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Charles River Community Health Inc

 495 Western Avenue
 Boston, MA 02135
[P] (617) 783-0500
[F] (617) 783-5514
http://www.charlesriverhealth.org/
[email protected]
Sue Lowcock
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1973
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 23-7221597

LAST UPDATED: 07/07/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names Joseph M Smith Community Health Center Inc. (2015)
Brighton-Allston Community Health Corporation (1971)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

--

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Charles River Community Health is to improve the health and well-being of the communities of Allston, Brighton, Waltham and surrounding areas by providing quality, comprehensive, coordinated care that is patient-centered, family friendly, and community focused. 

As a Patient Centered Medical Home, we are committed to providing patients with timely access to the right care, at the right place and at the right time, collaborating with other organizations to connect patients with a comprehensive range of services and provide continuity of care, and creating new community partnerships to meet the changing needs of patients and the community.

We value caring for everyone with dignity, respect, and compassion, reducing cultural, financial and other barriers to care, and eliminating health care disparities for our patients. We also advocate for the needs of our patients, the community, and public health causes.

 
 
 

Mission Statement

The mission of Charles River Community Health is to improve the health and well-being of the communities of Allston, Brighton, Waltham and surrounding areas by providing quality, comprehensive, coordinated care that is patient-centered, family friendly, and community focused. 

As a Patient Centered Medical Home, we are committed to providing patients with timely access to the right care, at the right place and at the right time, collaborating with other organizations to connect patients with a comprehensive range of services and provide continuity of care, and creating new community partnerships to meet the changing needs of patients and the community.

We value caring for everyone with dignity, respect, and compassion, reducing cultural, financial and other barriers to care, and eliminating health care disparities for our patients. We also advocate for the needs of our patients, the community, and public health causes.

 
 
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $16,887,467.00
Projected Expense $17,497,506.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Access to Benefits and Care Program
  • Family Healthy Heart, Healthy Food Program
  • Mom and Baby Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Charles River Community Health is to improve the health and well-being of the communities of Allston, Brighton, Waltham and surrounding areas by providing quality, comprehensive, coordinated care that is patient-centered, family friendly, and community focused. 

As a Patient Centered Medical Home, we are committed to providing patients with timely access to the right care, at the right place and at the right time, collaborating with other organizations to connect patients with a comprehensive range of services and provide continuity of care, and creating new community partnerships to meet the changing needs of patients and the community.

We value caring for everyone with dignity, respect, and compassion, reducing cultural, financial and other barriers to care, and eliminating health care disparities for our patients. We also advocate for the needs of our patients, the community, and public health causes.

 
 
 

Background Statement

Charles River Community Health (CRCH, formerly known as Joseph M. Smith Community Health Center) was founded by committed Allston-Brighton residents who joined forces in 1968, under the dynamic leadership of resident Joseph M. Smith, to assess the health care needs of community members, and to help them overcome difficulties finding appropriate care.

Since its inception in an apartment within the Charlesview housing complex in Allston in 1974, CRCH has stayed true to its mission while balancing tremendous growth. Expansion began in 1997, when CRCH moved to its first stand-alone facility. In 2004, we opened a second site in Waltham in response to the closing of this community’s only hospital. Continuing to meet the evolving needs of our community, CRCH opened satellite health centers in two Boston public schools in 2008, and continued to creatively expand its existing facilities for the next three years. At last, in October 2015, CRCH celebrated its greatest milestone with the opening a new, spacious, state-of-the-art clinical facility in Brighton that consolidated its administrative functions, and two Allston-based clinical sites. The new building, named in honor of our founder, Joseph M. Smith, will enable the health center to nearly double the patients it serves in Allston-Brighton.

CRCH is the only full service, freestanding, independent federally qualified health center (FQHC) in Allston-Brighton and Waltham. We are proud to have been recognized with an official PCMH designation from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) as a Level 2 Patient Centered Medical Home since 2013. Under this model, patients receive care that is well-coordinated, evidence-based, proactive, and easily accessible. The model uses health information technology to improve access to care and measure outcomes, and employs an integrated team approach to providing patient care. We are applying to become a Level 3 PCMH in 2016.

