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EcoLogic Development Fund

 186 Alewife Brook Parkway, Suite 214
 Cambridge, MA 02138
[P] (617) 4416300
[F] --
ecologic.org
[email protected]
Joshua Kruskal
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INCORPORATED: 1993
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 25-1704582

LAST UPDATED: 04/19/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

EcoLogic's mission is to empower rural and indigenous people to restore and protect tropical ecosystems in Central America and Mexico.

Mission Statement

EcoLogic's mission is to empower rural and indigenous people to restore and protect tropical ecosystems in Central America and Mexico.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,492,460.00
Projected Expense $1,338,030.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Bi-national Fisheries Protection
  • Conservation in Mexico's Chinantla Region
  • Ecosystem conservation in Huehuetenango, Guatemala
  • Environmental Protection in Ixcan, Guatemala
  • Restoring Nature in the Sarstun Region of Belize/Guatemala

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

EcoLogic's mission is to empower rural and indigenous people to restore and protect tropical ecosystems in Central America and Mexico.

Background Statement

EcoLogic was established in 1993 to conserve the planet's diminishing wildlife in a way that addresses the needs of local people. Given that the world's poorest people live in some of the most biologically diverse areas, EcoLogic's strategy tackles the underlying social and economic causes of habitat loss. EcoLogic was founded on the belief that local participation is not only socially just, but also essential for the effective long-term conservation of critical natural resources.

EcoLogic began by providing small, one-year grants to local groups, but has since evolved to build longer-term partnerships and provide technical assistance and multi-year financial commitments to local community organizations.

Impact Statement

In 2015-16, EcoLogic worked with our local partners to achieve the following impact: 
  • Conducted 141 workshops, trainings, and learning exchanges
  • Generated $216,028 income for rural and indigenous people from sustainable practices and enterprises
  • Install 828 fuel-efficent stoves 
  • Place 255,697 acres of watershed under effective community management
 
This year, EcoLogic aims to expand our impact by also:
  • Providing specialized training to 3,126 community members
  • Installing 680 fuel-efficient cookstoves
  • Reforesting 2,224 acres of tropical forest
  • Establishing 188 acres of agroforestry systems
 

Needs Statement

EcoLogic's needs include:
 
1. Financial Support: As a nonprofit organization, EcoLogic aims to allocate resources to where they do the most good – the project sites where our field work takes place. Our strong focus on our work means that we don't spend a lot of our resources on fundraising. People who support our work value the fact that 89% of our annual budget goes towards program management and implementation. Gifts to EcoLogic provide tangible benefits that help people and the environment today, while also creating a foundation for a  sustainable future. Your support helps EcoLogic to continue working to achieve our vision for the future.
 
2. Volunteers: EcoLogic depends on volunteers for support in virtually all areas of our work. Volunteers help us to do our work in the field, to measure our impact, and to gather data that allows us to fine-tune our approach. In our US-based office, volunteers help with administration, fundraising, and a variety of other essential functions. EcoLogic also benefits from the selfless support of our Ambassadors, volunteer fundraisers who support us by encouraging giving among their peers.
 
3. Increasing Awareness: EcoLogic works with small communities whose relationships with nature have a disproportionate influence on the environment. EcoLogic aims to promote the importance of protecting biodiversity, and to use this increased awareness to help further our mission. Simply sharing the story of EcoLogic's work helps to bring  attention to the critical issue of environmental degradation in Central America, and can point people towards a solution.

CEO Statement

For EcoLogic, the importance of your support cannot be overstated. Our unique way of working is truly unlike that of any other organization. Our local approach, personal commitment, and lasting impact provide rural and indigenous peoples with life-giving resources while protecting and restoring biodiversity. Our way of working is woven into our identity as an organization and the culture of our community; it is what allows EcoLogic, daily, to always find a path, even if at times unfamiliar, to affirm our commitment to rural and indigenous communities in Central America and Mexico. It is what inspires us.
 
So, we want to thank you. Your participation in our mission — whether as a supporter, partner, ally, or friend — helps us empower rural and indigenous peoples to restore and protect the natural areas in which they live, and on which they depend, in more ways than we ever have before. We face significant challenges, but I can say with confidence that EcoLogic is now positioned to push further and create more impact than ever before in our history.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

INTERNATIONAL

EcoLogic works in Central America and Mexico because it is one of the most biologically diverse areas in the world, but also because its people struggle with economic inequality. Many rural areas are poor and under-served. The people we work with face food insecurity and water shortages, and the region is extremely vulnerable to the devastating impacts of climate change. In the face of these challenges, we see that local communities to choose to protect nature when they have the opportunity.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
  2. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - International Development
  3. Environment - Forest Conservation

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Bi-national Fisheries Protection

This project brings together local fisherfolk and rural communities in the lower Sarstoon River Basin and coastal-marine area, along the disputed Caribbean border of Belize and Guatemala, to help develop and put in place cooperative strategies to promote healthy fisheries and protect the coastal ecosystem.

