association --
AJ Gerritson 451 Marketing --
Tom Grilk Boston Athletic Association --
William Gross Boston Police Department --
Amy Latimer TD Garden --
Nick Leschly Bluebird --
Lorraine Parker-Clegg Medtronic --
Ronald Sargent Staples, Inc. --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 23
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 88%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 20%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $5,450,000.00
Projected Expense $5,440,000.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audit

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $13,035,946 $12,615,457 $13,135,242
Total Expenses $13,284,974 $12,590,282 $13,463,948

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$757,061 $701,853 $657,611
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $601,580 $1,611,311 $1,744,969
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $93,675 $114,135 $133,664
Investment Income, Net of Losses $100,335 $31,072 $103,984
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $2,820,530 $2,312,117 $2,270,686
Revenue In-Kind $8,631,536 $7,810,222 $8,196,890
Other $31,229 $34,747 $27,438

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $11,650,010 $10,847,433 $11,780,486
Administration Expense $444,417 $425,548 $500,309
Fundraising Expense $1,190,547 $1,317,301 $1,183,154
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 1.00 0.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses 88% 86% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 28% 28% 25%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $14,762,844 $15,149,235 $15,355,605
Current Assets $1,644,267 $1,707,393 $1,490,007
Long-Term Liabilities $4,559,988 $4,678,536 $4,782,429
Current Liabilities $314,263 $333,078 $460,730
Total Net Assets $9,888,593 $10,137,621 $10,112,446

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.23 5.13 3.23

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 31% 31% 31%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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