CRCH serves nearly 12,300 patients through more than 61,000 visits a year. CRCH’s Allston-Brighton and Waltham health centers offer medical, dental, behavioral health services, and on-site pharmacy, as well as selected specialties. CRCH’s two school-based sites, comprised of one exam room each, offer primary medical services, immunizations, and health screenings. CRCH’s Vision Center, located within our Allston-Brighton facility, offers eye exams and fitting and dispensing of glasses, and contact lenses. All CRCH sites offer support services, including health insurance enrollment assistance, managed care specialty referrals, on-site translation, and social service case management to connect patients with community services such as affordable housing, transportation, SNAP benefits, and child care.


Impact Statement

Charles River Community Health (CRCH) began its Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) transformation in 2008, initially through the Qualis Safety Net Medical Home Initiative, and then the Massachusetts EOHHS PCMH demonstration project. In that time, we have restructured our primary care providers (PCP) and support staff into teams, and assigned all of our patients to a PCP panel and team. In addition, we created a high risk patient registry, and hired Complex Care Managers to work specifically with high risk patients by phone and in person to reduce hospital and emergency room use and improve care coordination within the patient’s primary care team. We use our Electronic Medical Record (EMR) to support our work, putting in orders for all CRCH and specialty services, and creating and reviewing reports, for example to indicate the percentage of appointments a patient has with his/her PCP or team provider. All of this work culminated with achieving Level 2 NCQA recognition in 2013. We have done sufficient follow up work since 2013 that when we need to renew our NCQA PCHM designation in 2016, we will apply for Level 3 recognition.

 
Most importantly, in October 2015, we opened a new, state-of-the-art health center facility in Brighton.  Our new space will enable us to provide care to nearly twice as many patients.   

Needs Statement

CRCH's most pressing needs are: 1) Physical space. We have wait lists for medical, dental and behavioral health, but there are not enough exam rooms to hire additional providers. We are currently conducting a capital campaign to open a new and larger Waltham facility, which will require approximately $900,000 in fundraising. 2) We require additional nursing and medical support staff to conduct care management and manage data, among other tasks. 3) We are in continual need of funding to support our Community Health and Health Benefits Departments ($200,000/yr). These departments provide health education and insurance enrollment information to patients. 4) Capacity building and technology. We are seeking to develop systems to assess and enhance patient and staff experiences, including data collection, evaluation, and continuous quality improvement tools. We are in need of funding for capacity-building in the form of staff training, meeting, and planning time as well as IT infrastructure upgrades. 5) Strengthened community relations. We are seeking to increase community awareness of the health center and improve our image through marketing and community outreach campaigns.

CEO Statement

Charles River Community Health (CRCH) is facing both tremendous opportunities and challenges at this time. Opportunities spring forth from the increasing recognition that community-based, integrated, primary care that also addresses social determinants of health is the best way to deliver health care services to patients. When done well, this model is comprehensive, coordinated, patient-centered, and cost-effective. Community health centers including CRCH have been providing care using this approach since their inception decades ago, and so we are well-positioned to deliver care for an increasing number of community members as the health care industry recognizes our value. Given this, CRCH has the opportunity to deliver services using this model of care to a broader scope of patients, such as elders covered by Medicare and working families covered by employer-based insurance. While we serve these patients now, it is a small portion of our overall patient population, as we primarily serve low-income Medicaid and uninsured patients. CRCH has also been expanding our physical capacity, as noted in our Board Chair’s statement. This combination of providing the best model of care with expanded, new space gives CRCH the opportunity to serve many additional patients and meet the increased health care needs of our community. The primary challenges relate to possible significant changes to Medicaid and other federal funding. We remain fiscally vigilant and closely manage expenses and cash flow so that we may weather potential future funding shortfalls. We are also active advocates, and educate our local and federal elected officials about the benefits of our work and mission. An additional challenge is the move of the state Medicaid program, MassHealth, to a value-based Accountable Care Organization model in 2018. We are addressing this by having joined the Community Care Cooperative ACO, which is an all community health center member ACO focusing on improving the model and total cost of care. We are excited about this health center driven ACO, where we are member of the Board of Directors and so have a direct impact on the decisions and direction of the organization.