While at present no marine conservation areas have been legislatively declared in this zone, a combined total of over 50,000 hectares of terrestrial wetland conservation areas have been declared by national governments and recognized by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. The restrictions placed on local villagers have caused tension and mistrust, however, due in large part to a lack of adequate consultation before imposing protected areas on people. Over the past decade, bay fisheries have declined significantly due (in part) to inappropriate fishing practices, such as using gill and drag nets, illegal cross-border fishing, and indiscriminate fishing in known spawning areas, mainly by Guatemalan fisherfolk. In addition, the area suffers from ineffectively applied seasonal closures and counterproductive marine resource zoning, particularly as a result of the lack of coordinated regulations between Belize and Guatemala.

Budget  $116,580.00
Category  Environment, General/Other
Population Served Latin America & the Caribbean
Program Short-Term Success 
EcoLogic will provide communities in the binational region with:
 
  •  Established agroforestry plots for sustainable food production
  • Composting latrines to improve crop yield and contain environmental pollution in Guatemala and Belize
  • Hundred of fuel-efficient stove to reduce demand for wood while increasing families' ability to cook food safely
  • A series of workshops, cultural exchanges, and organized learning opportunities. Themes included fisheries and aquaculture laws; watersheds and microwatersheds; risk reduction management in response to climate change; safe and sanitary production of value-added fish products, such as sausage; sustainable fisheries management; and alley-cropping agroforestry.
 
Program Long-Term Success  EcoLogic will conserve a total of  52,158 hectares of vulnerble territory: 35,202 hectares of Guatemala’s Sarstun River Multiple Use Zone, and 16,956 hectares of Belize’s Sarstoon Temash National Park, including five buffer zone communities in Belize.
Program Success Monitored By  All of EcoLogic's programs are subject to ongoing evaluation by our field staff, who personally oversee all of our work in Central America. This evaluation allows us to to measure the success our work is having, and to incorporate this learning into new programs and strategies.
Examples of Program Success 
Recent program successes include:
 
  •  EcoLogic led a soccer tournament to promote cross-cultural communication and cooperation. Matches were held between five communities (three in Guatemala, two in Belize). The final was played in February 2013 and won by the team from the community of Barranco, Belize.
  • A team of students from the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers university created a set of maps, based on data about the Sarstun region, that illustrate a variety of issues, actualities, and trends, including tree cover and vegetation density, flood plains, temperature and climate change predictions, pollution and development, biodiversity hotspots, and fisheries activity. The team visited the region in early 2013 to present their findings to community members, as well as to Greg Ch’oc, founder and executive director of SATIIM.

Conservation in Mexico's Chinantla Region

EcoLogic has an active working relationship with the Regional Environmental Collaborative for the Chinantla Region of Oaxaca, Mexico (FARCO). Created to foster cooperation between the three levels of government, academia and civil society, FARCO is an organization that works to advance sustainable social and economic development in the region of Oaxaca, Mexico. The state of Oaxaca is home to the highest concentration of biodiversity in Mexico. The Chinantla region, which is the northern part of the state, is the third-largest rainforest in Mexico, and is also home to some of the last remaining standing cloud forest in the country. EcoLogic is working with FARCO to take a fundamentally community-based approach to conservation, with a focus on strengthening the capacity of local institutions. Community members in Chinantla are highly motivated by the possibility of receiving payment for conserving watersheds and biodiversity. Based on this feedback, we are planning to train local farmers to build their capacity to access funds through existing government rewards for ecosystem services and stewardship (RESS) programs.

Budget  $176,523.00
Category  Environment, General/Other
Population Served Latin America & the Caribbean
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Develop a demonstration site that models sustainable livestock raising
  • Train 200 individuals as Forest GuardiansConduct stakeholder meetings to unite efforts in a landscape-level conservation approach and a RESS scheme with local municipalities, Mexican government agencies, conservation NGOs, and other relevant actors
Program Long-Term Success 
  •  Work with 80 local farmers to establish 50 acres of agroforestry
  • Reforest 960 acres with native tree species
  • Increase interest and involvement of the community in conservation by running education campaigns with youth and community leaders about the importance of habitat conservation

 

Program Success Monitored By 
All of EcoLogic's programs are subject to ongoing evaluation by our field staff, who personally oversee all of our work in Central America. This evaluation allows us to to measure the success our work is having, and to incorporate this learning into new programs and strategies.
Examples of Program Success  In 2015, EcoLogic's partners FARCO and the Association of Water Committees of the Southern Sector of Pico Bonito National Park in Honduras met in Mexico for a bilateral learning exchange. The groups discussed community water committees, legal hurdles, and on-the-ground steps necessary to organize effective, lasting water stewardship. Since this meeting, FARCO has conducted 18 workshop on watershed management and agricultural practices for 527 community members, and has legally established a regional community-based water committee.