Board Chair Statement

Charles River Community Health (CRCH) has been very successful in serving disadvantaged populations within our community for over 40 years, providing patients the health care services they need, as well as connecting them with community resources to address social determinants of health. We have also had successful expansion, constructing a new building in Brighton that opened in 2015, and now leasing expanded space in Waltham that will open by the end of this year. The challenges we face are the incredible uncertainty at the federal level with regards to health care – how will Congressional action impact the health center’s funding, Medicaid and other insurance coverage of our patients, and the ability for us to continue to see immigrants and other patients regardless of circumstance. Our challenge as a Board is to work with management to expand to meet the increasing and changing health care needs of our community, while being fiscally prudent in recognition of likely upcoming reductions in Medicaid and other federal funding. The need for community-based primary care is more important than ever, and so we must find a way to do our part to provide the highest quality, cost-effective care to manage the health of the populations we serve, and continue to show the value and importance of our work to funders and supporters.


Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
METROWEST REGION, MA

Charles River Community Health’s service area includes: (a) Allston-Brighton, two neighborhoods comprising the second largest district in the City of Boston, with a population of 79,997 or 13% of the City’s total population (617,594); (b) the City of Waltham 10 miles west of Boston with a total population of 63,014; and (c) other surrounding communities, including Watertown with a population of 34,127.

Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Community Clinics
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Access to Benefits and Care Program

The Access to Benefits and Care Program targets isolated populations that face socio-economic and linguistic to barriers to health care and public health education, including unemployed people, low income families, cultural and racial minorities, recent immigrants, and those with low English proficiency. These populations are more easily reached through health education that targets them while at work or other community locations. Barriers to accessing health education and care include cultural and linguistic isolation, socioeconomic status, lack of health insurance, limited availability of quality providers, limited transportation and child care services, and geographic considerations. Community Health Workers conduct street outreach in Spanish, English, Portuguese, Thai, Haitian Creole and Vietnamese to inform residents about the importance of accessing primary and preventive care and the services available at CRCH.
Budget  $200,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Health Care Reform
Population Served Families Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Benefits to the community include an increased awareness among community members about the importance of primary and preventive care, increased knowledge about specific chronic conditions and the health effects those conditions can have, and the provision of information on community resources for accessing health care and other social services. As a result of the program, 3,000 residents will receive information about the health center and insurance enrollment annually through community outreach at local businesses, community organizations, schools, churches and fairs; 300 community members will receive free preventive health screenings; 350 community members will receive educational materials; 500 community members will be newly enrolled in an insurance program; 1,500 CRCH patients and community members will re-enroll in or maintain insurance.


Program Long-Term Success  The long-term benefits of this program include fewer complications from chronic disease, a higher number of community residents accessing primary and preventive care services, and a decrease in illness which will lead to higher productivity at work and school and an overall higher quality of life. Health education and preventive care is also likely to reduce urgent care needs in the future, which will not only improve health outcomes, but also decrease overall health care costs.
Program Success Monitored By  Community Health Workers and Health Benefits Counselors fill out encounter forms when they meet with patients or community members. The encounter forms detail the type of service received and the number of people reached or assisted. Data from the encounter forms are entered into JMSCHC’s Electronic Health Record System. The Community Health Manager and/or Health Benefits Coordinator can then run reports focusing on specific program outcomes and staff productivity. CRCH will compare progress with the objectives every three months after the start of the project. If the health center is not on track to meet the objectives, program staff will meet to determine any barriers or challenges, and to develop an alternative approach.
Examples of Program Success  In FY12, CRCH reached more than 4,500 residents with information about the health center and insurance enrollment; conducted health screenings for 225 people; distributed educational materials to 525 people; enrolled 1,198 people in insurance; and conducted insurance renewals for more than 3,100 patients.

Family Healthy Heart, Healthy Food Program

The Family Healthy Heart, Healthy Food Program integrates prevention and management of cardiovascular disease risk factors, primarily hypertension, overweight/obesity, cholesterol, and smoking, with access to nutritious foods and primary care. The program utilizes culturally appropriate nutrition education and case management; provides avenues for accessing nutritious foods; and offers nurse education clinics to improve the health of low-income immigrant families, particularly Latinos, in Allston/Brighton and Waltham. Program activities include nurse education clinics focusing on hypertension management; nutritional counseling; individual nurse education sessions for hypertension and smoking cessation; fruit and vegetable vouchers to purchase fresh produce; community-based health screenings for hypertension and cholesterol; and case management to connect families with community resources for nutrition, fitness, and specialty care. We are also partnering with Greater Boston Food Bank to offer a monthly mobile market at our Brighton location. Further food assistance is givine through our partnership with Project Bread to offer supermarket vouchers to families who are food insecure. 
Budget  $200,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Health Care Issues
Population Served Families Hispanic, Latino Heritage Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success  1) Families will have increased access to fruits and vegetables following receipt of food vouchers and referrals to food access programs.2) Families have increased knowledge of where to locate affordable or subsidized nutritious foods. 3) An increase in families preparing traditional or home-cooked meals. 4) Families increase shopping at farmer’s markets. 5) Family members increase their levels of exercise. 6) Families begin meal planning to save money and eat healthier meals. 7) Patients with hypertension can accurately measure their own blood pressure. 8) Improved/stable clinical measures (blood pressure, cholesterol).9) Reduction in the development of chronic disease (hypertension, etc) commonly experienced among immigrants newly arriving in the US. This is a long-term outcome, but clinical data will be pulled from our EMR to determine if there was a decrease in new diagnoses of chronic conditions compared to the previous year.
Program Long-Term Success  The goal of the Family Healthy Heart, Healthy Food Program is to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among immigrant families in Allston/Brighton and Waltham, Massachusetts through decreasing CVD risk factors, including hypertension, cholesterol, smoking, and obesity.
Program Success Monitored By  CRCH will use patient surveys and clinical measures to evaluate the program. Surveys will be conducted at program intake, 6 months after intake, and 12 months after intake to monitor and evaluate the program. Community health workers will assist patients with filling out the surveys if needed. The Project Manager will work in collaboration with other program staff to ensure survey results are entered into an Excel file and data reported to program funders. In addition to the surveys, which will aim to evaluate behavioral and lifestyle changes, CRCH will collect baseline data on clinical indicators, such as weight, BMI, cholesterol, and blood pressure levels. Baseline data will be compared to clinical indicators taken during follow-up clinical appointments 6 months – 1 year after enrollment in the program. De-identified data from CRCH’s Electronic Medical Record can then be used to compare the measures before and after enrollment in the program to evaluate program effectiveness.
Examples of Program Success  This program is based on a pilot project conducted in 2010 and has not yet been implemented health-center wide. The pilot project was conducted among one provider's patient panel. Following completion of the pilot project, there was a 15% increase in patients enrolled in the project who had blood pressure that was under control (78% vs. 93%).

Mom and Baby Program

The goal of the Mom and Baby Program is to improve maternal and child health for vulnerable families in through increasing access to prenatal/postpartum care and health education, decreasing postpartum depression, offering social service case management, and connecting new mothers and their children to a culturally-appropriate medical home. The program includes health education and social service case management for new and expecting mothers, New Mom and Prenatal support groups, and home visits to provide support and connect the new mom with community services. Community Health Workers also ensure women and their children are enrolled in insurance and connect them to culturally-appropriate primary care. Health education covers nutrition, breastfeeding, and healthy child development, and topics such as immunizations, domestic violence, and maternal mental health. Case management connects women with community resources including car seats, diaper programs, and WIC.