Ecosystem conservation in Huehuetenango, Guatemala

The departments of Huehuetenango and Quiche are situated in the western highlands of Guatemala and cover nearly all of the Cuchumatanes mountain range as well as the lowland plains. The 13,000 hectares of forest are rich in biodiversity and include four significant watershed areas that provide water to over 200,000 people. Unfortunately, illegal logging, slash and burn agriculture, poaching, poorly managed construction and development (in particular of a major highway), and other activities threaten these forests and the biological and human life that depend on them. To address these issues, EcoLogic works with local partner the Northern Border Municipalities Alliance (MFN)—a coalition of municipalities we helped establish—to collaborate with communities to manage and restore degraded areas, demarcate and protect water sources, train forest guardians, construct fuel-efficient stoves, and promote the adoption of agroforestry practices, among other activities.

Budget  $90,659.00
Category  Environment, General/Other
Population Served Latin America & the Caribbean
Program Short-Term Success 

This year, EcoLogic will:
  • Increase our managed reforested land area by 25 hectares in 4 communities
  •  Work to ensure more reliable access to safe water sources for 2,000 families within 1 year
  • Work towards local governance of water resources and microwatersheds
  • Offer 3 workshops related to our clean-burning, fuel-efficient stoves program
  • Construct 25 new stoves
  • Obtain economic benefits for 30 families living in two microwatersheds to incentivize sustainable use

Program Long-Term Success 

Huehuetenango—a water recharge area for the Pojom, Nenton, Ixcan, Xacbal and Salinas rivers—is also home to the highest density of unique native plant species in Guatemala. Ecologic aims to protect this region using the following tools:

  • Agroforestry systems
  • Community investment and collaboration
  • Environmental Education
  • Forest Guardians - local community members trained in conservation education and outreach by EcoLogic
  • Fuel-efficient stoves
  • Greenhouses and nurseries that support reforestation
  • Reforestation
  • Watershed management
Program Success Monitored By  All of EcoLogic's programs are subject to ongoing evaluation by our field staff, who personally oversee all of our work in Central America. This evaluation allows us to to measure the success our work is having, and to incorporate this learning into new programs and strategies.
Examples of Program Success 

  • Salvador Toc, a Guatemalan farmer, EcoLogic collaborator, and early adopter of alley-cropping agroforestry practices, received Heifer International’s Golden Talent Award for “visionary leadership” in his community.
  • Sixty-nine forested hectares are managed by female forest guardians.
  • EcoLogic began supporting a radio program started by forest guardian Roman Jolomna Caal to spread the word and promote environmental education and protection.
  • EcoLogic provides technical guidance and support to local agroforestry farmers seeking financial compensation under a Guatemalan program called “PINPEP” which was created to encourage local conservation efforts.


Environmental Protection in Ixcan, Guatemala

In 2013, EcoLogic partnered with Heifer International to bring beekeeping to 100 families in the communities of Ixcan, Guatemala. As a result of this initiative, EcoLogic formed linkages with the Integral Production Beekeepers' Cooperative of the Southwest in Guatemala (COPIASURO), an award-winning cooperative of fair-trade honey producers. Currently, 185 families in Ixcan have beehives, with more than 600 hives between them. According to COPIASURO, that's enough for those families to produce about 38,000 pounds — or 19 tons — of honey each year. As members of COPIASURO, they will be guaranteed a fair-trade minimum price for their honey, which is currently set at slightly more than a dollar a pound.
Budget  $85,777.00
Category  Environment, General/Other
Population Served Latin America & the Caribbean
Program Short-Term Success 
This year EcoLogic aims to:
 
  • Create 50 acres of agroforestry land between 7 communities in the Ixcan region 
  • Reforest 30 acres of degraded land in Ixcan
  • Establish local committees to manage and oversee honey production
  • Construct 100 fuel-efficient stoves
  • Form committees to manage local microwatersheds sustainably
  • Plan educational workshops for youth in 7 Ixcan communities
Program Long-Term Success 
In addition to beekeeping, EcoLogic is engaging with local communities to implement the following solutions in the Ixcan region of Guatemala:
 
  •  Silvo-pastoral agriculture systems
  • Agroforestry systems
  • Reforestation
  • Management of micro-watersheds
  • Clean-burning fuel-efficient stoves
  • Environmental education
Program Success Monitored By  All of EcoLogic's programs are subject to ongoing evaluation by our field staff, who personally oversee all of our work in Central America. This evaluation allows us to to measure the success our work is having, and to incorporate this learning into new programs and strategies.
Examples of Program Success  Last year, 163 community beekepers were able to produce 7,000 pounds of honey, which they were able to sell at a fair market rate for a net income of $6,967.