 

Budget  $80,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Patient Education
Population Served Families Females Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success  CRCH expects that as a result of the program, 150 vulnerable women in Allston/Brighton and Waltham will receive increased emotional support during their pregnancies and immediately following the birth of their children, reducing postpartum isolation. Other anticipated outcomes include: 1) 75 infants of vulnerable women will be enrolled in insurance and connected to a culturally-appropriate medical home model of care at CRCH; 2)75 women in need will be newly connected to social services; and 3)125 women will receive information on breastfeeding and WIC to better support the nutrition needs of themselves and their children.
Program Long-Term Success  The goal of the Mom and Baby Program is to improve maternal and child health for vulnerable families in Allston/Brighton and Waltham through increasing access to prenatal/postpartum care and health education, decreasing postpartum depression, offering social service case management, and connecting new mothers and their children to a culturally-appropriate medical home.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success will be measured and evaluated based on attaining the project objectives and anticipated outcomes. Community health workers will track the number of patients they serve with social service case management, home visits, health education, and through support groups. Actual outcomes will be tracked and compared to anticipated outcomes. JMSCHC community health workers record their activities as encounters in the health center’s Electronic Medical Record. The information can be accessed electronically by running a report. An Excel spreadsheet is also kept for tracking program outcomes, which includes the names and demographic information of program participants, the dates of home visits, the number of referrals to other programs, and the dates and topics discussed for the New Moms and Prenatal groups among other data points.
Examples of Program Success  The program increases access to care by enrolling pregnant and postpartum women and their children in insurance and connecting them to a PCP. Health education focuses on preventive health, and includes a strong emphasis on nutrition, mental health for the mother, immunizations, breastfeeding, and healthy child development. It also provides for the emotional needs of mothers through ongoing support groups. These components increase awareness about appropriate perinatal and infant care, thereby positively impacting community health. In 2010, CRCH conducted 165 home visits, provided 149 perinatal women with case management, served 55 women through the Baby-Mom group and 44 women through the prenatal group.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Currently, the biggest challenges that we face are:
1) Uncertain funding for enabling services and community health programs, due to future changes in federal government funding; 2) changes in immigration policies which affects our largely immigrant patient population, in order to continue to serve this vulnerable population we need to offer additional legal counseling services and outreach services, none of which are financially supported by grants or government funding; 3) long waiting list in Waltham health center, which we hope to address through the opening of a new and larger facility in 2017. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Elizabeth Browne
CEO Term Start Feb 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Elizabeth Browne was appointed Executive Director in 2009. Liz has served previously as CRCH’s Interim Executive Director, Deputy Director, Director of Development, Director of Operations, as well as Practice Director for our Waltham site, whose opening she coordinated. Liz has 15 years’ experience in health care operations, billing, and technology. She holds a Masters of Business Administration in Health Care Management and Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering, both from Boston University.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Kathy Phenix 1999 2008
Mr. Marty Glynn -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Dr. William J. Horgan DDS, MPH Dental Director dr. Horgan has been practicing dentistry since 1977, primarily at community health centers. He joined JMSCHC as Dental Director in 1997. He received his Doctor of Dental Surgery from theUniversityofWashingtonand his Master of Public Health fromHarvardUniversity. He is Northeast Regional Board Certified and Board eligible in Dental Public Health. His interests include geriatric dentistry. Dr. Horgan speaks some Spanish in addition to English.
Ms. Kathleen Kehoe -- --
Ms. Sue Lowcock Director of Development & Community Relations Sue joined CRCH in 2016 as the Director of Development & Community Relations. Sue holds a Masters in Human Services Management from the Heller School at Brandeis University. Sue has extensive experience in non-profit sector as well as the public sector. She has worked in development for over 10 years, most recently at the National Institute for Children's Health Quality. Sue comes from Hong Kong and is fluent in Cantonese and Mandarin. 
Mr. Scott Miller -- --
Dr. Liz Molina M.D. Medical Director Dr. Karamja began practicing medicine in 1997 and has practiced all but 2 years in a community health center setting. Dr. Karanja joined JMSCHC in 2008 as the Associate Medical Director of ourWaltham site, and was instrumental in helping to establish a 340B pharmacy program at the Health Center. He was promoted to Medical Director in 2011. Dr. Karanja received his Doctor of Medicine fromBrownUniversity, completed his Family Medicine residency at San Francisco General Hospital, and is Board Certified by the American Board of Family Practice.
Mr. Jose Morrell LMHC -- --
Mr. James Souza Chief Financial Officer
Jim joined JMSCHC in 2000 as the Director of Finance and was appointed to CFO in 2007. He oversees all billing and finance staff. Jim has over 20 years of experience in finance. Before joining the Health Center, Jim held positions at Pathways Healthcare Services, Neworld Bank, Fleet Bank ofMassachusetts, and Bank of New England. Jim graduated fromStonehillCollegewith a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration with a major in finance and a minor in economics.
Mr. Vladimir Stevens -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Mayoral Prize for Innovations in Primary Care Boston Public Health Commission 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