Restoring Nature in the Sarstun Region of Belize/Guatemala

EcoLogic works with its region partner, the Mayan Association for Well-Being in the Sarstun Region (APROSARSTUN) to protect this threatened area from continued exploitation. We provide technical assistance for conservation efforts in the region and support for a variety of activities, including constructing and managing native tree nurseries, building and maintaining fuel-efficient stoves and composting latrines, and establishing agroforestry parcels.
Budget  $100,611.00
Category  Environment, General/Other
Population Served Latin America & the Caribbean
Program Short-Term Success 
This year, EcoLogic will:
 
  •  Establish protected areas of native forest for 12 communities in the Sarstun region
  • Increase vegetation coverage in the larger project area through continued reforestation programs, supported by EcoLogic greenhouses and nurseries
  • Offer 38 public programs that promote good environmental practices and management strategies
  • Establish demonstration parcels that will serve as instructional and promotional tools for EcoLogic's efforts to increase the practice of sustainable agroforestry in the region
Program Long-Term Success 
EcoLogic will conserve a project site of 35,202 hectares surrounding the Sarstun River, which form part of the Bordr between Guatemala and Belize. EcoLogic's efforts will focus on protecting tropical wet forest, wetlands, and coastal/marine habitats, which are now home to at least 44 endangered animal species. Ecologic will deploy yhte following solutions in order to achieve a sustainable, long-term conservation regime in the target area:
  • Agroforestry
  • Carbon monitoring programs
  • Community involvement and collaboration programs
  •  Composting latrines
  • Fuel-efficient stoves
  • Greenhouses and nurseries for growing native plants for reintroduction to degraded landscapes
  • Watershed management
Program Success Monitored By  All of EcoLogic's programs are subject to ongoing evaluation by our field staff, who personally oversee all of our work in Central America. This evaluation allows us to to measure the success our work is having, and to incorporate this learning into new programs and strategies.
Examples of Program Success 
In 2016, EcoLogic:
 
  • Installed 828 fuel-efficient stoves
  • Trained 515 farmed on agroforestry system setup and maintenance
  •  Established 210 acres of agroforestry systems

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Barbara Vallarino
CEO Term Start Mar 2004
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Barbara serves as executive director of EcoLogic and reports directly to the board of directors. A member of the EcoLogic team since 2004, Barbara has played a variety of fundraising and program development roles, most recently serving as director of development, managing the organization’s fundraising efforts. Prior to joining EcoLogic, she completed the Hydropower Reform Fellowship at American Rivers in Seattle, Washington, which focused on promoting meaningful citizen participation in licensing nonfederal hydropower projects. Barbara has been passionately involved in tropical conservation work since her early teens, when she conducted water quality sampling and analysis as a volunteer research assistant for the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), which was monitoring the Panama Canal watershed. She also wrote fundraising proposals for Panama’s National Association for the Conservation of Nature (ANCON). Barbara holds a Juris Doctor with a concentration in Environmental Law from the University of Washington and is a member of the Washington State Bar Association, as well as its Environmental and Land Use Law section. In addition she holds a BA cum laude in environmental earth science and anthropology from Dartmouth College. Barbara grew up in Panama City, Panama, and is fluent in Spanish and English and proficient in French.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
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Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 14
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 29
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Mark Spranca
Board Chair Company Affiliation Abt Associates
Board Chair Term Sept 2015 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. David Bray Florida International University Voting
William Byers Jr. Chairman Emeritus --
Orlando Cabrera Squire Sanders, LLP Voting
Joyce Cacho PhD Adinura Advisory, LLC Voting
Dr. Robin Chazdon University of Connecticut Voting
Norissa Giangola Coqui Marketing Voting
Patricia Goudvis Independent filmmaker Voting
William Green MD Retired Voting
Marc Hiller GreenWood Resources, International Forestry Investment Voting
Maura O'Donnell MasterCard Voting
Lance Pierce CDP North America Voting
Michael Rafferty Rafferty Communications Strategies Voting
Nicholas Shufro FEMA/DHS Voting
Mark Spranca Abt Associates Voting
Dan Tunstall Retired Voting
Fernando Valle AgroAmerica Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