CRCH collaborates with community organizations, hospitals, schools, local and state health departments, and local businesses to enhance care for our patients. Our hospital affiliates include Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Children’s Hospital Boston, and Mount Auburn Hospital. Our Prevention and Wellness program is funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), and we regularly attend DPH training sessions and workshops. In addition to collaborating with the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) on local initiatives such as fitness programs and other health events, we have BPHC contracts to provide primary care, infant mortality prevention, and pediatric mental health counseling. We collaborate with the Jackson Mann School Complex and Gardner Pilot Academy, where our school satellite community health centers are located. In Allston/Brighton and Waltham, we collaborate with community partners serving the same target populations as ours. Our community partners include Allston/Brighton Children Thrive, Allston/Brighton Free Diaper Program, Charlesview Apartments, Chinese Golden Age Center, WIC, Jewish Family and Children Services, Healthy Waltham, Waltham Family School, and Park Lodge Hotel among others.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 114
Number of Part Time Staff 51
Number of Volunteers 9
Number of Contract Staff 13
Staff Retention Rate % 85%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 13
Caucasian: 48
Hispanic/Latino: 79
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 7
Other (if specified): 24
Gender Female: 149
Male: 29
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

Blanket Personal Property
Boiler and Machinery
Business Income
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Commercial General Liability and Medical Malpractice
Computer Equipment and Software
Directors and Officers Policy
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Extra Expense Insurance
Fiduciary Liability
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Medical Malpractice
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Automobile Insurance

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Julie Moran
Board Chair Company Affiliation Orlans PC
Board Chair Term Nov 2015 - May 2018
Board Co-Chair Ms. Elizabeth Whittemore
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Health Management Associates
Board Co-Chair Term May 2017 - May 2021

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms Gabriela Canepa community volunteer Voting
Ms. Caroline Grossman PR & Marketing Consultant Voting
Mr. Vinay Gupta Brigham and Women's Hospital Voting
Mr. Anibal Guzman Pro Tech Towing Voting
Ms. Susan Kearns Nurse Voting
Mr. Steven Kent Points North Construction Voting
Ms. Tracey Mangham New England College of Optometry Voting
Ms. Patrice McGregor Nurse Voting
Ms. Julie Moran Orlans Moran P.L.L.C Voting
Ms. Sagrario Ortiz Independent contractor Voting
Mr. Anthony J Rufo Jr community volunteer --
Mr. Lamine Savadogo Marisan Energy Systems Voting
Mr. Amit Soni community volunteer --
Ms. Stephanie Sunderland-Ramsey Wayside Youth Voting
Ms. Elizabeth Whittemore Health Management Associates Voting
Mr. Todd Woodworth BioInnovation Capital Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms Hieu Do Circle Floors Inic NonVoting
Ms. Hyacinth McLaren METCO Exofficio
Mr Mel Scovell Retired NonVoting
Ms. Nadene Stein Waltham Public Schools Exofficio

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 71%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 13%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 30%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Performance and Quality Improvement
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

pasting

Charles River Community Health (CRCH) is facing both tremendous opportunities and challenges at this time.  Opportunities spring forth from the increasing recognition that community-based, integrated, primary care that also addresses social determinants of health is the best way to deliver health care services to patients. When done well, this model is comprehensive, coordinated, patient-centered, and cost-effective.  Community health centers including CRCH have been providing care using this approach since their inception decades ago, and so we are well-positioned to deliver care for an increasing number of community members as the health care industry recognizes our value.  Given this, CRCH has the opportunity to deliver services using this model of care to a broader scope of patients, such as elders covered by Medicare and working families covered by employer-based insurance.  While we serve these patients now, it is a small portion of our overall patient population, as we primarily serve low-income Medicaid and uninsured patients.  CRCH has also been expanding our physical capacity, as noted in our Board Chair’s statement.  This combination of providing the best model of care with expanded, new space gives CRCH the opportunity to serve many additional patients and meet the increased health care needs of our community.  The primary challenges relate to possible significant changes to Medicaid and other federal funding.  We remain fiscally vigilant and closely manage expenses and cash flow so that we may weather potential future funding shortfalls. We are also active advocates, and educate our local and federal elected officials about the benefits of our work and mission.  An additional challenge is the move of the state Medicaid program, MassHealth, to a value-based Accountable Care Organization model in 2018.  We are addressing this by having joined the Community Care Cooperative ACO, which is an all community health center member ACO focusing on improving the model and total cost of care.  We are excited about this health center driven ACO, where we are member of the Board of Directors and so have a direct impact on the decisions and direction of the organization.

 

Charles River Community Health (CRCH) is facing both tremendous opportunities and challenges at this time.  Opportunities spring forth from the increasing recognition that community-based, integrated, primary care that also addresses social determinants of health is the best way to deliver health care services to patients. When done well, this model is comprehensive, coordinated, patient-centered, and cost-effective.  Community health centers including CRCH have been providing care using this approach since their inception decades ago, and so we are well-positioned to deliver care for an increasing number of community members as the health care industry recognizes our value.  Given this, CRCH has the opportunity to deliver services using this model of care to a broader scope of patients, such as elders covered by Medicare and working families covered by employer-based insurance.  While we serve these patients now, it is a small portion of our overall patient population, as we primarily serve low-income Medicaid and uninsured patients.  CRCH has also been expanding our physical capacity, as noted in our Board Chair’s statement.  This combination of providing the best model of care with expanded, new space gives CRCH the opportunity to serve many additional patients and meet the increased health care needs of our community.  The primary challenges relate to possible significant changes to Medicaid and other federal funding.  We remain fiscally vigilant and closely manage expenses and cash flow so that we may weather potential future funding shortfalls. We are also active advocates, and educate our local and federal elected officials about the benefits of our work and mission.  An additional challenge is the move of the state Medicaid program, MassHealth, to a value-based Accountable Care Organization model in 2018.  We are addressing this by having joined the Community Care Cooperative ACO, which is an all community health center member ACO focusing on improving the model and total cost of care.  We are excited about this health center driven ACO, where we are member of the Board of Directors and so have a direct impact on the decisions and direction of the organization.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $16,887,467.00
Projected Expense $17,497,506.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $17,885,767 $14,919,172 $12,450,396
Total Expenses $13,471,512 $13,233,287 $11,990,517

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $3,355,008 $3,216,367 $3,198,925
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $3,355,008 $3,216,367 $3,198,925
Individual Contributions $4,090,900 $2,977,369 $558,110
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $9,072,681 $8,696,199 $8,680,874
Investment Income, Net of Losses $12,274 $29,125 $11,300
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $126,789 -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $1,228,115 $112 $1,187

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $11,239,221 $11,291,073 $10,486,557
Administration Expense $2,058,762 $1,794,623 $1,344,382
Fundraising Expense $173,529 $147,591 $159,578
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.33 1.13 1.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 85% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 2% 2% 4%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $27,080,469 $26,522,556 $9,163,236
Current Assets $24,443,341 $25,173,943 $6,337,523
Long-Term Liabilities $12,273,071 $16,214,022 $82,060
Current Liabilities $1,520,616 $1,442,664 $1,479,973
Total Net Assets $13,286,782 $8,865,870 $7,601,203

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value $754,549.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose We will be opening a new health center facility in Waltham at the end of 2017, to replace our current facility. We are raising funds to help defray the cost of the renovations and equipment purchasing needed for the new center.
Campaign Goal $900,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Dec 2012 - Dec 2015
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $1,667,667.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 16.07 17.45 4.28

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 45% 61% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, the organization changed its name in 2015 from Joseph M. Smith Community Health Center Inc to Charles River Community Health Inc. The recent IRS Letter of Determination is posted above, reflecting the new name.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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