   

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,492,460.00
Projected Expense $1,338,030.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited financials

2014 Audited financials

2013 Audited financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,859,140 $1,890,209 $2,108,366
Total Expenses $2,020,267 $2,020,952 $1,614,480

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $370,540 $295,799 $139,169
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $370,540 $295,799 $139,169
Individual Contributions $1,487,781 $1,563,515 $1,939,041
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $4,014 $29,018 $29,884
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-694 $2,264 $272
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $-2,501 $-387 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,465,489 $1,556,478 $1,253,514
Administration Expense $327,199 $146,113 $144,750
Fundraising Expense $227,579 $318,361 $216,216
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.92 0.94 1.31
Program Expense/Total Expenses 73% 77% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 17% 10%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,312,582 $1,442,997 $1,566,575
Current Assets $898,466 $1,049,928 $1,157,864
Long-Term Liabilities $36,822 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $22,161 $28,271 $21,106
Total Net Assets $1,253,599 $1,414,726 $1,545,469

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 40.54 37.14 54.86

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 3% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

EcoLogic empowers rural and indigenous peoples to restore and protect tropical ecosystems in Central America and Mexico. Our vision is a future in which rural communities lead in the creation of a sustainable world for both people and nature. We believe that the preservation of biological diversity, ecosystems, and natural places is critically important to the survival of us all—people, plants, and animals alike. In addition to the intrinsic value of nature and wildlife, biological diversity and healthy ecosystems provide humankind with many of the things that sustain our lives, including clean air and water, fertile soil, a stable climate, food, medicines, materials and technologies, and a diversity of genes and species—not to mention recreational opportunities and natural beauty.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

EcoLogic uses the KNIT approach to achieve sustainability in the communities where we work. We provide Knowledge, Networks, Incentives, and Tools which together empower rural and indigenous communities to protect their environment while building a foundation for a more secure and prosperous future for themselves.
 
EcoLogic pursues smart, sustainable solutions that are custom-tailored for each of our project sites. All of our programs are the result of careful measurement, evaluation, and planning. EcoLogic employs a long-term approach; our projects last years, not months, enabling us to see a project all the way through from the planning stages to completion. We know that true sustainability is requires a constant commitment from local communities, and a large part of our work is ensuring that this commitment is firmly established.
On the ground, we provide a number of concrete solutions that help communities to live and grow sustainably. Ecologic creates agroforestry and silvo-pastoral systems which increase crop yield while reducing the burden that communities exert on the environment. We provide fuel-efficient stoves which reduce the amount of wood needed to cook food. We also provide technical assistance and logistical support that helps to protect landscapes of all varieties, including watershed that are vulnerable to contamination. We build nurseries and greenhouses that support reforestation efforts in degraded natural areas. We install eco-friendly, resource-neutral composting latrines. We build firebreaks that prevent forest fires from affecting vulnerable new growth. We install beehives and train farmers in beekeeping. These solutions, among many other we deploy in the field, provide real, tangible improvements to underdeveloped communities and help them to live comfortably without relying on the exploitation of finite environmental resources.
 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

EcoLogic is an international organization, and our success depends on our ability to work directly with the communities we're trying to help. While our headquarters in based in the United States, most of EcoLogic's staff live and work in the countries where our projects are organized. This direct, on-the-ground approach ensures that we maintain close contact with all of our projects, from the planning and research phases, all the way through to post-implementation monitoring and follow-up. 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

EcoLogic's projects take place over many years, enabling us to gather data that compares progress from one year to the next. The determination of success depends on whether our work is having a tangible, measurable impact in the communities where we work. The data we gather ranges from large scale (ex: hectares of land reforested), to small scale (ex: number of trees planted), giving us a complete picture of exactly how our work on the ground is proceeding.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

EcoLogic's story so far is one of success. Last year, we directly empowered 154 rural and indigenous communities to restore and protect their ecosystems. We conducted 141 workshops and training, which provided 3,117 attendees with new knowledge, tools, and skills. We protected 1,982 acres of forest, and worked with 690 individuals who collectively have raised more than $200,000 to support sustainable environmental practices in their communities. We installed 828 fuel-efficient stoves. trained 515 farmers in agroforestry practices, and established 210 acres of agroforestry systems. While we are proud of this work, we know there is still much more to do, and we value the support of our supporters, volunteers, and dedicated staff who help to make our vision a reality.